Language Selection

English French German Italian Portuguese Spanish

About Tux Machines

Sunday, 18 Feb 18 - Tux Machines is a community-driven public service/news site which has been around for over a decade and primarily focuses on GNU/LinuxSubscribe now Syndicate content

Search This Site

Quick Roundup

Type Title Author Replies Last Postsort icon
Story New OSI President Steps Down srlinuxx 2 05/03/2005 - 5:04am
Story Cronkite denounces the war on drugs. srlinuxx 3 05/03/2005 - 6:07am
Story Texas Gaming Festival: Quick Peek at the LAN Party srlinuxx 06/03/2005 - 3:16pm
Story The Rock solidifies Doom movie role srlinuxx 2 08/03/2005 - 2:29am
Story Bumbling Bully srlinuxx 2 08/03/2005 - 2:30am
Story A Week with KDE 3.4rc1 srlinuxx 5 08/03/2005 - 3:46pm
Story Student in High School zombie terror threat srlinuxx 1 08/03/2005 - 4:00pm
Story European democracy bogus, says Open Source Consortium srlinuxx 2 08/03/2005 - 4:27pm
Story Linux Making Inroads into Automotive Industry srlinuxx 1 08/03/2005 - 4:59pm
Blog entry Cooker (Mandrake 10.2b3) Woes srlinuxx 1 09/03/2005 - 7:08pm

Solus 4 Is Coming Soon with Experimental Wayland Session for GNOME, Linux 4.15

Filed under
Linux
GNOME

Solus Project's Joshua Strobl posted today more details about the upcoming Solus 4 desktop operating system and some of the new features that will be integrated. These include a revamped Software Center with the latest Linux Driver Management for better hardware driver support, Hotspot support, Budgie 10.4.1, MATE 1.20, and an experimental Wayland session for the GNOME edition.

"Wayland will not be the default for Solus Budgie or Solus GNOME, however GNOME users will be able to install a separate session package if they wish to test and experiment with Wayland support," says Joshua Strobl. "During my testing, I have not found the quality of the GNOME + Wayland to be sufficient enough to be provided as a default experience for our users."

Read more

A look at Linux Mint 18.3 KDE – The Last KDE Linux Mint

Filed under
KDE
Linux

I wrote an article a while ago about how KDE was being removed as an official flavour of Linux Mint past 18.3, and so I thought perhaps a quick review of 18.3 KDE was in order. Linux Mint 18.3 KDE is based on Ubuntu 16.06 LTS.

Read more

i.MX6 UL based COM/SBC hybrid has FPGA with programmable ZPU core

Filed under
Linux
Debian
Ubuntu

Technologic’s rugged, open-spec “TS-4100” COM/SBC hybrid runs Linux on an i.MX6 UL, and offers a microSD slot, 4GB eMMC, a micro-USB OTG port, optional WiFi/BT and baseboard, and an FPGA with a programmable ZPU core for offloading real-time tasks.

Technologic Systems has begun sampling its first i.MX6 UL (UltraLite) based board, which is also its first computer-on-module that can double as an SBC. The 75 x 55mm TS-4100 module features a microSD slot, onboard eMMC, a micro-USB OTG port with power support, and optional WiFi and Bluetooth. Like most Technologic boards, such as the popular, i.MX6-based TS-4900 module, it offers long-term support and -40 to 85°C support, and ships with schematics and open source Linux images (Ubuntu 16.04 and Debian Jesse).

Read more

Security: Windows, Salon, Fraud. Skype and More

Filed under
Security
  • Critical Telegram flaw under attack disguised malware as benign images [Ed: Windows]

    The flaw, which resided in the Windows version of the messaging app, allowed attackers to disguise the names of attached files, researchers from security firm Kaspersky Lab said in a blog post. By using the text-formatting standard known as Unicode, attackers were able to cause characters in file names to appear from right to left, instead of the left-to-right order that's normal for most Western languages.

  • Salon to ad blockers: Can we use your browser to mine cryptocurrency?

