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About Tux Machines

Sunday, 15 Sep 19 - Tux Machines is a community-driven public service/news site which has been around for over a decade and a half and primarily focuses on GNU/LinuxSubscribe now Syndicate content

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Quick Roundup

Type Title Author Replies Last Postsort icon
Story Kubuntu 14.04 Alpha 2 Released with Improved USB Creator Rianne Schestowitz 24/01/2014 - 4:20am
Story New Linux Job Board LinuxCareers.com is now OUT Rianne Schestowitz 24/01/2014 - 4:25am
Story Open Source Libferris: Chasing the "Everything is a File System" Dream Rianne Schestowitz 24/01/2014 - 4:31am
Story Crypto Update for Linux 3.14 Rianne Schestowitz 24/01/2014 - 4:42am
Story How to get your conference talk submission accepted Rianne Schestowitz 24/01/2014 - 4:48am
Story [GIT PULL 0/6] ARM: SoC changes for Linux 3.14 Rianne Schestowitz 24/01/2014 - 4:53am
Story PC-BSD 10.0-RC5 Now Available Rianne Schestowitz 24/01/2014 - 4:59am
Story Rifles powered by Linux purchased by US Army Rianne Schestowitz 24/01/2014 - 8:55am
Story Kali Linux 1.0.6, hands-on Roy Schestowitz 24/01/2014 - 12:02pm
Story Quirky Linux Gets More Pep Out of Puppy Roy Schestowitz 24/01/2014 - 12:03pm

Novell predicts only two Linux distros will survive

Filed under
Linux

Novell boss Jack Messman is predicting that the open source operating system market will be reduced to two dominant suppliers in the next three to five years: Novell and Red Hat.

Open-Xchange Inc. Announces Open Source Collaboration Virtual Appliance

Filed under
OS

Open-Xchange Inc. today announced a Virtual “appliance” for its open source project Open-Xchange Server 0.8 – giving developers and the open source community the popular collaboration platform to run in a VMware Virtual Appliance.

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Microsoft delays wide launch of Windows Vista

Filed under
Microsoft

Microsoft Corp. will delay the consumer release of its new Windows operating system until January 2007, missing the holiday sales season and throwing some PC makers and retailers into turmoil.

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Next-Gen Linux Game Roundup

Filed under
Gaming

If you thought the Linux gaming world consisted of nethack, pp-racer, BZFlag, and well... fortune, you were wrong. Here's some next-gen Linux games that'll definitely make some waves:

Lightning strikes Mozilla

Filed under
Moz/FF

In contrast to web browsers, e-mail and calendar applications have remained largely platform-centric. If you use Windows, chances are you also run Outlook. If you're on a Mac, you're probably using Mail.app or Entourage. Unix? PINE (just kidding).

Free Vs. Open

Filed under
Interviews

Richard Stallman, founder of the Boston-based Free Software Foundation, has created a new version of his GNU General Public License, or GPL, under which many free software programs are distributed. In an interview by e-mail with Forbes, Stallman says freedom is more important to him than popularity. He also describes the differences between "free software" and "open source." And yes, he thinks one is better.

Linux gets built-in Cell processor support

Filed under
Linux

Linus Torvalds released a new Linux kernel Monday that supports features in IBM's Cell processor, includes Oracle software for clustered databases and improves how the open-source operating system runs on multiprocessor systems.

Red Hat's Fedora 5 boosts desktop features

Filed under
Linux

Red Hat released its Fedora Core 5 version of Linux Monday, giving enthusiasts new graphics and virtualization abilities, as well as some desktop utilities based on a software framework from Microsoft.

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New MEPIS Linux Test Version Uses Ubuntu Base

Filed under
Ubuntu

MEPIS founder Warren Woodford has announced a test release of SimplyMEPIS 6.0, incorporating software from the Ubuntu Dapper package pools. This is the first version of SimplyMEPIS with an Ubuntu base.

The Best Free Desktop Linux . . . and how to make it better

Filed under
Linux

Continuing his quest for the perfect Linux desktop, Michael C. Barnes gives DesktopLinux.com readers an in-depth analysis of the technologies that make open source a great alternative to proprietary operating systems.

Shuttleworth confirms 1 June for Dapper

Filed under
Ubuntu

In an e-mail to the Ubuntu community last night, Mark Shuttleworth confirmed the release date for Ubuntu Dapper Drake desktop and server editions as 1 June.

