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About Tux Machines

Saturday, 17 Mar 18 - Tux Machines is a community-driven public service/news site which has been around for over a decade and primarily focuses on GNU/LinuxSubscribe now Syndicate content

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Quick Roundup

Type Title Author Repliessort icon Last Post
Story Linux: Ready, willing and able srlinuxx 11/04/2005 - 3:27am
Story Microsoft's IT security plans spark controversy srlinuxx 11/04/2005 - 3:27am
Story Paris Hilton's sidekick hacked srlinuxx 11/04/2005 - 3:27am
Blog entry Weird *ss Weather srlinuxx 11/04/2005 - 3:26am
Story Greetings From the Most Connected Place on Earth srlinuxx 11/04/2005 - 3:26am
Story Get Into the Flame War ...please! srlinuxx 11/04/2005 - 3:26am
Story Linux kernel to include IPv6 firewall srlinuxx 11/04/2005 - 3:25am
Story Linux For The Future srlinuxx 11/04/2005 - 3:25am
Story M$ Not Ready to Settle Yet srlinuxx 11/04/2005 - 3:24am
Story security breach affects every state srlinuxx 11/04/2005 - 3:24am

Linux Foundation: ACRN, CNCF, AGL With Listening Device Support

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  • The Linux Foundation Announces an Open Source Reference Hypervisor Project Designed for IoT Device Development

    ACRN is comprised of two main components: the hypervisor and its device model, complete with rich I/O mediators. Intel's experience and leadership in virtualization technology was key to the initial development of this hypervisor solution.

  • Dell EMC: The Next Big Shift in Open Networking Is Here [Ed: "This article was sponsored by Dell EMC..." (LF still takes money to write puff pieces/ads, even for Microsoft)]
  • CNCF Webinar to Present New Data on Container Adoption and Kubernetes Users in China

    Last year, the Cloud Native Computing Foundation (CNCF) conducted its first Mandarin-language survey of the Kubernetes community. While the organization published the early results of the English-language survey in a December blog post, the Mandarin survey results will be released on March 20 in a webinar with Huawei and The New Stack.

    Many of China’s largest cloud providers and telecom companies — including Alibaba Cloud, Baidu, Ghostcloud, Huawei and ZTE — have joined the CNCF. And the first KubeCon + CloudNativeCon China will be held in Beijing later this year.

  • 4 Themes From the Open Source Leadership Summit (OSLS)

    This week we attended The Linux Foundation’s Open Source Leadership Summit (OSLS) in Sonoma. Over the past three decades infrastructure open source software (OSS) has evolved from Linux and the Apache web server to touching almost every component of the infrastructure stack. We see OSS’s widespread reach from MySQL and PostgreSQL for databases, OpenContrail and OpenDaylight for networking to Openstack and Kubernetes for cloud operating systems. Its increasing influence up and down the stack is best exemplified by the explosion of solutions included on the Cloud Native Landscape that Redpoint co-published with Amplify and the CNCF.

  • Amazon Embraces Open Source to Compete with Google Assistant on Cars

    Automotive Grade Linux (AGL) is a project hosted by Linux foundation which aims to build a truly open, Linux based platform and framework for automotive applications. Currently, the market is utterly dominated by Android Auto and Apple Car Play. AGL, when it debuts in 2018 Toyota Camry, will be a more neutral, open, and inter-operable alternative to Android Auto and iOS CarPlay.

    Amazon on the other hand is working with Nuance Communications Inc. and Voicebox Technologies Corp. to write code that makes AGL's in-vehicle apps compatible with several voice-assistant technologies (and not just Amazon's Alexa), eliminating the need for developers to make multiple versions. Given the fact that most automakers are also trying to diversify away from Google and Apple's restrictive eco-systems, this could eventually turn into a major win for all parties involved, including consumers.

Google FOSS Releases

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The Top 10 GNU/Linux Distros for Privacy & Security

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GNU/Linux is awesome! Most of its distros are free and open-source and the fun thing about it is the plethora of versions out there – especially if you are someone particular about security and privacy.

Today, we have decided to bring you a comprehensive list of Open-Source distributions with a focus on user security and privacy from which you can choose from.

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Tails 3.6 Linux Distribution Released

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Version 3.6 of Tails, the security and privacy minded live USB/DVD Linux distribution derived from Debian, is now available.

Tails 3.6 is available today and it now makes available easier screen locking, the "Additional Software" persistence feature was improved upon, the pdf-redact-tools CLI utility is now installed by default for cleansing PDF files, VA-API video driver support is now shipped by default, and there are package upgrades to Tor and other utilities. Tails 3.6 also has several known security fixes.

Read more

Also: Tails 3.6 is out

Which programming languages pay best, most popular? Developers' top choices

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Stack Overflow has released the results of its annual survey of 100,000 developers, revealing the most-popular, top-earning, and preferred programming languages.

The most-loved languages are Kotlin and Mozilla-developed Rust, according to Stack Overflow's 2018 developer survey.

