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Tuesday, 28 Jun 16 - Tux Machines is a community-driven public service/news site which has been around for over a decade and primarily focuses on GNU/LinuxSubscribe now Syndicate content

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Blog entry slashdot effect srlinuxx 1 19/03/2005 - 6:00am
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Story Computer Addiction or Healthy Enthusiam? srlinuxx 2 20/03/2005 - 6:02pm
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Blog entry Re-install Texstar 2 22/03/2005 - 2:41am
Story Dell welcomes back Muslim workers srlinuxx 1 22/03/2005 - 4:27pm
Story My workstation OS: PCLinuxOS Preview 8 Texstar 2 26/03/2005 - 11:17pm

How I Use Android: Franco.Kernel and Focus creator Francisco Franco

Filed under
Android
Interviews

Now we're talking! This isn't for everyone, and it may sound obvious, but I wouldn't be able to live without ADB and Fastboot.

For folks who don't know what it is, ADB is the Android Debug Bridge. It's a very powerful binary that lets you access your phone from your computer's terminal to do all sorts of magical commands.

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Cinnamon 3.0.6 Desktop Environment Brings Fixes for the Network Applet, Recorder

Filed under
Linux

Today, June 23, 2016, the leader of the Linux Mint project, Clement Lefebvre, has had the great pleasure of announcing the release and general availability of the Cinnamon 3.0.6 desktop environment.

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Flatpak Officially Released for Next-Generation, Standalone GNU/Linux Apps

Filed under
Development
GNU
Linux

Softpedia has been informed by GNOME Project's Allan Day about the official unveiling and general availability of the Flatpak project for various GNU/Linux operating systems.

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Snyk aims to help developers secure use of open source code

Filed under
OSS

Developers relying on open source code (or packages) is pretty much the norm these days. As software eats the world, the world is dining out on open source software.

But, regardless of how much time utilising someone else’s code can save you as a developer, it can also mean outsourcing the security of the code you ship, or spending a serious amount of time staying on top of known or newly discovered open source package vulnerabilities.

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Redefining how we share our security data.

Filed under
Red Hat

Red Hat Product Security has long provided various bits of machine-consumable information to customers and users via our Security Data page. Today we are pleased to announce that we have made it even easier to access and parse this data through our new Security Data API service.

While we have provided this information since January 2005, it required end users to download the content from the site, which meant you either downloaded many files and kept a local copy, or you were downloading large files on a regular basis. It also meant that, as part of writing the parser, if you were looking for certain criteria, you had to account for that criteria in your parser, which could make it more complex and difficult to write.

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Xen 4.7 Open Source Linux Hypervisor Arrives with Non-Disruptive, Live Patching

Filed under
Linux
Server
OSS

Today, June 23, 2016, the Xen Project has had the great pleasure of announcing the immediate availability for download of the Xen 4.7 open-source Linux hypervisor software for GNU/Linux operating systems.

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LibreOffice 5.1.4 Office Suite Now Available for Download with over 130 Bugfixes

Filed under
LibO

Today, June 23, 2016, The Document Foundation's Italo Vignoli has been happy to inform Softpedia about the immediate availability for download of the LibreOffice 5.1.4 "Fresh" open-source office suite.

Read more

Also: LibreOffice Online Is Now Ready for ownCloud Enterprise, Thanks to Collabora

today's leftovers

Filed under
Misc
  • XCOM 2 - Alien Hunters thoughts, prepare to get frustrated

    So I've been playing through XCOM 2 again, but now with the Alien Hunters DLC enabled and my god it's frustrating.

    To get this out of the way: I freaking love XCOM 2, I think it's an incredibly challenging game, that keeps me coming back for more. I like that it's challenging, I enjoy thinking up different strategies when I've failed numerous times.

  • The nostalgia of Windows is everyday Linux.

    A few days ago, I read a mailing list discussion about the advantages of running a computer in the 1980s. A few, like the lack of Digital Rights Management (DRM), were points well-taken. Others may have been tongue-in-cheek, but might also express personal preferences. However, most of the rest were advantages that I still enjoy (or could enjoy) as a Linux user thirty years later, partly because that is how Linux is designed, and partly because of my personal choices.

  • Kernel hacking workshop

    As part of our "community" program at Collabora, I've had the chance to attend to a workshop on kernel hacking at UrLab (the ULB hackerspace). I never touched any part of the kernel and always saw it as a scary thing for hardcore hackers wearing huge beards, so this was a great opportunity to demystify the beast.

  • More Banks Are Trying Out Ripple’s Blockchain For Fund Transfers

    The San Francisco-based financial technology company Ripple has signed up seven more banks to potentially use its blockchain for cross-border payments.

  • Puppy Linux 6.3.2 "Slacko" Gets New 64-Bit UEFI Boot Capability, F2FS Support

    Today, June 23, 2016, Barry Kauler, the creator of the Puppy Linux distribution, has proudly announced the release and immediate availability for download of Puppy Linux 6.3.2 "Slacko."

