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About Tux Machines

Monday, 19 Mar 18 - Tux Machines is a community-driven public service/news site which has been around for over a decade and primarily focuses on GNU/LinuxSubscribe now Syndicate content

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Quick Roundup

Type Title Author Replies Last Postsort icon
Story Where It All Began: The 10 Original Software Companies srlinuxx 28/06/2011 - 10:21pm
Story Gnome 3 got some issues srlinuxx 28/06/2011 - 10:24pm
Story The best violent video games of all time srlinuxx 28/06/2011 - 10:27pm
Story 9 Good Terminal Emulators for Linux srlinuxx 29/06/2011 - 2:13am
Story Farewell to Microsoft srlinuxx 29/06/2011 - 2:15am
Story Book Review: The Book of Audacity srlinuxx 29/06/2011 - 2:17am
Story Xamarin Joy Factory srlinuxx 29/06/2011 - 2:18am
Story 30 Days Ubuntu: Day 28: My Five Biggest Ubuntu Linux Complaints srlinuxx 29/06/2011 - 4:11am
Story Peppermint OS Two review srlinuxx 29/06/2011 - 4:14am
Story Security of GNU/Linux Systems srlinuxx 29/06/2011 - 6:36am

Not even Peter Jackson can rescue King Kong the game

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From an experienced gamer's point of view, I think it's even safe to say that Peter Jackson's King Kong (just King Kong from now on) fails in almost every aspect that it possibly can fail, starting from bad QC (quality control).

Book Review: Exploring the JDS Linux Desktop

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With all the interest in the OS and office productivity suite package, someone had to come up with a book to take IT enthusiasts along for the ride. O'Reilly Media's Exploring the JDS Linux Desktop, by Tom Adelstein and Sam Hiser, is an ideal introduction for the novice to more advanced user, especially since it is packaged with a live CD-ROM that lets you run the OS from RAM without installing it on your computer.

Kubuntu Distro Sprint

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This last week was the Ubuntu distro sprint, where a bunch of core Ubuntu developers get locked in a bland hotel in a bland part of London (which was overcast for the whole week with no variation in weather) and told to work on things in return for Amarulla. So here's the first exciting screenshot of the new Kubuntu live CD installer.

ATI + X2 The Threat

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Linux Game Publishing's port of Egosoft's X2 - The Threat has reached a new milestone with the fourth BETA release. Although there are still bugs to be fixed in the game before it ships to gaming distributors, this latest release available exclusively to the closed LGP testing community finally features ATI commercial driver support. Will this be another disappointment for the fans in red, or will this be a crucial win? We have thoroughly tested X2 - The Threat BETA 4 with various ATI Radeon cards as well as a NVIDIA GeForce 6 for comparative numbers.

Why not break free?

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Danny and Linda Lee, who are both in their mid-50s, know as much about computers as they do about gangsta rap. Yet Mr and Mrs Lee's computer at their home in Bedhampton, Hampshire, doesn't run Microsoft Windows. Nor is it a newbie-friendly Mac.

Setting Up a yum Repository

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While there are many Linux users who prefer other tools for doing their patch management, yum is designed for RPM-based distributions. Its popularity has grown as Fedora Linux has adapted yum as its primary patch management tool. This chapter will help you set up and configure a yum repository for your Linux distribution.

PC-BSD : A user friendly BSD flavour geared for the desktop

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Recently interest has been generated in making at least some of the Unix variants more user friendly and many projects have come up which aim to create a better experience for the end user both in installing and using them. One such project is PC-BSD.

Google given extra time to fight subpoena

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The Judge hearing Google's defence against the US attorney general's subpoena for search information has delayed the hearing for two weeks.

OOo Impress: Slide Shows that Will Impress Almost Anyone

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OOo Impress is a replacement for Microsoft's PowerPoint. Even if you're not an experienced presenter, Impress will help you create professional-looking slide shows.

Introducing KnoppMyth, a user-friendly Linux set-top box distro

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Open source project founder Cecil Watson provides some background on KnoppMyth in this brief project history. The project aims to create an easy-to-install-and-use Linux distribution for set-top boxes.

To Russia From IBM: A Hand With Open Source Development

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IBM is offering free software and educational resources for developers in Russia. The move, announced Friday, is intended to help encourage the creation of new applications based on open standards and open source.

Torvalds says DRM isn't necessarily bad

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Provisions against digital rights management in a draft update to the General Public License could undermine computer security, Linus Torvalds said this week in e-mails reflecting the Linux leader's pragmatic philosophy.

Blue Security's Do Not Intrude Registry

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Most people set up some type of filter to weed out the bad email from the good. That approach, has its limitations. One company is trying a new, open source-based approach that creates a user-enforced "Do Not Spam" list.

Google wants its very own Net

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It seems Google is lusting for its own personal and private global internet. If it manages this, forget DRM. It'll have the ultimate in consumer control.


Fixing Windows with Knoppix

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Do you use Knoppix? This bootable Linux distribution that comes in the form of a CD or DVD can be a lifesaver when your computer goes awry. In this feature, we guide you through the process of fixing Windows with Knoppix, which includes resizing Windows partitions, solving key system file problems, and recovering data.

Renewed Linux trademark bid in the works

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The United States-based body responsible for protecting the "Linux" name appears to be making a renewed push to register it as a trademark in Australia.

Green Up Journals: Game time

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It is late January and the development team of "America's Army" -- the U.S. Army's free video game for the Mac OS X, Windows and Linux operating systems -- has arrived in Camp Guernsey for three days of hands-on training and demonstrations via the Green Up event. While the team would ordinarily spend their days coding video games, for a few days they've been given full access to some of the weapons, vehicles, physical training and technologies used in their game.

