Language Selection

English French German Italian Portuguese Spanish

About Tux Machines

Tuesday, 21 Nov 17 - Tux Machines is a community-driven public service/news site which has been around for over a decade and primarily focuses on GNU/LinuxSubscribe now Syndicate content

Search This Site

Quick Roundup

Type Title Author Repliessort icon Last Post
Story Mandrakesoft and Conectiva Merger srlinuxx 11/04/2005 - 3:20am
Story Ebay Sued srlinuxx 11/04/2005 - 3:20am
Story FBI Being Spoofed in Email srlinuxx 11/04/2005 - 3:19am
Story Nvidia to release 75 series driver srlinuxx 11/04/2005 - 3:19am
Story NVIDIA Unleashes 6800 Mobile GPU srlinuxx 11/04/2005 - 3:18am
Story Newest Vulnerabilities in php apps srlinuxx 11/04/2005 - 3:18am
Story aKademy 2005 Logo Contest Launched srlinuxx 11/04/2005 - 6:29am
Story SCO and The Titanic srlinuxx 11/04/2005 - 4:28am
Story IBM backs open-source Web software srlinuxx 11/04/2005 - 4:27am
Story Who will take home the Gold? srlinuxx 11/04/2005 - 4:25am

Linux 4.13.13, 4.9.62, 4.4.98 and 3.18.81

Filed under
Linux

Open Source or Open Standards? (Yes!) The Future has Arrived

Filed under
OSS

Once upon a time – oh, say fifteen years ago – the terms open standards and open source software (OSS) were often used interchangeably. Not because they were the same thing, but because many people didn’t really know what either really was, let alone the differences between them. That was unfortunate, because at that time the two had little in common, and were developed for very different purposes.

Recently, many people (especially OSS developers) have begun referring to the software they develop as “a standard.” This time around they’re a lot closer to being right.

So, what’s going on here? And is it a good thing?

Read more

Debian/Ubuntu Derivatives: Elive 2.9.16, Deepin 15.5, Pop!_OS

Filed under
Debian
Ubuntu
  • Elive 2.9.16 beta released

    The Elive Team is proud to announce the release of the beta version 2.9.16
    This new version includes:

    Performance is now almost twice as responsive and smoother, videos also plays faster
    Designs improved buttons, window borders, and faster effects
    Desktop automatic scaling, font selection and sizing based on your screen, organization of elements are more accessible too
    Installer has a lot of improvements, fixes, fine-tuning and options to choice for the installed system, included privative drivers like Nvidia / Ati

  • Deepin 15.5 Linux OS Promises New Security Features, Extra Desktop Functionality

    The developers of the Deepin Linux operating system announced today the availability of the first beta release of Deepin 15.5, the next maintenance update to the stable series.

    Continuing to provide the Linux community with one of the most beautiful, safe, reliable, and easy to use computer operating system, Deepin 15.5 entered beta today with a bunch of new security features, such as support for importing and exporting VPN (Virtual Private Network) profiles and an application proxy function.

    The application proxy function works by allowing the user to open a certain program that requires an Internet connection through the system-wide, default proxy server. All you have to do is to right-click on an app's shortcut and choose the new "Open by proxy" option from the context menu.

  • Pop!_OS Has Arrived: How Does It Compare to Ubuntu?

    System76 is one of the most well-known hardware companies in the free and open source software world. That’s not to say the brand is by any means a household name. Nonetheless, System76 has been selling computers that run Ubuntu for over a decade. That’s why the company made news when it announced that it would provide its own Linux-based operating system, Pop!_OS.

    In the past few weeks, the first official release of Pop!_OS became available for download. Now it’s shipping as an option on new computers from System76. Should you check it out?

Programming: Embedded OpenJDK, Kanban Board and More

Filed under
Development
  • Azul Systems Affirms Commitment to Open Source Embedded Java

    Azul will Provide Continued Support for Embedded builds of OpenJDK on x86, Arm and PowerPC Processors

  • How to create better documentation with a kanban board

    If you're working on documentation, a website, or other user-facing content, it's helpful to know what users expect to find—both the information they want and how the information is organized and structured. After all, great content isn't very useful if people can't find what they're looking for.

