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Wednesday, 20 Sep 17 - Tux Machines is a community-driven public service/news site which has been around for over a decade and primarily focuses on GNU/LinuxSubscribe now Syndicate content

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Quick Roundup

Type Title Author Repliessort icon Last Post
Story HP's CEO Search srlinuxx 11/04/2005 - 3:24am
Story IBM Surpassed Dell in Sales? srlinuxx 11/04/2005 - 3:23am
Story This Week at the Movies: Million Dollar Baby & Constantine srlinuxx 11/04/2005 - 3:23am
Story Microsoft signs on Alcatel for IPTV srlinuxx 11/04/2005 - 3:22am
Story HP Printer Cartridges Die Before Use srlinuxx 11/04/2005 - 3:23am
Story IBM furthers Linux While Gates Signs Contract srlinuxx 11/04/2005 - 3:22am
Story rm -rf Contest Interest Wanes? srlinuxx 11/04/2005 - 3:22am
Story Lose Phone = Lose Friends srlinuxx 11/04/2005 - 3:21am
Story Big Bullies srlinuxx 11/04/2005 - 3:20am
Story Mini Mozilla marches on Windows mobiles srlinuxx 11/04/2005 - 3:21am

Solus 3 Brings Maturity and Performance to Budgie

Filed under
OS

Back in 2016, the Solus developers announced they were switching their operating system over to a rolling release. Solus 3 marks the third iteration since that announcement and, in such a short time, the Solus platform has come a long way. But for many, Solus 3 would be a first look into this particular take on the Linux operating system. With that in mind, I want to examine what Solus 3 offers that might entice the regular user away from their current operating system. You might be surprised when I say, “There’s plenty.”

This third release of Solus is an actual “release” and not a snapshot. What does that mean? The previous two releases of Solus were snapshots. Solus has actually moved away from the regular snapshot model found in rolling releases. With the standard rolling release, a new snapshot is posted at least every few days; from that snapshot an image can be created such that the difference between an installation and latest updates is never large. However, the developers have opted to use a hybrid approach to the rolling release. According to the Solus 3 release announcement, this offers “feature rich releases with explicit goals and technology enabling, along with the benefits of a curated rolling release operating system.”

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What's behind the Linux umask?

Filed under
Linux

The Linux umask setting plays a big role in determining the permissions that are assigned to files that you create. But what's behind this variable, and how do the numbers relate to settings like rwxr-xr-x?

First, umask is a setting that directly controls the permissions assigned when you create files or directories. Create a new file using a text editor or simply with the touch command, and its permissions will be derived from your umask setting. You can look at your umask setting simply by typing umask on the command line.

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Servers: IBM, Sumo Logic, and Canonical

Filed under
Server
  • IBM Touts Top-Notch Security in Next-Gen Linux Mainframe

    IBM on Tuesday launched LinuxOne Emperor II, the second generation of its open source mainframe computer system. The new model has a layer of security and privacy not seen in a Linux-based platform before, the company said. "We saw in our success stories for Emperor that security was a recurring theme attracting new customers to the platform," noted Mark Figley, director of LinuxOne Offerings at IBM. "Later, our experience with blockchain ... reinforced that lesson for us," he said.

  • Sumo Logic Cloud Study Highlights Linux, NoSQL and Docker

    At first glance, the numbers in Sumo Logic's State of Modern Applications in the Cloud 2017 report that was released on Tuesday don't seem to match what's being reported elsewhere. The first graph, a pie-chart titled "Breakdown of Customers," seems to indicate that Amazon Web Services has a 64 percent share, followed by "Others" with 26.4 percent, "Multi-Cloud" at 5.8 percent, and at the bottom Microsoft Azure with a pitiful 3.8 percent. There's no mention of Google Cloud Platform or IBM's Bluemix at all.

  • Canonical & Microsoft Enable Ubuntu Containers with Hyper-V Isolation on Windows

    Canonical's Dustin Kirkland announced that the company behind the popular Ubuntu Linux OS recently teamed up with Microsoft to enable Ubuntu containers to run on Windows systems with Hyper-V isolation.

    If you've ever dreamed of running your own Linux apps on a Windows machine, using your favorite GNU/Linux distro, which, in this case, is Ubuntu, we have some good news for you, as it's now possible to run Docker containers on Windows 10 and Windows Servers.

