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Thursday, 19 Jul 18 - Tux Machines is a community-driven public service/news site which has been around for over a decade and primarily focuses on GNU/LinuxSubscribe now Syndicate content

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Quick Roundup

Type Title Author Replies Last Postsort icon
Story Hollywood Studios File New Round of Web Lawsuits srlinuxx 1 02/03/2005 - 12:37am
Story Review: SimplyMEPIS 3.3 Linux srlinuxx 1 02/03/2005 - 12:39am
Story Cannabis 'doubles mental health risk' srlinuxx 3 02/03/2005 - 6:31am
Story Invisibility Shields Planned srlinuxx 2 02/03/2005 - 5:21pm
Story Illicit drug sales booming online srlinuxx 2 02/03/2005 - 5:24pm
Story Half-Life 2 sweeps Bafta awards srlinuxx 2 02/03/2005 - 11:48pm
Story KDE's FOSDEM report srlinuxx 03/03/2005 - 5:06am
Story AMD's Latest Stunt srlinuxx 03/03/2005 - 5:14am
Poll I think polls srlinuxx 2 03/03/2005 - 10:20am
Story Court Overturns Eolas Browser Judgment Against Microsoft srlinuxx 03/03/2005 - 3:42pm

Linux Foundation and Linux Development

  • Linux Foundation launches LF Energy open source platform

    Launched with support from Europe’s biggest transmission power systems provider and other organizations, LF Energy aims to streamline everything from system operator smart assistants to smart grid control software. It will serve as an umbrella organization that supports collaboration among vendors in the energy sector to advance information and communication technologies (ICT) that impact the energy balance and brings about economic value.

  • FPGA Device Feature List Framework Coming For Linux 4.19

    There's already a new framework coming to Linux 4.19 in the form of Google's Gasket while queued this week is now another new framework: the FPGA Device Feature List.

  • AMDGPU Firmware Updated From 18.20, Vega M Blobs Added

    The latest AMDGPU firmware/microcode binary images for Radeon GPUs have landed in the Linux-Firmware Git tree.

    Hitting linux-firmware.git minutes ago was the latest batch of AMDGPU firmware files from Bonaire and Hawaii up through Vega 10, Polaris, and Raven hardware. The updated firmware images are the same as what AMD recently shipped with the Radeon Software 18.20 hybrid driver package. No change-logs of what is different about these updated firmware images are currently available, but most of the time it's mostly routine and mundane fixes/updates.

  • Nvidia 390.77 Linux Graphics Driver Improves Compatibility with Latest Kernels

    Nvidia released a new version of its long-lived proprietary display driver for GNU/Linux, FreeBSD, and Solaris systems to add compatibility with recent Linux kernels and fix various bugs.

    While not a major release, the Nvidia 390.77 proprietary graphics driver brings better compatibility with the latest Linux kernels. However, Nvidia didn't mention if it's now possible to compile its proprietary display drivers with the upcoming Linux 4.18 kernel series or just with the recent Linux 4.17 point releases.

    In addition to improving compatibility with recent Linux kernels, the Nvidia 390.77 proprietary display driver for Linux-based operating systems addresses a random hang issue that could occur for some users when running Vulkan apps in full-screen mode and flipping was allowed.

Ballerina reinvents cloud-native programming

Filed under
Development

Ballerina has been inspired by Java, Go, C, C++, Rust, Haskell, Kotlin, Dart, TypeScript, JavaScript, Swift, and other languages. It is an open source project, distributed under the Apache 2.0 license, and you can find its source code in the project's GitHub repository.

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Games: Stranded Deep, Ion Maiden and More

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Gaming

Stable kernels 4.17.7, 4.14.56, 4.9.113 and 4.4.141

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Linux

Open-spec NAS SBC with 4x SATA 3.0 ports relaunches

Filed under
Linux

Kobol has relaunched its open-spec “Helios4” NAS SBC and fanned system. The Helios4 runs Debian on a Marvell Armada 388 SoC with 2GB ECC RAM and offers 1x GbE, 2x USB 3.0, and 4x SATA 3.0 ports for up to 48TB.

In May 2017, Singapore-based startup Kobol attempted to launch its open-spec Helios4 SBC and fan-equipped system for network attached storage (NAS) on Kickstarter. A total of 337 backers ponied up $74K for the Helios4, which also supports media streaming and file sharing. Kobol fell short of its $110K funding goal, but it fulfilled the last of its KS orders in January. The company is now running its own funding campaign to manufacture a second 500-unit batch.

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Security Leftovers

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Security

Cutelyst 2.5.0 released

Filed under
KDE

Cutelyst a C++ web framework based on Qt got a new release. This release has some important bug fixes so it’s really recommended to upgrade to it.