    Card sorting is a simple and effective way to gather input from users about what they expect from menu interfaces and pages. The simplest implementation is to label a stack of index cards with the sections you plan to include in your website or documentation and ask users to sort the cards in the way they would look for the information. Variations include letting people write their own menu headers or content elements.

  • Uber Open-Sources Its AI Programming Language, Encourages Autonomous Car Development

    Uber's self-driving car ambitions have been an open secret surrounding the company for some time now. If the ride share company's ambitions are met, someday when you hail a ride using its app it'll be an autonomous car that shows instead of a human looking to supplement his income. The company has been actively recruiting engineering talent toward its autonomous car program – even running into some legal trouble with Google along the way over accusations of poaching talent and technology.

  • 25 Pitfalls When Learning to Program
  • DevOps: How to avoid project death by hand-off

    There's a notion in DevOps that our work begins when we understand the strategic business goals that we're trying to meet, then we deliver on them. This is typically a two-step process where one team creates goals, then hands them off to another team to implement them.

OSS: Open Source Strategy, Pentagon, Banking, India

Filed under
OSS
  • Why and How to Set an Open Source Strategy

    Open source projects are generally started as a way to scratch one’s itch — and frankly that’s one of its greatest attributes. Getting code down provides a tangible method to express an idea, showcase a need, and solve a problem. It avoids over thinking and getting a project stuck in analysis-paralysis, letting the project pragmatically solve the problem at hand.

    Next, a project starts to scale up and gets many varied users and contributions, with plenty of opinions along the way. That leads to the next big challenge — how does a project start to build a strategic vision? In this article, I’ll describe how to walk through, measure, and define strategies collaboratively, in a community.

    Strategy may seem like a buzzword of the corporate world rather something that an open source community would embrace, so I suggest stripping away the negative actions that are sometimes associated with this word (e.g., staff reductions, discontinuations, office closures). Strategy done right isn’t a tool to justify unfortunate actions but to help show focus and where each community member can contribute.

  • Pentagon spreads the open source

    The US military is set to charge ahead into open source next year after an amendment to the National Defense Authorisation Act for Fiscal Year 2018.

    The amendment introduced by Sen. Mike Rounds (R-SD) and co-sponsored by Sen. Elizabeth Warren (D-MA) will mean that the Pentagon will be going open source.

  • Open Banking Starts With Opening Bank Culture
  • Banks are increasingly turning to open source projects. Here's why.
  • Embracing Open Source will help enterprises stay ahead of the AI game

    Kingsley Wood, Director, Infrastructure Business Group, Asia Pacific – Red Hat, said, “The interesting thing about the open source approach is that many people from the community can contribute a lot of fresh ideas, which can help identify problems quicker.”

  • MNCs & product cos are leading the open source movement in India

    engaluru: Contributing code to the open source world is regarded increasingly as a badge of honour. Yet, Indian IT services companies lag in embracing the open source code culture, shows data from open source code repository GitHub.

    Among GitHub's 75,000 engineers from India, IT services & ITES (IT enabled services) companies have the highest numbers on the platform, but most of the open source contributions were made by employees working for technology product companies and MNCs in India.

    GitHub is a platform where developers host and review codes, manage projects, and even build open source software along with other community members. Open source, which refers to software whose source code (the medium in which programmers create and modify software) is freely available on the internet, has become a major trend in software development today. It stands in contrast to proprietary commercial software whose source code is usually a closely guarded secret.

Security: Planes, USB, and Kali Linux

  • How can airlines stop hackers pwning planes over the air? And don't say 'regular patches'

    At least some commercial aircraft are vulnerable to wireless hacking, a US Department of Homeland Security official has admitted.

    A plane was compromised as it sat on the tarmac at a New Jersey airport by a team of boffins from the worlds of government, industry and academia, we're told. During the hack – the details of which are classified – experts accessed systems on the Boeing 757 via radio-frequency communications.