French police uses open source for variety, consistency

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France has two national police forces, each reporting to a different ministry. One ministry is trying to avoid the kind of IT monoculture that allows viruses to spread and disable all key systems; the other wants to bring uniformity to a sprawling IT infrastructure. Both are turning to open source software to achieve their aims.

February 2006 Web Server Survey

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In the February 2006 survey we received responses from 76,184,000 sites, an increase of 933K from January's total. Apache continues its strong growth with an increase of 1.3 million hostnames for the month, but the active sites data shows a very different result.

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More in Tux Machines

OSS Leftovers

  • LG Announces webOS Open-Source Edition
    What was Palm webOS nearly a decade ago is seeing its latest incarnation as LG webOS Open-Source Edition. The interesting history of webOS continues... While you probably recall HP acquired Palm in 2010 and with that there was webOS on the HP TouchPad. Around 2012 is when HP then announced they would publish the webOS source code as "Open webOS". WebOS was then acquired by LG Electronics where it's been in use for a few years now for smart TVs, IoT, and other LG devices. There's also been a few offshoots over the years like LuneOS as a fork of webOS.
  • Mi A1 Oreo Kernel source code released by Xiaomi
    Xiaomi’s first Android One phone, the Mi A1 was expected to receive Android 8.0 Oreo update by the end December, and the company did roll out the update to the device under the stipulated time. However, the kernel source for the upgrade was left covered with no access to it for third-party developers. This also violated the GNU General Public License, version 2 (GPLv2) and also hampered the advancement of developers who base their codes on source codes. Thankfully, after a delay of more than two months, Xiaomi has finally released the kernel source code of Android 8.1 for the Xiaomi Mi A1.
  • GSoC and Outreachy: Mentors don't need to be Debian Developers
    A frequent response I receive when talking to prospective mentors: "I'm not a Debian Developer yet". As student applications have started coming in, now is the time for any prospective mentors to introduce yourself on the debian-outreach list if you would like to help with any of the listed projects or any topics that have been proposed spontaneously by students without any mentor. It doesn't matter if you are a Debian Developer or not. Furthermore, mentoring in a program like GSoC or Outreachy is a form of volunteering that is recognized just as highly as packaging or any other development activity. When an existing developer writes an email advocating your application to become a developer yourself, they can refer to your contribution as a mentor. Many other processes, such as requests for DebConf bursaries, also ask for a list of your contributions and you can mention your mentoring experience there.
  • 11th Open Source Day Conference
    On May 23rd, Warsaw will host the 11th edition of Open Source Day. OSD is the largest conference about open source in Poland and CEE region, gathering every year nearly 1000 participants. The programme of the upcoming edition is focused mainly on practical sessions devoted to the most important directions of IT market development. Registration for the event is already open. For the first 600 attendees, participation in the conference is free-of-charge. Open Source Day is the biggest event in Poland and CEE region dedicated to open source. Over 6,000 people took part in previous editions, and several thousand followed the event online. Open Source Day is the knowledge exchange platform about open software, as one of the most important trends in the development of modern technologies, enabling creation of high-quality, stable IT solutions, which today are the basis for all branches of the economy.
  • March Add(on)ness: Tab Centre Redux (2) vs Tabby Cat (3)
  • March Add(on)ness: Reverse Image Search (2) Vs Unpaywall (3)
  • Facebook, Google and Big Switch Networks to Demonstrate Open Source Collaboration with Next-Gen Network Operating Systems During OCP Summit Keynote
  • 6 common questions about agile development practices for teams
    You’ve probably heard a speaker ask this question at the end of their presentation. This is the most important part of the presentation—after all, you didn't attend just to hear a lecture but to participate in a conversation and a community. Recently I had the opportunity to hear my fellow Red Hatters present a session called "Agile in Practice" to a group of technical students at a local university. During the session, software engineer Tomas Tomecek and agile practitioners Fernando Colleone and Pavel Najman collaborated to explain the foundations of agile methodology and showcase best practices for day-to-day activities.

Red Hat's GPL-Centric Initiative, Upcoming Fedora Test Day

GNU Mcron 1.1

Security: Bitwarden, Container Security, Windows at U.S. Power Plants, Firefox’s Weak Master Password Encryption

  • Behind the scenes with the Bitwarden password manager
    Having to remember passwords for web applications, email, banking, and more begat the password manager. And that begat such popular and proprietary services like LastPass and 1Password. A little over two years ago, software developer Kyle Spearrin decided the open source world needed its own web-based password manager. His company, 8Bit Solutions, develops and markets an open source alternative to services like LastPass and 1Password called Bitwarden. Recently I had the opportunity to ask Spearrin some questions about Bitwarden's origins, how it secures user information, where he sees Bitwarden going, and more.
  • Episode 88 - Chat with Chris Rosen from IBM about Container Security
  • Feds: Russian [Crackers] Are Attacking U.S. Power Plants

    The targets of these attacks include the country’s electric grid, including its nuclear power system, as well as “commercial facilities, water, aviation, and critical manufacturing sectors,” the statement said.  

    The report is damning confirmation of what has for months been suspected: that [crackers] in Russia are capable of infiltrating and compromising vital systems relied on by millions of Americans. According to the new report, the attacks began at least as early as March 2016, thriving on vulnerabilities in these systems’ online operations.

  • Firefox’s Weak Master Password Encryption Can Be Cracked In Just 1 Minute [Ed: If you have physical/remote access to a machine and an account, then you have a lot more power over it than just a list of passwords]
    You might rest assured after setting a Master Password in the Firefox web browser, but it’s not as secure as you think. Last year, Mozilla did a major overhaul of their browser in the form of Firefox Quantum. But the non-profit forgot to fix the security holes that exist in their ‘very fast’ web browser for nine years.