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Friday, 28 Apr 17 - Tux Machines is a community-driven public service/news site which has been around for over a decade and primarily focuses on GNU/LinuxSubscribe now Syndicate content

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Type Title Author Replies Last Postsort icon
Blog entry slashdot effect srlinuxx 1 19/03/2005 - 6:00am
Page Applications list srlinuxx 19/03/2005 - 6:01pm
Story unix motorcycle srlinuxx 1 19/03/2005 - 6:30pm
Story Computer Addiction or Healthy Enthusiam? srlinuxx 2 20/03/2005 - 6:02pm
Blog entry A Peak at MDK 10.2-b2 AMD64 srlinuxx 2 20/03/2005 - 6:21pm
Page Thank You For Completing Our Survey srlinuxx 21/03/2005 - 4:07am
CA survey srlinuxx 21/03/2005 - 4:13am
Blog entry Re-install Texstar 2 22/03/2005 - 2:41am
Story Dell welcomes back Muslim workers srlinuxx 1 22/03/2005 - 4:27pm
Story My workstation OS: PCLinuxOS Preview 8 Texstar 2 26/03/2005 - 11:17pm

Security Leftovers

Filed under
Security
  • Security updates for Monday
  • Recursive DNS Server Fingerprint Problem

    Our goal is to identify hijacked resolvers by analyzing their fingerprints, in order to increase safety of Internet users. To do that, we utilize data collected via RIPE Atlas (atlas.ripe.net).

  • Online developer tutorials are spreading XSS and SQL injection flaws

    The researchers, from across three universities in Germany and Trend Micro, checked the PHP code bases of more than 64,000 projects on Github and uncovered more than 100 vulnerabilities that they believe might have been introduced as a result of developers picking up the code that they used from online tutorials.

  • BrickerBot, the permanent denial-of-service botnet, is back with a vengeance

    BrickerBot, the botnet that permanently incapacitates poorly secured Internet of Things devices before they can be conscripted into Internet-crippling denial-of-service armies, is back with a new squadron of foot soldiers armed with a meaner arsenal of weapons.

  • Reproducible Builds: week 104 in Stretch cycle
  • Webroot antivirus goes bananas, starts trashing Windows system files

    Webroot's security tools went berserk today, mislabeling key Microsoft Windows system files as malicious and temporarily removing them – knackering PCs in the process.

    Not only were people's individual copies of the antivirus suite going haywire, but also business editions and installations run by managed service providers (MSPs), meaning companies and organizations relying on the software were hit by the cockup.

    Between 1200 and 1500 MST (1800 and 2100 UTC) today, Webroot's gear labeled Windows operating system data as W32.Trojan.Gen – generic-Trojan-infected files, in other words – and moved them into quarantine, rendering affected computers unstable. Files digitally signed by Microsoft were whisked away – but, luckily, not all of them, leaving enough of the OS behind to reboot and restore the quarantined resources.

  • How The Update Framework Improves Security of Software Updates

    Updating software is one of the most important ways to keep users and organizations secure. But how can software be updated securely? That's the challenge that The Update Framework (TUF) aims to solve.

    Justin Cappos, assistant professor at New York University, detailed how TUF works and what's coming to further improve the secure updating approach in a session at last week's DockerCon 17 conference in Austin, Texas. Simply using HTTPS and Transport Layer Security (TLS) to secure a download isn't enough as there have been many publicly reported instances of software repositories that have been tampered with, Cappos said.

  • Security Updates for Ubuntu Phone to End in June

    Security updates for Ubuntu phone and tablet will end this June, Canonical has confirmed. Current OTA updates are currently limited to critical fixes and security updates — a decision we were first to tell you back in January. But after June 2017 Canonical “will no longer deliver any further updates”.

  • Canonical to stop supporting Ubuntu Phone in June

    Canonical had already announced development of its Ubuntu Phone software was ending. Now we know when the final nail goes in the coffin: June.