    Puppy Linux 6.3.2 "Slacko" appears to be a point release to the Puppy Slacko 6.3 series, and as usual, it has been built from the binary TXZ packages of the Slackware 64-bit 14.1 GNU/Linux operating system. However, it looks like the distro is now powered by a kernel from the Linux 3.14 LTS series, version 3.14.55.

  • openSUSE Conference – First Impressions of Day One

    Wednesday, June 22nd, 2016. Long awaited openSUSE Conference (oSC) finally started. I arrived half an hour before the keynote to join an impressive crowd at the reception desk. Upon registration, like all attendees, I received the beautiful oSC 2016 T-shirt.f

  • Preparing my Chikiticluster in Frankfurt to my presentation

    I am excited that I will give a poster presentation about my experiences with HPC at #ISC16 I was selected to do it as part of the Women HPC:)

  • I've bought some more awful IoT stuff

    Today we're going to be talking about the KanKun SP3, a plug that's been around for a while. The idea here is pretty simple - there's lots of devices that you'd like to be able to turn on and off in a programmatic way, and rather than rewiring them the simplest thing to do is just to insert a control device in between the wall and the device andn ow you can turn your foot bath on and off from your phone. Most vendors go further and also allow you to program timers and even provide some sort of remote tunneling protocol so you can turn off your lights from the comfort of somebody else's home.

  • IBM to deliver 200-petaflop supercomputer by early 2018; Cray moves to Intel Xeon Phi

    More supercomputer news this week: The US is responding to China’s new Sunway TiahuLight system that was announced Monday, and fast. First, the Department of Energy’s (DOE) Oak Ridge National Laboratory is expected to take delivery of a new IBM system, named Summit, in early 2018 that will now be capable of 200 peak petaflops, Computerworld reports. That would make it almost twice as fast as TaihuLight if the claim proves true. (We had originally reported in 2014 that both Summit and Sierra would achieve roughly 150 petaflops.)

Leftovers: Software

Filed under
Software
  • NGINX Amplifies Web Server Technology

    Gus Robertson, CEO of NGINX, discusses his firm's latest technology and what's coming next.

  • Elixir v1.3 released

    Elixir v1.3 brings many improvements to the language, the compiler and its tooling, specially Mix (Elixir’s build tool) and ExUnit (Elixir’s test framework). The most notable additions are the new Calendar types, the new cross-reference checker in Mix, and the assertion diffing in ExUnit. We will explore all of them and a couple more enhancements below.

  • qBittorrent 3.3.5 Released With New Torrent Management Mode, Other Improvements

    qBittorrent 3.3.5 was released today and it includes new features, such as a torrent management mode, a new cookie management dialog, as well as other improvements and bug fixes.

  • 5 Best Linux Package Managers for Linux Newbies

    One thing a new Linux user will get to know as he/she progresses in using it is the existence of several Linux distributions and the different ways they manage packages.

    Package management is very important in Linux, and knowing how to use multiple package managers can proof life saving for a power user, since downloading or installing software from repositories, plus updating, handling dependencies and uninstalling software is very vital and a critical section in Linux system Administration.

Red Hat News

Filed under
Red Hat

Leftovers: OSS

Filed under
OSS
  • ​Apache Libcloud: The open-source cloud library to link all clouds together

    One of the great problems with cloud has always been interoperability. The Apache Software Foundation (ASF) addresses this problem with the release of Apache Libcloud v1.0, the cloud service interoperability library.

  • Why share / why collaborate? - Some useful sources outside Debian

    I consider that the Golden Rule requires that if I like a program I must share it with other people who like it. Software sellers want to divide the users and conquer them, making each user agree not to share with others. I refuse to break solidarity with other users in this way. I cannot in good conscience sign a nondisclosure agreement or a software license agreement. ... "

  • "But I'm a commercial developer / a government employee"

    Your employer may be willing to negotiate / grant you an opt-out clause to protect your FLOSS expertise / accept an additional non-exclusive licence to your FLOSS code / be prepared to sign an assignment...

  • How to share collaboratively

    Always remember in all of this: just because you understand your code and your working practices doesn't mean that anyone else will.

  • twenty years of free software -- part 3 myrepos

    myrepos is kind of just an elaborated foreach (@myrepos) loop, but its configuration and extension in a sort of hybrid between an .ini file and shell script is quite nice and plenty of other people have found it useful.

    I had to write myrepos when I switched from subversion to git, because git's submodules are too limited to meet my needs, and I needed a tool to check out and update many repositories, not necessarily all using the same version control system.

  • Being open to open source and creating a new business category at VMWare

    In the age of developer-defined infrastructure, where developers have decision making power in application and cloud infrastructure technologies, open source has proven to be a powerful go-to-market and distribution method for both startups and enterprises. Developers are always looking for new technologies to improve their productivity.

  • Rust implementation of GNUnet with GSoC - Mid-term progress

Security Leftovers

Filed under
Security

Linux recommendations for a novice: Trying out Linux Mint, Manjaro, and PCLinuxOS

Filed under
Reviews

My recommendation was a choice of three different distributions: Linux Mint MATE, Manjaro Xfce, or PCLinuxOS MATE. As I am a firm believer in "write about what you do, and do what you write about" (as opposed to "regurgitate press releases and try to sound important"), I went home and got out my own Samsung N150 Plus and loaded all three of those distributions on it.

