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About Tux Machines

Tuesday, 26 Jul 16 - Tux Machines is a community-driven public service/news site which has been around for over a decade and primarily focuses on GNU/LinuxSubscribe now Syndicate content

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Quick Roundup

Type Title Author Replies Last Postsort icon
Story some howtos: srlinuxx 18/11/2009 - 3:17am
Story Revisiting KDE 4 srlinuxx 2 18/11/2009 - 4:57am
Story Samsung Sponsors The Development Of Enlightenment srlinuxx 18/11/2009 - 5:30am
Story Adobe Flash Player 10.1 Beta For Linux srlinuxx 3 18/11/2009 - 7:50am
Story today's leftovers: srlinuxx 1 18/11/2009 - 10:06am
Story KDE 4.4 aims to take free desktop skyward srlinuxx 1 18/11/2009 - 2:32pm
Story Real Chrome OS developer preview screenshot srlinuxx 18/11/2009 - 4:06pm
Story Why Ubuntu release schedules should be changed srlinuxx 18/11/2009 - 4:07pm
Story Debian – The Universal Operating System srlinuxx 18/11/2009 - 4:08pm
Story 20 Essential Tips Every Ubuntu User Should Know srlinuxx 18/11/2009 - 4:10pm

Epatec dwarf PC makes a capable thin client

Filed under
Linux
Hardware

What can you do with a tiny 200MHz computer? We tested such a computing dwarf, the Epatec eTC thin client, and found you can save big money with this box by using it as a thin client.

System Administration Toolkit: Problems and pitfalls

Filed under
Linux

Knowing the right way of dealing with full disks, or a crippled system, is nearly as important as having tools in your arsenal to make sure you're prepared to react quickly to missing files or an insecure system. Avoid common pitfalls and traps to help keep your system running smoothly. This article focuses on some of the most common problems and issues facing UNIX administrators and ways to achieve a safe and effective resolution.

MiniTutor: Shell Colors and Cursor Positions

Filed under
Linux

If you are the lord of the terminal you probably know it's possible change colors and also cursor position, or control text. Sometimes you can use controlled characters to modify texts and how they are displayed, and also for fun you can draw, create animations, statusbar, progressbar and more.

Who Is Marketing Linux?

Filed under
Linux

Seriously. While a great many people still maintain that Linux isn't quite readyfor the desktop (myself occasionally being one of them), it has struck me thatsomething is far more important than developers' ability to code, or the GUI'sability to imitate a seamless user experience. It's great marketing. Wads of cash certainly helps this, and ultimately, if 90% of your overinflated budget is pumped into marketing, your software is bound to succeed.

RedHat's response: Interview with Mark Webbink (RedHat)

Filed under
Interviews

Three days ago we posted an interview with Justin Steinman, Director of Marketing for Linux & Open Platform Solutions for Novell. He answered some of our questions regarding the Novell-Microsoft deal. Now it's RedHat's turn for a session of Q&A on LinuxInterviews.com. We contacted RedHat Inc. and Mark Webbink agreed to answer some of our questions in regard with the Microsoft-Novell agreement, with more to come in the following days. Read below to find out what RedHat believes of this "unearthly" alliance and what they plan to do in the future.

Using styles in OpenOffice.org

Filed under
HowTos

My friend Kent used to say, "Unix is like chocolate sauce. Add it to anything and it's better." I'm going to tell him that the same is true of styles. They're great. And not too complicated, either. Styles are essentially just organized formatting.

$190 Puppy Linux Movie Player for the Minivan

Filed under
Hardware

What I wanted for the van was the equivalent of what we had already working at home, MythTV running on a $300 Linux box. For $190 I had a diskless, fanless, completely silent PC with a Via processor and 128 megs of RAM. To this I added a copy of Puppy Linux.

Ballmer: Linux Users Owe Microsoft

Filed under
Linux

In comments confirming the open-source community's suspicions, Microsoft CEO Steve Ballmer Thursday declared his belief that the Linux operating system infringes on Microsoft's intellectual property.

A closer look at Oracle's support and indemnification offerings for Linux

Filed under
Linux

I had a few minutes to burn today, so I did what I'm sure you were doing: I read the Oracle Enterprise Linux Services Agreement. It's funny what you find when you start digging around in the legalese that governs the Big Announcement that Oracle made. It makes "Unbreakable Linux" look, well, a little flimsy.