    “We got the airplane on September 19, 2016. Two days later, I was successful in accomplishing a remote, non-cooperative, penetration,” said Robert Hickey, aviation program manager within the cyber-security division of the DHS's science and technology directorate, while speaking at the CyberSat Summit in Virginia earlier this month.

  • Google researcher discovers 14 Linux USB vulnerabilities
  • How a cloud-based Kali Linux system helps with pen testing

    More substantial and more security minded businesses often also perform regular penetration tests to identify vulnerabilities in their systems that go beyond the reach of standard vulnerability scanners.

    When it comes to penetration testing, Offensive Security's Kali Linux is one of the most widely used tool sets in the industry. It is a free, Debian-based Linux distribution that contains hundreds of specific penetration testing tools.

FOSS in Networks

Filed under
OSS
  • Linux Foundation’s Joshipura says ONAP is now the de facto open networking platform

    Since ECOMP and Open O merged earlier this year to create Open Networking Automation Platform (ONAP), the Linux Foundation is seeing membership and interest continue to accelerate to automate more network functions via SDN and NFV.

    Arpit Joshipura, general manager of networking and orchestration for The Linux Foundation, told attendees during this year’s MEF 17 event that ONAP has become widely accepted.

  • Türk Telekom Joins the Open Network Automation Platform (ONAP) Project As Platinum Member
  • Navigating the Open Source Landscape

    Traditionally, the telecom industry was driven by large standards bodies such as 3GPP, ATIS (Alliance for Telecommunications Industry Solutions), the ITU (International Telecommunications Union), ETSI (European Telecommunications Standards Institute), which defined standards for everything in telecom right down to the telephone poles. These standards bodies have had dedicated individuals from across the industry working together for years to develop industry standards that are comprehensive to meet stringent requirements across many use cases.

  • ETSI Open Source MANO Group Unveils Release 3.0

    ETSI Open Source MANO group (ETSI OSM) announces the general availability of OSM Release THREE, keeping the pace of a release every 6 months. This release includes a large set of new capabilities as well as numerous enhancements in terms of scalability, performance, resiliency, security and user experience that facilitate its adoption in production environments.

    “OSM Release THREE provides a highly functional and reliable component for NFV Orchestration that enables all industry players to accelerate their deployment plans, with no need to change their target architectures for NFV infrastructure or OSS transformation.” declares Francisco-Javier Ramón, chairman of ETSI OSM group.

  • Euro telco standards wonks publish third iteration of open source orchestrator

    The European Telecommunications Standards Institute (ETSI) has published the third release of OSM, its open source management and orchestration (MANO) stack for network function virtualisation.

  • SDxCentral Releases 2017 Open Source in Networking Report

    Networking has been transformed with the advent of SDN (software-defined networking) and NFV (network functions virtualizations). What has traditionally been a closed and proprietary environment dominated by a few vendors has opened up to innovation and a much more rapid pace of development than in past decades.

Graphics: OpenGL and VC5

Filed under
Graphics/Benchmarks
  • Crunch Texture Compression Showing Off Promising Results For Unity

    The Crunch texture compression library developed by former Valve Linux/OpenGL engineer Rich Geldreich who cofounded the Binomial consulting firm is making much progress with showing off impressive compression capabilities for game engines.

    Unity 3D, which formerly employed Geldreich post-Valve, is finding encouraging results for this texture compression library with the Unity 2017.3 game engine that's now in beta. Their updated Crunch library in Unity 2017.3 is compressing DXT textures up to 2.5x faster while having about a 10% better compression ratio. Additionally, the latest Crunch is now able to handle more texture formats as well, including for iOS and Android with ETC textures.

  • VC4 & VC5 Drivers Get More Fixes Ahead Of The Holidays

    Eric Anholt at Broadcom has continued his spree of bringing up the next-gen VC5 Linux graphics driver stack while also continuing to maintain and improve upon the VC4 driver most commonly associated as being the open-source GPU driver option for the Raspberry Pi.

  • Igalia Posts Initial OpenGL SPIR-V Patches For Mesa, Intel i965

    Spanish development outfit Igalia has posted their initial work on wiring up the OpenGL 4.6 ARB_gl_spirv and ARB_spirv_extensions into core Mesa and the i965 OpenGL driver.

