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Saturday, 22 Jul 17 - Tux Machines is a community-driven public service/news site which has been around for over a decade and primarily focuses on GNU/LinuxSubscribe now Syndicate content

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Type Title Author Repliessort icon Last Post
Story HP's CEO Search srlinuxx 11/04/2005 - 3:24am
Story IBM Surpassed Dell in Sales? srlinuxx 11/04/2005 - 3:23am
Story This Week at the Movies: Million Dollar Baby & Constantine srlinuxx 11/04/2005 - 3:23am
Story Microsoft signs on Alcatel for IPTV srlinuxx 11/04/2005 - 3:22am
Story HP Printer Cartridges Die Before Use srlinuxx 11/04/2005 - 3:23am
Story IBM furthers Linux While Gates Signs Contract srlinuxx 11/04/2005 - 3:22am
Story rm -rf Contest Interest Wanes? srlinuxx 11/04/2005 - 3:22am
Story Lose Phone = Lose Friends srlinuxx 11/04/2005 - 3:21am
Story Big Bullies srlinuxx 11/04/2005 - 3:20am
Story Mini Mozilla marches on Windows mobiles srlinuxx 11/04/2005 - 3:21am

Top 4 reasons I use dwm for my Linux window manager

Filed under
Linux

I like minimalistic views. If I could run everything in a terminal I would. It's free from shiny stuff that hogs my resources and distracts my feeble mind. I also grow tired of resizing and moving windows, never getting them to align perfectly.

On my quest for minimalism, I grew fond of Xfce and used it as my main desktop environment for years on my Linux computers. Then, one day I came across a video of Bryan Lunduke talking about the awesome window manager he used called Awesome. It neatly arranges all of your windows for you, and so, sounded like just what I wanted. I tried it out but didn't get the hang of the configuration needed to tweak it into my liking. So, I moved on and discovered xmonad, but I had a similar result. It worked fine but I couldn't get around the Haskell part to really turn it into my perfect desktop.

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Raspberry Pi: How I built an OctaPi-style computing cluster

Filed under
Linux
HowTos

The inspiration for this post (and this project) came from something that I recently read in the Raspberry Pi blog. I would like to start out by saying if you are interested in computers, programming, DIY electronics, space exploration, or just technology in general, you are very likely to find the Raspberry Pi blog interesting and entertaining.

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Apache discontinues use of Facebook code libraries

Filed under
OSS
Legal
  • Apache discontinues use of Facebook code libraries

    San Francisco, July 18 (IANS) US-based open-source community Apache Foundation has said it will not use Facebook’s ‘BSD-licensed’ code for any of its new software projects for legal reasons.

    The foundation banned the use of libraries, frameworks and tools covered by Facebook’s open-source ‘BSD-plus-Patents’ license in any new projects, The Register reported on Tuesday.

    “No new project, sub-project or codebase, which has not used Facebook’s ‘BSD-plus-Patents’ licensed jars are allowed to use them,” Chris Mattmann, Legal Affairs Director, Apache Foundation, was quoted as saying.

  • Apache says 'no' to Facebook code libraries

    The Apache Foundation has declared that none of its new software projects can include Facebook's booby-trapped BSD-licensed code.

    The foundation's legal affairs director, Chris Mattmann, said over the weekend that libraries, frameworks and tools covered by Facebook's open-source-ish BSD-plus-Patents license should not be absorbed into any new projects.

    "No new project, sub-project or codebase, which has not used Facebook BSD+Patents licensed jars (or similar), are allowed to use them," Mattmann wrote. "In other words, if you haven't been using them, you aren't allowed to start. It is Cat‑X."

  • Apache Bans Facebook’s License Combo

BSD: OPNsense RC1, TrueNAS X10, LLVM and More

Filed under
BSD

SharkLinux OS Is Destined for Success

Filed under
Linux
Reviews

SharkLinux OS is a cool display of innovation and design. The developer boasts that he never used a physical keyboard in making his distro. Petit developed it exclusively in a cloud environment accessed from his Samsung Galaxy Android smartphone.

Even if you do not have a big commitment to cloud services, SharkLinux OS offers an excellent computing platform for everyday tasks. It is an easy rival to other Linux distros.