Security: Devices, Open Source Secure, Cybrary, and Kaspersky Lab

Filed under
Security

Linux and Linux Foundation: Wipro, Torvalds, Zemlin and Kees Cook

Filed under
Linux
  • Wipro joins The Linux Foundation, Automotive Grade Linux
  • Wipro joins Open source technologies focused Linux foundation
  • Linux Goes to Hollywood for Inaugural Open Source Summit
  • Linux Foundation Aims to Advance Open-Source Software Development

    The Linux Foundation hosted its annual Open Source Summit North America event from Sept. 11 to 14 in Los Angeles, highlighting open-source efforts that it helps to lead. One question that Linux Foundation Executive Director, Jim Zemlin grapples with on a regular basis is why his organization continues to be relevant.

    In an era where anyone can simply go to GitHub and start a project, the barriers to entry for open-source development are very low. The Linux Foundation however isn't about basic open-source project hosting, according to Zemlin.

    "One question that we ask ourselves all the time inside of The Linux Foundation is why do we need The Linux Foundation," Zemlin told eWEEK in a video interview. "What's the point?"

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  • Open Source Summit: Linux Kernel Developers Discuss Challenges, Opportunities

    While Linus Torvalds is the most famous Linux kernel developer, he's just one of many that help to lead the way forward. In a panel session at the Open Source Summit in Los Angeles a panel of leading Linux kernel developers discussed their views on the current state of Linux kernel development.

    Google developer Kees Cook explained that right now the kernel is broken up into many different sub-systems each with its own maintainer. A challenge for Cook, is getting changes implemented that span multiple sub-systems. Cook works specifically on security and the changes he tends to need to make have broad impact.

    What Cook has to do now is either send patches to each and every subsystem, or have his own complete kernel tree that the subsystem maintainers can pick up.

Desktop: Lenovo and StationX

Filed under
GNU
Linux

Is Open Source Secure?

Filed under
OSS

With ransomware attacks and security breaches impacting organisations globally on a regular basis, security is very much front and centre of every CSO’s agenda. Known vulnerabilities like Heartbleed and the SMB vulnerability exploited in the WannaCry ransomware attack brought many organisations to their knees, causing panic and chaos.

According to Telstra’s 2017 Cyber Security Report, almost 60 percent of surveyed organisations in Australia detected a security incident on at least a monthly basis in 2016. The Telstra report stated seeing increases in security risks across the board with more than half of all businesses experiencing a ransomware attack last year.

With open source software (OSS) gaining popularity among organisations, there is inevitably discussion around the security of OSS, with most people simply wanting to know: “is open source secure?”

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Games: Swim Out, Mesa, Psychonauts, SteamWorld Dig 2, Ravenfield

Filed under
Gaming

KDE: Plasma Accessibility, Randa Report, KMarkdownWebView 0.1.0, and PureOS

Filed under
KDE
  • Plasma accessibility updates

    Marco Martin recently posted about some of the improvements in krunner, today I want to show some of the effort into navigating the Plasma panels.

    This video shows a user navigating the plasma panel using voice and keyboard. A shortcut focusses the panel, and then one can use tab and cursor keys as normal. In future we will improve our key-focus visual indicators, and allow for richer interaction.

  • Randa Report: The Fall of KDateTime

    The main goal for me and Volker for this year Randa Meeting was to port KCalCore, our calendaring library, away from KDateTime. KDateTime/KTimeZone are classes for handling date, time and time zones which were used back in the KDE4 (and earlier) days when Qt’s QDateTime wasn’t good enough for us, mainly due to missing time zone support.

    In Qt5 QDateTime finally gained all the necessary features we need which made it possible for us to leave KDateTime behind. But we couldn’t just go and replace “K” with “Q” everywhere – there are many subtle (and not-so-subtle) differences in API, behavior and some missing features of QDateTime that required us to carefully consider each step. The fact that we started working on this over 2 years ago shows how challenging task this was.

  • KMarkdownWebView 0.1.0

    The KMarkdownWebView software provides a KParts plugin for rendered display of Markdown files, using web technologies (webpage with JavaScript library which creates HTML from the plaintext handed in). This enables KParts-using applications (like the archiving tool Ark or the file manager Krusader) to show Markdown files in the target format. It is also prepared for the upcoming “Live Preview” plugin for KTextEditor-based applications like the editors/IDEs Kate & KDevelop (see introduction).