KDE and GNOME News

Filed under
KDE
GNOME
  • KDevelop 5.2 Open-Source IDE Released with Improved C++, PHP and Python Support

    KDevelop, the well-known open-source and cross-platform IDE (Integrated Development Environment) for GNU/Linux and Microsoft Windows operating system, has been updated recently to version 5.2.

    Almost half a year in the making, KDevelop 5.2 is a major release that introduces more analyzer plugins to the Analyzer menu entry implemented in the previous release, KDevelop 5.1. These include Heaptrack, a heap memory profiler for Linux apps written in C/C++ and Cppcheck, a popular static analyzer for the C++ programming language, which can be used from inside KDevelop by default.

  • Kubuntu Most Wanted

    Kubuntu Cafe Live, is our new community show. This new format show is styled using a magazine format. We created lots of space for community involvement, breaking the show into multiple segments, and we want to get you involved. We are looking for Presenters, Trainers, Writers and Hosts.

  • GNOME 3.27.2 RELEASED

    GNOME 3.27.2, the second unstable release in the 3.28 development cycle, is now available.

    The porting of more modules to meson continues (which is great!), but It's still causing some problems for some modules. See the build failures below, along with a short list of other build errors.

  • GNOME 3.27.2 Released: More Meson Porting, Nautilus Starring Files

    GNOME 3.27.2 is now available as the second development release in the road to next March's GNOME 3.28 desktop stable update.

  • Epiphany 3.27.2 Improves GNOME Web Apps, Firefox Sync

    Epiphany 3.27.2 is now available as the latest web browser release in the road to next year's GNOME 3.28 desktop.

    One of the big changes with this Epiphany browser development release is restructuring how "web apps" are handled. They are now treated more like "silos, rather than prisons." This bug report describes more of the reworking of these GNOME Web Apps. The updated implementation allows these web applications to support tabs, allowing external links, button changes, and more.

These are the 12 Potential LibreOffice Mascots

Filed under
LibO

If you have anything approaching a memory you may recall that The Document Foundation is on the hunt for a LibreOffice mascot. Ring any bells?

Read more

Features for Linux 4.15 and 4.14 Roundup

Filed under
Linux

Games Leftovers

Filed under
Gaming

Lunera turns lights into an “ambient cloud” of distributed Linux servers

Filed under
Linux

The Internet of Things is a powerful concept, especially in the industrial world—but it's also full of potential security disasters and hidden computing and networking costs. But what if all you had to do to create a secure network of distributed Linux systems—complete with location awareness and custom application support capable of supporting location-based applications like asset tracking, robotic delivery, and "smart rooms"—was to change the lightbulbs?

Read more

Portable, open source retro game player runs Linux and Arduino

Filed under
Linux
OSS

Clockwork’s hackable “GameShell” retro game console runs Linux on a quad -A7 SoC, and offers a 2.7-inch LCD, gaming controls, GPIO, and Arduino links.

Hangzhou, China based Clockwork has surpassed its Kickstarter funding goal for a handheld GameShell device that is billed as “the world’s first modular, portable game console with a GNU/LINUX embedded operating system.” The GameShell is available in kit form through Dec. 19 in identical Kickstarter early bird packages ranging from $89 to $119, with shipments due in April 2018.

Read more

Why serverless computing makes Linux more relevant than ever

Filed under
Linux

Not so the OS vendors. Red Hat, SUSE, and others offer 10-year support life-cycles for patching and supporting their enterprise OSes. To accomplish this they have to invest over half of their engineering resources on old technology. This simply isn't the business model for the clouds, and likely won't become such for many years.

Read more

Kodi 17 "Krypton" Media Center Gets Its Last Update, Kodi 18 "Leia" Coming Next

Filed under
Movies

Kodi 17.6 has been released today as the last minor bugfix update to the Krypton series, bringing a fix for a crash that could occur in the Controller dialog, updates the standard scrapers to their lastest versions available at the moment of writing, as well as a fix for some connection issues that could occur with the internal web server.