  • Malware Hunts And Kills Poorly Secured Internet Of Things Devices Before They Can Be Integrated Into Botnets

    Researchers say they've discovered a new wave of malware with one purpose: to disable poorly secured routers and internet of things devices before they can be compromised and integrated into botnets. We've often noted how internet-of-broken-things devices ("smart" doorbells, fridges, video cameras, etc.) have such flimsy security that they're often hacked and integrated into botnets in just a matter of seconds after being connected to the internet. These devices are then quickly integrated into botnets that have been responsible for some of the worst DDoS attacks we've ever seen (including last October's attack on DYN).

GNOME/GTK News

Filed under
GNOME
  • The Way GNOME Handles Wallpapers Really Annoys Me

    I love GNOME Shell — and no, not just because I’ve little choice now that is Ubuntu’s default desktop! But the more I use GNOME the more I learn that the desktop environment, like every other, has its own share of quirks, bugs and inconsistencies. Like the following appreciably niche niggle in the the way GNOME handles desktop wallpapers.

  • Drag-and-drop in lists

    I’ve recently had an occasion to implement reordering of a GtkListBox via drag-and-drop (DND). It was not that complicated. Since I haven’t seen drag-and-drop used much with list boxes, here is a quick summary of what is needed to get the basics working.

Containers News

Filed under
Server
OSS
  • How Kubernetes is making contributing easy

    As the program manager of the Kubernetes community at Google, Sarah Novotny has years of experience in open source communities including MySQL and NGINX. Sarah sat down with me at CloudNativeCon in Berlin at the end of March to discuss both the Kubernetes community and open source communities more broadly.

    Among the topics we covered in the podcast were the challenges inherent in shifting from a company-led project to a community-led one, principles that can lead to more successful communities, and how to structure decision-making.

  • How Microsoft helped Docker with LinuxKit and Moby Project [Ed: Microsoft 'helped'... embrace, extend, coerce; haven't Docker employees learned from history?]

    Today, supporting Linux is as critical to Microsoft as it is to Red Hat and SUSE.

  • How to make branding decisions in an open community

    On April 18, Docker founder Solomon Hykes made a big announcement via a pull request in the main Docker repo: "Docker is transitioning all of its open source collaborations to the Moby project going forward." The docker/docker repo now redirects to moby/moby, and Solomon's pull request updates the README and logo for the project to match.

    Reaction from the Docker community has been overwhelmingly negative. As of this writing, the Moby pull request has garnered 7 upvotes and 110 downvotes on GitHub. The Docker community is understandably frustrated by this opaque announcement of a fait accompli, an important decision that a hidden inner circle made behind closed doors. It's a textbook case of "Why wasn't I consulted?"

Ubuntu 17.04: Unity's swan song?

Filed under
Reviews
Ubuntu

For the most part, not much has changed on Ubuntu's Desktop edition in the past year. Unity 7 has more or less remained the same while work was progressing on the next version of the desktop, Unity 8. However, now that both desktops are being retired in favour of the GNOME desktop, running Ubuntu 17.04 feels a bit strange. This week I was running software that has probably reached the end of its life and this version of Ubuntu will only be supported for nine months. I could probably get the same desktop experience and most of the same hardware support running Ubuntu 16.04 and get security updates through to 2021 in the bargain. In short, I don't think Ubuntu 17.04 offers users anything significant over last year's 16.04 LTS release and it will be retired sooner.

That being said, I could not help but be a little wistful about using Unity 7 again. Even though it has been about a year since I last used Unity, I quickly fell back into the routine and I was once more reminded how pleasant it can be to use Unity. The desktop is geared almost perfectly to my workflow and the controls are set up in a way that reduces my mouse usage to almost nothing. I find Unity a very comfortable desktop to use, especially when application menus have been moved from the top panel to inside their own windows. While there are some projects trying to carry on development of Unity, this release of Ubuntu feels like Unity's swan song and I have greatly enjoyed using the desktop this week.