    Salon explains what's going on in a new FAQ. "How does Salon make money by using my processing power?" the FAQ says. "We intend to use a small percentage of your spare processing power to contribute to the advancement of technological discovery, evolution, and innovation. For our beta program, we'll start by applying your processing power to help support the evolution and growth of blockchain technology and cryptocurrencies."

  • Why children are now prime targets for identity theft [sic] [iophk: "the real name for this is "fraud" and there are already existing laws on it"]

    SSA believed this change would make it more difficult for thieves to “guess” someone’s SSN by looking at other public information available for that person. However, now that an SSN is not tied to additional data points, such as a location or year of birth, it becomes harder for financial institutions, health care providers, and others to verify that the person using the SSN is in fact the person to whom it was issued.

    In other words: Thieves now target SSNs issued after this change as they know your 6-year-old niece or your 4-year-old son will not have an established credit file.

  • Microsoft won't plug a huge zero-day in Skype because it'd be too much work

    The bug in the automatic updater (turd polisher) for the Windows desktop app has a ruddy great hole in it that will let dodgy DLLs through.

  • ‘I Lived a Nightmare:’ SIM Hijacking Victims Share Their Stories

    The bug itself didn’t expose anything too sensitive. No passwords, social security numbers, or credit card data was exposed. But it did expose customers’ email addresses, their billing account numbers, and the phone’s IMSI numbers, standardized unique number that identifies subscribers. Just by knowing (or guessing) customer’s phone numbers, hackers could get their target’s data.

    Once they had that, they could impersonate them with T-Mobile’s customer support staff and steal their phone numbers. This is how it works: a criminal calls T-Mobile, pretends to be you, convinces the customer rep to issue a new SIM card for your number, the criminal activates it, and they take control of your number.

AMD Vega 8 Graphics Performance On Linux With The Ryzen 3 2200G

Filed under
Graphics/Benchmarks

Yesterday I posted the initial Ryzen 5 2400G Vega 11 Linux graphics benchmarks while for your viewing please today -- as well as this morning's 21-way Intel/AMD CPU Linux comparison that featured these new Raven Ridge APUs -- the results now completed are initial OpenGL and Vulkan performance figures for the Vega 8 graphics found on the Ryzen 3 2200G.

Read more

Better Late Than Never: GNOME 3.28 Beta Desktop Arrives for Valentine's Day

Filed under
GNOME

GNOME 3.28 is the next major update to the widely-used Linux desktop environment, which is now used by default in the popular Ubuntu operating system. It promises many new features, as well as a wide range of enhancements, especially under the hood as most of the components were ported to the Meson build system.

Most importantly, the beta was delayed because the GNOME 3.28 desktop environment is now using BuildStream project's build sandbox, which ensures a reliable build process regardless of the dependencies you might have installed on your GNU/Linux operating system.

Read more

Also: GNOME 3.28 Beta Released With Many Improvements

Plasma 5.12.1 bugfix update lands in backports PPA for Artful 17.10

Filed under
KDE
Security

After the initial release of Plasma 5.12 was made available for Artful 17.10 via our backports PPA last week, we are pleased to say the the PPA has now been updated to the 1st bugfix release 5.12.1.

The full changelog for 5.12.1 can be found here.

Including fixes and polish for Discover and the desktop.

Also included is an update to the latest KDE Frameworks 5.43.

Upgrade instructions and caveats are as per last week’s blog post, which can be found here.

The Kubuntu team wishes users a happy experience with the excellent 5.12 LTS desktop, and thanks the KDE/Plasma team for such a wonderful desktop to package.

Read more

today's leftovers

Filed under
Misc
  • Is it an upgrade, or a sidegrade?

    I went to a nearby store, looked at the offers... And, in part due to the attitude of the salesguy, I decided not to (installing Linux will void any warranty, WTF‽ In 2018‽). Came back home, and... My Acer works again!

  • How To Install KDE Plasma Mobile On Your Android Smartphone?

