Language Selection

English French German Italian Portuguese Spanish

About Tux Machines

Tuesday, 17 Jan 17 - Tux Machines is a community-driven public service/news site which has been around for over a decade and primarily focuses on GNU/LinuxSubscribe now Syndicate content

Search This Site

Quick Roundup

Type Title Author Replies Last Postsort icon
Story today's odds & ends srlinuxx 28/09/2009 - 3:16am
Story Buying Software in Ubuntu srlinuxx 28/09/2009 - 10:49am
Story The size of the Gentoo tree srlinuxx 28/09/2009 - 10:51am
Story First KDialogue Is Now Open srlinuxx 28/09/2009 - 10:53am
Story FreeBSD 8.0 vs. Ubuntu 9.10 Benchmarks srlinuxx 28/09/2009 - 10:54am
Story DistroWatch Weekly, Issue 322 srlinuxx 28/09/2009 - 10:55am
Story Are Schools Giving Students The Wrong Idea About Technology? srlinuxx 28/09/2009 - 12:56pm
Story Apache Holds Steady in a Changing Web Server Landscape srlinuxx 28/09/2009 - 12:57pm
Story Mozilla coders join Palm, apparently jabbing Apple srlinuxx 28/09/2009 - 12:59pm
Story Sharing Linux srlinuxx 28/09/2009 - 2:52pm

GPLv3 is officially open source

CBR: The Open Source Initiative's chairman, Michael Tiemann, announced Friday that the organization's licensing board have officially approve the version three of the General Public License and Lesser General Public License as OSI-approved.

IBM adds heft to OpenOffice open-source project

Filed under
OOo

cnet: IBM said on Monday that it will join the OpenOffice.org project and pledged to further use the open-source software in its own products.

Care to Ubuntu? Part 3

Filed under
Ubuntu

mitchelaneous.com: To continue from where I left off previously, my installation of Ubuntu’s Feisty Fawn (7.04) has been full of nothing but pleasant surprises. Granted, not all applications/software/games will work on Ubuntu….yet. But thanks to some clever people over at the Wine project, that is soon to be a thing of the past.

Windows, Linux vie for honours

Filed under
Linux

australianit.news.com: THE energy efficiency battle between Linux and Windows is intensifying, with each claiming to be better at cutting power consumption and avoiding environmental damage.

AMD: GPU Specifications Without NDAs!

Filed under
Hardware

phoronix: This morning at the X Developer Summit in the United Kingdom, Matthew Tippett and John Bridgman of AMD have announced that they will be releasing their ATI GPU specifications without any Non-Disclosure Agreements needed by the developers!

Audio Editing Freedom - An introduction to Audacity

Filed under
Software

raiden's realm: Audacity is a sound editing program that puts the freedom to create into the hands of the user. It is a vital tool for audiophiles everywhere who love to record, mix and edit their own music or sound files, and for the average joe who just wants to do a little audio editing.

How to give your low-end Canon digital camera RAW support

Filed under
HowTos

linux.com: If you have a point-and-click digital camera made by Canon, you may be able to turn on all sorts of features usually reserved for more expensive SLRs. That includes live histograms, depth-of-field calculation, under and overexposure highlighting, and -- best of all -- shooting your pictures in RAW. The secret is CHDK, an enhanced, free software replacement firmware.

Windows, Linux, OS X User Interfaces: All Fluff, No Function

Filed under
OS

OSWeekly: I have been wondering about this for sometime now - what defines a professional looking UI for an operating system? Each OS platform has its strengths and weaknesses. But what has me concerned is how each of the three platforms appear to have taken such a fancy to its UI so much that other important features seem to have taken a backseat.

Video Surveillance With ZoneMinder On Ubuntu

Filed under
Ubuntu
HowTos

ZoneMinder is the top Linux video camera security and surveillance solution. In this document I will cover how to get ZoneMinder up and running on Ubuntu 6.06.1 LTS or Dapper Drake with the recent updates included.

The March of the penguin

Filed under
Linux

dailycamera.com: Shopping for a home computer involves more than just choosing hardware — buyers must also pick what kind of operating system they want to run that new machine. And for most people, that's long meant choosing between Microsoft's Windows, which runs on PCs, or OS, the system that operates Apple's Macintosh. Enter Linux.

Benchmarking the MD3000 powervault under linux

Filed under
Hardware

broadband reports: I've been spending some time benchmarking the Dell MD-3000 powervault storage array under SuSE 10.2 x86_64 linux. It is ok for the price we paid (half retail), but this storage array, with the guts of an old IBM DS4100 which had an anemic 485 MB/sec internal bus speed, is not able to max out the total sequential read or write performance of the 15 disks it is able to contain.

