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About Tux Machines

Saturday, 30 Jul 16 - Tux Machines is a community-driven public service/news site which has been around for over a decade and primarily focuses on GNU/LinuxSubscribe now Syndicate content

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Quick Roundup

Type Title Author Replies Last Postsort icon
Story Is Linux the New Threat? srlinuxx 26/09/2009 - 2:32pm
Story openSUSE Weekly News#90 is out! srlinuxx 26/09/2009 - 2:34pm
Story Distro Hoppin`: PCLinuxOS 2009.2 srlinuxx 26/09/2009 - 2:35pm
Story Myth of the blue-headed step children srlinuxx 26/09/2009 - 6:14pm
Story Proposed Process Changes For X Server 1.8 srlinuxx 26/09/2009 - 6:16pm
Story Clipboard management with Linux srlinuxx 26/09/2009 - 6:17pm
Story some howtos: srlinuxx 26/09/2009 - 9:03pm
Forum topic Improvement ilaserok 27/09/2009 - 2:10am
Story Boot Linux Over HTTP With boot.kernel.org (BKO) falko 27/09/2009 - 9:49am
Story Jolicloud brings the stupidity of web apps to Linux netbooks. acurrie 1 27/09/2009 - 11:08am

Red Hat Enterprise Linux 4.5 Beta Released As V5 Prepped For Launch

Filed under
Linux

With Enterprise Linux 5 set to ship in March, Red Hat has put into beta testing an update for Enterprise Linux 4 that makes it virtualization-friendly.

Linux Software Installation, Part VI: Conclusions

Filed under
Linux

The bottom line is: installing software on Linux is a horror at the moment. This horror leads to some absurd, some strange and also some very mean situations. The main point for me in this regard is:

5 useful Firefox tweaks

Filed under
Moz/FF

Firefox is a great browser, and part of that is it’s extensibility. As well as extensions and themes, Firefox also has an extensive set of hidden preferences that you can’t get to through the graphical Preferences dialogue.

Resetting your screen resolution with xrandr

Filed under
HowTos

I recently discovered a very useful tool: xrandr. This command allows you to reset your screen resolution, which comes in very handy when some buggy app changes you screen resolution and doesn't set it back.

Full Tip.

How to Increase Your Linux System Loading Speed

Filed under
HowTos

Linux can be run on various run level, for run level 0 is shutdown, and run level 6 is restart and usually run level 1 is single user linux. By knowing what run level of your linux distro init, you can further tweak your system by stopping wanted services.

Microsoft Windows ousted at California school district

Filed under
Linux

By all appearances, the migration from Microsoft Windows to Novell SUSE Linux on the server and the desktop at the Windsor Unified School District in Northern California has been almost as pain-free as any IT professional could hope for.

Preloaded Linux on Dell: Fact or Fiction?

Filed under
Linux

Having Linux preloaded on PCs from major vendors is a dream many in the Linux community have had for a long time. They have made significant Linux efforts for the enterprise and are involved in the Linux community in varying degrees. So why hasn't Linux appeared pre-loaded on PCs yet? It's simple: demand and dollars.

Is a Linux desktop avalanche coming?

Filed under
Linux

Slowly, ever so slowly, the Linux desktop has been picking up momentum. It keeps getting better and better, but Microsoft's monopoly has kept many PC users from realizing that there really is a viable alternative to Windows. However, that's about to change.

One-click email backup of OpenOffice.org documents

Filed under
HowTos

Gmail offers a few clever features that make it more than just an email service. You can use your Gmail account as a document viewer, a file storage, and even as a full-blown Getting Things Done solution. You can also turn Gmail into a nifty backup solution for your OpenOffice.org documents using a simple OOoBasic macro and Gmail's own tools.

The first political victory for open source

Filed under
OSS

The WIPO (World Intellectual Property Organization) Development Agenda is usually a great way to put folks to sleep, but this week it represents what may be the first political victory for open source.

Linux almost desktop ready

Filed under
Linux

AFTER MORE THAN two years I have decided to put Linux to the test again to see if it is ready to become a home desktop yet. Here is what I tried and the results. Included PCLOS, Freespire, Mepis, and Ubuntu.

Some common beginner Linux installation issues

Filed under
Linux

In this cursory overview, Mark Rais, provides some of the common reasons why people brand new to Linux have installation failures. The brief article covers issues with Fedora, Gentoo, Mepis, PCLinuxOS, and Ubuntu.

Installing Puppet on Ubuntu

Filed under
HowTos

Puppet is a configuration automation tool that allows you to centralize management of the various *nix flavors running on your network. This is a step by step tutorial on how to install the server component of Puppet (puppetmaster) on one machine, and the Puppet client (puppetd) on another. We then perform a simple test to make sure Puppet is working properly.

Why Dell and other major hardware vendors won't do desktop Linux preinstallation

Filed under
Linux

The big problem with Linux preinstallation is that one size rarely fits all. Although modern community-driven distributions like Ubuntu and Fedora are designed for a broad audience, serious Linux users are very particular about how their systems are configured.

Linux: 2.6.21-rc2, Lots of Changes

Filed under
Linux

Announcing 2.6.21-rc2, Linus Torvalds noted, "I'm not very proud of this, because quite frankly, -rc2 has way more changes than I really like." The current Linux kernel development model is that the bulk of changes in a new kernel should happen during the -rc1 phase, with the rest of the -rc kernels being primarily bug fixes."

Mac vs. Linux: Which is More Secure?

Filed under
OS

In last month’s column, I said “I’m more secure on a Mac than I was on Windows XP.” Some of you asked how Linux fares in that comparison. To that, I’ll say I’m marginally more secure on Linux than on a Mac.

What Tech Companies Should Know About Linux Users

Filed under
Linux

It happened again this week. This time it was Dell, who asked the public what they'd like to see Dell offering. The overwhelming number-one response was "Linux machines". Then the inevitable foot-dragging began.

Securing Linux by breaking it with Damn Vulnerable Linux

Filed under
Linux

Damn Vulnerable Linux (DVL) is everything a good Linux distribution isn't. Its developers have spent hours stuffing it with broken, ill-configured, outdated, and exploitable software that makes it vulnerable to attacks. DVL isn't built to run on your desktop -- it's a learning tool for security students

Run Windows Apps on Linux using 2X ApplicationServer

Filed under
HowTos

I recently read an article describing how to run Windows apps on Linux using 2X ApplicationServer with Windows running as a virtual machine (VM) on the local system. It's a really cool sounding idea and overcomes some of the compatibility problems of Wine, but always having a Windows VM active consumes a lot of resources and may not always be the best solution.

Killing misbehaving programs and processes

Filed under
HowTos

I’d love to say it doesn’t happen on Linux, but very rarely it does. I can say it happens less often than on Windows, though. What am I talking about? Programs and processes misbehaving - locking up, stopping working and generally causing a problem.

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Tablet review: BQ Aquaris M10 Ubuntu Edition

As employees have become more and more flexible in recent years thanks to the power and performance of mobile devices, the way we work has changed dramatically. We frequently chop and change between smartphones, tablets and laptops for different tasks, which has led to the growth of the hybrid market – devices such as Microsoft’s Surface Pro 3 and Apple’s iPad Pro – that provide the power and functionality of a laptop with the mobility and convenience of a tablet. Read more