    New Linux-based mobile operating systems and hardware projects have been making numerous headlines in the recent months. Projects like postmarketOS, Plasma Mobile, Librem 5, etc., have managed to gain momentum and support of open source community.

    To give you a rough idea of how things are going on the Plasma Mobile land, its developers have shared two methods (Via: Softpedia) to test Plasma Mobile on an actual Android smartphone. In a previous post, they also shared virtual machine images of the OS.

  • A KDE Love Story: Translating Kalzium into Chinese

    When I was a high school student, chemistry was not my cup of tea. My grades in chemistry were not bad either, but I hated memorizing those organic compounds. Then, I decided to major in computer science at university, and from that moment, destiny tightly bonded me and Free and Open Source Software.

  • Last week in Kube
  • fwupd now tells you about known issues

    That one little URL for the user to click on is the result of a rule engine being added to the LVFS. Of course, firmware updates shouldn’t ever fail, but in the real world they do, because distros don’t create /boot/efi correctly (cough, Arch Linux) or just because some people are running old versions of efivar, a broken git snapshot of libfwupdate or because a vendor firmware updater doesn’t work with secure boot turned on (urgh). Of all the failures logged on the LVFS, 95% fall into about 3 or 4 different failure causes, and if we know hundreds of people are hitting an issue we already understand we can provide them with some help.

  • I love free software… and Gentoo does! #ilovefs

    Some people care if software is free of cost or if it has the best features, above everything else. I don’t. I care that I can legally inspect its inner workings, modify and share modified versions. That’s why I happily avoid macOS, Windows, Skype, Photoshop.

  • Multiplexing Input or Output on a Raspberry Pi Part 1: Shift Registers

    A Raspberry Pi doesn't have that many GPIO pins, and neither does an Arduino Uno. An Arduino Mega does, but buying a Mega to go between the Pi and the keyboard kind of misses the point of scavenging a $3 keyboard; I might as well just buy an I2C or MIDI keyboard. So I needed some sort of I/O multiplexer that would let me read 31 keys using a lot fewer pins.

    There are a bunch of different approaches to multiplexing. A lot of keyboards use a matrix approach, but that makes more sense when you're wiring up all the buttons from scratch, not starting with a pre-wired keyboard like this. The two approaches I'll discuss here are shift registers and multiplexer chips.

  • Fanless, Linux-friendly Kaby Lake mini-tower drives seven 4K displays

    Compulab’s rugged “Airtop2” mini-tower runs Linux Mint or Win 10 on a Xeon E3-1275 or Core i7-7700 CPU with optional Nvidia Quadro P4000 graphics plus up to 64GB DDR4, a 6-drive NVMe/SATA subsystem, up to 7x display ports, and optional M.2 and FACE modules.

OSS Leftovers

Filed under
OSS

Server: IBM, 'DevOps', Kubernetes, and OpenStack

Filed under
Server
  • Big Blue levels up server sextet with POWER9 for IBM i, AIX, HANA, Linux

    IBM is bashing out a set of go-faster POWER9 servers in the face of mounting competition from Xeon SP systems.

  • Your DevOps attempt will fail without these 7 departments buying in

    When DevOps was coined by Andrew Shafer and Patrick Debois, the goal was to bring developers and operators closer to achieve customer value together. DevOps is a culture of continuous learning and improvement. While automation and tools can garner some improvements, having the right culture drives larger impacts. The sharing of knowledge and ideas resulting in cultural growth is the value creator in DevOps.

  • Kubernetes The Smart Way

    Kelsey Hightower, Developer Advocate at Google, kicked off the KubeCon + CloudNativeCon event in Austin with an opening keynote in which he demonstrated Kubernetes' ease of use with the help of his smartphone. Apart from commending the audience for making Kubernetes the boring-in-a-good-way framework it is today, Hightower also warned about how Kubernetes should not be considered the end game, but a means to an end.