It also fixes a crash when the peripheral joystick add-on is disabled, and probably other minor issues that haven't been added to today's release notes, which mention the fact that from now on the upcoming Kodi 18 "Leia" series will be put in the spotlight and will receive more honorable mentions during its development cycle.

Read more

The Road to the GNOME 3.28 Desktop Environment Continues, Second Snapshot Is Out

Filed under
GNOME

The GNOME 3.27.2 unstable snapshot was announced a few moments ago by Tristan Van Berkom of the GNOME Release Team via an email announcement, which informs us that several more components of the GNOME Stack have been ported to the Meson build system, though some of them are failing to build for now.

These include the GNOME Chess, GNOME Documents, GNOME Boxes, GNOME Terminal, GNOME Software, GNOME System Monitor, and fwupd. However, GNOME 3.27.2 includes many updated apps, such as the recently released NetworkManager 1.10.0, and brings various improvements to the Epiphany web browser and other apps.

Read more

Syndicate content

More in Tux Machines

Tizen News

OSS Leftovers

  • How Open Source Tech Helps Feds Solve Workforce Turnover Issues
    Just as a mainframe from decades ago might be ready for retirement, the IT staff who originally procured and installed that system might also be preparing for a new phase in their lives. It’s up to the current and next generation of government IT employees to prepare for that eventuality, but there are indications they may not be ready, despite evidence that older IT professionals are retiring or will soon be leaving their positions. Unfortunately, a skills gap exists even among younger generation IT workers. Agencies are scrambling to find personnel with expertise in cloud service management, cybersecurity, technical architecture and legacy technologies, such as common business-oriented language (COBOL) and mainframes, among other areas. At the same time that many workers are getting ready to retire, leaving behind a wealth of knowledge, many younger IT professionals are struggling to gain the knowledge they will need to take their agencies into the future.
  • Introducing Fn: “Serverless must be open, community-driven, and cloud-neutral”
    Fn, a new serverless open source project was announced at this year’s JavaOne. There’s no risk of cloud lock-in and you can write functions in your favorite programming language. “You can make anything, including existing libraries, into a function by packaging it in a Docker container.” We invited Bob Quillin, VP for the Oracle Container Group to talk about Fn, its best features, next milestones and more.
  • Debian seminar in Yokohama, 2017/11/18
    I had attended to Tokyo area debian seminar #157. The day’s special guest is Chris Lamb, the Debian Project Leader in 2017. He had attended to Open Compliance Summit, so we invited him as our guest.
  • Overclock Labs bets on Kubernetes to help companies automate their cloud infrastructure
    Overclock Labs wants to make it easier for developers to deploy and manage their applications across clouds. To do so, the company is building tools to automate distributed cloud infrastructure and, unsurprisingly, it is betting on containers — and specifically the Kubernetes container orchestration tools — to do this. Today, Overclock Labs, which was founded two years ago, is coming out of stealth and announcing that it raised a $1.3 million seed round from a number of Silicon Valley angel investors and CrunchFund — the fund that shares a bit of its name and history with TechCrunch but is otherwise completely unaffiliated with the blog you are currently reading.
  • MariaDB Energizes the Data Warehouse with Open Source Analytics Solution
    MariaDB® Corporation, the company behind the fastest growing open source database, today announced new product enhancements to MariaDB AX, delivering a modern approach to data warehousing that enables customers to easily perform fast and scalable analytics with better price performance over proprietary solutions. MariaDB AX expands the highly successful MariaDB Server, creating a solution that enables high performance analytics with distributed storage and parallel processing, and that scales with existing commodity hardware on premises or across any cloud platform. With MariaDB AX, data across every facet of the business is transformed into meaningful and actionable results.
  • AT&T Wants White Box Routers with an Open Operating System [Ed: AT&T wants to openwash its surveillance equipment]
    AT&T says it’s not enough to deploy white box hardware and to orchestrate its networks with the Open Network Automation Platform (ONAP) software. “Each individual machine also needs its own operating system,” writes Chris Rice, senior vice president of AT&T Labs, Domain 2.0 Architecture, in a blog post. To that end, AT&T announced its newest effort — the Open Architecture for a Disaggregated Network Operating System (dNOS).
  • Intel Lands Support For Vector Neural Network Instructions In LLVM
  • p2k17 Hackathon report: Antoine Jacoutot on ports+packages progress
  • GCC 8 Feature Development Is Over
    Feature development on the GCC 8 compiler is over with it now entering stage three of its development process. SUSE's Richard Biener announced minutes ago that GCC 8 entered stage three development, meaning only general bug fixing and documentation updates are permitted.
  • 2018 Is The Year For Open Source Software For The Pentagon
  • Open-source defenders turn on each other in 'bizarre' trademark fight sparked by GPL fall out
    Two organizations founded to help and support developers of free and open-source software have locked horns in public, betraying a long-running quarrel rumbling mostly behind the scenes. On one side, the Software Freedom Law Center, which today seeks to resolve licensing disputes amicably. On the other, the Software Freedom Conservancy, which takes a relatively harder line against the noncompliance of licensing terms. The battleground: the, er, US Patent and Trademark Office. The law center has demanded the cancellation of a trademark held by the conservancy.
  • Open Source Underwater Glider: An Interview with Alex Williams, Grand Prize Winner
    Alex Williams pulled off an incredible engineering project. He developed an Autonomous Underwater Vehicle (AUV) which uses a buoyancy engine rather than propellers as its propulsion mechanism and made the entire project Open Source and Open Hardware.