  • ​KDE is partnering with Purism to create a Linux smartphone

    Most people are happy to use Android smartphones. Others love their Apple iPhones. But there's some folks who really want a free-software smartphone without a trace of proprietary code or firmware. For these folks, Purism and KDE are partnering to create the Purism Librem 5 smartphone.

How an open source tool is helping hurricane victims

Filed under
OSS

After Hurricane Harvey recently ripped through the Houston area, causing catastrophic flooding and devastation, the Stephen F. Austin Community Health Network (SFA) responded quickly by leveraging open source technology to reach out to patients and victims of the crisis in areas of Texas that are virtually inaccessible.

Using an advanced cloud-based version of the OpenEMR software, the SFA Community Health Network was able to treat patients in clinics that were physically unreachable by care providers. The next-generation version of the open source electronic health record (EHR) was developed and is maintained by St. Louis-based Williams Medical Technologies, Inc. (WMT).

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Initial Benchmarks Of The AMD EPYC 7601 On Ubuntu Linux

Filed under
Graphics/Benchmarks

Last week we received the AMD EPYC 7601 32 core / 64 thread processor for testing at Phoronix with the Tyan Transport SX TN70A-B8026 2U server. Since then I've had the pleasure of putting this Zen server processor through its paces. I am still early in the testing process with many more interesting benchmarks to come, but today are some initial numbers of the AMD EPYC 7601 compared to various Intel Xeon CPUs while running Ubuntu Linux.

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Linux drone controller has HDMI input and long-range WiFi

Filed under
Linux

The ArduPilot based “Emlid Edge” drone controller runs Linux on a quad -A53 SoC, and offers an HDMI input, long-range 5.8GHz WiFi, and a UAVCAN GNSS module.

Emlid, which has previously launched the Raspberry Pi based Navio and HAT-ready Navio2 drone controllers, has now opened $699 pre-sales on a much more advanced Emlid Edge controller, due in November. The kit is notable for offering an HDMI input to capture video from an HD camera such as the GoPro. There’s also an optimized, long-range 5.8GHz WiFi links that streams pre-compressed HD video and telemetry data at up to 2 km to Emlid’s QGroundControl Ground Control Station (GCS) software running on a laptop equipped with the same 5.8GHz link.

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today's leftovers

Filed under
Misc
  • ​New IBM big iron for Linux

    IBM mainframes are alive, well, and being designed to make the most of Linux.

  • Create a Linux VM with these potential limitations in mind

    it involves creating a VM object and allocating hardware resources, such as memory, virtual network adapters and virtual CPUs. As simple as the creation process might be, however, the OS that will eventually be installed onto the VM requires some consideration. For example, the VM will need to be provisioned with enough memory to run the OS. In some cases, there may be additional considerations that need to be made beyond meeting the minimum hardware requirements of the OS. This can be especially true for a Linux VM.

  • Cairo Adds Support For OpenGL ES 3.0

    The Cairo 2D vector graphics library used by GTK, Firefox, WebKit, and many other programs finally has an OpenGL ES 3.0 back-end merged.

    Cairo supports many different backends from OpenGL to DirectFB to outputting as SVG/PDF/PostScript files as well as Skia, Direct2D, OpenVG, and other less notable code paths. Finally, OpenGL ES 3.0 is now supported by mainline Cairo.

  • Install and Configure ISC DHCP Server in Debian 9
  • Solving Physics Problems on Linux

Red Hat, CentOS and Fedora

Filed under
Red Hat

Devices: Purism’s Librem 5, ASUSTOR, and Tizen

Filed under
Linux
Hardware

OSS: Comcast, Small Businesses, Cloudera, Windows, and DragonFly

Filed under
OSS
  • Comcast cuts truck rolls with open source AI software

    Comcast claims to have saved tens of millions of dollars through avoiding the need for truck rolls, by using a machine learning program that can predict with 90% accuracy whether or not it will need to send a technician to a customer’s home to fix connectivity problems. Every operator would love to reduce truck rolls. Estimates of the average costs vary, but tend to be somewhere between $50 and $100 per truck roll. Even if a company is using the most efficient vehicles possible, those costs are increasing as fuel and labour costs rise. Every operator is well aware that they end up sending people out on the road more often than is really needed, because many problems could be…

  • Need Free Software? Open-Source Options for Small Businesses

    Nearly all of today's software packages run on a monthly subscription model. It doesn't sound like much upfront, but if you spend $10 a month here and another $20 there, all of a sudden you're forking over a bunch of money each month for programs you're no longer sure that you even need.

