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Wednesday, 22 Feb 17 - Tux Machines is a community-driven public service/news site which has been around for over a decade and primarily focuses on GNU/LinuxSubscribe now Syndicate content

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Quick Roundup

Type Title Author Repliessort icon Last Post
Story Mandrakesoft and Conectiva Merger srlinuxx 11/04/2005 - 3:20am
Story Ebay Sued srlinuxx 11/04/2005 - 3:20am
Story FBI Being Spoofed in Email srlinuxx 11/04/2005 - 3:19am
Story Nvidia to release 75 series driver srlinuxx 11/04/2005 - 3:19am
Story NVIDIA Unleashes 6800 Mobile GPU srlinuxx 11/04/2005 - 3:18am
Story Newest Vulnerabilities in php apps srlinuxx 11/04/2005 - 3:18am
Story aKademy 2005 Logo Contest Launched srlinuxx 11/04/2005 - 6:29am
Story SCO and The Titanic srlinuxx 11/04/2005 - 4:28am
Story IBM backs open-source Web software srlinuxx 11/04/2005 - 4:27am
Story Who will take home the Gold? srlinuxx 11/04/2005 - 4:25am

Leftovers: OSS

Filed under
OSS
  • ReactOS 0.4.4 Released

    Today marks the fifth release of the ReactOS 0.4.x series, as well as the fifth following the 4 month release cycle started by 0.4.0 itself. Progress has continued steadily, with a great deal of work going on in the background to improve ReactOS' general usability and stability. Many of these improvements were on display at the FOSDEM convention in Brussels that took place on the 4th and 5th of this month. Certainly one of the more notable albeit less visible additions was the incorporation of basic printing support by Colin Finck. At present ReactOS is only capable of sending print commands to a parallel port printer, but this is the first step towards universal support and Colin should be applauded for his effort. A video demonstration of it can be viewed here.

  • ReactOS 0.4.4 Released with Initial Printing Support, Rendering Improvements

    A new stable maintenance update of the ReactOS 0.4 series of operating system that tries to recreate the design principles of Windows NT and offer binary compatibility is now available for download, versioned 0.4.4.

    Coming exactly three months after the release of ReactOS 0.4.3, a point release that ReactOS 0.4.4 implemented the Winsock library and fixed over 340 bugs, ReactOS 0.4.4 is here to add initial printing support, as well as various general stability and usability improvements, most of which were planned during the FOSDEM 2017 meeting.

  • Ivy League astronomers take exoplanet hunting open-source

    If you’ve ever wanted to join the ranks of career scientists and academics who hunt for exoplanets using the world’s most powerful telescopes, your day has come. This week, an international team of astronomers including a delegation from MIT, Carnegie Mellon, and Yale released to the public a huge set of exoplanet-detecting observations taken with the radial velocity method. To demonstrate the utility of the data set, they used it to find more than 100 exoplanets, all within 100 parsecs of us. There’s even one orbiting a near neighboring star to our own Solar System, GJ 411, which lies about 8.1 light years from Earth.

  • Why I’m Not a Full-Throttle FOSS Advocate

    I’m not this kind of hypocrite. I’m a pragmatic computer user. I use free software wherever I can, and open source as my #2 preference. But the main thing is that the software I use must be able to do the job.

  • 5 Tips on Enterprise Open Source Success From Capital One, Google, and Walmart

    Some of the world’s largest and most successful companies gathered this week at Open Source Leadership Summit in Lake Tahoe to share best practices around open source use and participation. Companies from diverse industries -- from healthcare and finance, to telecom and high tech -- discussed the strategies and processes they have adopted to create business success with open source software.

  • New ‘Open Source Days’ Program Launches as Part of OpenStack Summit in Boston

    The OpenStack Summit—the must-attend open infrastructure event—will feature a new program called “Open Source Days,” happening May 8-11 in Boston at the Hynes Convention Center. Open Source Days bring together adjacent open source communities with the goals to improve collaboration and technical integration throughout the diverse ecosystem of open source projects that OpenStack users rely upon.