Installing eAccelerator on mod_php

Filed under
HowTos

FOSSwire: PHP is an interpreted language. That unfortunately means that every time a client requests a PHP page from your site, the PHP interpreter has to re-read the script and compile it on the fly before it is run. It can be beneficial to use a PHP caching system to shave some time off the pageload.

openSUSE 10.3 Beta 3 Report

Filed under
Reviews
SUSE
-s

Welp, we're in the homestretch now. Beta 3 of openSUSE 10.3 was released a few days ago, and with only one more developmental release before final, we were hoping things were starting to shape up. This release doesn't bring too many surprises or any new eye candy, but most subsystems are stablizing. With 587 MB of changes, developers are homing in on their goal.

John Carmack not as interested in Linux (and OpenGL?)

Filed under
Gaming

beyond3d.com: A german publication has posted an interview with Todd Hollenshead, id Software's CEO, that reveals id Software and John Carmack are no longer as committed to Linux as they have been.

Disable Syntax Highlighting in Vim

Filed under
HowTos

howto geek: I'm the type of geek that always has an open ssh session connected to my servers, but ever since I switched to using a Mac running OS X, I noticed a huge annoyance in my terminal… the syntax highlighting makes it impossible to read the files I'm trying to edit.

80% on Novell

Filed under
SUSE

matt asay: OK, so sometimes I'm wrong. Miguel de Icaza called out an error I made in criticizing Novell for its open-source strategy. I admit that I find it hard to see beyond Novell's patent pact with Microsoft but, as Miguel pointed out in a string of emails between us today, this leaves out a lot that Novell does well.

Vector Linux 5.8 on 450Mhz K6-2, 256Mb

Filed under
Linux

kmandla.wordpress.com: In a lot of the same ways I liked Wolvix, I like Vector Linux. On the other hand, there’s enough that’s different that I probably won’t keep it. Part of that might be a sophomore slump having just seen Wolvix in action: It’s a hard act to follow.

2.4.36-pre1, Preventing NULL Dereferences

Filed under
Linux

kernelTRAP: "In private discussions, Solar Designer proposed to restrict the ability to map the NULL address to CAP_RAW_IO capable processes only. The idea behind this was to prevent 'normal' users from trying to exploit NULL dereferences in the kernel which have not been discovered yet."

Paterva Evolution is dead, long live Maltego

Filed under
Software

linux.com: As noted in the update to our review of Paterva Evolution, a personal data mining tool, Roelof Temmingh has removed the binaries for the application after having received legal threats over its use. In an email on the Paterva announcement's mailing list over the weekend, Temmingh revealed more about why the binaries had to be removed and unveiled his plans for future work on the project.

Chuck Norris Week on Ubuntu Forums

Filed under
Ubuntu

Motho ke motho ka botho: For the next week, most (if not all) of the UF.org staff have transmogrified into miniature renditions of everyone’s favorite superhuman being, Chuck Norris.

Syndicate content

More in Tux Machines

Leftovers: OSS

  • D-Wave Unveils Open-Source Software for Quantum Computing
    Canada-based D-Wave Systems has released an open-source software tool designed to help developers program quantum computers, Wired reported Wednesday.
  • D-Wave builds open quantum computing software development ecosystem
    D-Wave Systems has released an open source quantum computing chunk of software. Quantum computing, as we know, moves us on from the world of mere 1’s and 0’s in binary to the new level of ‘superposition’ qubits that can represent many more values and therefore more computing power — read this accessible piece for a simple explanation of quantum computing.
  • FOSS Compositing With Natron
    Anyone who likes to work with graphics will at one time or another find compositing software useful. Luckily, FOSS has several of the best in Blender and Natron.
  • Hadoop Creator Doug Cutting: 5 Ways to Be Successful with Open Source in 2017
    Because of my long-standing association with the Apache Software Foundation, I’m often asked the question, “What’s next for open source technology?” My typical response is variations of “I don’t know” to “the possibilities are endless.” Over the past year, we’ve seen open source technology make strong inroads into the mainstream of enterprise technology. Who would have thought that my work on Hadoop ten years ago would impact so many industries – from manufacturing to telecom to finance. They have all taken hold of the powers of the open source ecosystem not only to improve the customer experience, become more innovative and grow the bottom line, but also to support work toward the greater good of society through genomic research, precision medicine and programs to stop human trafficking, as just a few examples. Below I’ve listed five tips for folks who are curious about how to begin working with open source and what to expect from the ever-changing ecosystem.
  • Radio Free HPC Looks at New Open Source Software for Quantum Computing
    In this podcast, the Radio Free HPC team looks at D-Wave’s new open source software for quantum computing. The software is available on github along with a whitepaper written by Cray Research alums Mike Booth and Steve Reinhardt.
  • Why events matter and how to do them right
    Marina Paych was a newcomer to open source software when she left a non-governmental organization for a new start in the IT sector—on her birthday, no less. But the real surprise turned out to be open source. Fast forward two years and this head of organizational development runs an entire department, complete with a promotional staff that strategically markets her employer's open source web development services on a worldwide scale.
  • Exploring OpenStack's Trove DBaaS Cloud Servic
    You can install databases such as MySQL, PostgreSQL, or even MongoDB very quickly thanks to package management, but the installation is not even half the battle. A functioning database also needs user accounts and several configuration steps for better performance and security. This need for additional configuration poses challenges in cloud environments. You can always manually install a virtual machine in traditional settings, but cloud users want to generate an entire virtual environment from a template. Manual intervention is difficult or sometimes even impossible.
  • Mobile Edge Computing Creates ‘Tiny Data Centers’ at the Edge
    “Usually access networks include all kinds of encryption and tunneling protocols,” says Fite. “It’s not a standard, native-IP environment.” Saguna’s platform creates a bridge between the access network to a small OpenStack cloud, which works in a standard IP environment. It provides APIs about such things as location, registration for services, traffic direction, radio network services, and available bandwidth.