French approve copyright protection bill

Filed under
Misc

The French National Assembly approved a digital copyright bill today that will require DRM (digital rights management) developers to reveal details of their technology to rivals that wish to build interoperable systems. The bill will make it illegal to develop, distribute or promote P2P and threaten [the development of] free and open-source software.

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Pimp Your Shell

Filed under
HowTos

Bored with your black and white Linux prompt? Try these tips to pimp your shell prompt. I tested these tips with Bash shell version 2 and above.

Mozilla Firefox v2.0 Alpha 1 Screenshots

Filed under
Moz/FF

With a few months since Firefox v1.5 had been released, the Mozilla developers have been quick to progress in the Mozilla v2.0 development tree. As the Firefox 2 development progresses, among the many goals Mozilla wishes to address include Really Simply Syndication improvements, redoing their tabbing support, and many other nifty features to come.

If It's Tuesday, This Must Be Fedora (Five)

Filed under
Reviews

My ever famous old laptop got an infusion of FC5 last night. And it was not that bad. I haven't had installed Fedora since FC3, so it was kinda new for me. The improved Anaconda is indeed extremely easy to use, it's a truly no-nonsense installer.

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More in Tux Machines

Debian Community Team (CT) and miniDebConf19 Vaumarcu

  • Molly de Blanc: Free software activities (August 2019)

    The Debian Community Team (CT) had a meeting where we discussed some of our activities, including potential new team members!

  • miniDebConf19 Vaumarcus – Oct 25-27 2019 – Call for Presentations

    We’re opening the Call for Presentations for the miniDebConf19 Vaumarcus now, until October 20, so please contribute to the MiniDebConf by proposing a talk, workshop, birds of feather (BoF) session, etc, directly on the Debian wiki: /Vaumarcus/TalkSubmissions We are aiming for talks which are somehow related to Debian or Free Software in general, see the wiki for subject suggestions. We expect submissions and talks to be held in English, as this is the working language in Debian and at this event. Registration is also still open; through the Debian wiki: Vaumarcus/Registration.

New Distro Releases: EasyOS Buster 2.1.3, EasyOS Pyro 1.2.3 and IPFire 2.23 - Core Update 136

  • EasyOS Buster version 2.1.3 released

    EasyOS version 2.1.3, latest in the "Buster" series, has been released. This is another incremental upgrade, however, as the last release announced on Distrowatch is version 2.1, the bug fixes, improvements and upgrades have been considerable since then. So much, that I might request the guys at Distrowatch to announce version 2.1.3.

  • EasyOS Pyro version 1.2.3 released

    Another incremental release of the Pyro series. Although this series is considered to be in maintenance mode, it does have all of the improvements as in the latest Buster release.

  • IPFire 2.23 - Core Update 136 is available for testing

    the summer has been a quiet time for us with a little relaxation, but also some shifted focus on our infrastructure and other things. But now we are back with a large update which is packed with important new features and fixes.

Linux 5.3

  • Linux 5.3
    So we've had a fairly quiet last week, but I think it was good that we
    ended up having that extra week and the final rc8.
    
    Even if the reason for that extra week was my travel schedule rather
    than any pending issues, we ended up having a few good fixes come in,
    including some for some bad btrfs behavior. Yeah, there's some
    unnecessary noise in there too (like the speling fixes), but we also
    had several last-minute reverts for things that caused issues.
    
    One _particularly_ last-minute revert is the top-most commit (ignoring
    the version change itself) done just before the release, and while
    it's very annoying, it's perhaps also instructive.
    
    What's instructive about it is that I reverted a commit that wasn't
    actually buggy. In fact, it was doing exactly what it set out to do,
    and did it very well. In fact it did it _so_ well that the much
    improved IO patterns it caused then ended up revealing a user-visible
    regression due to a real bug in a completely unrelated area.
    
    The actual details of that regression are not the reason I point that
    revert out as instructive, though. It's more that it's an instructive
    example of what counts as a regression, and what the whole "no
    regressions" kernel rule means. The reverted commit didn't change any
    API's, and it didn't introduce any new bugs. But it ended up exposing
    another problem, and as such caused a kernel upgrade to fail for a
    user. So it got reverted.
    
    The point here being that we revert based on user-reported _behavior_,
    not based on some "it changes the ABI" or "it caused a bug" concept.
    The problem was really pre-existing, and it just didn't happen to
    trigger before. The better IO patterns introduced by the change just
    happened to expose an old bug, and people had grown to depend on the
    previously benign behavior of that old issue.
    