While there is not much new in Ubuntu 17.04, the release is pretty solid. Apart from the confusion that may arise from having three different package managers, I found Ubuntu to be capable, fairly newcomer friendly and stable. Everything worked well for me, at least on physical hardware. Unity is a bit slow to use in a virtual machine, but the distribution worked smoothly on my desktop computer.

Read more

FOSS in European Public Services

Filed under
OSS
  • France: How a high school association finally obtained a source code

    In October 2016, the association Droit des Lycéens, which represents French high school students and helps them assert their rights, finally obtained the source code of an algorithm that influences students’ choice of university after the Baccalauréat exam. This puts an end to a conflict lasting more than seven months between the association and the Ministry of Education, which until then had refused to publish the source code of its tool.

    The opening of algorithms and calculators is a flagship measure in the French law for a digital republic that was passed in 2016. Since then, France has started to publish some source codes, such as the personal tax calculator in April 2016. This may have created a precedent for the present case, according to the association.

    The algorithm in question forms the core of the APB (Admission Post-Bac) online platform, which is used by all students in France. It allows them to enter their preferences in terms of universities and syllabus, and helps match applicants to available places. But Droit des Lycéens believes that the calculation method has been kept secret by the Ministry, and lacks transparency.

  • OFE welcomes continued emphasis on openness in EIF

    The OpenForum Europe (OFE) think tank welcomes the publication of the European Interoperability Framework (EIF). This document continues to emphasise the importance of openness, the organisation writes on its blog.

  • Czech Finance Ministry app boosts open data, source

    A data visualisation application developed in 2015 by the Czech Ministry of Finance, is helping to promote the publication of open data, and is making the case for open source software development across the government. The tool, called Supervizor, was one of the winners of the European Commission’s Sharing and Reuse Award. At the Sharing and Reuse Conference in Lisbon (Portugal), on 29 March, Supervizor was awarded EUR 15,000 - to help the project expands its reach.

Leftovers: Gaming

Filed under
Gaming

Kernel Space/Linux

Filed under
Linux

Fedora: The Latest

Filed under
Red Hat

Enlightenment Development

Filed under
Development
GNU
Linux
  • Enlightenment image viewer Ephoto 1.0 released

    The fancy looking Ephoto 1.0 [Official Site, Git] for Enlightenment has been officially released recently with lots of useful features to manage your image library.

  • Enlightenment Working On OpenGL-Accelerated Evas Filters

    An Enlightenment developer has been working on support for accelerating EFL Evas filters with OpenGL shaders.

    Evas is Enlightenment's display canvas API. Those wishing to learn about Evas before reading this article can see this Enlightenment.org page.

Android Leftovers

Filed under
Android

AMDGPU-PRO 17.10 OpenCL vs. NVIDIA Shows Problems

Filed under
Graphics/Benchmarks

Last week I began posting a number of AMD Radeon RX 580 Linux benchmarks but not covered so far has been the OpenCL compute performance considering the Clover-based compute stack isn't good enough for benchmarking and is basically unmaintained these days by AMD. Meanwhile, their ROCm stack is still being brought up and is not yet fully-opened nor optimized yet for performance. Thus for those with desktop cards looking for basic OpenCL support are left with the AMDGPU-PRO hybrid driver with its closed-source OpenCL driver. In this article are some fresh OpenCL benchmarks of AMDGPU-PRO on the RX 580 and other Radeon GPUs compared to NVIDIA with its Linux OpenCL driver.

Read more

Dark times for OmniOS – an Oracle-free open-source Solaris project

Filed under
OS
OSS

Development of OmniOS – an Oracle-free open-source variant of Solaris – is being killed after five years of work.

Active development of OmniOS by OmniTI is being suspended, we're told, with its current beta being the final release. OmniOS is a distribution of Illumos, which is derived from OpenSolaris, Sun's open-source flavor of Solaris.

