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About Tux Machines

Wednesday, 26 Oct 16 - Tux Machines is a community-driven public service/news site which has been around for over a decade and primarily focuses on GNU/LinuxSubscribe now Syndicate content

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Quick Roundup

Type Title Author Replies Last Postsort icon
Story today's leftovers & stuff srlinuxx 1 27/09/2009 - 11:33am
Story A different kind of suicide srlinuxx 27/09/2009 - 1:34pm
Story Is the FSF shooting the open-source community in the foot? srlinuxx 27/09/2009 - 1:36pm
Story 6 of the best media burners for Linux srlinuxx 27/09/2009 - 1:38pm
Story Gentoo Ten LiveDVD Testing srlinuxx 27/09/2009 - 6:01pm
Story The C programming language and its importance srlinuxx 27/09/2009 - 6:03pm
Story 5 alternative image manipualtion apps for Linux newbies srlinuxx 27/09/2009 - 7:50pm
Story Ubuntu Spelunkers Need Help srlinuxx 27/09/2009 - 7:52pm
Story some howtos: srlinuxx 28/09/2009 - 1:38am
Story Ubuntu gets set to mark fifth birthday srlinuxx 28/09/2009 - 3:11am

Put Close/Maximize/Minimize Buttons on the Left in Ubuntu

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howtogeek: If you are a new Ubuntu user coming from a Mac background, you might be disoriented by the placement of the minimize/maximize/close box on Ubuntu, which mimics Windows by default.

Arch Voodoo Install

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Techzone: Arch has been my primary Linux distribution for two years and I dual boot it with Windows XP on my Thinkpad. I like Arch for its KISS principle, good speed and repository full of latest stable packages.

GParted vs QTParted

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Linux App Finder: As a KDE user, I tend to pick a Qt app when two mostly equivalent programs exist. I thought that would be the case with QTParted and GParted, but to my surprise I found GParted to be a superior program that actually allowed me to accomplish my goal when QTParted could not.

The definitive bittorrent client for Linux

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Tux -o- Blog: So the experience with Transmission was a good one, but it didn't go without its bumps. I haven't tried to build it again, but oh well, I've found a better alternative anyway.

Editing chestnuts with gimp

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HowTos This week-end, I wanted to edit a chestnut image, to put some brightness on this blog (and I love doing chestnut things). So, I fired up cooker's gimp. But I didn't really expect this marathon...

Opensource driver for the ATI R500-based cards Released

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Jerome Glisse announced today that a small team of X.Org developers has managed to provide the initial support for ATI R500-based cards (ATI Radeon X1300 up to X1600 at the time) by reverse engineering.

A Linux User in Vista-land: Part 1

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Nosredna Ekim: With my Acer Aspire 5050 I received a free Express upgrade to Vista Premium. After all the talk of DRM, and low performance I at first shunned it as a clearly inferior OS, but my curiosity got the better of me and I had to try it out.

Also: Howto: Vista + Ubuntu Dual Boot

Ralink Help For Ubuntu Feisty

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lockergnome: If you are reading this, chances are you are running a RT2500 based chipset wireless card that worked perfectly with Ubuntu Edgy and then stopped working after your upgrade to Feisty. I have a solution for you that will hopefully offer you a way to get around Ubuntu’s latest wireless “fix”.

Hate an application? Shoot it.

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fosswire: Have you ever gotten really mad at an application and just wanted to blast a huge hole in it? With blast that is exactly what you can do. Use your system’s preferred package manager to install the blast package.

A Sample Function inline with Bashprompt

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HowTos The bash prompt has built in commands that use escape charachter syntax. By default a lot of packages ship bash with a default that shows the hostname and relative path. The escape sequences for all users is usually kept in /etc/bashrc or a similar system location.

Dell: Interest in Linux Outside the United States

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direct2dell: On IdeaStorm, Linux and open source-related ideas are commonly some of the most popular ones. Currently the Sell Linux PCs Worldwide idea by ergo and Dell Ubuntu for Europe by yesmathew are near the top of the front page of IdeaStorm. In other words, they are recently popular ideas.

Linux configure point to point tunneling PPTP VPN client for Microsoft PPTP vpn server

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With this tip you will be able to work from home using VPN and that too from Linux / FreeBSD system for the proprietary Microsoft Point-to-Point vpn server.

