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Monday, 29 Aug 16 - Tux Machines is a community-driven public service/news site which has been around for over a decade and primarily focuses on GNU/LinuxSubscribe now Syndicate content

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Novell takes Microsoft’s InfoCard technology open source

Filed under
SUSE

Novell is developing an open source implementation of Microsoft’s identity card technology that is functionally equivalent to the Windows software but will run on both Linux and Macintosh.

Novell steering Microsoft defectors back to Microsoft?

Filed under
SUSE

Oh, my. On the one hand, Mary Jo is reporting that, just as Novell's Bruce Lowry had said, Novell's pact with Microsoft seems to be earning it back market share against Red Hat.http://www.tuxmachines.org/node/14679/edit

Here come the RHEL 5 clones

Filed under
Linux

If imitation is the sincerest form of flattery, Red Hat should be flattered. Less than two weeks after the company introduced RHEL 5 (Red Hat Enterprise Linux 5), StartCom Ltd. released the first RHEL 5 clone, StartCom Enterprise Linux AS-5.0.0.

Gentoo attempts to deal with developer conflicts

Filed under
Gentoo

Earlier this month, Slashdot posted a piece asking whether the Gentoo project is in "crisis." The project has responded to the issues discussed in the posting, in part, by adopting a Code of Conduct (CoC), with "proctors" who will address breaches of the CoC. So far, that move seems of limited worth.

Quicker open source editor: Emacs

Filed under
News

The open source Emacs editor (one of the powerhouses of UNIX computing) is a large, complex application that does everything from editing text to functioning as a complete development environment.

Debian/etch Xen: Nice, but not quite ready for me

Filed under
Linux

n my previous post I explained how I set up my new server as a Xen server in order to maximize my flexibility. It's been little over a week now and I am saddened to say that Xen has gone out the Window. While I love the flexibility, it's just not ready for me yet.

Snag 1: Running NFS

Benchmarking With VDrift

Filed under
Software

Chris Guirl sent me a note this weekend alerting me to the release of VDrift 2007-03-23 and letting me know that this drift racing game now supports benchmarking.

Linux-Optimized Laptops: Does the Hardware Matter?

Filed under
Hardware

Even though interest in server-side Linux has been steadily growing in enterprises and organizations around the world, desktop and laptop-based Linux solutions have faced a steady series of uphill climbs.

Novell: It's Cheaper Than Linux

Filed under
SUSE

Lately, I have watched various companies make marketing blunders on a near everyday basis. Some in the general media, others in niche arenas, where most people will never see just how huge of a mistake was actually made. But all of them aside, Novell has had the pleasure of topping them all and solidifying fears that many Linux users share, with one single statement.

Non-free repositories!?

Filed under
Software

There’s a discussion going on on my LUG mailing list today which seems to have diverged from its original topic to the question of the inclusion of officially supported non-free repositories in distributions: is this merely facilitating freedom or does it have more sinister implications for free software?

Nero for Linux V3 is almost out

Filed under
Software

NERO WAS SHOWING two things at CeBIT, one was a great thing, the other potentially interesting. One requires hardware, the other doesn't require Windows.

Changing the look of Wine

Filed under
HowTos

One of the nicer things of Linux is that you have tons of thinkerers around. One of my online buddies who goes by the nick of Tripl showed this solution to change the default look of Wine (simply horrible) into the human theme of Ubuntu.

All the text bellow needs to be pasted bellow the line above in ~/.wine/user.reg that is your home directory .wine folder

...

CLI Magic: socat

Filed under
HowTos

Socat, netcat's "twin brother," is a utility that "establishes two bidirectional byte streams and transfers data between them." It handles sockets in various ways, allowing a wide range of actions, including file transfers, port forwarding, and serial line emulation.

Bluetooth PAND (Personal Area Network) Howto For Debian Etch

Filed under
Linux
HowTos

I wanted to access the internet over bluetooth instead of GPRS/3G network from my mobile phone (SE K800i). After a lot of searching I couldn't find a clear explanation as how to accomplish this. I did manage to set it up with Windows XP, using the "Personal Area Network" in the bluetooth utility and doing internet connection sharing.

The free Tron Universe—Armagetron

Filed under
Gaming

After all these years, I still remember the sounds and primary colours associated with the climatic lightcycle scene in the 1982 Walt Disney film TRON. As the noise-ridden cycles raced to certain destruction, synthetic electronic reverberations could be felt throughout the whole audience and my bones at the cinema.

Ubuntu Receives Editor's Choice Award from PC Welt

Filed under
Ubuntu

Canonical Ltd, the commercial sponsor of Ubuntu, today announced it has scooped another award for Ubuntu, its leading-edge Linux distribution. At the PC Welt awards dinner held during the CeBIT Exhibition in Hanover, on Friday 16th March, Ubuntu was awarded the "Editor's Choice Award for Open Source."

Bake-Off: 4 Linux Desktops Tackle The Enterprise

Filed under
Linux

The year 2007 might be remembered as the year when Linux corporate desktops stood up to Windows Vista. Hewlett-Packard recently announced it is making large deals with Linux desktops and that these orders might be a signal of an important shift in the market.

Debian at the crossroads

Filed under
Linux

The Debian GNU/Linux project has come to some kind of crossroads - due to many factors, some of them artificial - and the man who takes over leadership next month will have to make some crucial decisions on the future direction of the project.

Voting is in progress for the next leader who will take over on April 17. Eight candidates are in the running, including the incumbent, Anthony Towns.

You can get taste of Linux without having to install it

Filed under
Linux

Q: I just tried Windows Vista and was soooo impressed that now I'd like to try out Linux. What is the best way to dip my toes into the Linux pond?