    If you're a solopreneur or a small business, you don't want the costs of effective software to eat too much into the bottom line. At the same time, you definitely need the right tools to get the job done.

    This is where free, open-source software can come to the rescue. Not every icon may have the same type of excessive attention to detail and polish as paid software, but when it comes to getting the job done, these free tools can be just as effective. Here are a few of our favorite options.

  • Cloudera Joins Open Source Eclipse IoT Community

    Cloudera, Inc. (NYSE: CLDR), the modern platform for machine learning and analytics, optimized for the cloud, announced it has joined the Eclipse Foundation as a Solutions member and will participate in the Eclipse IoT Working Group. In this capacity, Cloudera collaborates with industry leaders such as Bosch, Eurotech, Red Hat and Samsung Electronics to support the development of Eclipse IoT Open Testbeds. This new initiative showcases how open source software, open standards, and commercial solutions can be used to create real-world, industry-specific IoT (Internet of Things) solutions.

  • On my way to Kieler Open Source und Linux Tage
  • Preview: Linux Containers on Windows
  • How the Windows vs. Linux Debate Has Changed over the Past Decade [Ed: Better headline might be, how Microsoft PR money has subverted the media (e.g. "loves Linux") and more money silenced the Linux Foundation, Linux OEMs]
  • HAMMER2 Is Looking & Performing Good As The Future DragonFlyBSD File-System

    With this week DragonFlyBSD seeing HAMMER2 support added to the installer in preparation for this file-system being an option in the next DragonFly release due out in a few weeks, I've been testing out the state of this HAMMER file-system successor as well as running some benchmarks.

FOSS Licensing News

Filed under
OSS
Legal
  • Public Money? Public Code! 22 Organizations Seek to Improve Public Software Procurement

    Today, 22 organizations are publishing an open letter in which they call for lawmakers to advance legislation requiring publicly financed software developed for the public sector be made available under a Free and Open Source Software license. The initial signatories include CCC, EDRi, Free Software Foundation Europe, KDE, Open Knowledge Foundation Germany, Open Source Business Alliance, Open Source Initiative, The Document Foundation, Wikimedia Germany, as well as several others; they ask individuals and other organization to sign the open letter. The open letter will be sent to candidates for the German Parliament election and, during the coming months, until the 2019 EU parliament elections, to other representatives of the EU and EU member states.

  • Two Open Source Licensing Questions: The AGPL and Facebook
  • How Open Source and Proprietary IP Can Co-Exist [Ed: law firms pushing software patents, not just copyright]

    Open source software imparts a number of benefits, including decreasing product development time, distributing development across a community and attracting developers to your organization. However, some organizations shy away from it due to perceived risks and disadvantages around intellectual property.

    [...]

    That's a situation in which we might open source an implementation and file for a patent at the same time. In scoping the patent and the license terms, the open source community gets access to the software but the patent retains value.

FOSS and Oracle

Filed under
OSS
  • Oracle Joins CNCF, and Releases Kubernetes on Oracle Linux and Terraform Kubernetes Cloud Installer

    At the Open Source Summit, held in Los Angeles, USA, it was announced that Oracle have joined the Cloud Native Computing Foundation (CNCF) as a Platinum member. Oracle have also released two technologies for installing Kubernetes on Oracle Cloud Infrastructure: "Kubernetes on Oracle Linux", an integration of Kubernetes into the Oracle Container Service; and an open source HashiCorp Terraform Kubernetes Installer for the Oracle Bare Metal Cloud. This news follows from the July release of three open source container tools by Oracle, which included a Rust-based alternative container runtime that implements the OCI-runtime specification

  • Oracle Joins the Cloud Native Computing Foundation
  • Java EE Finds Open Source Home

    Oracle announced this week it would turn over Java Enterprise Edition to the Eclipse Foundation, a nonprofit corporation formed in 2004 and an outgrowth of a software project originally created by IBM in 2001. The company said its decision resulted from consultations with IBM and Red Hat, the other key contributors to the Java EE platform.

  • Get out your specs: Java EE's headed to the Eclipse Foundation

    Oracle has named the Eclipse Foundation as the new host for Java Enterprise Edition, but said the platform won’t get to keep its name.

    The decision to make Java EE - which is already developed in open source - fully open was announced last month, with Oracle’s David Delabassee saying it was in a bid to make it “more agile and responsive”.