Most of this release fixes came form a side project I started called Cloudlyst, I did some work for the NextCloud client, and due that I became interested into how WebDAV protocol works, so Cloudlyst is a server implementation of WebDAV, it also passes all litmus tests. WebDAV protocol makes heavy use of REST concept, and although it uses XML instead of JSON it’s actually a good choice since XML can be parsed progressively which is important for large directories.

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Open Source at 20

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OSS

Open source software has been around for a long time. But calling it open source only began in 1998. Here's some history:

Christine Peterson came up with the term "open source software" in 1997 and (as she reports at that link) a collection of like-minded geeks decided on February 3, 1998 to get behind it in a big way. Eric S. Raymond became the lead evangelist when he published Goodbye, "free software"; hello, "open source" on February 8th. Bruce Perens led creating the Open Source Initiative later that month. Here at Linux Journal, we were all over it from the start as well. (Here's one example.)

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Lubuntu 18.10 May Support 32-Bit PCs If There's Demand, Here's How You Can Help

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Ubuntu

After it was decided earlier this year when the development of the next Lubuntu release, 18.10, kicked off that 32-bit installations will be dropped, Lubuntu developer Simon Quigley informs us that the team behind the lightweight GNU/Linux distribution wants to give 32-bit support one more chance if there's still demand from the community.

Starting with the upcoming Ubuntu 18.10 (Cosmic Cuttlefish) release, which is currently scheduled for an October 18, 2018, release, the official flavors won't be shipping with 32-bit installation images, except Lubuntu if users are interested in helping testing and 32-bit (i386) ISOs. Otherwise, Lubuntu 18.10 will not ship with 32-bit installation images.

Read more

Also: Lubuntu Needs Help Testing For 32-bit x86 Support To Continue

today's leftovers

Filed under
Misc

Games: Atari VCS Console, Humble Store and TUNG (The Ultimate Nerd Game)

Filed under
Gaming
  • Atari VCS Console Runs a Custom Linux Distro Called “AtariOS”

    Following criticism of its mediocre internal makeup the Ataris VCS console will now ship with 8GB RAM by default, up from the 4GB proposed during the funding push.

    It’s a decent increase in memory that should help the system cope better with more intensive indie games (don’t expect AAA titles to play nicely on the machine with the middling AMD Bristol Ridge APU).

  • Humble Store is doing a 'Pixel Perfect Platformers Sale' and it has some top Linux games for cheap

    For those of you who love your platformers, regardless of them being 2D, 3D, puzzle or action adventures there's bound to be something for the bored Linux gamer in the Humble Store Pixel Perfect Platformers Sale.

  • TUNG (The Ultimate Nerd Game) made me realise how stupid I really am

    The Ultimate Nerd Game or TUNG for short, is a first-person sandbox game about building intricate machines and it made me feel so very dumb.

    If you loved Minecraft's Redstone circuits or anything remotely similar, this is probably a free game you're going to love. For me, it was an exercise in frying my brain like it's in a microwave.

OSS Leftovers

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OSS
  • Pharmaceutical industry gets first open source platform for Level 4 serialization

    Pharmaceutical companies today for the first time have an open source alternative for level 4 serialization with the launch of QU4RTET, a platform that provides them with new flexibility, transparency and affordability as they comply with global drug anti-counterfeiting laws.

  • Kontron Uses Open Source to Move Beyond Bare Metal

    Kontron, a company known for its embedded computing technology, is leveraging virtualization and open source to become a direct supplier to large service providers, promising to integrate hardware and operating system software with best-of-breed virtual network functions.

    That new sales strategy has evolved to support containers, particularly as they fit at the edge of the network, which for Kontron AG is the cell tower. In May, Kontron announced that its integrated SYMKLOUD open source platform now supports the latest versions of OpenStack for virtual machines and bare metal, as well as Kubernetes v1.10 for Docker and containers, via its distribution partnership with Canonical.

  • Open Source Expands In Finance With The FINOS Platform
  • Global Open Source Services Market Forecast to 2025 Published by Marketresearchnest
  • Synopsys ARC HS4x Processors Now Supported By GCC

    The GCC 8 compiler brought the Synopsys ARC CPU target while for the GCC 9 release is going to be support for the company's HS4x processors.

    Merged today to mainline GCC is support for the HS4x CPUs within the ARC target. Adding this newer generation of ARC processors to the GNU Compiler Collection code-base was just a few hundred lines of code with building off the existing target code.

  • GPL Cooperation Commitment gets more support for open source licensing

    Red Hat has announced its open source license enforcement initiative is making new strides. As part of the GPL Cooperation Commitment, 14 new companies have joined the effort to promote greater predictability for GPLv2 and LGPLv2.x licenses.