Enterprise Open Source Is Not Just the Code

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OSS After infiltrating corporate operating systems and middleware products, open source software has in recent years moved into enterprise applications with great success.

Also: Open source 'not relevant', claim CIOs

Give Firefox a Safari-Style Address Bar

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One of the coolest features about Safari is the address bar. It doubles as a loading bar, and the shaded color behind it progresses across the address bar as the page loads. Well, now you can duplicate that functionality with the Fission extension for Firefox.

Also: A Firefox extension to animate PNGs

Why Dell should offer more than just Ubuntu

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Linux In the US Dell has famously started offering Ubuntu on selected machines as a direct alternative to XP or Vista. Fortunately these machines cost less than their Windows counterparts and that's good, but Dell really should consider moving beyond offering Ubuntu; and here's why.

Ars at WWDC: Interview with Lars Knoll, creator of KHTML

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arstechnica: Ars Technica sat down today to talk with KHTML developer and Trolltech employee, Lars Knoll. We talked about his involvement in the project that ultimately became the HTML rendering engine for Apple's Safari web browser.

iTunes in Linux

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pimp you linux: Will apple release iTunes for Linux? Not anytime soon. So what solutions does the open source community have? Wine.

Spice up Windows - replace it! [with Linux]; part 5

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A Blog Of Gentoo: In my few previous posts I've stated that I'd like to help people to spice their system and move from Windows to Linux. But we all know that it cannot be done in an instant. This time I will explain the 5th step: Playing around.

Kilted Debian lovers to overrun Edinburgh

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the Register: Here's a poser for you: could there be anything more frightening than a bunch of open source geeks (proud ones, at that) milling around the mean streets of Edinburgh? Well, yes. How about if you put some of them in special Debian kilts?

Linux: Dual-Licensing the Kernel

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kernelTRAP: "I was impressed in the sense that it was a hell of a lot better than the disaster that were the earlier drafts," Linus Torvalds explained in reply to a comment suggesting that he was impressed with the final draft of the GPLv3. He went on to add, "I still think GPLv2 is simply the better license." The discussion began with a suggestion that the Linux kernel be dual-licensed GPLv2 and GPLv3.

Also: The Linux Kernel on a Dual Basis?

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More in Tux Machines

Leftovers: Ubuntu and Debian

  • This Is the Final Artwork of the Debian GNU/Linux 9 "Stretch" Operating System
    Today, October 25, 2016, Debian Project's Laura Arjona Reina and Niels Thykier proudly announced Juliette Taka Belin as the official artwork winner for the upcoming Debian GNU/Linux 9 "Stretch" operating system.
  • Rankings, Condorcet and free software: Calculating the results for the Stretch Artwork Survey
    We had 12 candidates for the Debian Stretch Artwork and a survey was set up for allowing people to vote which one they prefer. The survey was run in my LimeSurvey instance, LimeSurvey its a nice free software with a lot of features. It provides a “Ranking” question type, and it was very easy for allowing people to “vote” in the Debian style (Debian uses the Condorcet method in its elections). However, although LimeSurvey offers statistics and even graphics to show the results of many type of questions, its output for the Ranking type is not useful, so I had to export the data and use another tool to find the winner.
  • Reviews: Quirky Zorin and Boring Ubuntu
    Perhaps not so coincidentally, Joshua Allen Holm reached nearly the same conclusion today with Ubuntu 16.10. He began, "At first glance, little has changed in Ubuntu 16.10. It looks almost exactly like every other recent release of Ubuntu." He spent most of his article looking at Unity 8, which is still just a preview, and said it does show promise with its early "polish." Holm concluded there was little reason to recommend an upgrade unless you need a fix provided or wish the newer software. In addition, Chin Wong recently upgraded and came to nearly the same exact conclusions.
  • Canonical explains Ubuntu Advantage benefits -- could your business switch to Linux?
    Linux-based desktop operating systems are better than Windows because they are free, right? Whoa there, folks. Neither are necessarily better or worse -- it really depends on your needs. Cost-free operating systems, such as Ubuntu and Fedora, are definitely great for home consumers looking to breathe new life into old machines. With that said, the benefits of Linux extend beyond money and cost-savings. Linux being free is sort of misleading when it comes to business use too. While a small business with a few employees can get by with free support, larger companies would be crazy to go it entirely alone -- paid support is a necessity for success. Today, Canonical releases a well-designed infographic that explains the benefits of its paid support, called 'Ubuntu Advantage'. "Ubuntu Advantage is the commercial support package from Canonical. It includes Landscape, the Ubuntu systems management tool, and the Canonical Livepatch Service, which enables you to apply kernel fixes without restarting your Ubuntu 16.04 LTS systems", says Canonical.