    In his talk, Hightower first addressed the misconception that Kubernetes is difficult to install. He did so by installing an eight-node Kubernetes cluster in less than two minutes just by giving verbal instructions to the Kubernetes Engine assistant through his smartphone, thus proving tha Kubernetes generally gets out of the way quickly.

  • OpenStack: Open source community collaboration needed to overcome edge computing adoption barriers

    In a whitepaper co-authored by a number of open source advocates, the OpenStack Foundation makes the case for taking a teamwork approach to tackling the barriers to widespread edge computing adoption

    The open source cloud community is being urged to pull together and overcome the barriers preventing widespread adoption of edge computing practices becoming a reality.

  • Apache CloudStack 4.11 Boosts Open-Source Cloud Features

    Apache CloudStack v4.11 was officially released by the open-source Apache Software Foundation (ASF) on Feb. 12, after eight months of development.

    "This release has been driven by the people operating CloudStack clouds," Rohit Yadav, Apache CloudStack v4.11 Release Manager stated. "Along with great new features, v4.11 brings several important structural changes such as better support for systemd and Java 8, migration to embedded Jetty, and a new and optimized Debian 9 based systemvm template."

    CloudStack has been part of the ASF since April 2012, when Citrix donated the technology to the open-source foundation. Citrix had originally acquired from cloud.com in July 2011. The first official Apache CloudStack release was version 4.0 which debuted in November 2012.

Linux, Linux Foundation, Graphics, and BSD

Filed under
Linux
BSD

Red Hat: Elisa, Fedora Test Day, CentOS Dojo and FOSDEM 2018

Filed under
Red Hat
  • Elisa, Red Hat to demonstrate network throughput boosting software at MWC

    Elisa said it will be demonstrating a cloud-ready mobile network automation system for telecommunication operators at Mobile World Congress in Barcelona from 26 February to 01 March. It will showcase Elisa SON (Self-Organising Networks) there with Red Hat. Elisa SON uses closed loop automation and tailored algorithms that can double user data throughput on an existing network.

    Elisa offers unlimited data plans to subscribers, so its networks carry a high volume of mobile data. For this reason, it has focused on optimising network performance and getting maximum value out of its existing equipment.

  • Red Hat–1-2-3 on App Modernization

    David Egts, chief technologist for Red Hat public sector has some words of wisdom for Federal managers seeking ways to move from legacy applications to more agile environments: modernization is not just about adopting new technologies and practices, it is about what happens to the old ones.

    Three application migration patterns are emerging as government agencies and commercial businesses attempt to modernize aging, mission-critical applications: Lift and Shift, Augment with New Layers, and Rewrite, Egts said. He noted that Red Hat’s PaaS Community of Practice leader, expounded on these approaches in a whitepaper, Making Old Applications New Again.

    So, which approach is best? “There is no single right answer,” Egts said. It depends on the application, the business, and contextual factors, as well as what stage the applications are in their life cycle. However, for the best results, agencies should partner “with system integrators or vendors that can cover all three migrations, and join you in this journey,” Egts advised.

    How do the three patterns work?

  • NuWave Investment Management LLC Invests $228,000 in Red Hat Inc (RHT)
  • Red Hat, Inc. (NYSE:RHT) – Glowing Stock’s Review
  • How much should pay for $1 Earnings? On Red Hat, Inc. (RHT)
  • Signition LP Acquires Shares of 5,178 Red Hat Inc (RHT)
  • Contribute at the Fedora Test Day for kernel 4.15

    The kernel team is working on final integration for kernel 4.15. This version was just recently released, and will arrive soon in Fedora. This version has many security fixes included. As a result, the Fedora kernel and QA teams have organized a test day for Thursday, February 22. Refer to the wiki page for links to the test images you’ll need to participate.

  • CentOS Dojo and FOSDEM 2018

    FOSDEM is one of the largest open source conferences in the world, with over 8000 participants. As many developers gather not just from Europe but from all around the world, there are a number of pre- and post conferences timed to happen before and after FOSDEM. This year before FOSDEM, I also participated at the CentOS Dojo, a whole-day event about CentOS.

