Language Selection

English French German Italian Portuguese Spanish

About Tux Machines

Tuesday, 17 Jan 17 - Tux Machines is a community-driven public service/news site which has been around for over a decade and primarily focuses on GNU/LinuxSubscribe now Syndicate content

Search This Site

Quick Roundup

Using NoMachine NX to Remotely Administer Ubuntu

Filed under
HowTos

just uber: I set up a desktop the other day which I intend to store some files on. The problem is however, I usually use my laptop, and I’m too lazy to walk upstairs to the desktop. I’ve always just used ssh to administer servers through the command line, but in this case, this being a desktop, I wanted a GUI.

Set Up PC-BSD v1.4 beta

Filed under
BSD
HowTos

This article describes how to set up PC-BSD v1.4 beta. PC-BSD is released under the BSD license. PC-BSD is a desktop operating system based on FreeBSD. It uses KDE as its desktop environment.

PCLinuxOS Magazine September 2007 Issue 13 Released!

Filed under
PCLOS

PCLinuxOS Magazine, September 2007 Issue is available to download. Some highlights include PCLinuxOS - A Walk Down History Lane, KDE User Guide - Part 8, and Ubuntu's Hype is Misleading.

KDE 4.0: Well worth the wait!

Filed under
KDE

pinderkent.blogsavy: I was disappointed today to hear that the release of KDE 4.0 will be delayed by two months. The delay is caused by the insertion of two extra betas. But this isn’t a bad thing at all.

Open source a natural for anti-virus software?

Filed under
OSS

matt asay: Consider: a large population of users who can report virii. Many people with the same "itch" (to be free of virii). A subsegment of both communities with the aptitude and interest in killing these virii. Should be a perfect market for open source, right?

Ubuntu Everywhere?

Filed under
Ubuntu

binstock.blogspot: I have long felt that desktop Linux would become a reality only when you could go to a Linux gathering and find no more than a third of the attendees at the command line. Earlier this summer, I was at O'Reilly's Ubuntu Live conference in Portland, and the Ubuntu tribe were almost all using the GUI interface.

Shorties

Filed under
Linux
  • VirtualBox now in Debian

  • Ubuntu and Ruby
  • NOKIA 6300 USB & Ubuntu

Linux: 2.6.23-rc5, Kernel Summit

Filed under
Linux

kernelTRAP: Linus Torvalds released the fifth release candidate for the upcoming 2.6.23 Linux kernel noting that he was on his way to Cambridge, England, for the 2007 kernel summit. The invite-only kernel summit has been hosted in Ontario, Canada the past five years, the being the first year it has been hosted in Europe.

Off Topics

Filed under
Misc
  • Tales From The Tech Side (or...would you like valium with your cube?)

  • Diamond goes head to head against Nvidia
  • Isn't It Time We Forked the Concept of a Computer?
  • Thoughts about Captchas: Today animated GIFs, tomorrow Flash videos?

U.S. Backs Open XML as ISO Vote Nears

cio today: In the U.S. vote for Open XML this week, IBM strongly argued against approval of Open XML, and Oracle joined IBM in voting against it. Voting in favor of the Open XML format were Hewlett-Packard, EMC, Intel, Sony Electronics, Lexmark International, and Apple, as well as the Defense Department, Homeland Security, and NIST.

Network Security with tcpwrappers

Filed under
HowTos

Ubuntu tutorials: I thought today I would outline a few tips on network security with tcpwrappers or, as you’re probably more familiar, the hosts.allow and hosts.deny files. How you can use them?

Writing Scripts that need root permission

Filed under
HowTos

Linux by Example: While executing commands that needs root permission, I rely on sudo. Sudo provides me a very convenient way to execute root privilege commands from my user account provided with my user account password.

Bye bye Dapper. Hello Feisty.

Filed under
Ubuntu

opensourcelearning.info: One wisdom in the realm of Linux says: “If it isn’t broken, don’t fix it”. Well, after a year of playing with Ubuntu Dapper Drake it was time to move ahead. It was getting broken.

Comprehensive Linux Terminal Performance Comparison

Filed under
Software

Martin Ankerl: Linux has an abundance of excellent terminal applications. Interestingly, I could not find any decent comparison of their text display performance. Since I use the command line a lot, I want text output that is as fast as possible.

People Behind KDE: Summer of Code 2007 (3/4)

Filed under
KDE

People Behind KDE releases the third interview in its series of four interviews with students who are working on KDE as part of the Google Summer of Code 2007 - meet Leo Franchi, Juan González Aguilera, Andrew Manson and Marcus Hanwell!

Saving Power on Intel Hardware Using Powertop

only ubuntu: PowerTOP is a Linux tool that finds the software component(s) that make your laptop use more power than necessary while it is idle. However... there are many things that can ruin the party, both inside the kernel and in userspace.

Xubuntu plus Gnome equals … a metapackage

Filed under
Ubuntu

kmandla.wordpress: I’m going out on a limb saying it, but here’s my brief prediction: Xubuntu’s push toward Gnome applications is going to marginalize the distro.

Nokia N800 As an EBook Reader Using FBReader

Filed under
Hardware

Every Flavour Beans: Though N800 is an Internet Tablet, it can serve as a very good ebook reader too, for those casual/semi-serious readers who don’t want to invest in a stand-alone ebook reader. At its screen size and resolution, reading ebooks is extremely pleasing on the eye.

