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Tuesday, 27 Sep 16 - Tux Machines is a community-driven public service/news site which has been around for over a decade and primarily focuses on GNU/LinuxSubscribe now Syndicate content

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Quick Roundup

How to make a Live CD

Filed under
HowTos

This isn't a tutorial for making your own distro- that requires time, money, and m4d-1337 technical 5k!11z. This is how to make a Live CD for an application of your choice.

==Why have a Live CD?==

Portability. A program would normally have to be installed several times in order for it to be able to be used wherever you go, so why not put it on a CD?

Hiding arguments from ps

Filed under
HowTos

There are many articles on the Interwobble telling you how to set the process title on Linux; they all concentrate on the problem of placing an arbitrarily long string in argv[0] to report status information in the process list.

Mark Shuttleworth: The Wizard of OS

Filed under
Ubuntu

To find the 22 innovators, instigators, and inventors to honor with a Rave Award this year, we started by looking for the most intriguing breakthroughs in the world today — then tracked down the individuals who made them happen.

Installing Ubuntu on Virtual PC for Windows Lovers

Filed under
HowTos

I recently decided to try out Ubuntu to see what all the fuss was about. My notes here apply to Virtual PC 2007.

Downloading Ubuntu and Setting up the VPC

To start, download the iso image from the Ubuntu download site. I downloaded the 7.04 version first since I assumed the bigger the version number, the better, right? We’ll see this isn’t always the case as we’ll see.

Howto Setup a Lighttpd Chroot Jail Web Server under Debian Linux

Filed under
Linux
Software
Security
Web
Ubuntu
HowTos

Security, speed, compliance, and flexibility--all of these describe LightTPD which is rapidly redefining efficiency of a webserver; as it is designed and optimized for high performance environments.

ASCII-Art fun: cowsay and FIGlet

Filed under
Software

Ever wanted to type in text terminal somehow funnier? This article describes two programs that can be used to generate a little less standard output in Linux console: cowsay and figlet.

Reasons for Apache’s 56%

Filed under
Software

In a recent post I asked why Apache is losing market share for several months in a row now. Several readers responded with insightful comments and possible answers like better configuration tools or today’s high quality of IIS.

Who are the Linux desktop users?

Filed under
Linux

A typical Linux desktop user is a guy in his twenties who's computer savvy but may very well not be an IT professional. Those are some of the conclusions you can draw from the just-released openSUSE survey results.

Review of SAM Linux 2007

Filed under
Linux
Reviews

Sam Linux 2007 is another one of those distros that clearly has a lot going for it because numerous people have told me to look in it's direction. On further investigation it seems odd that I've not heard of this release before.

Interface, aesthetics and general feel

Planet Penguin Racer

Filed under
Gaming

It’s about time for another FOSSwire game post and this time I’m going to be looking at Planet Penguin Racer.

PP Racer is actually a fork of a now-abandoned game, Tux Racer. You can still download the old Tux Racer, but the last news for it was back in 2001. For the newer levels and features, you’ll probably want to play PP Racer.

Burning Issues With Vista

Filed under
Microsoft

Having heard that Vista's CD/DVD burn utility by default uses a nonstandard format, possibly as a result of yet another one of Microsoft's lock-in schemes, I decided to check things out for myself. That would also give me a nice chance to see what Vista was all about.

The plan was simple:

1. Locate a Vista box,
2. Bring empty CD's plus some arbitrary files on a USB stick, and

openSUSE Simple Software Installּ

Filed under
SUSE

A great solution for finding and installing software in openSUSE.

Benjamin Weber's solution provides a meta-repository of packages from repositories around the web, and a meta-package format makes it very easy to install new software, without having to find and register new repositories, or even start the dreaded YaST...

on desktop wars

Filed under
Software

Yesterday, after arriving at the Ubuntu Developer Summit in Sevilla, I had three people in a row claiming one of the following: "You're a KDE guy, I'm GNOME guy, so we should be fighting (rather than drinking beer together)", "KDE? Sorry, I'm a GNOME user." or "... (silence)".