Instead of versioning its releases, SharkLinux offers a base system that you can upgrade or convert. The base includes primarily standard Ubuntu releases with all upstream software being offered by way of optional installs and upgrades.

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LinuxAndUbuntu Distro Review Of The Week - NeptuneOS

Filed under
OS
Reviews

We want a nice looking distro, don’t we? We want a distro that does the best work when it comes to stability. Don’t we? Here we come across NeptuneOS, a Linux distro based on Debian with KDE desktop environment. As we all know when it comes to stability, there are a lot of fewer distros that can match Debian. Also being based on Debian, the number of compatible software increase a lot.

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Ubuntu 17.10 (Artful Aardvark) Needs Some Testing, Here's How You Can Help

Filed under
Ubuntu

Canonical's Alan Pope invites the Ubuntu community today to download and test out the latest daily build ISO images of the upcoming Ubuntu 17.10 (Artful Aardvark) operating system to report if things are working correctly or not on their PCs.

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Alexa-ready digital alarm clock radio runs on hackable Chip Pro

Filed under
Linux

PAI’s “Sandman Doppler” is an Alexa-enabled smart alarm clock and music streamer that runs Linux on the Chip Pro COM, and offers 6x USB charging ports.

Palo Alto Innovation (PAI) had a troubled first-time Kickstarter launch with its original Sandman Clock, but the company fulfilled all its orders and moved on to a next generation model, the Sandman Doppler. This larger, more capable digital alarm clock and smart speaker adds Amazon Alexa voice controls, dual speakers, and two more USB charging ports, among other features. The Linux-driven device is built on the Next Thing’s open spec Chip Pro module, and lets you hack the COM via its micro-USB port (see farther below).

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A brief history of GnuPG: vital to online security but free and underfunded

Filed under
GNU
Security

Most people have never heard of the software that makes up the machinery of the internet. Outside developer circles, its authors receive little reward for their efforts, in terms of either money or public recognition.

One example is the encryption software GNU Privacy Guard (also known as GnuPG and GPG), and its authors are regularly forced to fundraise to continue the project.

GnuPG is part of the GNU collection of free and open source software, but its story is an interesting one, and it begins with software engineer Phil Zimmermann.

We do not know exactly what Zimmermann felt on January 11, 1996, but relief is probably a good guess. The United States government had just ended its investigation into him and his encryption software, PGP or “Pretty Good Privacy”.

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Remix OS, the Android Desktop OS, Is Discontinued

Filed under
Android
Linux

Despite plenty of hype and potential around it, today brings word that Remix OS is discontinued.

This desktop-orientated version of Android was designed to be used like a regular desktop OS and could be freely installed on Intel PCs and Macs. A variety of conventional desktop features were plumped in to make the OS more “desktop friendly”, including a task bar, a start menu, a system tray, and the ability to run multiple Android apps in resizable windows.

Remix OS for PC, which is based on the work of the Android x86 project, also boasts full local installation, UEFI support, and (until now) OTA updates.

But it seems the project won’t migrate out of beta.

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​The ultimate Linux workstation: The Dell 5720 AIO

Filed under
GNU
Linux

Want a cheap Linux desktop? Look elsewhere. But, if you want a kick-rump-and-take-names desktop for serious graphics or development work, you want the Dell 5720 AIO workstation.

This take-no-prisoners workstation starts at $1,699, but the model I looked at costs over $3,200. It's worth it.

This model came with a Quad Core 3.8Ghz Intel Xeon Processor E3-1275. In a word, it's fast.

It also comes with 64GB of 2133MHz DDR4 ECC RAM. That's fast, too. The main memory is backed by a 512GB M.2 PCIe SSD and a pair of 1TB 2.5-inch SATA (7,200 RPM) hard drives. Yes, they're really fast, too.

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Red Hat: New Talk by Lennart Poettering, Presence at Southeast Linux Fest (SELF), and Financial News

Filed under
Red Hat

Microsoft Marketing (Proprietary) in "Linux" Clothing

Filed under
Microsoft

Security and FOSS: Sonatype Report, Bitfury, and Nokia

Filed under
OSS
Security

Ubuntu’s Impact on Software Naming Conventions and Testing of Artful Aardvark

Filed under
Ubuntu
  • Coincidence or Subtle Influence? Ubuntu’s Impact on Software Naming Conventions

    Could Ubuntu have had an impact on the versioning and naming conventions of other software projects, including Windows, Android and more?