Debian and Ubuntu: Readers' Choice Awards, Reproducible Builds, LXD, Servers and Ubuntu LoCo Council

Filed under
Debian
Ubuntu
  • Best Linux Distribution

    This year we're breaking up our Readers' Choice Awards by category, so check back weekly for a new poll on the site. We started things off with Best Linux Distribution, and nearly 10,000 readers voted. The winner was Debian, with many commenting "As for servers, Debian is still the best" or similar.

    One to watch that is rising in the polls is Manjaro, which is independently based on the Arch Linux. Manjaro is a favorite for Linux newcomers and is known for its user-friendliness and accessibility.

  • Reproducible Builds: Weekly report #146
  • LXD weekly status #34
  • Ubuntu Server development summary – 13 February 2018

    The purpose of this communication is to provide a status update and highlights for any interesting subjects from the Ubuntu Server Team.

  • Ubuntu LoCo Council: Three month wrap-up

    The new LoCo Council has been a little lax with updating this blog. It’s admittedly taken us a little bit of time to figure out what exactly we’re doing, but we seem to be on our feet now. I’d like to rectify the blog issue by wrapping up the first three months of our reign in a summary post to get us back on track.

Programming/Development: BH 1.66.0-1, Data scientists, vi, Emacs and Compilers

Filed under
Development
  • BH 1.66.0-1

    A new release of the BH package arrived on CRAN a little earlier: now at release 1.66.0-1. BH provides a sizeable portion of the Boost C++ libraries as a set of template headers for use by R, possibly with Rcpp as well as other packages.

    This release upgrades the version of Boost to the Boost 1.66.0 version released recently, and also adds one exciting new library: Boost compute which provides a C++ interface to multi-core CPU and GPGPU computing platforms based on OpenCL.

  • Data scientist wanted: Must have Python, spontaneity not required

    The average salary offered to data scientists in the past year was £47,000, with Python being the most desirable programming language, according to an analysis of job ads.

    The assessment, carried out by listings site Joblift, looked at 8,672 data scientist vacancies posted in the UK over the last 12 months.

    It found that data science salaries have increased at 3 per cent a month, which is a percentage point higher than the UK job market as a whole.

  • Top 11 vi tips and tricks

    The vi editor is one of the most popular text editors on Unix and Unix-like systems, such as Linux. Whether you're new to vi or just looking for a refresher, these 11 tips will enhance how you use it.

  • How to create slides with Emacs Org mode and Reveal.js

    You've crafted each slide in your presentation. Now what? You'll want to generate the HTML version of your slide deck. To do that, press Ctrl+c Ctrl+e on your keyboard. This opens the Org mode export buffer. Next, type R+R. Emacs creates a single HTML file in the folder where you saved your slide file.

    Open that HTML file in a web browser. You can move through the slides by pressing the arrow keys on your keyboard.

  • Renesas Synergy Platform Boosts IoT Performance With IAR Systems Advanced Compiler Technology

Open source: why is it such a big deal?

Filed under
OSS

What is open source software (OSS)? OSS is any program, application, operating system that is released along with its source code so that you, the user, can change it at will. Or at least have the option to utilise the services of a vendor of your choice. The fact that any other type of software exists is itself strange: would you buy a car that is completely sealed off from repair? No access to the engine, the tail-lights, or the windshield wiper? Even the tyres? One and only one company — the manufacturer of the car — will be able to fix even the smallest problem. Would you buy such a vehicle? Forget buying, given the current competition in vehicles, such a product would not last in the market for even a week.

The fact that people are selling you software that you cannot take to another person to fix, re-package, assist in providing even basic upgrades is in itself wrong and the discussion should end right here, IMHO. But that is a whole different topic and best left to camp-fire discussions; we have neither the will nor the wherewithal to turn an entire industry on its head.