  • OpenSSL Hit By New High Severity Security Issue

    OpenSSL has been hit by another "high" severity security vulnerability.

Go 1.8 Release Notes

Filed under
Development
Google
  • Go 1.8 Release Notes

    The latest Go release, version 1.8, arrives six months after Go 1.7. Most of its changes are in the implementation of the toolchain, runtime, and libraries. There are two minor changes to the language specification. As always, the release maintains the Go 1 promise of compatibility. We expect almost all Go programs to continue to compile and run as before.

  • Go 1.8 Released With Various Performance Improvements

    Google today announced the release of the Go 1.8 programming language implementation that is coming with six months worth of features and changes.

    Go 1.8 has a few new 64-bit x86 instructions supported, Go 1.8 now uses its new compiler back-end on all architectures (with Go 1.7 their new compiler back-end was just used on 64-bit x86) and that should yield a 20~30% performance improvement for 32-bit ARM systems. But even x86 64-bit systems should see 0~10% performance improvements with Go 1.8.

Games for GNU/Linux: HITMAN and Serious Sam

Filed under
Gaming

Security News

Filed under
Security
  • Thursday's security updates
  • Capsule8 comes out of stealth to help protect Linux from attacks

    Capsule8 has emerged from stealth mode to unveil its plans for the industry’s first container-aware, real-time threat protection platform designed to protect legacy and next-generation Linux infrastructures from both known and unknown attacks. Founded by experienced hackers John Viega, Dino Dai Zovi and Brandon Edwards, Capsule8 is being built on the real-world experience of its founders in building and bringing to market defensive systems to protect against exploitation of previously unknown vulnerabilities. The company raised seed funding of $2.5 million from Bessemer Venture Partners, as well as individual investors Shardul Shah of Index Ventures and Jay Leek of ClearSky. The funding will help fuel the launch of the Capsule8 platform spring 2017.

  • Bruce Schneier Says Government Involvement in Coding Is Coming

    Security expert Bruce Schneier is painting a grim future for the tech community as the government will start to stick its nose into people’s codes.

    Schneier, present at the RSA Conference, said that until now everyone had this “special right” to code the world as they saw fit. “My guess is we’re going to lose that right because it’s too dangerous to give it to a bunch of techies,” he added, according to The Register.

  • How To Shrink Attack Surfaces with a Hypervisor

    A software environment’s attack surface is defined as the sum of points in which an unauthorized user or malicious adversary can enter or extract data. The smaller the attack surface, the better. We recently sat down with Doug Goldstein (https://github.com/cardoe or @doug_goldstein) to discuss how companies can use hypervisors to reduce attack surfaces and why the Xen Project hypervisor is a perfect choice for security-first environments. Doug is a principal software engineer at Star Lab, a company focused on providing software protection and integrity solutions for embedded systems.

  • Xen Project asks to limit security vulnerability advisories
  • Xen Project wants permission to reveal fewer vulnerabilities
  • Xen Project proposes issuing fewer advisories
  • Verified Boot: From ROM to Userspace

    Amid growing attacks on Linux devices, the 2016 Embedded Linux Conference demonstrated a renewed focus on security. One well-attended presentation at ELC Europe covered the topic of verified boot schemes. In this talk, Marc Kleine-Budde of Pengutronix revealed the architecture and strategies of a recently developed verified boot scheme for a single-core, Cortex-A9 NXP i.MX6 running on the RIoTboard SBC.

  • Yahoo's Security Incompetence Just Took $250 Million Off Verizon's Asking Price

    So last year we noted how Verizon proposed paying $4.8 billion to acquire Yahoo as part of its plan to magically transform from stodgy old telco to sexy new Millennial advertising juggernaut, which, for a variety of reasons, isn't going so well. One of those reasons is the fact that Yahoo failed to disclose the two, massive hacks (both by the same party) that exposed the credentials of millions of Yahoo customers during deal negotiations. The exposure included millions of names, email addresses, phone numbers, birthdates, hashed passwords (using MD5) and "encrypted or unencrypted" security questions and answers.

