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Thursday, 25 Aug 16 - Tux Machines is a community-driven public service/news site which has been around for over a decade and primarily focuses on GNU/LinuxSubscribe now Syndicate content

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Quick Roundup

Type Title Author Replies Last Postsort icon
Story Move over GNOME, Ubuntu Mobile looks at Qt, other desktop environments srlinuxx 19/01/2009 - 10:01pm
Story openSUSE Weekly News, Issue 55 srlinuxx 19/01/2009 - 10:14pm
Story The Linux KVM may change the way you use Linux solrac 20/01/2009 - 12:26am
Story 2008, the Buzzwords that were srlinuxx 20/01/2009 - 12:26am
Story Mandriva Linux 2009 Spring - Alpha2 release available srlinuxx 20/01/2009 - 12:28am
Story Linux KDE 4.2 RC1: Photos srlinuxx 20/01/2009 - 1:50am
Story Getting things done on Linux srlinuxx 20/01/2009 - 3:22am
Story INTERVJU: Tom "Spot" Callaway, The Fedora Engineering Manager srlinuxx 20/01/2009 - 3:25am
Story Publicising a FOSS project srlinuxx 20/01/2009 - 3:31am
Story some howtos: srlinuxx 20/01/2009 - 5:37am

The Power of SystemRescueCD 1.0.3 - A Must Have Utility Disc

Filed under
Linux

reviewlinux.com: SystemRescueCD has been around for sometime and their latest version 1.0.3 just came out today. I take a short look at it and briefly describe some of its advantages. Checkout the short flash video at the end of the article to see SystemRescueCD 1.0.3 in action.

The Anatomy of a Crappy Linux Distro

Filed under
Linux

junauza.com: All Linux distributions are not created equal. Some are superior in quality while others are so full of crap. I hate to sound grumpy like Béranger, but I have tried plenty of distros my entire life and have experienced using those that made my blood boil.

Why Linux Frightens Both the Software and Hardware Industry

Filed under
Linux

earthweb.com: Today's closed source software vendors have a very neat, tidy arrangement that works well for them on both the Windows and OS X platforms. I will be exploring why I believe that the software and hardware industries fear widespread Linux adoption and what they will eventually have to do about it should things with desktop Linux come into fruition.

Rock out on Linux with the Banshee 1.0 beta 2 media player

Filed under
Software

arstechnica.com: It has been almost a year since we got our first glimpse of the next-generation Banshee media player. The latest beta, which was released on Friday, offers a wide variety of impressive features and a highly polished user interface.

20 killer apps for ubuntu linux

Filed under
Software

mcphersonz.wordpress: An operating system is only as good as the application that it can run. Lack of options is definitely not a problem with Ubuntu (or most flavors of Linux for that matter). The problem you are faced with is what to use — looking at my Ubuntu software repositories, I see over 24,000 packages. That’s a lot to choose from.

The Exherbo brouhaha

Filed under
Gentoo

kmandla.wordpress: Don’t fault yourself as clueless just because you haven’t heard about the Exherbo yet. The distro-to-be seems to have gotten some attention for making it clear that your help is not needed, thank you very much.

CSIR to switch 2300 users to Ubuntu Linux

Filed under
Ubuntu

tectonic.co.za: Parastal CSIR, South Africa’s national science and technology research organisation, is readying to switch most of its more than 2300 staff to using Ubuntu Linux as their default desktop.

Via laptop goes Open Source

Filed under
Hardware

theinquirer.net: BUILDING YOU OWN computer has gone beyond nailing a few off-the-shelf components together and overclocking the RAM with the announcement that Via will be offering CAD files of its Openbook laptop to anyone who's interested.

today's leftovers

Filed under
News
  • RadeonHD Driver Delivers AMD 780 Support

  • 20 Essential KDE Applications
  • What virtualization tools are available for testing?
  • Are universities turning to open source for IT management?
  • Facebook To Open Source Facebook Platform
  • What does KDE mean to you? (denouement)
  • Open source explained
  • oooPortal.com - The worldwide portal for OpenOffice.org
  • New Linux kernels released to hardy-updates
  • Git Gets Down to Business
  • Switching to Linux which distro to use, Ubuntu?

Windows vs. Linux: Understanding the Difficulty Divide

Filed under
OS

workswithu.com: Over the years, I’ve developed a generalized theory about the relative cost of getting things done in Windows versus that of Linux, and as something of a corollary, the reason a lot of people say Linux is too hard, or “not ready for the desktop.”

Lightweight Linux distributions

Filed under
Linux

abzone.be: Years ago I already played a bit with Linux (It was Redhat 5.0 on my 386). At that time I thought the operating system wasn't yet ready for the desktop. Things changed when Ubuntu 5.04 was released. So then I started searching to a nice and user-friendly lightweight distribution.

some bloggings

Filed under
Linux
  • Wish you were here, virtually

  • My Linux Story
  • The Wanky World of Windows
  • Fedora 9 Useless?
  • In the future I predict that Linux will be King
  • Simplicity, an important value

Debian Weekly News - May 26th, 2008

Filed under
Linux

Welcome to this year's 3rd issue of DPN, the newsletter for the Debian community. Steve McIntyre sent a new Bits from the DPL mail. A serious issue in Debians OpenSSL package has been fixed recently. Debian is discussing about an archive strucure for huge packages.

Introducing the Sugar Emulation Live Image 0.01

Filed under
Linux

gregdek.livejournal: The problem: if you don't actually have a physical XO unit, it can be a real bear to get a version of Sugar up and running. It's been possible for a while to run Sugar under emulation, but if you don't quite understand the right incantations, that can be pretty tricky as well. The solution: a customized Live Image based on Fedora 9.