Programming Leftovers

Security: Linux, Free Software Principles, Microsoft and Intel

  • Some 'security people are f*cking morons' says Linus Torvalds
    Linux overlord Linus Torvalds has offered some very choice words about different approaches security, during a discussion about whitelisting features proposed for version 4.15 of the Linux kernel. Torvalds' ire was directed at open software aficionado and member of Google's Pixel security team Kees Cook, who he has previously accused of idiocy. Cook earned this round of shoutiness after he posted a request to “Please pull these hardened usercopy changes for v4.15-rc1.”
  • Free Software Principles
    Ten thousand dollars is more than $3,000, so the motives don't add up for me. Hutchins may or may not have written some code, and that code may or may not have been used to commit a crime. Tech-literate people, such as the readers of Linux Magazine, understand the difference between creating a work and using it to commit a crime, but most of the media coverage – in the UK, at least – has been desperate to follow the paradigm of building a man up only to gleefully knock him down. Even his achievement of stopping WannaCry is decried as "accidental," a word full of self-deprecating charm when used by Hutchins, but which simply sounds malicious in the hands of the Daily Mail and The Telegraph.
  • New warning over back door in Linux
    Researchers working at Russian cyber security firm Dr Web claim to have found a new vulnerability that enables remote attackers to crack Linux installations virtually unnoticed. According to the anti-malware company, cyber criminals are getting into the popular open-source operating system via a new backdoor. This, they say, is "indirect evidence" that cyber criminals are showing an increasing interest in targeting Linux and the applications it powers. The trojan, which it's calling Linux.BackDoor.Hook.1, targets the library libz primarily. It offers compression and extraction capabilities for a plethora of Linux-based programmes.
  • IN CHATLOGS, CELEBRATED HACKER AND ACTIVIST CONFESSES COUNTLESS SEXUAL ASSAULTS
  • Bipartisan Harvard panel recommends hacking [sic] safeguards for elections
     

    The guidelines are intended to reduce risks in low-budget local races as well as the high-stakes Congressional midterm contests next year. Though most of the suggestions cost little or nothing to implement and will strike security professionals as common sense, notorious attacks including the leak of the emails of Hillary Clinton’s campaign chair, John Podesta, have succeeded because basic security practices were not followed.  

  • Intel Chip Flaws Leave Millions of Devices Exposed
     

    On Monday, the chipmaker released a security advisory that lists new vulnerabilities in ME, as well as bugs in the remote server management tool Server Platform Services, and Intel’s hardware authentication tool Trusted Execution Engine. Intel found the vulnerabilities after conducting a security audit spurred by recent research. It has also published a Detection Tool so Windows and Linux administrators can check their systems to see if they're exposed.