Read more

Also: Developers love trendy new languages, but earn more with functional programming

Purism Successfully Runs KDE Plasma Mobile on Librem 5 Linux Phone's Test Boards

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The company, which is known for selling the most secure laptops powered a Linux-based operating system, said in a report that they worked closely with the KDE community to install, run, and enable a mobile network provider service on the Plasma Mobile graphical environment on top of the Debian-based PureOS distribution.

While their Librem 5 Linux phone is far from becoming a reality, Purism's initial enablement of KDE's Plasma Mobile was done on an i.MX 6 development board running their PureOS operating system installed, which is currently based on Debian Testing, and using a Wayland/Weston environment.

Read more

Also: Purism Gets Plasma Mobile Running On Their First Librem 5 Development Board

Review: Asus Tinker Board S – Single-Board Computer

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The Asus Tinker Board S is an ARM-based, single-board computer (SBC) with a quad-core CPU, 2GB RAM and support for 4K video and HD audio. It’s billed as a marvellous computer for DIY enthusiasts and makers.

SBCs are in their ascendancy, in part because of the wide variety of devices available and the unrivaled success of the Raspberry Pi (RPi), offering kids, teachers and hobbyists access to an inexpensive way to embrace computing. In April last year, Asus launched a competitor to the RPi. Their Tinker Board received a promising reception with plaudits given for its hardware specification, and it was generally regarded as a competent platform for building and tinkering.

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Running DOS on the Raspberry Pi

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You may be familiar with The FreeDOS Project. FreeDOS is a complete, free, DOS-compatible operating system that you can use to play classic DOS games, run legacy business software, or develop embedded PC applications. Any program that works on MS-DOS should also run on FreeDOS.

As the founder and project coordinator of the FreeDOS Project, I'm often the go-to person when users ask questions. And one question I seem to get a lot lately is: "Can you run FreeDOS on the Raspberry Pi?"

Read more

Firefox 59 Prepped For Release: Nukes GTK2 Code, Still Prepping For Wayland

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Mozilla's Firefox 59.0 is now available to download from the FTP server ahead of the official announcement.

Firefox 59.0 can now be downloaded for all supported platforms. Firefox 59.0 does deliver on dropping GTK2 support in favor of the GTK3 tool-kit support that's now mature.

But what didn't make it for Firefox 59.0 is the Firefox 59 Wayland support that remains a work-in-progress and was diverted from being a target for mozilla59. While the Wayland support isn't yet squared away, there have been bug fixes and other improvements in working towards getting this native Wayland support ready by default for those not building your web-browser with the --enable-default-toolkit=cairo-gtk3-wayland switch.

Read more

Original: Version 59.0, first offered to Release channel users on March 13, 2018

Mozilla Firefox 59 Released with Faster Page Load Times, New Privacy Features

Open Source LimeSDR Mini Takes Off in Satellites

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The topic of 5G mobile networks dominated the recent Mobile World Congress in Barcelona, despite the expectation that widespread usage may be years away. While 5G’s mind-boggling bandwidth captivates our attention, another interesting angle is found in the potential integration with software defined radio (SDR), as seen in OpenAirInterface’s proposed Cloud-RAN (C-RAN) software-defined radio access network.

As the leading purveyor of open source SDR solutions, UK-based Lime Microsystems is well positioned to play a key role in the development of 5G SDR. SDR enables the generation and augmentation of just about any wireless protocol without swapping hardware, thereby affordably enabling complex networks across a range of standards and frequencies.

Read more

Games Leftovers

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A plan for rebooting an open source project

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Once in a while, you will have an open source project that needs care and feeding. Maybe you're just stepping into an existing project, and you need to figure out where the project is and where it needs to go. It needs a reboot. What do you do? How do you begin?

When I was in this situation, I was thrown into the deep end with a security issue. I spent a good eight months getting to know the community as we resolved that issue and other legacy infrastructure issues. After about a year, I finally felt like I had a good outline of the community and its challenges and strengths. I realized afterward that it would've been smarter if I had first invested time to review the project's status and create a strategy for how we tackled its needs.

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Security: Slingshot, Symantec Certification Authorities, and DDoS Defense

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  • Potent malware that hid for six years spread through routers

    Slingshot—which gets its name from text found inside some of the recovered malware samples—is among the most advanced attack platforms ever discovered, which means it was likely developed on behalf of a well-resourced country, researchers with Moscow-based Kaspersky Lab reported Friday. The sophistication of the malware rivals that of Regin—the advanced backdoor that infected Belgian telecom Belgacom and other high-profile targets for years—and Project Sauron, a separate piece of malware suspected of being developed by a nation-state that also remained hidden for years.

  • Distrust of Symantec TLS Certificates

    A Certification Authority (CA) is an organization that browser vendors (like Mozilla) trust to issue certificates to websites. Last year, Mozilla published and discussed a set of issues with one of the oldest and largest CAs run by Symantec. The discussion resulted in the adoption of a consensus proposal to gradually remove trust in all Symantec TLS/SSL certificates from Firefox. The proposal includes a number of phases designed to minimize the impact of the change to Firefox users:

  • How Creative DDOS Attacks Still Slip Past Defenses

    Distributed denial of service attacks, in which hackers use a targeted hose of junk traffic to overwhelm a service or take a server offline, have been a digital menace for decades. But in just the last 18 months, the public picture of DDoS defense has evolved rapidly. In fall 2016, a rash of then-unprecedented attacks caused internet outages and other service disruptions at a series of internet infrastructure and telecom companies around the world. Those attacks walloped their victims with floods of malicious data measured up to 1.2 Tbps. And they gave the impression that massive, "volumetric" DDOS attacks can be nearly impossible to defend against.