    Reader Abu A. pinged us earlier today to share this interesting insight he has on Ubuntu’s contributions to the wider software community.

  • The Artful Aardvark Needs You!

    I don’t consider myself to be psychic and yet, somehow, miraculously, I happen to know what you’re going to be doing later.

    You’re going to help test the Ubuntu 17.10 daily builds on real hardware to uncover unwanted behaviour in user-facing features.

Testing of Linux 4.13 and Improved Thunderbolt Support

Filed under
Linux
  • Linux 4.13 RC1 arrives: 'Get testing' says ​Linus Torvalds

    Linus Torvalds took the wraps off the first Linux 4.13 kernel release candidate on Saturday, a day ahead of its expected release.

    The new release candidate (RC) comes a fortnight after the stable release of Linux 4.12, which was one of the biggest updates in the kernel's 25 year history. That kernel also got its first update to 4.12.1 last week.

  • Dell TB15/TB16 Thunderbolt Docks Should Soon Work Better On Linux

    There are many bug reports out there about issues with Dell's TB15 and TB16 Thunderbolt docks under Linux, but at least some of those remaining issues should be cleared up by a pending fix.

GNU: GCC Benchmark, Glibc 2.26

Filed under
Development
GNU
Graphics/Benchmarks
  • GCC vs. Clang Compilers On The Intel Core i9 With Clear Linux

    For those curious about the GCC versus LLVM Clang compilers with Intel's new Core i9 7900X, earlier this month I had ran some compiler benchmarks on this high-end processor.

    I simply forgot to post these GCC vs. Clang i9-7900X benchmark results earlier, but here they are for those interested. The tests were done with the performance-oriented Clear Linux distribution.

  • New Features Coming For Glibc 2.26

    Given our recent articles of Glibc enabling a per-thread cache for malloc and Fedora 27 will use glibc 2.26, you may be curious about some of the other features coming to this next version of the GNU C Library.

Graphics: Mesa, RadeonSI, and Vulkan Release

Filed under
Graphics/Benchmarks
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More in Tux Machines

KDE: Krita 3.2.0 Beta 2, Akademy 2017

  • Krita 3.2.0: Second Beta Available
    We’re releasing the second beta for Krita 3.2.0 today! These beta builds contain the following fixes, compared to the first 3.2.0 beta release. Keep in mind that this is a beta: you’re supposed to help the development team out by testing it, and reporting issues on bugs.kde.org.
  •  
  • KDE Arrives in Almería for Akademy 2017
    We have travelled from across the globe to meet for our annual gathering where we plan and discuss the next year's activities creating free software to share with the world. Almería is in the south east of Spain, a country which has long been a supporter of free software and collaboration with its creators. The sun here is hot but the water is also warm for those who make it to the beach to discuss their work with a pina colada and a swim. Over the last year KDE has run conferences in Brazil, India, Spain, Germany and sprints in Randa in Switzerland, Krita in the Netherlands, Marble in Germany, GSoC in the US, WikiToLearn in India, Plasma in Germany, Kontact in France, and sent representatives to OSCAL in Albania, FOSSASIA in Singapore, FUDCON in Cambodia, HKOSCon in Hong Kong and more.
  • Guest Post: Retired From KDE, by Paul Adams
    Long time no see, huh? Yes, I neglected my blog and as such didn't post anything since Akademy 2014... Interestingly this is the last one where my dear Paul Adams held a famous talk.  [...] During my PhD I was studying Free Software community productivity metrics. I was also working on research into software quality funded by the European Commission. KDE eV (the governance body1 for KDE) was also taking part in that project. At this time KDE was almost ready to release KDE 4. It was an exciting time to get involved.

Software and howtos

Ubuntu: Desktop Software Users' Feedback, Ubuntu Server Development

Games: Day of Infamy, Gravitation, and Patches From Samuel Pitoiset for Valve