    As noted previously, Verizon had been using the scandal to drive down the $4.8 billion asking price, reports stating that Verizon was demanding not only a $1 billion reduction in the price, but another $1 billion to cover the inevitable lawsuits by Yahoo customers.

  • Updates on CyberSecurity, WordPress and what we're cooking in the lab today.

    One of the most effective ways the Wordfence team keeps the WordPress community and customers secure is through something we call the ‘Threat Defense Feed’. This is a combination of people, software, business processes and data. It’s an incredibly effective way to keep hackers out and provide our customers with early detection.

  • The 7 security threats to technology that scare experts the most

    What happens if a bad actor turns off your heat in the middle of winter, then demands $1,000 to turn it back on? Or even holds a small city’s power for ransom? Those kinds of attacks to personal, corporate, and infrastructure technology were among the top concerns for security experts from the SANS Institute, who spoke Wednesday during the RSA conference in San Francisco.

    Some of these threats target consumers directly, but even the ones that target corporations could eventually “filter down” to consumers, though the effects might not be felt for some time.

Android Leftovers

Filed under
Android

Tizen News

Filed under
Linux
  • Google under Investigation for obstructing Samsung’s development of Tizen

    Google, the maker of the Android Operating System (OS), has had an anti-competitive Investigation launched against it by The South Korean Fair Trade Commission (FTC), to see whether it has obstructed Samsung’s development of the Tizen platform to replace the Android OS on its mobiles.

  • Smartphone Game: Ninja Assassin’s comes to the Tizen Store for Samsung Z1, Z2, and Z3
  • GameAnalytics releases SDK for use with Tizen apps

    Of late we have been reporting on SDKs being released by some of the popular software service providers for the Tizen OS. Today’s new addition to this list comes from GameAnalytics. GameAnalytics until now has been available for iOS, Android, Windows, Unity, Unreal, etc and provides game developers with an easy to use service for getting valuable analytical data of their players. The most important part of the service is that it is completely free of cost. Tizen game developers can now make use of GameAnalytics’ SDK for Tizen and implement it into their games.

  • Smartphone App: HDR Camera take HD photos on your Tizen Devices

    Lots of new apps were added to the Tizen Store this month like games, funny apps, music and video apps, photo editing, camera apps, entertainment apps etc. Lately, we have also had many good camera apps added like InstaTags, Monograph. Sweet camera, angleCam etc.

Games for GNU/Linux

Filed under
Gaming

openSUSE Tumbleweed Is Powered by Linux Kernel 4.9.9 and Mesa 13.0.4, Update Now

Filed under
Linux
SUSE

openSUSE's Douglas DeMaio reports today, February 16, about the latest software updates and technologies that landed in the stable repositories during last week and the beginning of this one via a total of six snapshots.

Read more

A Few Windows 10 vs. Ubuntu Linux OpenGL Benchmarks With A Core i7 7700K

Filed under
Graphics/Benchmarks

This week I've published Windows 10 vs. Linux NVIDIA gaming benchmarks and a Radeon Software Windows 10 vs. RadeonSI/RADV Linux comparison with a variety of interesting games. For this third article on the topic of Windows 10 vs. Linux performance are a few Intel HD Graphics 630 benchmark results.

Read more

Top 10 FOSS legal stories in 2016

Filed under
OSS
Legal

The year 2016 resulted in several important developments that affect the FOSS ecosystem. While they are not strictly "legal developments" they are important for the community.

For one, Eben Moglen, the general counsel of the Free Software Foundation, stepped down. Eben has been a leader on FOSS legal issues since the late 1990s and has been critical to the success of the FOSS movement. The FOSS community owes him a huge debt of gratitude, and I expect that he will continue to be active in the FOSS community. The success of FOSS adoption was dramatically illustrated when Microsoft joined the Linux Foundation and summarized in the article, Open Source Won. So, Now What? in Wired magazine.

