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About Tux Machines

Wednesday, 28 Sep 16 - Tux Machines is a community-driven public service/news site which has been around for over a decade and primarily focuses on GNU/LinuxSubscribe now Syndicate content

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Quick Roundup

Type Title Author Replies Last Postsort icon
Story Move over GNOME, Ubuntu Mobile looks at Qt, other desktop environments srlinuxx 19/01/2009 - 10:01pm
Story openSUSE Weekly News, Issue 55 srlinuxx 19/01/2009 - 10:14pm
Story The Linux KVM may change the way you use Linux solrac 20/01/2009 - 12:26am
Story 2008, the Buzzwords that were srlinuxx 20/01/2009 - 12:26am
Story Mandriva Linux 2009 Spring - Alpha2 release available srlinuxx 20/01/2009 - 12:28am
Story Linux KDE 4.2 RC1: Photos srlinuxx 20/01/2009 - 1:50am
Story Getting things done on Linux srlinuxx 20/01/2009 - 3:22am
Story INTERVJU: Tom "Spot" Callaway, The Fedora Engineering Manager srlinuxx 20/01/2009 - 3:25am
Story Publicising a FOSS project srlinuxx 20/01/2009 - 3:31am
Story some howtos: srlinuxx 20/01/2009 - 5:37am

Switch: Windows Vista to Ubuntu Linux

Filed under
Ubuntu

besttechie.net: I am mainly a Windows and OSX user - however, that does not stop from occasionally attempting to use Linux as a desktop operating system. I do use Linux to run all of my servers. So I install Ubuntu Hardy Heron (8.04) - the install is relatively quick and quite painless. Good so far.

An open-source problem? Too many scratches for too few itches

Filed under
Software

Att Masay: After writing my rebuke of Sidux, I came across an excellent post on a similar topic. Ryan Davis writes a cogent attack on software's tendency to reinvent the wheel. While Ryan's critique lingers on open-source software, it's by no means limited to open source.

coupla posts with no introduction to cp & paste

Filed under
Software
  • Some firefox 3 tips

  • Audio KDE Applications

GRAMPS: Open Source Genealogy

Filed under
Software

makeuseof.com: When we’re kids, we learn stories of the past from our grandparents, often involving their parents and grandparents. How many of you remember those stories? What about the names of the people involved? Those of you with your hands up, are you into genealogy? I’ve been working on it for a couple of years now, and I just love this program, GRAMPS.

more bloggings

Filed under
Linux
  • Top Reasons to Use Linux

  • What special about Ubuntu 8.04 Hardy Heron
  • Back to PCLinuxOS - The Home Coming
  • Auntie Happy w/ Ubuntu
  • Did we really need yet another Linux distribution?

What could Open Office do with a business model?

Filed under
OOo

Dana Blankenhorn: It has been amusing this Independence Day reading reaction to Microsoft’s Equipt announcement. The reaction has ranged from hope to anger, depending on the author’s attitude toward Microsoft. Rather than play either note I’d like to focus on the business model and the opportunities it offers open source.

15 Coolest GNU Wallpapers

Filed under
Linux

junauza.com: There are plenty of high-quality Linux wallpapers that you can get on the web, but not that much for the good-old GNU (GNU's Not Unix). So, I decided to take some time to find and collect a few of my favorite GNU wallpapers in existence.

KDE 4.1 Beta 2: Two Steps Forward, One Step Back

Filed under
KDE

earthweb.com: KDE 4.1 is supposed to make everything right with the recently troubled desktop. Everyone agrees now that KDE 4.0 was a mistake. However, what the mistake was -- and whose -- is a matter of opinion.

few bloggings

Filed under
Linux
  • Ubuntu 8.0.4 Suxors

  • My Dissapointment with Fedora 9
  • Move over Mandriva, I think I’m in love

Penumbra Overture - If You Dare

Filed under
Gaming
-s

I've always liked computer games. When I used Windows I liked to play games like Myst and Riven, but when I switched to Linux I had to be contented with first-person shooters. Fortunately, they do have a bit of puzzle intermixed with all the combat, but I still grow weary of gunfight after gunfight. That's why when I heard of Penumbra, I was quite excited. Penumbra Overture is a 3D first-person mystery puzzle game. It's a bit like the Quakes without the gunplay. Or perhaps it could be likened to Myst and Riven, but lots more frightening.