Leftovers: Ubuntu and Debian

  • Debian Creeps Closer To The Next Release
    I’ve been alarmed by the slow progress of Debian towards the next release. They’ve had several weird gyrations in numbers of “release-critical” bugs and still many packages fail to build from source. Last time this stage, they had only a few hundred bugs to go. Now they are over 600. I guess some of that comes from increasing the number of included packages. There are bound to be more bad interactions, like changing the C compiler. I hate that language which seems to be a moving target… Systemd seems to be smoother but it still gives me problems.
  • Mir: 2016 end of year review
    2016 was a good year for Mir – it is being used in more places, it has more and better upstream support and it is easier to use by downstream projects. 2017 will be even better and will see version 1.0 released.
  • Ubuntu Still Planning For Mir 1.0 In 2017
    Alan Griffiths of Canonical today posted a year-in-review for Mir during 2016 and a look ahead to this year.
  • Linux Mint 18.1 “Serena” KDE – BETA Release

GNU Gimp Development

  • Community-supported development of GEGL now live
    Almost every new major feature people have been asking us for, be it high bit depth support, or full CMYK support, or layer effects, would be impossible without having a robust, capable image processing core. Øyvind Kolås picked up GEGL in mid-2000s and has been working on it in his spare time ever since. He is the author of 42% of commits in GEGL and 50% of commits in babl (pixel data conversion library).
  • 2016 in review
    When we released GIMP 2.9.2 in late 2015 and stepped over into 2016, we already knew that we’d be doing mostly polishing. This turned out to be true to a larger extent, and most of the work we did was under-the-hood changes. But quite a few new features slipped in. So, what are the big user-visible changes for GIMP in 2016?

Development News

  • Dart-on-LLVM
    Dart already has an excellent virtual machine which uses just-in-time compilation to get excellent performance. Since Dart is dynamically typed (more precisely, it’s optionally typed), a JIT compiler is a natural fit — it can use the types available at runtime to perform optimizations that a static compiler can’t do.
  • Google Developers Experiment With Plumbing Dartlang Into LLVM
    It's been a while since last hearing much excitement around Google's Dart programming language that's an alternative to JavaScript. This ECMA-approved language is now being used with IoT devices, can still be source-to-source compiled for JavaScript, and the latest is that the Google developers have been experimenting with wiring it into LLVM.
  • A behind the scenes look at Exercism for improving coding skills
    In our recent article, we talked about Exercism, an open source project to help people level up in their programming skills with exercises for dozens of different programming languages. Practitioners complete each exercise and then receive feedback on their response, enabling them to learn from their peer group's experience. Katrina Owen is the founder of Exercism, and I interviewed her as research for the original article. There are some fantastic nuggets of information and insight in here that we wanted to share with anyone interested in learning to programming, teaching programming, and how a project like this takes contributions like this from others.
  • ‘You are Not Expected to Understand This’: An Explainer on Unix’s Most Notorious Code Comment
    The phrase “You are Not Expected to Understand This” is probably the most famous comment in the history of Unix. And last month, at the Systems We Love conference in San Francisco, systems researcher Arun Thomas explained to an audience exactly what it was that they weren’t supposed to understand.