Read more

Linux/FOSS Events

Filed under
OSS
  • DebConf18 Will Be Hosted in Hsinchu, Taiwan, as First Debian Conference in Asia

    Debian developer Daniel Lange announced today that the host city of the next Debian conference, DebConf18, will be Hsinchu, a city in northern Taiwan located southwest of Taipei.

    While the developers and engineers behind the very popular Debian GNU/Linux operating system are currently preparing for DebConf17, which will take place in Montréal, Canada, between August 6-12, 2017, it looks like they've already decided which will be the next host city, but no official dates were set for the upcoming event.

  • NorNet: An Open Source Inter-Continental Internet Testbed

    With new devices and applications creating interesting use cases for IoT, smart cities, vehicle networks, mobile broadband and more, we are creating new ways to use networked technologies, and we need to be able to test these in realistic settings across locations. In his LinuxCon Europe talk, Thomas Dreibholz, Senior Research Engineer at Simula Research Laboratory talked about how they are building NorNet using open source software as an inter-continental Internet testbed for a variety of networked applications.

  • NorNet -- Building an Inter-Continental Internet Testbed Based on Open Source Software

    Thomas Dreibholz, Senior Research Engineer at Simula Research Laboratory, describes how his team is using open source software to build NorNet -- an inter-continental Internet testbed for a variety of networked applications.

  • DevConf.cz 2017

    Friday was the first day of the conference. We got up bright and early (well, maybe not bright…) and headed over to the venue. I spent a fair amount of time on Friday attending talks.

    I started with the keynote, presented by a variety of speakers representing a wide range of Red Hat's products. The keynote told a narrative of going from unboxed, racked servers to deploying code live from Eclipse to production on those servers (and all the steps in between).

    Next I attended "Generational Core - The Future of Fedora?" by Petr Sabata. Petr presented about Fedora's modular future and how Factory 2.0 fits into the picture.

  • Facebook throws an open source hackathon

    Facebook’s Boston-area outpost is in Cambridge, close to MIT – they’ve just expanded from a smaller site and annexed a whole floor of a well-kept office building near Kendall Square Station. The first thing you see when you get off the elevator is a floor-to-ceiling pattern of blue lines that are meant to spell out the words “Ship Love” (Facebook’s unofficial motto) in binary.

Servers/Networks

Filed under
Server
  • Agile and DevOps: Better together?

    Organisations across Europe believe that using an Agile methodology for software development can vastly improve the customer experience, while using DevOps can boost revenue from new sources.

    A new report commissioned by software company CA said that 67 percent of UK organisations using an Agile methodology saw an improvement in customer experience, while firms using DevOps practices report a 38 percent increase in business growth from new revenue sources.

  • Taking Control of the Programmable Network

    Digitization is changing the world. Businesses, organizations, and governments alike are harnessing the power of digitization to build trust, move faster, add greater value, and grow.

    As a result, the network is undergoing a huge change, too. This change is just as big as the move from analog to digital. It is the shift away from physical devices—hardware—to software that virtualizes device functions and supports digital innovation.

  • Mainframe revival: IBM refreshes legacy business with machine learning, Linux

    Civilization rests firmly on the mainframe. These massive computers run banking systems, weave the financial webs that hold nations together and control infrastructure at every level. Yet, these beasts must also be modernized.

OSS Leftovers

Filed under
OSS
  • Container file system from Portworx goes open source

    Portworx, a provider of container data services for DevOps, has announced that it is open-sourcing a filesystem that is purpose-built for containers: the Layer Cloning File System (LCFS). Created to encourage increased innovation in a fundamental technology that boots all containers, LCFS aims to improve the speed of downloading, booting, tearing-down, and building containers.

    LCFS operates directly on top of block devices, as opposed to two filesystems that are then merged. The filesystem also directly manages at the container image’s layer level, effectively eliminating the overhead of having a second filesystem that is later merged.