New Asus Eee PC 904 – an Acer Aspire One killer instead?

itwire.com: Just a day or so after Acer’s Aspire One goes on sale in Australia comes news that the Asus Eee PC 904 will shortly go on sale in the UK, muddying the waters over which is the best value ‘netbook’ to buy.

Explaining Software Freedom to a Beginner

Filed under
OSS

trombonechamp.wordpress: I needed a good way to explain software freedom to people who have little to no computer experience (possibly parents or grandparents, kids, stay-at-home moms/dads, etc.), so I created the following blog post. Many of these people could benefit from free software, but aren’t going to learn about it through mainstream media.

Six Things You Didn't Know You Could Do With Deskbar

Filed under
Software

ibeentoubuntu.com: Deskbar is often associated with search and only search. Sure, you can search you files, search Yahoo!, search Del.icio.us, or even search for a word in a dictionary, but did you know that you could DO stuff, too?

Also: Ten Things You Didn't Know You Could Do With Rhythmbox

Must OR Must Not Have Ubuntu Apps

Filed under
Software

my10sen.com: Ubuntu latest release, I must admit is a total kickass operating system. You got almost everything figure out for you. Pop in the cd answer some simple question and there you have it. Almost to perfection operating system with the cost of nothing. But not everything runs as you planned.

How about an Open Sourced office?

Filed under
Software

brajeshwar.com: Open source software has a lot of options for the business world, alongside the home user bandwagon. Apart from the other generic features, Open Source softwares at times have a greater degree of customization as compared to their proprietary counterparts.

Who Writes Linux and Who Supports It

Filed under
Linux

blog.linuxoss.com: Never before in the history of computing have there been so many companies, users and developers united behind one project, specifically one that has seen so much commercial success.

some early howtos:

Filed under
HowTos
  • Reconstructor: Creating Your Own Ubuntu Distribution

  • Fedora 9: Change Linux Hostname or Computer System Name
  • How to install Adobe Flash Player 10 beta 2 on Ubuntu 8.04 Hardy Heron
  • General steps for installing Nvidia diplay driver in Linux
  • How-To: Install Codecs and DVD Support in Debian Lenny
  • Using LVM on AIX Unix. Part One Of No More Than Two.

few leftovers

Filed under
News
  • Pencil Turns Firefox into a Drawing Tool

  • Advanced file permissions in Linux
  • Latest News on Linux Mint development

5 Reasons to Use CLI Over GUI

vivapinkfloyd.blogspot: First, I must say that using CLI is not always faster, not necessarily. There are tasks which can be done faster and easier using some GUI application rather than typing a whole bunch of commands. But, nevertheless, command line is still very powerful and it's more appropriate to use it for certain tasks.

Five Reasons Ubuntu Is the #1 Linux Distro

Filed under
Ubuntu

dawningvalley.com: Ubuntu is, according to DistroWatch, the #1 Linux distribution. That’s a huge feat in itself. However, once you realize that Ubuntu is only three and a half years old, the feat is much bigger. How did the Linux rookie beat out the nine-year-old Mandrake, the fourteen-year-old SUSE, or the fifteen-year-old Debian?

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More in Tux Machines

Proxmox VE 4.3 released

Proxmox Server Solutions GmbH today announced the general availability of Proxmox Virtual Environment 4.3. The hyper-converged open source server virtualization solution enables users to create and manage LXC containers and KVM virtual machines on the same host, and makes it easy to set up highly available clusters as well as to manage network and storage via an integrated web-based management interface. The new version of Proxmox VE 4.3 comes with a completely new comprehensive reference documentation. The new docu framework allows a global as well as contextual help function. Proxmox users can access and download the technical documentation via the central help-button (available in various formats like html, pdf and epub). A main asset of the new documentation is that it is always version specific to the current user’s software version. Opposed to the global help, the contextual help-button shows the user the documentation part he currently needs. Read more