Open Sourcing the Hunt for Exoplanets

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A Quick Look to Ubuntu 18.04 Beta 1

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Ubuntu 18.04 LTS "Bionic Beaver" Beta 1 released few days ago. This Beta 1 is the first pre-release version designed for testing to prepare the final release next April. I have installed Beta 1 and this short review covers where to download Bionic Beta 1, what applications available, how the desktop looks, how much RAM it takes, and more links and information about it. In short, Bionic Beta 1 brings GNOME 3.27 and Linux Kernel 4.15, with LibreOffice 6.0 and bunch of GNOME Applications, and with Firefox Quantum beside the improved Ubuntu Software. Finally, this article is for all of you wanting to know Bionic in brief without installing it. I hope you enjoy it!

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Windows vs Linux in 2018

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Over the years, we've seen countless articles state that we're entering the fabled Year of the Linux Desktop. They cite the advantages of Linux. Other articles, still, have expressed that specific advantages don't matter – those who switch to Linux need to be motivated by a specific reason.

In any case, many of those switching will be migrating from Windows. So it's important to understand the core differences between Windows and Linux, now in 2018.

Read more

Also: Chromebooks with Touchscreen Will Soon Get a Brand-New, Android-Like Power Menu

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More in Tux Machines

lkml: remove eight obsolete architectures

In the end, it seems that while the eight architectures are extremely different, they all suffered the same fate: There was one company in charge of an SoC line, a CPU microarchitecture and a software ecosystem, which was more costly than licensing newer off-the-shelf CPU cores from a third party (typically ARM, MIPS, or RISC-V). It seems that all the SoC product lines are still around, but have not used the custom CPU architectures for several years at this point. Read more

If you hitch a ride with a scorpion… (Coverity)

I haven’t seen a blog post or notice about this, but according to the Twitters, Coverity has stopped supporting online scanning for open source projects. Is anybody shocked by this? Anybody? [...] Not sure what the story is with Coverity, but it probably has something to do with 1) they haven’t been able to monetize the service the way they hoped, or 2) they’ve been able to monetize the service and don’t fancy spending the money anymore or 3) they’ve pivoted entirely and just aren’t doing the scanning thing. Not sure which, don’t really care — the end result is the same. Open source projects that have come to depend on this now have to scramble to replace the service. [...] I’m not going to go all RMS, but the only way to prevent this is to have open tools and services. And pay for them. Read more

Easily Fund Open Source Projects With These Platforms

Financial support is one of the many ways to help Linux and Open Source community. This is why you see “Donate” option on the websites of most open source projects. While the big corporations have the necessary funding and resources, most open source projects are developed by individuals in their spare time. However, it does require one’s efforts, time and probably includes some overhead costs too. Monetary supports surely help drive the project development. If you would like to support open source projects financially, let me show you some platforms dedicated to open source and/or Linux. Read more

KDE: Kdenlive, Kubuntu, Elisa, KDE Connect

  • Kdenlive Café #27 and #28 – You can’t miss it
    Timeline refactoring, new Pro features, packages for fast and easy install, Windows version and a bunch of other activities are happening in the Kdenlive world NOW!
  • Kubuntu 17.10 Guide for Newbie Part 9
    This is the 9th article, the final part of the series. This ninth article gives you more documentations to help yourself in using Kubuntu 17.10. The resources are online links to certain manuals and ebooks specialized for Kubuntu basics, command lines usage, software installation instructions, how to operate LibreOffice and KDE Plasma.
  • KDE's Elisa Music Player Preparing For Its v0.1 Released
    We have been tracking the development of Elisa, one of several KDE music players, since development started about one year ago. Following the recent alpha releases, the KDE Elisa 0.1 stable release is on the way. Elisa developers are preparing the Elisa v0.1 release and they plan to have it out around the middle of April.
  • KDE Connect Keeps Getting Better For Interacting With Your Desktop From Android
    KDE Connect is the exciting project that allows you to leverage your KDE desktop from Android tablets/smartphones for features like sending/receiving SMS messages from your desktop, toggling music, sharing files, and much more. KDE Connect does continue getting even better.
  • First blog & KDE Connect media control improvements
    I've started working on KDE Connect last November. My first big features were released yesterday in KDE Connect 1.8 for Android, so cause for celebration and a blog post! My first big feature is media notifications. KDE Connect has, since it's inception, allowed you to remotely control your music and video's. Now you can also do this with a notification, like all Android music apps do! So next time a bad song comes up, you don't need to switch to the KDE Connect app. Just click next on the notification without closing you current app. And just in case you don't like notifications popping up, there's an option to disable it.