Read more

OPNFV project

Filed under
Linux
Web

[Network Functions Virtualisation=NFV]

  • Linux's NFV crew: Operators keen to ditch clunky networks, be cool like Facebook

    Network operators have a jealous eye on the likes of Facebook and Google and want to ditch their clunky networks to compete for "cooler" consumer services, the head of the open-source network function virtualisation (NFV) project has said.

    Heather Kirksey is director of the collaborative Linux foundation's OPNFV project – the open source software platform intended to promote the uptake of new products and services using Network Functions Virtualisation (NFV).

  • Nokia, Intel collaborate on open source hardware

    Just a week after Nokia (NYSE:NOK) announced an agreement to help China Mobile move to a more flexible cloud network infrastructure, Nokia said it is teaming up with Intel to make its carrier-grade AirFrame Data Center Solution hardware available for an Open Platform Network Functions Virtualization (OPNFV) Lab.

  • OPNFV Summit: Key Takeaways

    The open source multi-VIM MANO, Cloudify, is giving a sneak preview of its Telecom Edition today at the OPNFV Summit in Berlin. Cloudify is an open source orchestrator used by a growing group of large telecoms and Tier 1 network operators that are pursuing network functions virtualization (NFV).

Microsoft Liars

Filed under
Microsoft
  • Microsoft Edge is a system hog and cannot be called 'power efficient'

    IT WAS ONE HELL of a Monday morning. The rain was hammering down with no end in sight, and the usual 'wrong type of rain' and 'leaves on the line' meant that trains from outlying areas into central London were all pretty much stationary.

    When I finally got to the office, I dashed to my desk, powered up my system and launched Microsoft Edge - the window to my Office 365-using world.

    I was met with a big, blank white window that wouldn't shift, no matter how often I pressed Ctrl+Alt+Delete.

    It was the final straw after a year of repeated crashes, hangs, random tab locks followed by forced refreshes, and general slow motion performance that's made anguished cries and keyboard thumps a normal occurrence for those around me.

    So after using Edge religiously since Windows 10's launch as an attempt to ‘embed' with the tech I write about, I decided this morning to stop using it entirely.

  • Opera repudiates Microsoft Edge battery-saving claims

    The browser-maker Opera has negated Microsoft’s much-publicised claim that its Windows 10-exclusive Edge browser provides significantly less battery drain than competitors Chrome and Opera – and its own tests put Edge firmly in second place for battery efficiency.

    In a post at the Opera blog today, Błażej Kaźmierczak reveals the result of the company’s own tests, which put Google Chrome in third place at two hours and fifty-four minutes, Edge in second at three hours twelve minutes, and Opera ahead of that by obtaining three hours and fifty-five minutes of battery life under identical tests.

Fedora: The Latest

Filed under
Red Hat
  • Upgrade to Fedora 24

    I just updated to Fedora 24 today, just a day after it’s release. Two dnf commands and 30 minutes later, my system is now upgraded to Fedora 24.

  • Example of newer document writing for Fedora-docs
  • Rejection report 2: Korora KDE and GeckoLinux

    This is as bollocky as bollocks go. Korora 23 Gnome actually booted FINE on my G50 machine just the other day. No problem, no sweat. Well, it wouldn't boot from USB, but DVD was fine. Not so with the KDE version. Consistency is such a troubled word. I tried a couple of coasters, even tried a different DVD tray, and then booted the Gnome edition to make sure there's nothing wrong with the hardware. And there isn't.

    I can't describe how frustrated I am. It's the same bloody distro with just a few small changes in the visual layout. But then, Fedora boots fine, after a firmware update. Korora Gnome boots fine, but only from DVD. Korora KDE boots not. I am embarrassed to tell people I'm a Linux user. How can this be? We're in 2016. This isn't 1999 anymore. We're not fighting code demons anymore. Seriously, I'm considering starting a petition that says there should be prison time for badly executed and poorly QA-ed distros. The problem is no one cares about petitions.

  • Caching makes me cranky

    Among issues with Ion is its incorrect use of the DMA APIs. I've briefly mentioned this before. My educated opinion is that it's a complete mess and that time travel would be a great solution to fix this this problem.

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Leftovers: Gaming

Today in Techrights

Snapcraft 2.12 Coming Soon to Ubuntu 16.04, Lets You Access the Parts Ecosystem

The development of Snapcraft, the handy Ubuntu utility that lets you create Snaps for your applications, which you can now distribute across multiple operating systems, is advancing at a fast pace, and it looks like Snapcraft 2.12 will land soon. Read more

GeckoLinux 421.160627.0 "Static" Editions Released Based on openSUSE Leap 42.1

Users of the GeckoLinux distribution are in for yet another treat after the announcement of updated GeckoLinux 421.160623.0 "Rolling" Editions based on the latest openSUSE Tumbleweed snapshots. Read more