  • Oracle Punts Java EE To The Eclipse Foundation

    Since last month's announcement by Oracle that they were essentially looking to offload Java EE to a new foundation, that new steward has now been named.

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More in Tux Machines

Security: Equifax, Kodi, Infrared, and Windows XP in 2017

  • Safer but not immune: Cloud lessons from the Equifax breach
  • Warning: If you are using this Kodi repository, you could be in danger
    Kodi is quite possibly the best media center software of all time. If you are looking to watch videos or listen to music, the open source solution provides an excellent overall experience. Thanks to its support for "addons," it has the potential to become better all the time. You see, developers can easily add new functionality by writing an addon for the platform. And yes, some addons can be used for piracy, but not all of them are. These addons, such as Exodus and Covenant, are normally added using a repository, which hosts them. [...] We do not know 100 percent if the person that re-registered the metalkettle name on GitHub is planning anything evil, but it is better to be safe than sorry.
  • Infrared signals in surveillance cameras let malware jump network air gaps
    The malware prototype could be a crucial ingredient for attacks that target some of the world's most sensitive networks. Militaries, energy producers, and other critical infrastructure providers frequently disconnect such networks from the Internet as a precaution. In the event malware is installed, there is no way for it to make contact with attacker-controlled servers that receive stolen data or issue new commands. Such airgaps are one of the most basic measures for securing highly sensitive information and networks. The proof-of-concept malware uses connected surveillance cameras to bridge such airgaps. Instead of trying to use the Internet to reach attacker-controlled servers, the malware weaves passwords, cryptographic keys, and other types of data into infrared signals and uses a camera's built-in infrared lights to transmit them. A nearby attacker then records the signals with a video camera and later decodes embedded secrets. The same nearby attackers can embed data into infrared signals and beam them to an infected camera, where they're intercepted and decoded by the network malware. The covert channel works best when attackers have a direct line of sight to the video camera, but non-line-of-sight communication is also possible in some cases.
  • Manchester police still relies on Windows XP
    England's second biggest police force has revealed that more than one in five of its computers were still running Windows XP as of July. Greater Manchester Police told the BBC that 1,518 of its PCs ran the ageing operating system, representing 20.3% of all the office computers it used. Microsoft ended nearly all support for the operating system in 2014. Experts say its use could pose a hacking risk. The figure was disclosed as part of a wider Freedom of Information request. "Even if security vulnerabilities are identified in XP, Microsoft won't distribute patches in the same way it does for later releases of Windows," said Dr Steven Murdoch, a cyber-security expert at University College London.

Flock 2017, Fedora 27, and New Fedora 26 (F26) ISO

  • Flock 2017: How to make your application into a Flatpak?
  • Flock to Fedora 2017
  • Flock 2017 – A Marketing talk about a new era to come.
    I had two session at Flock this year, one done by me and another in support of Robert Mayr in the Mindshare one, if there were been any need for discussing. Here I’m talking about my session: Marketing – tasks and visions (I will push the report about the second one after Robert’s one, for completion). In order to fit the real target of a Flock conference (that is a contributor conference, not a show where people must demonstrate how much cool they are; we know it!) is to bring and show something new, whether ideas, software, changes and so on, and discuss with other contributors if they’re really innovative, useful and achievable.
  • F26-20170918 Updated Live isos released
  • GSoC2017 Final — Migrate Plinth to Fedora Server
  • Building Modules for Fedora 27
    Let me start with a wrong presumption that you have everything set up – you are a packager who knows what they want to achieve, you have a dist-git repository created, you have all the tooling installed. And of course, you know what Modularity is, and how and why do we use modulemd to define modular content. You know what Host, Platform, and Bootstrap modules are and how to use them.

Red Hat Financial Results Expectations High

Will Microsoft love Linux to death? Shuttleworth and Stallman on whether Windows 10 is free software's friend

Richard Stallman is a free-software activist and creator of the GNU OS that forms part of the basis of modern GNU/Linux distros. He believes that Microsoft's decision to build a Windows Subsystem for Linux (WSL) amounts to an attempt to extinguish software that users are free to run, copy, distribute, study, change and improve. "It certainly looks that way. But it won't be so easy to extinguish us, because our reasons for using and advancing free software are not limited to practical convenience," he said. "We want freedom. As a way to use computers in freedom, Windows is a non-starter." Read more