Read more

Ubuntu Phone security updates end in June, app store closing

Filed under
Ubuntu
Gadgets

When Mark Shuttleworth, founder of Canonical (the company behind the Ubuntu Linux distribution), announced his company would not only be abandoning their custom desktop environment (Unity), but also halting development on their phone/tablet operating system, many questions were left unanswered.

One of those questions: What happens to the existing phones and tablets running Ubuntu Touch that have already been sold?

Read more

today's leftovers

Filed under
Misc
  • OpenRA C&C Reimplementation Gets New Stable Release, Here Is What's New

    Oliver Brakmann from the OpenRA project, an open-source and cross-platform initiative to offer a reimplementation of the popular Command & Conquer games, announced the availability of a new stable release.

  • Pisi-Linux-2.0-Beta-KDE5
  • Arch-Based arkOS Linux Being Discontinued

    arkOS, the Arch-based Linux distribution focused on "securely self-hosting your online life" with aims to make it easy to deploy servers for web-based services, is being discontinued.

    ArkOS since 2012 had been working to make it trivial to deploy your own Linux web server, your own personal cloud (ownCloud), and making it easy for other services to be deployed while being done so securely and easily. You probably haven't heard of arkOS making the news in a while and sadly now it's making news again, but only because it's being discontinued by its lead developer.

  • SUSE Hack Week 15

    Back in February the fifteenth SUSE Hack Week took place. As always this was a week of free hacking, to learn, to innovate, to collaborate, and to have a lot of fun. I didn't have the full time, so I worked on a couple of small things and a few projects I maintain. I did want to summarize that, so here you go.

  • How To Use SD Card As Internal Storage On Android | Adoptable Storage On Android
  • Anbox - Android in a Box
  • Your CEO’s Obliviousness about Open Source is Endangering Your Business [Ed: Jeff Luszcz says nothing about the risk of proprietary components with back doors etc. and instead 'pulls a Black Duck']

    But what caused these issues? Itis what happens when an open source component is integrated into a commercial software product and violates its open source license, or when it contains a vulnerability that was previously unknown. As technology evolves, open source security and compliance risk are reaching a critical apex that if not addressed, will threaten the entire software supply chain.

  • Mentor tips Azure IoT support and Linux-driven self-driving tech [Ed: Azure is a patent trap with back doors]

    Mentor announced Azure Certified for IoT compliance for Mentor Embedded Linux, and unveiled a Linux-based “DRS360” self-driving car platform.

Leftovers: Software

Filed under
Software
  • 3 signs your Kubernetes distro is built to last

    It's hard to turn around these days without bumping into a Kubernetes distribution. For example, Mirantis recently buffed its OpenStack distribution to use Kubernetes as an internal component and for container management. Major Linux server distributions include it now.

    For Kubernetes adopters, it's all good news. It means the most remarkable development in the container world since, well, containers themselves is enjoying strong uptake and acceptance.

  • Cockpit – An Easy Way to Administer Multiple Remote Linux Servers via a Web Browser

    Cockpit is a free and open source web-based system management tool where users can easily monitor and manage multiple remote Linux srvers. It is very thin and light weight utility & directly interacts with the operating system from a real Linux session and doesn’t require any difficult configuration so just install it, it is ready for use.

  • Some Useful Indicators: Ayatana, Clipboard-Autoedit, Diskstat, Files, Bulletin and Udisks

    Panel Indicators always comes in handy when you have to do some productive work on your desktop computer, to access quick functions of different applications these indicators saves you a lot of time, some indicator give you information you want to receive, it all depends on your needs. Today presenting you some useful indicators which may help you and makes your desktop experience much better. Following all the indicators are developed by just one guy and available through his PPA.

  • SRT Video Transport Protocol Open-Sourced

    In aiming to enhance online video streaming, the SRT video protocol has been open-sourced and an alliance forming around that for low-latency video.