  • [Older] Baidu's deep learning framework adopts Kubernetes

    PaddlePaddle, Baidu's open source framework for deep learning, is now compatible with the Kubernetes cluster management system to allow large models to be trained anywhere Kubernetes can run.

    This doesn't simply expand the range of systems that can be used for PaddlePaddle training; it also provides end-to-end deep learning powered by both projects.

  • Announcing TensorFlow 1.0

    In just its first year, TensorFlow has helped researchers, engineers, artists, students, and many others make progress with everything from language translation to early detection of skin cancer and preventing blindness in diabetics. We're excited to see people using TensorFlow in over 6000 open-source repositories online.

  • Why is IoT Popular? Because of Open Source, Big Data, Security and SDN

    Why is everyone talking about the Internet of Things (IoT)? It's not because the IoT is a new concept -- it's not -- but rather because the IoT intersects with several other key trends in the tech world, from open source and big data to cybersecurity and software-defined networking.

  • Firefox Nightly and Wayland Builds Are Now Available for Download as Flatpaks

    About a month ago, we told you that Red Hat's desktop engineering manager Jiří Eischmann was working on packaging the Mozilla Firefox Developer Edition web browser as a Flatpak for various GNU/Linux distros supporting the sandboxing technology.

    Five weeks later, the developer wrote today a new blog post to inform the Linux community that he managed to also package the Firefox Nightly and Firefox Wayland builds as Flatpak packages for distribution on Fedora 25 and Ubuntu 16.10 (Yakkety Yak) operating systems, as well as other OSes that offer Flatpak support, of course.

  • Nightly and Wayland Builds of Firefox for Flatpak

    When I announced Firefox Developer Edition for Flatpak over a month ago, I also promised that we would not stop there and bring more options in the future. Now I can proudly announce that we provide two more variants of Firefox – Firefox Nightly and Firefox Nightly for Wayland.

  • Open Source is Safe, But Not Risk Free [Ed: Microsoft-connected propaganda and FUD monetisation firm is at it again]
  • HHVM 3.18 Released With Garbage Collection Options, Ubuntu 16.10 Support

    Facebook's team working on HHVM, their high-performance implementation of PHP and also what's used by their Hack language, is now up to version 3.18.

Leftovers: Software

Filed under
Software
  • MPV 0.24 Media Player Adds Experimental Stream Recording, X11 Pseudo HiDPI Scaling

    MPV Player, the popular fork of MPlayer/MPlayer2, is out this week with a significant feature update.

    MPV 0.24 is the new release and it comes with a number of notable additions. New to MPV 0.24 is an experimental C plug-in interface, an experimental stream recording feature, prefetching for the next playlist entry, VA-API now supports 10-bit video formats, and X11 pseudo HiDPI scaling support.

  • MPV 0.24.0 Open-Source Video Player Adds Experimental Stream Recording Feature

    MPV developer Martin Herkt released a new stable version of the popular, powerful, and open-source video player application for all supported platforms, versioned 0.24.0.

    Over 70 improvements have been implemented in MPV 0.24.0, which comes seven weeks after the release of MPV 0.23.0. There are a couple of experimental new features introduced for the player, namely a C plugin interface and a stream recording feature that can be used using the "--record-file" command-line argument.

  • Flatpak Update Enhances OpenGL Driver Support

    The latest stable update to Flatpak, the distro-agnostic, decentralised, and open-source application packaging and distribution format

  • Whatever is an Unofficial Evernote App for Linux

    Evernote is practically a by-word for being well organised and super productive — and not just in the minds of its 100 million users but among those who, like me, aspire to be.

    But with no official Evernote Linux app available it’s been left to the community to plug the productivity gap with unofficial alternatives, like NixNote, EverPad, NeverNote, and the Ubuntu Touch notes app.