Games for GNU/Linux

Security News

  • Tuesday's security updates
  • New Open Source Linux Ransomware Divides Infosec Community
    Following our investigation into this matter, and seeing the vitriol-filled reaction from some people in the infosec community, Zaitsev has told Softpedia that he decided to remove the project from GitHub, shortly after this article's publication. The original, unedited article is below.
  • Fax machines' custom Linux allows dial-up hack
    Party like it's 1999, phreakers: a bug in Epson multifunction printer firmware creates a vector to networks that don't have their own Internet connection. The exploit requirements are that an attacker can trick the victim into installing malicious firmware, and that the victim is using the device's fax line. The firmware is custom Linux, giving the printers a familiar networking environment for bad actors looking to exploit the fax line as an attack vector. Once they're in that ancient environment, it's possible to then move onto the network to which the the printer's connected. Yves-Noel Weweler, Ralf Spenneberg and Hendrik Schwartke of Open Source Training in Germany discovered the bug, which occurs because Epson WorkForce multifunction printers don't demand signed firmware images.
  • Google just saved the journalist who was hit by a 'record' cyberattack
    Google just stepped in with its massive server infrastructure to run interference for journalist Brian Krebs. Last week, Krebs' site, Krebs On Security, was hit by a massive distributed denial-of-service (DDoS) attack that took it offline, the likes of which was a "record" that was nearly double the traffic his host Akamai had previously seen in cyberattacks. Now just days later, Krebs is back online behind the protection of Google, which offers a little-known program called Project Shield to help protect independent journalists and activists' websites from censorship. And in the case of Krebs, the DDoS attack was certainly that: The attempt to take his site down was in response to his recent reporting on a website called vDOS, a service allegedly created by two Israeli men that would carry out cyberattacks on behalf of paying customers.
  • Krebs DDoS aftermath: industry in shock at size, depth and complexity of attack
    “This attack didn’t stop, it came in wave after wave, hundreds of millions of packets per second,” says Josh Shaul, Akamai’s vice president of product management, when Techworld spoke to him. “This was different from anything we’ve ever seen before in our history of DDoS attacks. They hit our systems pretty hard.” Clearly still a bit stunned, Shaul describes the Krebs DDoS as unprecedented. Unlike previous large DDoS attacks such as the infamous one carried out on cyber-campaign group Spamhaus in 2013, this one did not use fancy amplification or reflection to muster its traffic. It was straight packet assault from the old school.
  • iOS 10 makes it easier to crack iPhone back-ups, says security firm
    INSECURITY FIRM Elcomsoft has measured the security of iOS 10 and found that the software is easier to hack than ever before. Elcomsoft is not doing Apple any favours here. The fruity firm has just launched the iPhone 7, which has as many problems as it has good things. Of course, there are no circumstances when vulnerable software is a good thing, but when you have just launched that version of the software, it is really bad timing. Don't hate the player, though, as this is what Elcomsoft, and what Apple, are supposed to be doing right. "We discovered a major security flaw in the iOS 10 back-up protection mechanism. This security flaw allowed us to develop a new attack that is able to bypass certain security checks when enumerating passwords protecting local (iTunes) back-ups made by iOS 10 devices," said Elcomsoft's Oleg Afonin in a blog post.
  • After Tesla: why cybersecurity is central to the car industry's future
    The news that a Tesla car was hacked from 12 miles away tells us that the explosive growth in automotive connectivity may be rapidly outpacing automotive security. This story is illustrative of two persistent problems afflicting many connected industries: the continuing proliferation of vulnerabilities in new software, and the misguided view that cybersecurity is separate from concept, design, engineering and production. This leads to a ‘fire brigade approach’ to cybersecurity where security is not baked in at the design stage for either hardware or software but added in after vulnerabilities are discovered by cybersecurity specialists once the product is already on the market.

Ofcom blesses Linux-powered, open source DIY radio ‘revolution’

Small scale DAB radio was (quite literally) conceived in an Ofcom engineer’s garden shed in Brighton, on a Raspberry Pi, running a full open source stack, in his spare time. Four years later, Ofcom has given the thumbs up to small scale DAB after concluding that trials in 10 UK cities were judged to be a hit. We gave you an exclusive glimpse into the trials last year, where you could compare the specialised proprietary encoders with the Raspberry Pi-powered encoders. “We believe that there is a significant level of demand from smaller radio stations for small scale DAB, and that a wider roll-out of additional small scale services into more geographic areas would be both technically possible and commercially sustainable,” notes Ofcom. Read more