Dell To Fix Misleading Advertising Links

Filed under
Linux

In late February or early March, active LXer member, cyber_rigger, raised concerns about Dell advertising links showing up in Google searches related to Linux computers. In searching on the terms "linux notebooks", a Dell ad appeared in the result page.

Nina Reiser Couldn’t Win

Filed under
Reiser

Nina Reiser vanished sometime during the day on September 5, 2006, after taking her children to visit Hans Reiser. Though Nina is still missing, investigators in Oakland, California eventually gathered enough evidence against Hans Reiser to charge him with her murder.

Litrix v7.4 Linux LiveCD Screenshots

Filed under
Linux

We've never heard of this Brazilian Linux distribution but decided to give it a shot with the recent release of Litrix v7.4. The Litrix LiveCD is based upon Gentoo Linux and with the new additions in v7.4 being NTFS write support, support for wireless networking, i686 optimizations, NVIDIA's binary blob pre-installed, and Beryl integration.

Linux: Improved KVM Performance, Vista Support

Filed under
Linux

Avi Kivity announced significant performance improvements and support for running 32-bit Windows Vista as a guest within the latest release of KVM.

The happy theme of today's kvm is the significant performance improvements, brought to you by a growing team of developers. I've clocked kbuild at within 25% of native.

More Here.

Virtual Hosting With PureFTPd And MySQL (Incl. Quota And Bandwidth Management) On Debian Etch

Filed under
HowTos

This document describes how to install a PureFTPd server that uses virtual users from a MySQL database instead of real system users. This is much more performant and allows to have thousands of ftp users on a single machine.

Simple Instructions for enabling all Necessary Repositories with openSUSE

Filed under
SUSE

The openSUSE Community website has a neat and tidy guide for enabling all the necessary repositories that you would need, on openSUSE. This includes the online OSS and Non-OSS repositories, as well as the popular Guru and Packman repositories.

brightside: workspace switcher

Filed under
Software

This utility for the GNOME desktop allows you to switch between virtual desktops by moving the mouse cursor to the edge of the screen, as if dragging it to the next one beside it, and is a nice alternative to keyboard shortcuts for the more mouse-oriented user.