Read more

Security: Updates, Microsoft, Google, and Telegram

Filed under
Security
  • Security updates for Wednesday
  • Winter Olympics was hit by cyber-attack, officials confirm [Ed: This is a Microsoft Windows issue, but Bill Fates is paying The Guardian, so...]
  • Google Patches Chromebooks Against Meltdown/Spectre, Adds New Chrome OS Features

    Earlier this month, Google updated its Chrome OS computer operating system to stable version 64.0.3282.134 and platform version 10176.65.0, an update that's now available for most Chromebook devices.

    Besides the usual security improvements and bug fixes, the latest Chrome OS 64 release includes several new features that are worth mentioning, such as the ability to take screenshots by simultaneously pressing the Power and Volume Down buttons on your Chromebook with a 360-degree hinge.

  • Skype can't fix a nasty security bug without a massive code rewrite
  • Perfect Computer Security Is a Myth. But It’s Still Important [Ed: The "everything is broken" defeatism overlooks the coordinated vandalism done to put back doors in most things]

    Maybe you’ve heard it before: “Security is a myth.” It’s become a common refrain after a never-ending string of high-profile security breaches. If Fortune 500 companies with million dollar security budgets can’t lock things down, how can you?

    And there’s truth to this: perfect security is a myth. No matter what you do, no matter how careful you are, you will never be 100 percent safe from hackers, malware, and cybercrime. That’s the reality we all live in, and it’s important to keep this in mind, if only so that we can all feel more sympathy for victims.

  • Microsoft Fixes 50 Vulnerabilities In February’s Patch Tuesday Update

    Microsoft has released February’s cumulative updates for Windows 10, better known as Patch Tuesday. The reason why the update is worth getting is it comes with fixes for 50 vulnerabilities in various versions of Windows 10.

    As per the release notes, the software addressed as a part of the Patch Tuesday update are Windows OS, Microsoft Edge, Internet Explorer, Microsoft Office, Microsoft Office Services and Web Apps, and the JavaScript engine ChakraCore. In addition to security fixes, Microsoft has also made improvements to address minor glitches in Windows 10.

  • Telegram Zero-Day Vulnerability Lets Hackers Pwn Your PC to Mine Cryptocurrency

    A zero-day vulnerability was discovered by Kaspersky Lab in the Telegram Desktop app that could let hackers pwn your computer to mine for cryptocurrencies like Zcash, Monero, Fantomcoin, and others.

    Kaspersky Lab's security researchers say the zero-day vulnerability can be used to deliver multi-purpose malware to computer users using the Telegram Desktop app, including backdoors and crypto-cash mining software.

    The security company also discovered that hackers had actively exploited the vulnerability in the Telegram Desktop app, which is based on the right-to-left override Unicode method, since March last year, but only to mine cryptocurrencies like Fantomcoin, Monero, and Zcash.

OSI Joins UNESCO to Grow Open Source Community

Filed under
OSS

The FOSSASIA Summit 2018 takes place in Singapore from Thursday, March 22 – Sunday, March 25. Open Source contributors can now apply for a free ticket to the event, and accommodation throughout conference. In addition, you’ll be eligible to participate in: A featured workshops, the UNESCO hackathon, and celebrate the 20th Anniversary of the Open Source Initiative. All you have to do is convince us, that you are an awesome Open Source contributor and book your trip to Singapore!

Read more

Syndicate content

More in Tux Machines

Review: DietPi 6.1

DietPi makes it extremely easy to turn a single board computer into many different things. Installing and configuring Nextcloud, Kodi, etc., only require a few very basic steps. Every software package I tried installed with few issues, and worked great once installed. DietPi does almost all the hard work for the user, which makes it a great option for running on any single board computer or as a virtual machine. If you are looking for a lightweight and easy-to-use operating system for your single board computer, you cannot go wrong with DietPi. Read more