Major vendors put open source into turmoil

Filed under
OSS

Major software vendors are shaking up the open-source market. Microsoft Corp.'s deal with Novell Inc. and Oracle Corp.'s move to support Red Hat Linux have sent IT investors scurrying to figure out what it all means.

Bring back deleted files with lsof

Filed under
HowTos

There you are, happily playing around with an audio file you've spent all afternoon tweaking, and you're thinking, "Wow, doesn't it sound great? Lemme just move it over here." At that point your subconscious chimes in, "Um, you meant mv, not rm, right?" Oops. I feel your pain -- this happens to everyone. But there's a straightforward method to recover your lost file, and since it works on every standard Linux system, everyone ought to know how to do it.

Getting Cute with the GPL

Filed under
OSS

Eben Moglen has now stated that GPLv3 will be redrafted to include clear language that will make the Novell-Microsoft agreement an obvious GPL violation, and more.

Restrict the use of su command

Filed under
HowTos

su is used to become another user during a login session. Invoked without a username, su defaults to becoming the super user. By default almost all distro allows to use su command. However you can restrict the use of su command for security reasons.

Also: Howto prevent non-root users from logging into the system

The Thing About Beagle

Filed under
Software

Beagle is a desktop search tool for Gnome. I thought I might give it a go, because sometimes I need to find things. Since I am using KDE I also installed Kerry, which is a KDE front end for Beagle.

Using Apache Derby databases, Part 2: Manage IT services beyond mere deployment

Filed under
News

In this article, find out how IBM autonomic computing technology, particularly the IBM Autonomic Integrated Development Environment (AIDE) toolkit, may be an effective solution. Learn how you can use this technology with Apache Derby

Review of Ubuntu 6.10 Edgy Eft

Filed under
Reviews
Ubuntu

Most Linux users have heard of the popular Ubuntu Linux distribution and many know how stable the OS is on desktop computers. But for the growing Linux laptop user segment, how well does the latest version of Ubuntu recognize specialized laptop hardware and perform on their portable device? Today I'm taking a look at Ubuntu 6.10 Edgy Eft on Open Addict's DELL XPS M170 test laptop.

FSF praises Sun's commitment to OSS

Filed under
OSS

The Free Software Foundation (FSF) announced yesterday that they welcomed the public commitment from Sun Microsystems to distribute its proprietary Java platform under the GNU General Public Licence (GPL).

Ensuring network interfaces remain named consistently

Filed under
HowTos

If you have more than one network card, there is no guarantee that eth0 when you first boot up remains eth0 in the next boot. It could swap with eth1. This can happen especially if the cards are the same chipset, I reckon. If you change kernels or switch to using something like hotplug or udev you can also find the same problem.

LinuxBIOS - A truly GPLed Free Software BIOS

Filed under
Software

A BIOS is an acronym for Basic Input Output System and is the starting point of the boot process in your computer. But one of the disadvantages of the proprietary BIOS which are embedded in most PCs is that there is a good amount of code which is used in it to support legacy operating systems such as DOS and the end result is a longer time taken to boot up and pass the control to the resident operating system.

PS3 Linux: Dual Boot Instructions & Blu-ray disc mounting supported!

Filed under
HowTos

A day after the PS3 Japan launch madness, all of us here at QJ had a chance to look back and see exactly what info we had missed. I had the responsibility of checking out the Linux side of things. And while the article which I wrote yesterday was pretty much spot on, there's a few more things which I could get out of the documents released.

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More in Tux Machines

Server Administration

  • Open Source Docker Monitoring & Logging
    Docker is growing by leaps and bounds, and along with it, its ecosystem. Being light, the predominant container deployment involves running just a single app or service inside each container. Most software products and services are made up of at least several such apps/services. We all want all our apps/services to be highly available and fault tolerant. Thus, Docker containers in an organization quickly start popping up like mushrooms after the rain. They multiply faster than rabbits.While, in the beginning, we play with them like cute little pets, as their numbers quickly grow we realize we are dealing with a herd of cattle, implying we’ve become cowboys. Managing a herd with your two hands, a horse, and a lasso will only get you so far. You won’t be able to ride after each and every calf that wonders in the wrong direction. To get back to containers from this zoological analogy—operating so many moving pieces at scale is impossible without orchestration—this is why we’ve seen the rise of Docker Swarm, Kubernetes, Mesos, CoreOS, RancherOS, and so on.
  • DevOps: A Pillar of Modern IT Infrastructure
    A massive transformation is underway in the way we manage IT infrastructure. More companies are looking for improved agility and flexibility. They are moving from traditional server stacks to cloudy infrastructure to support a new array of applications and services that must be delivered at breakneck pace in order to remain competitive.
  • The one big change in IT
    Yet Bob does not believe the devops hammer should be used on anything that looks remotely like a nail. Accounting systems, supply chain management systems, warehouse management systems, and so on do not benefit from the constant modification enabled by devops. Those are bound by precise, interlocking processes along with granular permissions and regulations. Here, continuous change invites disaster of the type that ITIL-huggers and OCM (organizational change management) proponents fear most.

