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About Tux Machines

Tuesday, 25 Apr 17 - Tux Machines is a community-driven public service/news site which has been around for over a decade and primarily focuses on GNU/LinuxSubscribe now Syndicate content

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Quick Roundup

Making animated banners with GIMP….

Filed under
HowTos

readthisaloud.wordpress: Ok, this time I’ll show you how to make one of these bad boys, an animated banner logo. The first one is actually a bit trickier as it involves a lot more layers than the other one, but I’ll explain that later.

My Ubuntu Experiment

Filed under
Ubuntu

blogs.sun.com: My 71 year-old father has agreed to try Ubuntu on his home PC. He has used Windows for years, but after his XP system became so infected with viruses and other malware that I needed to wipe his system, he's willing to try Linux. I've promised I'll reload XP if this experiment fails.

Zonbu Notebook review

Filed under
Hardware

crunchgear.com: So you’re ready to try Linux but you don’t have a DVD burner or the ability to download large files. What’s a body to do? Well, you can try the Zonbu notebook, a fairly inexpensive Everex laptop with 1.5GHz VIA C7-M and 512MB and 60GB of hard drive space and running Zonbu OS, a Gentoo Linux variant with a full set of open source productivity and gaming apps.

NVIDIA 2007 Year In Review

Filed under
Software

phoronix: In 2005 we started our annual AYiR (A Year in Review) articles for looking at the progress of the proprietary ATI and NVIDIA Linux display drivers over time (NVIDIA 2005, NVIDIA 2006). Now in our third year of doing this, it's time to see how NVIDIA's binary driver has panned out over the past year.

PCLinuxOS Rediscovered

Filed under
PCLOS

rutsum.blogspot: Now that I'm back on PCLinuxOS, I feel a lot more comfortable with my PC, and my productivity (if I do something productive, that is) has increased 10 folds, as compared to Windows XP, and just about a billion times if compared to Ubuntu Gutsy Gibbon.

linux.conf.au: Taking FOSS to the masses

Filed under
OSS

iTWire: Jacinta Richardson is one woman who admits to definitely being a geek. But that hasn't got in the way of her being the organiser of the only non-geek event of the 2008 Australian national Linux conference - Open Day.

some howtos:

Filed under
HowTos
  • Use Apt-mirror to Create Your Own Ubuntu Mirror

  • Lynis - Security and system auditing tool
  • Change the Console Codepage in Ubuntu
  • Routing with Ubuntu
  • AWN installation in ubuntu gutsy gibbon
  • Setup Hamachi on Fedora 8
  • How to Share a single keyboard, mouse, and clipboard between Windows and UNIX machines
  • HOWTO set up NUT 2.2.0 on Gentoo Linux for Tripp Lite OMNI1000LCD USB UPS

Szulik's Departure from Red Hat

Filed under
Linux

weblog.infoworld: It's old news now that longtime Red Hat CEO Matthew Szulik is resigning the CEO position and has appointed the former COO from Delta Airlines Jim Whitehurst. However, I've long suspected that Szulik wanted out.

Ubuntu Needs to Respond Faster

Filed under
Ubuntu

justuber.com: Anyone who has installed an Ubuntu desktop system recently, can’t have failed to realise that Flash is broken, and it’s broken quite badly.

NVIDIA driver 169.07 with fan bug

Filed under
Software

linux-gamers.net: In many forums linux users complain about an odd and nagging bug in the actual NVIDIA gpu driver: While 169.04 BETA worked fine, after installing 169.07 the fan of the graphics board stays at max speed (and max noise) all the time.

INQUIRER guide to free operating systems

Filed under
Linux

the inquirer: XP IS GETTING a bit long in the tooth, Vista is a pig and you don't want to buy a Mac and join the Jobs Cult. So, you're thinking of having a look at Linux, but are bamboozled by the hundreds of flavours and don't want to spend a weekend discussing it with disturbingly intense bearded men in socks and sandals. So here is the Inquirer's guide to Linux: quick, clear, opinionated and unfair.

Linux for muggles

Filed under
Linux

afifplc.blogspot: My first experience with Linux was 8 years ago, a few years after my Dad bought me my first ever computer. The first Linux OS that I tried was RedHat Linux. Back then I didn't know much about computers. So after a few tries I gave up and decided to stick to Windows until now.

Thoughts on the Kubuntu 8.04 - No longer an LTS

Filed under
Ubuntu

jjesse.wordpress: There has been a lot of discussion in regards to what exactly going on with the next version of Kubuntu 8.04, the Hardy Heron. I am a little disappointed to find out the 8.04 will not be a long term release for Kubuntu due to the nature of KDE4 being released.

KDE 3 vs. KDE 4 Performance Revisited

Filed under
KDE

nowwhatthe.blogspot: I wrote about the performance of KDE 4 some time ago, and I'd like to revisit it. Now it's possible to have it clean and fast, and I did indeed see an increase in performance when trying it.

Spice up Joomla! with productivity-enhancing extensions

Filed under
Software

linux.com: Joomla!, a popular content management system (CMS) for Web portals, is easy to install and maintain, and has thousands of components, modules, and Mambots for almost every thinkable function a Web site could possibly need. Here are a few extensions that I find indispensable.

Opera is Cool Again

Filed under
Software

movingparts.net: Okay, well, I mean, it’s always been cool. I’ve been using it for a few days instead of Firefox and it’s nice to see some of the new things in the Opera camp since I had last used it.

Adobe Flash Player 9 Update 3

Filed under
HowTos

linuxondesktop.blogspot: A Few weeks back Adobe released the new version of their popular Flash Player( Adobe Flash Player 9 Update 3, version identifier 9,0,115,0) on the Linux platform. To install Flash Player in Ubuntu 7.10 type in the following command in the terminal window:

Linux: no longer a winner?