Google, Windows and Outlook

  • Google's Octopus Is A Gemini Lake Chromebook
    While we're still waiting on an AMD-powered Chromebook as well as for Cannonlake to materialize, it appears Google is prepping support for a Geminilake Chromebook as well. Gemini Lake was launched back in December and makes use of Goldmont Plus CPU cores with Gen9 (Kabylake) class graphics. The current Gemini Lake mobile parts are the Celeron N4000/N4100 and Pentium Silver N5000. The Celeron models are dual core while the Pentium Silver N5000 is quad-core, all of them have a 6 Watt TDP, 1.1GHz base frequency, and turbo frequency in the 2.4~2.7GHz range while the graphics clock up only to 650~750MHz.
  • Windows 10 Update KB4058043 Causing BSODs, Some PCs Unable to Boot
    Botched updates keep making the rounds these days, and here’s a new one that was actually released in December, but whose effects haven’t been spotted until this month. Windows 10 update KB4058043, which is released to systems running the Fall Creators Update, brings reliability improvements to the Microsoft Store and fixes an issue which Microsoft says could cause app update failures and unnecessary network requests. But as it turns out, it also brings new problems to a number of systems installing it. A post on Microsoft’s Community forums, which got pinned earlier this week – meaning that it’s really an issue that all users should be aware of, reveals that Windows 10 update KB4058043 caused BSODs on a system before eventually pushing it to an unbootable state.
  • A Life Lesson in Mishandling SMTP Sender Verification

    Whenever I encounter incredibly stupid and functionally destructive configuration errors like this I tend to believe they're down to simple incompetence and not malice.

    But this one has me wondering. If you essentially require incoming mail to include the contents of spf.outlook.com (currently no less than 81 subnets) as valid senders for the domain, you are essentially saying that only outlook.com customers are allowed to communicate.

    If that restriction is a result of a deliberate choice rather than a simple configuration error, the problem moves out of the technical sphere and could conceivably become a legal matter, depending on what outlook.com have specified in their contracts that they are selling to their customers.

Graphics: Nouveau, Mesa and VESA

  • Nouveau Gets ARB_bindless_texture Support For Maxwell & Newer
    Back for Mesa 18.0 there was OpenGL bindless textures for Kepler GPUs on the open-source NVIDIA "Nouveau" driver while now for Mesa 18.1 that support is in place for Maxwell GPUs and newer. Bindless texture support is important for "AZDO" purposes for approaching zero driver overhead with OpenGL. ARB_bindless_texture reduces the API/GL driver overhead of resource bindings and allows accessing textures without needing to first bind/re-bind them.
  • Marek Working Towards Even Lower SGPR Register Usage
    Yesterday well known open-source AMD developer Marek Olšák landed his RadeonSI 32-bit pointers support for freeing up some scalar general purpose registers (SGPRs) and he's continued with a new patch series to alleviate register usage even more.
  • Libdrm 2.4.90 Released With Meson Build System, AMDGPU & Intel Improvements
    Marek Olšák on Saturday released the big libdrm 2.4.90 DRM library update that sits between Mesa and other GPU user-space components and the kernel's Direct Rendering Manager code.
  • Mesa Git Lands RadeonSI 32-bit Pointers Support
    At the start of the new year Marek Olšák of AMD posted a set of patches for 32-bit GPU pointers in RadeonSI. That work has now landed in mainline Mesa Git.
  • xf86-video-vesa 2.4.0
    Nothing terribly exciting, but enough bug fixes to justify a release.
  • VESA X.Org Driver Sees First Update In Three Years
    Should you find yourself using the xf86-video-vesa DDX for one reason or another, a new release is now available and it's the first in three years. The xf86-video-vesa 2.4.0 X.Org driver was released this week with the handful of commits that came in since v2.3.4 was tagged three years ago, it's been eight years already since xf86-video-vesa 2.3.0. For most users, xf86-video-vesa is just used in select fallback instances when your main DDX driver fails but even still these days KMS is pretty solid with xf86-video-modesetting, fbdev and other DDX drivers working well, etc.

Kernel: VGA_Switcheroo, Con Kolivas/MuQSS, and KPTI Protection