    SRT is short for Secure Reliable Transport and is a low-latency video transport protocol developed by Haivision. The SRT protocol is being opened under the LGPL license.

today's howtos

Filed under
HowTos

Linux and Linux Foundation

Filed under
Linux

KDE and GNOME

Filed under
KDE
GNOME

Debian Family

Filed under
Debian
  • Devuan GNU/Linux 1.0.0 "Jessie" Just Around the Corner, Release Candidate Out

    It's been five almost five months since the developers behind the Debian-based Devuan GNU/Linux operating system launched the second Beta version towards the first stable release of the OS, and they now announced the Release Candidate.

    The Devuan project continues its vision of providing a libre Debian fork without using the systemd init system, and the Release Candidate (RC) version brings the GNU/Linux distribution closer to a final release. The interesting fact is that this RC appears to be stable enough to be used for production work.

  • Budgie 10.3 Released, Here’s How to Install it on Ubuntu

    A new version of the Budgie desktop is available to install on Ubuntu. Budgie 10.3 adds a new Alt+Tab switcher, and brings a stack of bug fixes to the table.

  • Ubuntu 17.10 Codename Released "Artful Aardvark"
  • openHAB

    Partners Canonical, openHAB Foundation and Azul Systems have collaborated hard to drive development of the new openHAB 2.0 smart-home platform as a snap package. An alternative to Apple Homekit and Samsung SmartThings, openHAB from openHAB Foundation is completely free and open source, and acts as a control hub for home IoT setups.

Development News

Filed under
Development
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More in Tux Machines

Today in Techrights

Linux, Graphics, and Linux Foundation

Leftovers: Debian and Ubuntu

  • CD/DVD Image Changes For The Upcoming Debian 9.0 Release
    With Debian 9.0 not being far away from releasing, the Debian CD Images Team has issued an update over their fundamental changes happening for this "Stretch" cycle.
  • The System76 'Galago Pro' laptop looks fantastic, $50 off for a few more days
    The Galago Pro looks like an incredibly stylish device ready for the masses with a slick aluminium casing, instead of the always cheap feeling plastic cases most tend to come with. It's slim, but best of all incredibly light for such a device at 1.3kg (2.87 lbs). It comes with Ubuntu 16.04.2 LTS or Ubuntu 17.04, a speedy 7th Gen Intel in either an i5 7200U or i7 7500U and Intel® HD Graphics 620.
  • Download Ubuntu 17.10 daily builds
    The release schedule for Ubuntu 17.10 has been announced, and you can now download the daily build ISO images as well. Daily builds can be useful to watch the progress of Ubuntu 17.10, but are not recommended for normal usage due to possible bugs and changes.

Leftovers: Software

  • GJS: What’s next?
    In my last post, I went into detail about all the new stuff that GJS brought to GNOME 3.24. Now, it’s time to talk about the near future: what GJS will bring to GNOME 3.26.
  • Sending SMS from Linux Just Got Easier with Latest Indicator KDE Connect Update
    Indicator KDE Connect now has Google Contacts integration, making it even easier to send text messages from the Linux desktop.
  • Cumulus Qt is a Lightweight Weather App for Linux
    Cumulus Qt is a Qt weather app for the Linux desktop. It's lightweight, has a bold, striking design inspired by Stormcloud, and is very customisable.
  • Vivaldi 1.10 Browser Now in Development, Will Introduce Docked Developer Tools
    Vivaldi's Ruarí Ødegaard just informed us a few moments ago that Vivaldi 1.10 will be the next major version of the free and cross-platform web browser based on the latest Chromium technologies, not Vivaldi 2.0 as many of you have hoped. Vivaldi 1.9 just hit the streets the other day as world's first web browser to ship with the Ecosia search engine enabled by default to help reforest the plane, and it now looks like Vivaldi's devs never sleep, and development of Vivaldi 1.10 starts today with the first snapshot, Vivaldi 1.10.829.3, which introduces a long-anticipated feature: Docked Developer Tools!