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Sunday, 28 Aug 16 - Tux Machines is a community-driven public service/news site which has been around for over a decade and primarily focuses on GNU/LinuxSubscribe now Syndicate content

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Open Source coders caught stealing Open Source code

Filed under
OSS

DEVELOPERS OF OpenBSD took code from their brethren at Linux, violating the code's licence, the GPL. To the horror of the Linux folk, the OpenBSD licence allows proprietary use.

The Linux coders went to great pains to reverse engineer Broadcom's wireless chipset. The company's hardware is found in many wireless devices, but Broadcom shuns open source.

Bye bye Windows I don't need you anymore

Filed under
Linux

I have been dying to say goodbye to Microsoft Windows for a number of years. I am fed up with the unceasing number of bugs, inexplicable system freezes, persistent gaping flaws that hackers can drive a truck through and empty promises of improvements with each new release. I'm ready to give Linux another try but is Linux ready for me?

Can Open Source Cure Global Software Piracy?

Filed under
OSS

Efforts to curb the practice in emerging markets fail to take into account the underlying reason it happens in the first place. Most software born in the United States is priced completely wrong for most emerging markets, given their economic state. There are also cultural considerations that are way beyond our U.S.-centric world view.

Ekiga videophone gets you connected

Filed under
Software

Linux has come a long way in a lot of areas, but if my experience is an indicator, we're not much further along in the use of personal webcams today than we were five years ago. After a couple of unsuccessful attempts to use Ekiga (formerly GnomeMeeting) as a video phone, I finally prevailed and got Ekiga working with both sound and video.

Open source pioneers break rank on the future

Filed under
OSS

Richard Stallman looks like either a prophet or an aging hippie, but you would never mistake him for a businessman. His long brown hair, scraggily beard and penchant for T-shirts and loose-fitting pants are in sharp contrast to the striped suits worn by nearly everyone else in the technology industry.

The importance of being SUDO

Filed under
Linux

Many modern Linux distributions, in the interest of security I guess, have made the root account hidden and without a password. So even if you drop to a terminal and try to log in as root you can't. I know it is very easy to add a root password it does defeat the design philosophy of the distribution.

Compiz and Beryl are Reuniting - It's official

Filed under
Software

After several weeks of discussion the leaders of Compiz and Beryl have agreed that the two communities shall reunite. This decision is supported by both David and Quinn and represents the majority decision of the administrators and developers in each community.

At this early stage not a lot has been decided, but these are the main points of the agreement:

A Casual guide to some commonly used Linux Commands

Filed under
HowTos

Through this document i try to explain some of the commonly used commands under linux and their basic use In this first part of series we cover ls,cat,arch,bzip2,gzip,tar,pwd,more,mpg123

1. cat : ( concatenate)

A Need for Kubuntu Live CD Repair Tools

Filed under
Software

Repair and recovery tools continue to be difficult for inexperienced, and often experienced, users. Most top distros come with a Live CD that allow you to boot into a desktop and also install from it. That's great, but it should be just as easy to repair an existing installation. Unfortunately it's not so easy.

Transgaming Cedega 6.0 Preview

Filed under
Gaming

While id Software and Epic Games are among the few major companies that are Linux gaming patrons, if you've been wanting to play such games as Battlefield 2142 or Elder Scrolls IV: Oblivion, you will now be able to do so starting April 14! Next week Transgaming will be introducing Cedega 6.0 "Swordfish".

Battlestar Galactica open source project is frackin' sweet

Filed under
Gaming

Listen up, nuggets. You're in a Colonial Viper. You've got no wingman, three inbound Cylon Heavy Raiders, and you just spotted a Basestar several klicks away. What do you do? Choose your own adventure:

1. Whiz your flight suit.
2. Call for backup and fire up your FTL drive
3. Hammer down the trigger and go for the gold

Help Create Opensuse Slogan!

Filed under
SUSE

As you may or may not know, openSUSE is in need of a slogan, a mission statement, a "one-liner", if you will. Ubuntu has their "Linux for human beings" slogan, now it's time to help create ours. This is an awesome chance to help define how the openSUSE project will be presented to the masses.

A first look at SimplyMEPIS 6.5 (rc2)

Filed under
Linux
Reviews

So, there I was in Salt Lake City, sick as a dog, with my faithful IBM T40 ThinkPad. This system uses a 1.5 GHz Pentium M processor with 1 MB of L2 cache, and a 400 MHz FSB (Front Side Bus). It has 512 MB of DDR SDRAM memory, and a built-in ATI Mobility Radeon 9000 AGP 4x with 32 MB of VRAM for graphics.