    And never fear, we'll re-introduce the fix that improved on the IO
    patterns once we've decided just how to handle the fact that we had a
    bad interaction with an interface that people had then just happened
    to rely on incidental behavior for before. It's just that we'll have
    to hash through how to do that (there are no less than three different
    patches by three different developers being discussed, and there might
    be more coming...). In the meantime, I reverted the thing that exposed
    the problem to users for this release, even if I hope it will be
    re-introduced (perhaps even backported as a stable patch) once we have
    consensus about the issue it exposed.
    
    Take-away from the whole thing: it's not about whether you change the
    kernel-userspace ABI, or fix a bug, or about whether the old code
    "should never have worked in the first place". It's about whether
    something breaks existing users' workflow.
    
    Anyway, that was my little aside on the whole regression thing.  Since
    it's that "first rule of kernel programming", I felt it is perhaps
    worth just bringing it up every once in a while.
    
    Other than that aside, I don't find a lot to really talk about last
    week. Drivers, networking (and network drivers), arch updates,
    selftests. And a few random fixes in various other corners. The
    appended shortlog is not overly long, and gives a flavor for the
    changes.
    
    And this obviously means that the merge window for 5.4 is open, and
    I'll start doing pull requests for that tomorrow. I already have a
    number of them in my inbox, and I appreciate all the people who got
    that over and done with early,
    
                    Linus
    
  • Linux Kernel 5.3 Officially Released, Here's What's New

    Linus Torvalds announced today the release of the Linux 5.3 kernel series, a major that brings several new features, dozens of improvements, and updated drivers. Two months in the works and eight RC (Release Candidate) builds later, the final Linux 5.3 kernel is now available, bringing quite some interesting additions to improve hardware support, but also the overall performance. Linux kernel 5.3 had an extra Release Candidate because of Linus Torvalds' travel schedule, but it also brought in a few needed fixes. "Even if the reason for that extra week was my travel schedule rather than any pending issues, we ended up having a few good fixes come in, including some for some bad Btrfs behavior. Yeah, there's some unnecessary noise in there too (like the speling fixes), but we also had several last-minute reverts for things that caused issues," said Linus Torvalds.

  • Linux 5.3 Kernel Released With AMD Navi Support, Intel Speed Select & More

    Linus Torvalds just went ahead and released the Linux 5.3 kernel as stable while now opening the Linux 5.4 merge window. There was some uncertainty whether Linux 5.3 would have to go into extra overtime due to a getrandom() system call issue uncovered by an unrelated EXT4 commit. Linus ended up reverting the EXT4 commit for the time being.

Kubernetes Leftovers

  • With its Kubernetes bet paying off, Cloud Foundry doubles down on developer experience

    More than 50% of the Fortune 500 companies are now using the open-source Cloud Foundry Platform-as-a-Service project — either directly or through vendors like Pivotal — to build, test and deploy their applications. Like so many other projects, including the likes of OpenStack, Cloud Foundry went through a bit of a transition in recent years as more and more developers started looking to containers — and especially the Kubernetes project — as a platform on which to develop. Now, however, the project is ready to focus on what always differentiated it from its closed- and open-source competitors: the developer experience.

  • Kubernetes in the Enterprise: A Primer

    As Kubernetes moves deeper into the enterprise, its growth is having an impact on the ecosystem at large. When Kubernetes came on the scene in 2014, it made an impact and continues to impact the way companies build software. Large companies have backed it, causing a ripple effect in the industry and impacting open source and commercial systems. To understand how K8S will continue to affect the industry and change the traditional enterprise data center, we must first understand the basics of Kubernetes.

  • Google Cloud rolls out Cloud Dataproc on Kubernetes

    Google Cloud is trialling alpha availability of a new platform for data scientists and engineers through Kubernetes. Cloud Dataproc on Kubernetes combines open source, machine learning and cloud to help modernise big data resource management. The alpha availability will first start with workloads on Apache Spark, with more environments to come.

  • Google announces alpha of Cloud Dataproc for Kubernetes

    Not surprisingly, Google, the company that created K8s, thinks the answer to that question is yes. And so, today, the company is announcing the Alpha release of Cloud Dataproc for Kubernetes (K8s Dataproc), allowing Spark to run directly on Google Kubernetes Engine (GKE)-based K8s clusters. The service promises to reduce complexity, in terms of open source data components' inter-dependencies, and portability of Spark applications. That should allow data engineers, analytics experts and data scientists to run their Spark workloads in a streamlined way, with less integration and versioning hassles.