Linux 4.7

  • Collabora contributions to Linux Kernel 4.7
    Linux Kernel 4.7 was released this week with a total of 36 contributions from five Collabora engineers. It includes the first contributions from Helen as Collaboran and the first ever contributions on the kernel from Robert Foss. Here are some of the highlights of the work Collabora have done on Linux Kernel 4.7. Enric added support for the Analogix anx78xx DRM Bridge and fixed two SD Card related issues on OMAP igep00x0: fix remove/insert detection and enable support to read the write-protect pin. Gustavo de-staged the sync_file framework (Android Sync framework) that will be used to add explicit fencing support to the graphics pipeline and started a work to clean up usage of legacy vblank helpers.
  • The new Linux Kernel 4.7 is now officially released
    For users who are running some form of Linux, this should come as welcome news--the final version of the Linux Kernel 4.7 is now finally released. Linux founder Linus Torvalds said of the announcement, “Despite it being two weeks since rc7, the final patch wasn’t all that big, and much of it is trivial one- and few-liners. There’s a couple of network drivers that got a bit more loving.”
  • Linux 4.7 lands

Leftovers: Software

  • OpenVZ 7.0 Becomes A Complete Linux Distribution, Based On VzLinux
    OpenVZ, a long-standing Linux virtualization technology and similar to LXC and Solaris Containers, is out with their major 7.0 release. OpenVZ 7.0 has focused on merging the OpenVZ and Virtuozzo code-bases along with replacing their own hypervisor with that of Linux's KVM. Under OpenVZ 7.0, it has become a complete Linux distribution based upon VzLinux.
  • OpenVZ 7.0 released
    I’m pleased to announce the release of OpenVZ 7.0. The new release focuses on merging OpenVZ and Virtuozzo source codebase, replacing our own hypervisor with KVM.
  • Announcing git-cinnabar 0.4.0 beta 2
    Git-cinnabar is a git remote helper to interact with mercurial repositories. It allows to clone, pull and push from/to mercurial remote repositories, using git.
  • FreeIPA Lightweight CA internals
    In the preceding post, I explained the use cases for the FreeIPA lightweight sub-CAs feature, how to manage CAs and use them to issue certificates, and current limitations. In this post I detail some of the internals of how the feature works, including how signing keys are distributed to replicas, and how sub-CA certificate renewal works. I conclude with a brief retrospective on delivering the feature.
  • Lightweight Sub-CAs in FreeIPA 4.4
    Last year FreeIPA 4.2 brought us some great new certificate management features, including custom certificate profiles and user certificates. The upcoming FreeIPA 4.4 release builds upon this groundwork and introduces lightweight sub-CAs, a feature that lets admins to mint new CAs under the main FreeIPA CA and allows certificates for different purposes to be issued in different certificate domains. In this post I will review the use cases and demonstrate the process of creating, managing and issuing certificates from sub-CAs. (A follow-up post will detail some of the mechanisms that operate behind the scenes to make the feature work.)
  • RcppArmadillo 0.7.200.2.0
    The second Armadillo release of the 7.* series came out a few weeks ago: version 7.200.2. And RcppArmadillo version 0.7.200.2.0 is now on CRAN and uploaded to Debian. This followed the usual thorough reverse-dependecy checking of by now over 240 packages using it. For once, I let it simmer a little preparing only a package update via the GitHub repo without preparing a CRAN upload to lower the update frequency a little. Seeing that Conrad has started to release 7.300.0 tarballs, the time for a (final) 7.200.2 upload was now right. Just like the previous, it now requires a recent enough compiler. As g++ is so common, we explicitly test for version 4.6 or newer. So if you happen to be on an older RHEL or CentOS release, you may need to get yourself a more modern compiler. R on Windows is now at 4.9.3 which is decent (yet stable) choice; the 4.8 series of g++ will also do. For reference, the current LTS of Ubuntu is at 5.4.0, and we have g++ 6.1 available in Debian testing.

Red Hat and Fedora