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More in Tux Machines

Security News

  • Tuesday's security updates
  • New Open Source Linux Ransomware Divides Infosec Community
    Following our investigation into this matter, and seeing the vitriol-filled reaction from some people in the infosec community, Zaitsev has told Softpedia that he decided to remove the project from GitHub, shortly after this article's publication. The original, unedited article is below.
  • Fax machines' custom Linux allows dial-up hack
    Party like it's 1999, phreakers: a bug in Epson multifunction printer firmware creates a vector to networks that don't have their own Internet connection. The exploit requirements are that an attacker can trick the victim into installing malicious firmware, and that the victim is using the device's fax line. The firmware is custom Linux, giving the printers a familiar networking environment for bad actors looking to exploit the fax line as an attack vector. Once they're in that ancient environment, it's possible to then move onto the network to which the the printer's connected. Yves-Noel Weweler, Ralf Spenneberg and Hendrik Schwartke of Open Source Training in Germany discovered the bug, which occurs because Epson WorkForce multifunction printers don't demand signed firmware images.
  • Google just saved the journalist who was hit by a 'record' cyberattack
    Google just stepped in with its massive server infrastructure to run interference for journalist Brian Krebs. Last week, Krebs' site, Krebs On Security, was hit by a massive distributed denial-of-service (DDoS) attack that took it offline, the likes of which was a "record" that was nearly double the traffic his host Akamai had previously seen in cyberattacks. Now just days later, Krebs is back online behind the protection of Google, which offers a little-known program called Project Shield to help protect independent journalists and activists' websites from censorship. And in the case of Krebs, the DDoS attack was certainly that: The attempt to take his site down was in response to his recent reporting on a website called vDOS, a service allegedly created by two Israeli men that would carry out cyberattacks on behalf of paying customers.
  • Krebs DDoS aftermath: industry in shock at size, depth and complexity of attack
    “This attack didn’t stop, it came in wave after wave, hundreds of millions of packets per second,” says Josh Shaul, Akamai’s vice president of product management, when Techworld spoke to him. “This was different from anything we’ve ever seen before in our history of DDoS attacks. They hit our systems pretty hard.” Clearly still a bit stunned, Shaul describes the Krebs DDoS as unprecedented. Unlike previous large DDoS attacks such as the infamous one carried out on cyber-campaign group Spamhaus in 2013, this one did not use fancy amplification or reflection to muster its traffic. It was straight packet assault from the old school.
  • iOS 10 makes it easier to crack iPhone back-ups, says security firm
    INSECURITY FIRM Elcomsoft has measured the security of iOS 10 and found that the software is easier to hack than ever before. Elcomsoft is not doing Apple any favours here. The fruity firm has just launched the iPhone 7, which has as many problems as it has good things. Of course, there are no circumstances when vulnerable software is a good thing, but when you have just launched that version of the software, it is really bad timing. Don't hate the player, though, as this is what Elcomsoft, and what Apple, are supposed to be doing right. "We discovered a major security flaw in the iOS 10 back-up protection mechanism. This security flaw allowed us to develop a new attack that is able to bypass certain security checks when enumerating passwords protecting local (iTunes) back-ups made by iOS 10 devices," said Elcomsoft's Oleg Afonin in a blog post.
  • After Tesla: why cybersecurity is central to the car industry's future
    The news that a Tesla car was hacked from 12 miles away tells us that the explosive growth in automotive connectivity may be rapidly outpacing automotive security. This story is illustrative of two persistent problems afflicting many connected industries: the continuing proliferation of vulnerabilities in new software, and the misguided view that cybersecurity is separate from concept, design, engineering and production. This leads to a ‘fire brigade approach’ to cybersecurity where security is not baked in at the design stage for either hardware or software but added in after vulnerabilities are discovered by cybersecurity specialists once the product is already on the market.

Ofcom blesses Linux-powered, open source DIY radio ‘revolution’

Small scale DAB radio was (quite literally) conceived in an Ofcom engineer’s garden shed in Brighton, on a Raspberry Pi, running a full open source stack, in his spare time. Four years later, Ofcom has given the thumbs up to small scale DAB after concluding that trials in 10 UK cities were judged to be a hit. We gave you an exclusive glimpse into the trials last year, where you could compare the specialised proprietary encoders with the Raspberry Pi-powered encoders. “We believe that there is a significant level of demand from smaller radio stations for small scale DAB, and that a wider roll-out of additional small scale services into more geographic areas would be both technically possible and commercially sustainable,” notes Ofcom. Read more

nginx

Case in point: I've been using the Apache HTTP server for many years now. Indeed, you could say that I've been using Apache since before it was even called "Apache"—what started as the original NCSA HTTP server, and then the patched server that some enterprising open-source developers distributed, and finally the Apache Foundation-backed open-source colossus that everyone recognizes, and even relies on, today—doing much more than just producing HTTP servers. Apache's genius was its modularity. You could, with minimal effort, configure Apache to use a custom configuration of modules. If you wanted to have a full-featured server with tons of debugging and diagnostics, you could do that. If you wanted to have high-level languages, such as Perl and Tcl, embedded inside your server for high-speed Web applications, you could do that. If you needed the ability to match, analyze and rewrite every part of an HTTP transaction, you could do that, with mod_rewrite. And of course, there were third-party modules as well. Read more

Linux and Open Source Hardware for IoT

Most of the new 21 open source software projects for IoT that we examined last week listed Linux hacker boards as their prime development platforms. This week, we’ll look at open source and developer-friendly Linux hardware for building Internet of Things devices, from simple microcontroller-based technology to Linux-based boards. In recent years, it’s become hard to find an embedded board that isn’t marketing with the IoT label. Yet, the overused term is best suited for boards with low prices, small footprints, low power consumption, and support for wireless communications and industrial interfaces. Camera support is useful for some IoT applications, but high-end multimedia is usually counterproductive to attributes like low cost and power consumption. Read more