  • Old Version of Skype for Linux to Live on Beyond Microsoft's March 1 Deadline

Linux and Graphics

Filed under
Graphics/Benchmarks
Linux
  • The Linux Foundation and the National Center for Women & Information Technology Release Inclusive Speaker Orientation Course for Events
  • Automotive Grade Linux Continues Rapid Growth

    Automotive Grade Linux (AGL), a collaborative open source project developing a Linux-based, open platform for the connected car, today announced that six new members have joined Automotive Grade Linux and The Linux Foundation. DrimAES joins AGL at the Silver level while ARM, Elektrobit, RealVNC, Telenav and Tuxera join AGL at the Bronze level.

    “We saw a 60% membership growth in 2016, and we expect that momentum to continue in 2017,” said Dan Cauchy, Executive Director of Automotive Grade Linux. “Our new members represent a wide group of skills and expertise, from location-based services to digital storage, which will be valuable as we continue to enhance our UCB infotainment platform and expand into other automotive applications like telematics and instrument cluster.”

  • QXL DRM Driver Picks Up Atomic Mode-Setting Support

    Gabriel Krisman Bertazi of Collabora has published a set of 14 patches today for implementing atomic mode-setting support within the QXL DRM driver.

    The QXL DRM driver as a reminder is for Red Hat's SPICE with guest virtual machines on QEMU. QXL -- presumably with Linux 4.12 -- will join Nouveau, Intel, and other DRM drivers in supporting atomic mode-setting.

  • Intel Goes Ahead & Drops i915 Driver From OpenGL 2.1 To 1.4 By Defaultv

    Intel Linux developers have partially reverted Mesa work done years ago to drop the default OpenGL behavior with the older i915 driver from exposing OpenGL 2.0+ support to now only having OpenGL 1.4 out-of-the-box.

Wickr Liberated

Filed under
OSS
  • Wickr Releases Crypto Protocol on GitHub

    Secure messaging service Wickr is opening its core cryptographic protocol to review by making the code available on GitHub. The move is a first for the company, which until now had kept its efforts proprietary.

  • Encrypted chat app Wickr opens code for public review

    Security researchers have wanted a peek at Wickr’s code since the secure messaging app launched in 2012, and now they’re finally getting that chance. Wickr is publishing its code for Wickr Professional, the subscription-based enterprise version of its free messaging app, today for public review.

  • Wickr, the encrypted messaging app, finally goes open source

    Finally, Wickr has released its core crypto code to the open source community.

    The end-to-end encrypted messaging service launched in 2012, long before Signal took off and WhatsApp rolled out encryption of its own.Yet Wickr became one of the last to publish its code to the open source community.

    The service's use of encrypted and disappearing messaging, à la Snapchat, helped to gain users' trust that their messages wouldn't be stolen, leaked, or exposed to either hackers or federal agents.

    But the company's choice to restrict access to its crypto code made it impossible for anyone to be sure that the service was free from vulnerabilities or backdoors, except for a very few select cryptographers and security auditors.

Why enterprises should embrace open source

Filed under
OSS

The techie cold war did eventually thaw with projects like MIT’s Project Athena and Stallman’s work with Emacs and GPL leading a transformation in the way people worked. Project Athena allowed all the disparate corporate systems to work together through common protocols, ultimately enabling businesses and home users the freedom to mix and match their hardware and software as they pleased.