Open Source Applications: EmelFM2

Filed under
Software

celettu.wordpress: I want to draw some attention to a hidden gem I’ve discovered not too long ago: EmelFM2, a wonderful two-pane view lightweight file manager. Personally, I need two panes. Everything I download goes into a directory in my /home, unsorted, to check them out. Two-pane managers are great for this.

KDE4Daily - testing KDE 4.1 with daily updates

Filed under
KDE

liquidat.wordpress: KDE4Daily, a virtual machine image of KDE 4 with daily updates was released for KDE 4.1. This gives anyone the opportunity to test the newest KDE 4.1 sanely inside a virtual machine.

Interview with Jeff Moe: BLAG, linux-libre and MoreMagic Banana's picture

Filed under
Linux
Interviews

blue-gnu.biz: Jeff Moe is a 37 year old self-employed father. Better known as jebba, he is the main developer behind the 100% Free distribution BLAG (for BLAG Linux And GNU). He is also leading a couple of other Free software projects. He kindly agreed to give Blue GNU an interview.

Open source licensing suits settle in short order

Filed under
Legal

lawyersweekly.ca: Many open source licences are only two or three paragraphs long and read more like a manifesto than a traditional software licence. The simple but unorthodox nature of open source licences, along with the fact that the software is provided “free,” has lulled many into a false sense that these licences must surely be unenforceable and that the use and redistribution of open source software will have no consequences.

Alternative distros: Linux Mint

Filed under
Linux

Josh Saddler: In the first article of this series, I test-drove three lightweight distros: Fluxbuntu, TinyMe, and SliTaz. I took Linux Mint 4.0 Fluxbox Community Edition for a spin yesterday. How did the second Ubuntu-based distro do?

Can System Builders Turn to Ubuntu?

Filed under
Ubuntu

channelinsider.com: Late last month, Ubuntu 8.04 arrived on the scene, right on time, right on its six-month refresh cycle and readily available via a simple ISO image file download. While that may have been big news for the Linux community, the question remains, what if any impact will this latest release have on mainstream computer users?

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More in Tux Machines

GNU/FSF

Linux and Graphics

  • ContainerCon Vendors Offer Flexible Solutions for Managing All Your New Micro-VMs
    As you might expect, this week's LinuxCon and ContainerCon 2016, held in Toronto, is heavy on the benefits and pitfalls of deploying containers, but several vendors aim to come to the rescue with flexible tools to manage it all. Take Datadog, a New York-based company that offers scalable monitoring of your containerized infrastructure—and just about everything else—from a single interface. This is an off-premise, cloud-based tool that can monitor tens of thousands of your hosts and integrate with stuff you already know, like AWS, Cassandra, Docker, Kubernetes, Postgre and 150 other tools.
  • Happy Birthday Linux
    Linux turns 25 today. That's four years older than Linus was when he invented it. That means Linus has spent more of his life with Linux than he did without it
  • AMDGPU In Linux 4.9 To Bring Virtual Display Support, Improved GPU Reset
    The first pull request has been submitted of new Radeon and AMDGPU DRM driver updates to be queued in DRM-Next for landing with the Linux 4.9 kernel. To look forward to Linux 4.9 even though Linux 4.8 is still weeks from being released is PowerPlay support for Iceland GPUs, improved GPU reset, UVD and VCE power-gating for Carrizo and Stoney, support for pre-initialized vRAM buffers, TTM clean-ups, virtual display support, and other low-level changes. Many bug fixes also present. The AMDGPU virtual display support is useful and we have been looking forward to it. GPU reset improvements are also welcome for better recovery when the GPU becomes hung. As is the case lately, most of these changes are focused around the newer AMDGPU DRM driver over the mature Radeon DRM code.
  • OpenGL ES 3.1 Comes For Intel Haswell On Mesa
    For those running Intel Haswell processors, hope is not lost in seeing new versions of OpenGL extensions with the Intel Mesa driver.

Security News

  • Wednesday's security updates
  • This Android botnet relies on Twitter for its commands
  • Android Security Flaw Exposes 1.4B Devices [Ed: Alternative headline is, "Android is very popular, it has billions of users. And yes, security ain’t perfect." When did the press ever publish a headline like, "Windows flaw leaves 2 billion PCs susceptible for remote takeover?" (happens a lot)]
  • Wildfire ransomware code cracked: Victims can now unlock encrypted files for free
    Victims of the Wildfire ransomware can get their encrypted files back without paying hackers for the privilege, after the No More Ransom initiative released a free decryption tool. No More Ransom runs a web portal that provides keys for unlocking files encrypted by various strains of ransomware, including Shade, Coinvault, Rannoh, Rakhn and, most recently, Wildfire. Aimed at helping ransomware victims retrieve their data, No More Ransom is a collaborative project between Europol, the Dutch National Police, Intel Security, and Kaspersky Lab. Wildfire victims are served with a ransom note demanding payment of 1.5 Bitcoins -- the cryptocurrency favored by cybercriminals -- in exchange for unlocking the encrypted files. However, cybersecurity researchers from McAfee Labs, part of Intel Security, point out that the hackers behind Wildfire are open to negotiation, often accepting 0.5 Bitcoins as a payment. Most victims of the ransomware are located in the Netherlands and Belgium, with the malicious software spread through phishing emails aimed at Dutch speakers. The email claims to be from a transport company and suggests that the target has missed a parcel delivery -- encouraging them to fill in a form to rearrange delivery for another date. It's this form which drops Wildfire ransomware onto the victim's system and locks it down.

today's howtos