Filed under
Linux

paul murphy: I was thinking about the future of Linux when it occurred to me that one path for its future can seen as a simple consequence of what we mean by “winning.” In other words, asking whether Linux will still be a winner in ten years leads first to the question of what we mean by “winner” and then to an answer about where Linux is going.

some howtos, shorts, and stuff

Filed under
News
  • Make Broadcom Wifi Work With Ndiswrapper on openSUSE 10.3

  • Picasa 3.0 on the way
  • GTK dialog boxes from shell scripts
  • Reduce Firefox 3 location bar autocomplete menu
  • Basilisk Games Announces the availability of Eschalon: Book I for Linux
  • Nokia N810 Internet Tablet overview and demo
  • Four Years of Gentoo

Review: Zenwalk 4.8 - Does Easier Mean Easy?

Filed under
Linux

adventuresinopensource.blogspot: I've been running Zenwalk 4.8 almost a week now and it did give some me more time to get a feel for it. I'd been told it was Slackware without the hassle, I'd even been told it was good for new users. Could this be true? Here's how I got on in my week with Zenwalk...

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More in Tux Machines

Containers News

  • How Kubernetes is making contributing easy
    As the program manager of the Kubernetes community at Google, Sarah Novotny has years of experience in open source communities including MySQL and NGINX. Sarah sat down with me at CloudNativeCon in Berlin at the end of March to discuss both the Kubernetes community and open source communities more broadly. Among the topics we covered in the podcast were the challenges inherent in shifting from a company-led project to a community-led one, principles that can lead to more successful communities, and how to structure decision-making.
  • How Microsoft helped Docker with LinuxKit and Moby Project [Ed: Microsoft 'helped'... embrace, extend, coerce; haven't Docker employees learned from history?]
    Today, supporting Linux is as critical to Microsoft as it is to Red Hat and SUSE.
  • How to make branding decisions in an open community
    On April 18, Docker founder Solomon Hykes made a big announcement via a pull request in the main Docker repo: "Docker is transitioning all of its open source collaborations to the Moby project going forward." The docker/docker repo now redirects to moby/moby, and Solomon's pull request updates the README and logo for the project to match. Reaction from the Docker community has been overwhelmingly negative. As of this writing, the Moby pull request has garnered 7 upvotes and 110 downvotes on GitHub. The Docker community is understandably frustrated by this opaque announcement of a fait accompli, an important decision that a hidden inner circle made behind closed doors. It's a textbook case of "Why wasn't I consulted?"

Ubuntu 17.04: Unity's swan song?

For the most part, not much has changed on Ubuntu's Desktop edition in the past year. Unity 7 has more or less remained the same while work was progressing on the next version of the desktop, Unity 8. However, now that both desktops are being retired in favour of the GNOME desktop, running Ubuntu 17.04 feels a bit strange. This week I was running software that has probably reached the end of its life and this version of Ubuntu will only be supported for nine months. I could probably get the same desktop experience and most of the same hardware support running Ubuntu 16.04 and get security updates through to 2021 in the bargain. In short, I don't think Ubuntu 17.04 offers users anything significant over last year's 16.04 LTS release and it will be retired sooner. That being said, I could not help but be a little wistful about using Unity 7 again. Even though it has been about a year since I last used Unity, I quickly fell back into the routine and I was once more reminded how pleasant it can be to use Unity. The desktop is geared almost perfectly to my workflow and the controls are set up in a way that reduces my mouse usage to almost nothing. I find Unity a very comfortable desktop to use, especially when application menus have been moved from the top panel to inside their own windows. While there are some projects trying to carry on development of Unity, this release of Ubuntu feels like Unity's swan song and I have greatly enjoyed using the desktop this week. While there is not much new in Ubuntu 17.04, the release is pretty solid. Apart from the confusion that may arise from having three different package managers, I found Ubuntu to be capable, fairly newcomer friendly and stable. Everything worked well for me, at least on physical hardware. Unity is a bit slow to use in a virtual machine, but the distribution worked smoothly on my desktop computer. Read more

FOSS in European Public Services

  • France: How a high school association finally obtained a source code
    In October 2016, the association Droit des Lycéens, which represents French high school students and helps them assert their rights, finally obtained the source code of an algorithm that influences students’ choice of university after the Baccalauréat exam. This puts an end to a conflict lasting more than seven months between the association and the Ministry of Education, which until then had refused to publish the source code of its tool. The opening of algorithms and calculators is a flagship measure in the French law for a digital republic that was passed in 2016. Since then, France has started to publish some source codes, such as the personal tax calculator in April 2016. This may have created a precedent for the present case, according to the association. The algorithm in question forms the core of the APB (Admission Post-Bac) online platform, which is used by all students in France. It allows them to enter their preferences in terms of universities and syllabus, and helps match applicants to available places. But Droit des Lycéens believes that the calculation method has been kept secret by the Ministry, and lacks transparency.
  • OFE welcomes continued emphasis on openness in EIF
    The OpenForum Europe (OFE) think tank welcomes the publication of the European Interoperability Framework (EIF). This document continues to emphasise the importance of openness, the organisation writes on its blog.
  • Czech Finance Ministry app boosts open data, source
    A data visualisation application developed in 2015 by the Czech Ministry of Finance, is helping to promote the publication of open data, and is making the case for open source software development across the government. The tool, called Supervizor, was one of the winners of the European Commission’s Sharing and Reuse Award. At the Sharing and Reuse Conference in Lisbon (Portugal), on 29 March, Supervizor was awarded EUR 15,000 - to help the project expands its reach.

Leftovers: Gaming