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Google's Upspin Debuts

  • Another option for file sharing
    Existing mechanisms for file sharing are so fragmented that people waste time on multi-step copying and repackaging. With the new project Upspin, we aim to improve the situation by providing a global name space to name all your files. Given an Upspin name, a file can be shared securely, copied efficiently without "download" and "upload", and accessed by anyone with permission from anywhere with a network connection.
  • Google Developing "Upspin" Framework For Naming/Sharing Files
    Google today announced an experimental project called Upspin that's aiming for next-generation file-sharing in a secure manner.
  • Google releases open source file sharing project 'Upspin' on GitHub
    Believe it or not, in 2017, file-sharing between individuals is not a particularly easy affair. Quite frankly, I had a better experience more than a decade ago sending things to friends and family using AOL Instant Messenger. Nowadays, everything is so fragmented, that it can be hard to share. Today, Google unveils yet another way to share files. Called "Upspin," the open source project aims to make sharing easier for home users. With that said, the project does not seem particularly easy to set up or maintain. For example, it uses Unix-like directories and email addresses for permissions. While it may make sense to Google engineers, I am dubious that it will ever be widely used.
  • Google devs try to create new global namespace
    Wouldn't it be nice if there was a universal and consistent way to give names to files stored on the Internet, so they were easy to find? A universal resource locator, if you like? The problem is that URLs have been clunkified, so Upspin, an experimental project from some Google engineers, offers an easier model: identifying files to users and paths, and letting the creator set access privileges.

RPi-friendly home automation kit adds voice recognition support

Following its successful Kickstarter campaign for a standalone Matrix home automation and surveillance hub, and subsequent release of an FPGA-driven Matrix Creator daughter board for use with the Raspberry Pi, Matrix Labs today launched a “Matrix Voice” board on Indiegogo. The baseline board, currently available at early-bird pricing of $45, has an array of 7 microphones surrounding a ring of 18 software-controlled RGBW LEDs. A slightly pricier model includes an MCU-controlled WiFi/Bluetooth ESP32 wireless module. Read more

The Year Of Linux On Everything But The Desktop

The War on Linux goes back to Bill Gates, then CEO of Microsoft, in an “open letter to hobbyists” published in a newsletter in 1976. Even though Linux wouldn’t be born until 1991, Gates’ burgeoning software company – itself years away from releasing its first operating system – already felt the threat of open source software. We know Gates today as a kindly billionaire who’s joining us in the fight against everything from disease to income inequality, but there was a time when Gates was the bad guy of the computing world. Microsoft released its Windows operating system in 1985. At the time, its main competition was Apple and Unix-like systems. BSD was the dominant open source Unix clone then – it marks its 40th birthday this year, in fact – and Microsoft fired barrages of legal challenges to BSD just like it eventually would against Linux. Meanwhile Apple sued Microsoft over its interface, in the infamous “Look and Feel” lawsuit, and Microsoft’s reign would forever be challenged. Eventually Microsoft would be tried in both the US and the UK for antitrust, which is a government regulation against corporate monopolies. Even though it lost both suits, Microsoft simply paid the fine out of its bottomless pockets and kept right at it. Read more

Digital audio and video editing in GNU/Linux

  • Linux Digital Audio Workstation Roundup
    In the world of home studio recording, the digital audio workstation is one of the most important tools of the trade. Digital audio workstations are used to record audio and MIDI data into patterns or tracks. This information is then typically mixed down into songs or albums. In the Linux ecosystem, there is no shortage of Digital audio workstations to chose from. Whether you wish to create minimalist techno or full orchestral pieces, chances are there is an application that has you covered. In this article, we will take a brief look into several of these applications and discuss their strengths and weaknesses. I will try to provide a fair evaluation of the DAWs presented here but at the end of the day, I urge you to try a few of these applications and to form an opinion of your own.
  • Shotcut Video Editor Available As A Snap Package [Quick Update]
    Shotcut is a free, open source Qt5 video editor developed on the MLT Multimedia Framework (it's developed by the same author as MLT), available for Linux, Windows and Mac. Under the hood, Shotcut uses FFmpeg, so it supports many audio, video and image formats, along with screen, webcam and audio capture. The application doesn't require importing files, thanks to its native timeline editing. Other features worth mentioning are multitrack timeline with thumbnails and waveforms, 4k resolution support, video effects, as well as a flexible UI with dockable panels.
  • Simple Screen Recorder Is Now Available as a Snap App
    Simple Screen Recorder, a popular screen recording app for Linux desktops, is now available to install as a Snap app from the Ubuntu Store.