A: Wow. I'm sure that wasn't the effect that Microsoft was going for; however I can't say that I'm surprised.

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More in Tux Machines

GNOME News

  • The Begining
    The friendship/relationship with the awesome community of GNOME begins. What followed after 2 commits into the main branch, one application submission, and the result was the start of the most amazing few months. These months have been a humbling experience, the biggest learning experience, and the most productive time.
  • GTK+ Tester Window?
    For an internal application, I’ve created a Gtk.Window derived tester class, added some widgets to show current test, status, number of fails and a Gtk.Grid to attach custom widgets. This class expose some API to set a widget to test, autoclose and some signals you can use to run some tests.
  • GUADEC 2016
    A lot of great things happened – as always GUADEC with it’s perfect size got me to speak to a hell lot of new and interesting people. Thank you all for being there – it was a pleasure.

Leftovers: OSS and Sharing

  • #MyOpenHA Part 1 -Philosophy
    Home Automation. The holy hipster and geek grail. I have played with it. I have tried. I have failed. But today I am proud to have a solution I can truly endorse. So join me on this journey. This series will explain my solution, in excruciating detail. In the hope that I can learn from you while I am explaining. This series will be filled over time with more and more articles. But now, let’s talk about philosophy. The Why. Soon you will see the What and How. One promise, or the TL;DR: It is all 100% Open Source. Well, almost. I have integrated some quite non-open things but always in an Open Source Way.
  • Disable the new Firefox 48 location bar - Tutorial
    Here we are. Seven minutes later, our life is bearable again, but not perfect. Thank you Mozilla, thank you very much. This is exactly what I needed to enrich my life. After all, we all know, cosmetic changes are good, because that's what plants crave. Stop with these idiotic tweaks please. No one cares. It won't make the browser better. It won't change the market share. It will not attract idiots, as idiots are happy. It will only alienate diehard users who keep on using your browser because they have no alternative. From a loved favorite to the least of evils choice. That's what Firefox has become.
  • What’s Happening in OpenStack-Ansible (WHOA) – August 2016
    My goal with these posts is to inform more people about what we’re doing in the OpenStack-Ansible community and bring on more contributors to the project.
  • PowerShell on Linux? No, Thank You [comic]
  • LLVM Might Get An AAP Back-End (Altruistic Processor)
    There's an active proposal to incorporate a back-end into LLVM for AAP, a processor ISA for deeply-embedded Harvard architectures. AAP is designed for FPGA usage and there is an open-source soft-core with commercial deployments also being available. AAP is short for the Altruistic Processor and is described in technical detail here. AAP is said to be an original design but inspired by the OpenRISC / RISC-V projects.
  • UK-French Data Taskforce publishes joint report
    "Invest in and share experiences building core data registers, learning from the French National Address Database experience”; “develop initiatives to bring basic data literacy into primary and secondary education”; and “commission research into algorithmic transparency and accountability” are among the recommendations listed in a report published in July by the joint French-UK Data Taskforce.
  • Tuscany: how to promote the economy of sharing and collaboration
    In June, the region of Tuscany (Italy), in collaboration with Open Toscana and ANCI Toscana, launched a project, the goal of which is to “build a regional policy on the economy of sharing and collaboration”.
  • MS Tries But Just Doesn’t Get FLOSS
    This is what drove me to GNU/Linux so many years ago.
  • Microsoft's maps lost Melbourne because it used bad Wikipedia data
    Microsoft has laid part of the blame for Bing Maps' mis-location of the Australian city of Melbourne by a whole hemisphere on Wikipedia. Yes, Wikipedia, “the free encyclopaedia that anyone can edit.” Microsoft made its admission after your correspondent took to Twitter on Monday to do what we in publishing call “pimping"the story of Melbourne's mis-placement. Ricky Brundritt, a senior program manager at Bing Maps, noticed that pimping and responded as follows.
  • Northern Ireland promotes Open Data in education
    The Northern Ireland Department of Finance has supported a challenge that encourages the re-use of public Open Data in education. Called the OpenDataNI Challenge – Using Open Data for Education” (ODNI4EDU), this project, officially launched on June 14, intends to award two applications or educational tools and resources that make use of at least one dataset published on the portal OpendataNI.
  • Try this handy tool to convert a Web site into a native app with Electron
  • Introducing CloudiumOS [Ed: built on Electron]
    It is a complete multi platform operating system that allows you to manage your documents, access your media files and collaborate with other people on the go. CloudiumOS can work side-by-side with another operating system (either via a VM, a Desktop app or Mobile App) or as a standalone installation.

Opera Data Breach, Security of Personal Data

  • Opera User? Your Stored Passwords May Have Been Stolen
    Barely a week passes without another well-known web company suffering a data breach or hack of some kind. This week it is Opera’s turn. Opera Software, the company behind the web-browser and recently sold to a Chinese consortium for $600 million, reported a ‘server breach incident’ on its blog this weekend.
  • When it comes to protecting personal data, security gurus make their own rules
    Marcin Kleczynski, CEO of a company devoted to protecting people from hackers, has safeguarded his Twitter account with a 14-character password and by turning on two-factor authentication, an extra precaution in case that password is cracked. But Cooper Quintin, a security researcher and chief technologist at the Electronic Frontier Foundation, doesn’t bother running an anti-virus program on his computer. And Bruce Schneier? The prominent cryptography expert and chief technology officer of IBM-owned security company Resilient Systems, won’t even risk talking about what he does to secure his devices and data.

Android Leftovers