    “Through this initiative, we hope ultimately to increase participation in the use and development of open source software by helping to ensure that enforcement, when it takes place, is fair and predictable,” according to the commitment’s website.

  • The Global IP Exchange: Human ingenuity and open source technology

    He said: “Customers do increasingly care about open source, and if you don’t comply you are at risk of upsetting authors, as well as litigation and injunctions.”

    “If you’re just distributing internally, then you’re fine, but as soon as it leaves your company, then you’ve triggered an obligation.”

    For those who don’t comply, he warned that either the licensor, or the Free Software Foundation will find out.

  • How to Setup Python Virtual Environment on Ubuntu 18.04

    Python is a versatile programming language that can be used for many different programming projects(Web - Mobile - Desktop).

    Easy to set up, and written in a relatively straightforward style with immediate feedback on errors, Python is a great choice for beginners and experienced developers alike. Python 3 is the most current version of the language and is considered to be the future of Python.

    This article will guide you through installing Python 3 on your local Linux machine and setting up a programming virtual environment via the command line. This article will explicitly cover the installation procedures for Ubuntu 18.04, but the general principles apply to any other distribution of Debian Linux.

  • How expensive is globbing for sources in large projects

    Since we have the measurement script, let's use it for something more interesting. Modules are an upcoming C++ feature to increase build times and a ton of other coolness depending on who you ask. The current specification works by having a kind of "module export declaration" at the beginning of source files. The idea is that you first compile those to generate a sort of a module declaration file and then you can start the actual compilation that uses said files.

    If you thought "waitaminute, that sounds exactly like how FORTRAN is compiled", you are correct. Because of this it has the same problem that you can't compile source files in an arbitrary order, but instead you must first somehow scan them to find out the interdependencies between source (not header) files. In practice what this means is that instead of single-phase compilation all files must be processed twice. All scan operations must be done before any compilation jobs can start because otherwise you might start to compile a file before its dependencies are fully processed.

    The scanning can be done in one of two ways. Either the build system scans the sources meaning it needs to understand the syntax of source files or the compiler can be invoked in a special preprocessing mode. Note that build systems such as Ninja do not do any such operations by themselves but instead always invoke external processes to do their work.

  • Security updates for Monday

Software: Newsboat, FreeFileSync, Corebird, FileZilla, nomacs, RAV1E

Filed under
Software
  • Newsboat: A Snazzy Text-Based RSS Feed Reader

    Newsboat is a sleek, open source RSS/Atom feed reader for the text console. It’s a fork of Newsbeuter. RSS and Atom are a number of widely-used XML formats to transmit, publish and syndicate articles, typically news or blog articles.

    Newsboat is designed to be used on text terminals on Unix or Unix-like systems. It’s entirely controlled by the keyboard.

    The software has an internal commandline to modify configuration variables and to run commands.

  • FreeFileSync – Data Backup and File Synchronization App

    FreeFileSync is a free data backup and file synchronization app which is available in Linux systems enables you to seamlessly sync your backup data with the source data.

    When you take a backup of your HD, or any other disk drive, you should keep it in sync for the file changes you do from time to time. It is often difficult to remember which file/directories you have changed/deleted/updated since the last backup. FreeFileSync solves that problem and it can determine and sync only those changed/deleted/updated files in your backup.

  • Corebird Twitter Client – to Stop Working

    Corebird, the best native GTK+ Twitter client available for Linux desktops including Ubuntu will stop working on August 2018. This has been recently reported by the Corebird developer in patreon as well as in GitHub. This is mainly due to the policy change from Twitter which will remove UserStream API which is used by Corebird and other third party Twitter clients.

    In the patreon post, the developer stated that, the new API by Twitter named Accounts Activity API is too difficult to implement and he may not have much time available for development.

  • FileZilla – Best FTP Client for Linux, Ubuntu Releases version 3.34.0

    FileZilla is a free and open source FTP client available for Ubuntu, Mint and other Linux systems. FileZilla is the go-to software when you need a FTP client for your need. FileZilla is loaded with supports for FTP, SFTP, FTPS protocols and it is cross platform. It comes with nice user friendly and easy to use GUI.

  • nomacs 3.10.2

    nomacs is licensed under the GNU General Public License v3 and available for Windows, Linux, FreeBSD, Mac, and OS/2.

  • RAV1E: The "Fastest & Safest" AV1 Encoder

    Following the news about VP9 and AV1 having more room to improve particularly for alternative architectures like POWER and ARM, a Phoronix reader pointed out an effort that Mozilla is behind on developing the "rav1e" encoder.

    AV1 up to this point for encoding on CPUs has been - unfortunately - extremely slow. But it turns out Mozilla and others are working on RAV1E as what they are billing as the fastest and safest AV1 encoder. RAV1E has been in development for a while now but has seemingly flown under our radar.