More ISO OOXML news ahead of today's deadline

Filed under
Microsoft
OSS

the inquirer: THERE'S MORE news about countries' ISO votes on Microsoft's proposed OOXML document formats ahead of today's deadline for votes to be submitted.

Also: Poland vote$ for Microsoft OOXML

Conky: highly configurable system monitor for X

Filed under
Software

DPotD: Conky is one of my favorite applications for all of my Linux distros. It is a light-weight system monitor (according to the project page) that can monitor many different aspects of your computer.

Syndicate content

More in Tux Machines

Development News

  • Dart-on-LLVM
    Dart already has an excellent virtual machine which uses just-in-time compilation to get excellent performance. Since Dart is dynamically typed (more precisely, it’s optionally typed), a JIT compiler is a natural fit — it can use the types available at runtime to perform optimizations that a static compiler can’t do.
  • Google Developers Experiment With Plumbing Dartlang Into LLVM
    It's been a while since last hearing much excitement around Google's Dart programming language that's an alternative to JavaScript. This ECMA-approved language is now being used with IoT devices, can still be source-to-source compiled for JavaScript, and the latest is that the Google developers have been experimenting with wiring it into LLVM.
  • A behind the scenes look at Exercism for improving coding skills
    In our recent article, we talked about Exercism, an open source project to help people level up in their programming skills with exercises for dozens of different programming languages. Practitioners complete each exercise and then receive feedback on their response, enabling them to learn from their peer group's experience. Katrina Owen is the founder of Exercism, and I interviewed her as research for the original article. There are some fantastic nuggets of information and insight in here that we wanted to share with anyone interested in learning to programming, teaching programming, and how a project like this takes contributions like this from others.
  • ‘You are Not Expected to Understand This’: An Explainer on Unix’s Most Notorious Code Comment
    The phrase “You are Not Expected to Understand This” is probably the most famous comment in the history of Unix. And last month, at the Systems We Love conference in San Francisco, systems researcher Arun Thomas explained to an audience exactly what it was that they weren’t supposed to understand.

Red Hat and Fedora

  • OpenStack Swift: Scalable and Durable Object Storage
  • OpenStack Swift by Christian Schwede, Red Hat
    In his LinuxCon Europe talk, Christian Schwede from Red Hat talked about how Swift is deployed at large enterprise companies with many of these deployments operating on a scale of multiple petabytes.
  • [Red Hat CEO] 5 resolutions to become a more open leader in 2017
    I'm always looking for ways to help people understand the power of open. And this year, I'm even more committed to showing others how a culture of openness can reinvigorate an organization and generate new opportunities for innovation, whether in the area of software development or beyond. Here are five resolutions we can all make if we want to become more open leaders in 2017.
  • ABR Of Red Hat, Inc. (NYSE:RHT) At 1.47
  • Fedora 26 Planning For A Modular Server Preview
    Fedora Linux has been pursuing a path of modularity whereby modules provide different software purpose/functionality and are integrated/tested at the module level and a unit of delivery itself. With the Fedora 26 release they are hoping to provide a Fedora Modular Server preview build.
  • Factory 2, Sprint 8 Report
    We are on track with respect to three of the four priorities: module build infrastructure will be ready before the F26 Alpha freeze. Our VMs are provisioned, we're working through the packaging rituals, and we'll be ready for an initial deployment shortly after devconf. Internally, our MvP of resultsdb and resultsdb-updater are working and pulling data from some early-adopter Platform Jenkins masters and our internal performance measurement work is bearing fruit slowly but steadily: we have two key metrics updating automatically on our kibana dashboard, with two more in progress to be completed in the coming sprints.

Security Leftovers

  • Truffle Hog Finds Security Keys Hidden in GitHub Code
    According to commentors on a Reddit thread about Truffle Hog, Amazon Web Services has already been using a similar tool for the same purpose. "I have accidentally committed my AWS secret keys before to a public repo," user KingOtar wrote. "Amazon actually found them and shut down my account until I created new ones. Kinda neat Amazon."
  • 5 Essential Tips for Securing Your WordPress Sites
    WordPress is by far the most popular blogging platform today. Being as popular as it is, it comes with its own strengths and weaknesses. The very fact that almost everybody uses it, makes it more prone to vulnerabilities. WordPress developers are doing a great job of fixing and patching the framework as new flaws are discovered, but that doesn’t mean that you can simply install and forget your installation. In this post, we will provide some of the most common ways of securing and strengthening a WordPress site.
  • Google ventures into public key encryption
    Google announced an early prototype of Key Transparency, its latest open source effort to ensure simpler, safer, and secure communications for everyone. The project’s goal is to make it easier for applications services to share and discover public keys for users, but it will be a while before it's ready for prime time. Secure communications should be de rigueur, but it remains frustratingly out of reach for most people, more than 20 years after the creation of Pretty Good Privacy (PGP). Existing methods where users need to manually find and verify the recipients’ keys are time-consuming and often complicated. Messaging apps and file sharing tools are limited in that users can communicate only within the service because there is no generic, secure method to look up public keys.
  • How to Keep Hackers out of Your Linux Machine Part 2: Three More Easy Security Tips
    In part 1 of this series, I shared two easy ways to prevent hackers from eating your Linux machine. Here are three more tips from my recent Linux Foundation webinar where I shared more tactics, tools and methods hackers use to invade your space. Watch the entire webinar on-demand for free.

Games for GNU/Linux