Leftovers: OSS

  • How Walmart Is Embracing the Open-Source OpenStack Model
    Walmart wasn't always an open-source advocate, but now it's one of the biggest consumers of open-source technology and is actively building a culture that fosters open-source development. BARCELONA, Spain—Walmart, the world largest retailer and one the largest employers, aims to give back to the OpenStack community. In a session at the OpenStack Summit here, Andrew Mitry, lead architect for Walmart's OpenStack effort, and Megan Rossetti, part of the OpenStack Operations team at Walmart, detailed how the open-source model is working for the retail giant.
  • Chain Releases Open-Source Version of Chain Core Technology Powering Visa’s New B2B Connect
    On October 21, 2016, Visa announced a new partnership with blockchain enterprise company Chain that will develop “a simple, fast and secure way to process B2B payments globally.” Dubbed Visa B2B Connect, the system will offer participating pilot financial institutions a consistent process for managing settlement through Visa’s standard practices. “The time has never been better for the global business community to take advantage of new payment technologies and improve some of the most fundamental processes needed to run their businesses,” said McCarthy. “We are developing our new solution to give our financial institution partners an efficient, transparent way for payments to be made across the world.”
  • Chain Launches Open Source Developer Platform
    Chain, a provider of blockchain technology solutions, today released Chain Core Developer Edition, a free and open source version of its distributed ledger platform that enables organizations to issue and transfer assets on permissioned blockchain networks. For the first time, developers can download and install Chain Core to start or join a blockchain network, build financial applications, and access in-depth technical documentation and tutorials. Users have the option to run their prototypes on a test network, or “testnet,” operated by Chain, Microsoft, and the Initiative for Cryptocurrencies and Contracts (IC3), a collaboration of Cornell University, Cornell Tech, UC Berkeley, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, and the Technion.
  • Open Source ERP Options For Small and Medium Businesses
    Open source ERP (enterprise resource planning) holds a small portion of the overall ERP market, which is mainly ruled by few commercial products provided by well-known enterprise software vendors such as Microsoft, Oracle, SAP, and Sage.
  • Steering Kubernetes Through Uncharted Territory
    Taylor Thomas is a Cloud Software Engineer for the Software Defined Infrastructure team at Intel working on Kubernetes, CI/CD, and the Snap open telemetry framework. The team also uses Kubernetes to run a large part of their services, and Thomas will describe this work in his upcoming talk "Off the Beaten Path: An Explorer’s Guide to Kubernetes " at KubeCon. In this article, however, he provides a preview of some challenges that the team has encountered.
  • PUFIN Open Source Blockchain Tech May Be Marketplace Lending Answer
  • Software Freedom Kosova 2016
    Software Freedom Kosova (SFK) 2016 took place in Prishtina from October 21-23, 2016. We were able to push a special Fedora badge for SFK to be awarded to SFK attendees who vist the Fedora booth. The badge was awarded 14 times out of which 12 were existing contributors while 2 new contributors were onboarded at the event ! Yaay – we look forward to seeing you in the community nafieshehu and marianab.
  • OpenStack Summit Barcelona

6 smart settings to make your Android phone anticipate your needs

There's no denying that our smartphones have made our lives so much easier, putting our contacts and schedules, our driving directions, the whole internet, right at our fingertips. But if you're using an Android phone you might be leaving even more convenience on the table. There are a bunch of super-smart settings in Nougat and Google Now that’ll make your Android device feel like it’s 10 steps ahead of you. Your Android phone can be proactively telling you how long it’ll take to get to work in the morning, and nudging you when your favorite team is about to take the field. Your device can keep itself unlocked whenever it’s on you, and those snapshots you just took can automatically be arranged into beautiful collages. Battery running low? Android can know to dial down background activity to keep your phone alive. And if you love the idea of asking Google questions without ever touching your phone, you can train your phone to do that, too. Read more

Android and Tizen Leftovers