Red Hat Looks Beyond Docker for Container Technology

Filed under
Server
Security

While Docker Inc and its eponymous container engine helped to create the modern container approach, Red Hat has multiple efforts of its own that it is now actively developing.

The core component for containers is the runtime engine, which for Docker is the Docker Engine which is now based on the Docker-led containerd project that is hosted at the Cloud Native Computing Foundation (CNCF). Red Hat has built its own container engine called CRI-O, which hit its 1.0 release back in October 2017.

For building images, Red Hat has a project called Buildah, which reached its 1.0 milestone on June 6.

Read more

Containers: The Update Framework (TUF), Nabla, and Kubernetes 1.11 Release

Filed under
Server
Security
  • How The Update Framework Improves Software Distribution Security

    In recent years that there been multiple cyber-attacks that compromised a software developer's network to enable the delivery of malware inside of software updates. That's a situation that Justin Cappos, founder of The Update Framework (TUF) open-source project, has been working hard to help solve.

    Cappos, an assistant professor at New York University (NYU), started TUF nearly a decade ago. TUF is now implemented by multiple software projects, including the Docker Notary project for secure container application updates and has implementations that are being purpose-built to help secure automotive software as well.

  • IBM's new Nabla containers are designed for security first

    Companies love containers because they enable them to run more jobs on servers. But businesses also hate containers, because they fear they're less secure than virtual machines (VM)s. IBM thinks it has an answer to that: Nabla containers, which are more secure by design than rival container concepts.

    James Bottomley, an IBM Research distinguished engineer and top Linux kernel developer, first outlines that there are two kind of fundamental kinds of container and virtual machine (VM) security problems. These are described as Vertical Attack Profile (VAP) and Horizontal Attack Profile (HAP).

  • [Podcast] PodCTL #42 – Kubernetes 1.11 Released

    Like clockwork, the Kubernetes community continues to release quarterly updates to the rapidly expanding project. With the 1.11 release, we see a number of new capabilities being added across a number of different domains – infrastructure services, scheduling services, routing services, storage services, and broader CRD versioning capabilities that will improve the ability to not only deploy Operators for the platform and applications. Links for all these new features, as well as in-depth blog posts from Red Hat and the Kubernetes community are included in the show notes.

    As always, it’s important to remember that not every new feature being released is considered “General Availability”, so be sure to check the detailed release notes before considering the use of any feature in a production or high-availability environment.

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More in Tux Machines

More Android Leftovers (Mostly Microsoft's Antitrust Push Against Android)

Ubuntu 17.10 Reaches End of Life, Existing Users Must Upgrade to 18.04

Ubuntu 17.10 reached the end of life on 19th July 2018. This means that systems running Ubuntu 17.10 won’t receive security and maintenance updates from Canonical anymore leaving them vulnerable. Read more

3 big steps toward building authentic developer communities

As more software businesses are selling open source products, we've seen a corresponding rise in the emphasis of building out developer communities around these products as a key metric for success. Happy users are passionate advocates, and these passionate advocates raise overall awareness of a company's product offerings. Attract the right vocal influencers into your community, and customers become more interested in forming a relationship with your company. Doing community building the right way, however, is a delicate balance. Undercut the needs of your user community in favor of driving sales, and your company will face a decrease in adoption and unfavorable brand awareness. Meanwhile, too little focus on the bottom line isn't good for the company. So how can this tension be balanced effectively, especially in a world in which developers are the "new kingmakers" and meeting their sensibilities is a cornerstone of driving corporate purchasing decisions? Over the past year, I've thought a lot about how to do effective community building while building the business bottom line. In this article, I'll outline three big steps to take toward building authentic, productive, sustainable developer communities. Read more Also: A 4-step plan for creating teams that aren't afraid to fail

Amid the 20th anniversary of open source, Tim O’Reilly warns that platform companies built on open-source software have lost their way

It’s rare to hear Chinese philosophy quoted on stage at a software-development conference. But O’Reilly Media founder and CEO Tim O’Reilly invoked the words of Lao Tzu Wednesday morning during the opening keynotes at OSCON 2018 in hopes of convincing those in attendance — many of whom work for the big internet platform companies of our time — that the tech industry needs to return to the spirit of openness and collaboration that drove the early days of the open-source community before it is too late. “We have an opportunity with these next generation of systems, to rebuild, to rethink the future, to discover what does it mean to get these systems right,” O’Reilly said. If the first era of the internet was dominated by open protocols, and the second era was dominated by the rise of huge platform companies like Amazon, Google, and Facebook, the third era we’re about to enter presents a chance to get it right again. Read more