Firefox 3 release schedule draft

Filed under
Moz/FF

In the latest Firefox 3 status meeting, a release schedule draft was published. In brief:

* Alpha 4, by the end of April
* Alpha 5, by the end of May
* Alpha 6, by the end of June
* Beta 1, in July
* Beta 2, on September

So, considering a run of release candidates during October, Firefox 3 should be around November according to this schedule. I find it somewhat aggressive.

Linux tip - booting multiple desktop environments

Filed under
HowTos

If you just can’t choose between GNOME and KDE, or you just want a change of scenery every now and then, it’s really easy to install multiple desktop environments and seamlessly switch between them.

It’s really easy to install them - just use your distribution’s package management system to add your desktop environment of choice.

The Newbies Guide to Compiling Your First Kernel

Filed under
HowTos

So you've been using Linux for a while now and have decided to take the next step. Whether you are looking for a performance increase, added hardware support or even just to enhance your geek cred, compiling your own kernel need not be a horrifying experience. Compiling a kernel has historically been a very involved and, at times, frustratingly hair pulling experience for new Linux users.

Damn Small Linux The Portable Desktop

Filed under
Linux

We’ve written about portable apps quite a number of times in the past, but why bother with just apps when there’s a whole OS that’ll fit on a 50MB USB stick? Damn Small Linux, sometimes abbreviated DSL, is a 50MB mini desktop Linux distribution.

Using Sharp Fonts On A GNOME Desktop

Filed under
HowTos

You might have noticed that fonts are quite fuzzy on Linux desktops which can make your eyes ache if you have to sit in front of your computer all day long. Font rendering is still a little bit awkward and one of the last weaknesses of Linux desktops. This tutorial shows how you can make GNOME and all GNOME applications (such as Evolution, the file browser Nautilus, etc.) use sharp fonts.

The new Mandriva Linux: Here Comes The Spring!

Filed under
MDV

Mandriva Linux 2007 Spring is the latest edition of Mandriva Linux, the product of more than than nine years of continuous innovation for desktops and enterprise servers.

Cathedrals, Bazaars and Advocates

Filed under
OSS

In “The Cathedral and The Bazaar” Eric S. Raymond tried to convince the world that the open source development model (the bazaar) was better and cheaper than the traditional -closed- model (the cathedral). Of course this it utter nonsense. When I think of a bazaar I remember the soukh of Marrakech or Casablanca.

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More in Tux Machines

today's leftovers

Linux Development and LinuxCon

  • Linus Torvalds says GPL was defining factor in Linux's success
    Linus Torvalds and Dirk Hohndel, vice president and chief of open source at VMware, discussed the role that GNU GPL played in the success of Linux during a keynote conversation this week at LinuxCon NA in Toronto. Hohndel, who has been involved with the kernel for a very long time, said that during the past 25 years there have been many challenges, and one of the biggest challenges was the possibility of fragmentation. "How do we keep one single kernel?" he asked. "I used to be worried about fragmentation, and I used to think that it was inevitable at some point," said Torvalds. “Everyone was looking at the history of Linux and comparing it with UNIX. People would say that it’s going to fail because it's going to fragment. That's what happened before, so why even bother?" What made the difference was the license. "FSF [Free Software Foundation] and I don't have a loving relationship, but I love GPL v2," said Torvalds. "I really think the license has been one of the defining factors in the success of Linux because it enforced that you have to give back, which meant that the fragmentation has never been something that has been viable from a technical standpoint."
  • Making Use Of eBPF In The Mainline Linux Kernel
    One of the exciting innovations within the Linux kernel in the past few years has been extending the Berkeley Packet Filter (BPF) to become a more generalized in-kernel virtual machine. The eBPF work with recent versions of the Linux kernel allow it to be used by more than just networking so that these programs can be used for tracing, security, and more.
  • Linux turns 25 with a brilliant history
    Chances are, you use it every day. Linux runs every Android phone and tablet on Earth. And even if you’re on an iPhone or a Mac or a Windows machine, Linux is working behind the scenes, across the Internet, serving up most of the webpages you view and powering most of the apps you use. Facebook, Google, Pinterest, Wikipedia—it’s all running on Linux. Now, Linux is finding its way onto televisions, thermostats, and even cars. As software creeps into practically every aspect of our lives, so does the OS designed by Linus Torvalds.
  • Intel Lost Another Open-Source Driver Developer To Google Earlier This Summer
    There was another long-time Intel open-source Linux graphics driver developer that left the company earlier this summer and is now working at Google on the Chrome/Chromium OS graphics stack. Among the notable departures in the past few months from Intel's Open-Source Technology Center were Jesse Barnes, Wayland-founder Kristian Høgsberg, and Dirk Hohndel and apparently others that went under the radar or outside of our area of focus. Another graphics driver developer no longer at Intel is Chad Versace.
  • OpenGL ES 3.1 For Haswell Lands With Intel's Mesa Driver