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Wednesday, 22 Nov 17 - Tux Machines is a community-driven public service/news site which has been around for over a decade and primarily focuses on GNU/LinuxSubscribe now Syndicate content

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Type Title Author Replies Last Postsort icon
Blog entry slashdot effect srlinuxx 1 19/03/2005 - 6:00am
Page Applications list srlinuxx 19/03/2005 - 6:01pm
Story unix motorcycle srlinuxx 1 19/03/2005 - 6:30pm
Story Computer Addiction or Healthy Enthusiam? srlinuxx 2 20/03/2005 - 6:02pm
Blog entry A Peak at MDK 10.2-b2 AMD64 srlinuxx 2 20/03/2005 - 6:21pm
Page Thank You For Completing Our Survey srlinuxx 21/03/2005 - 4:07am
CA survey srlinuxx 21/03/2005 - 4:13am
Blog entry Re-install Texstar 2 22/03/2005 - 2:41am
Story Dell welcomes back Muslim workers srlinuxx 1 22/03/2005 - 4:27pm
Story My workstation OS: PCLinuxOS Preview 8 Texstar 2 26/03/2005 - 11:17pm

GNU/Linux Laptops for Developers

Filed under
GNU
Linux
  • 5 New & Powerful Dell Linux Machines You Can Buy Right Now

    The land of powerful PCs and workstations isn’t barren anymore when we talk about Linux-powered machines; even all of the world’s top 500 supercomputers now run Linux.

    Dell has joined hands with Canonical Inc. to give Linux-powered machines a push in the market. They have launched five new Canonical-certified workstations running Ubuntu Linux out-of-the-box as a part of the Dell Precision series. An advantage of buying these canonical-certified machines is that the users won’t have to worry about incompatibility with Linux.

  • How to set up a Pixelbook for programming

    The beauty of Chrome OS is that most of the "state" of your system is in the cloud, attached to your Google Account, but if you have any local documents those will be gone. This is because Developer Mode basically destroys the physically secure design of Chrome OS. Now you're in Linux land, and local security is your job, not Google's.

    Every time you boot up now, you'll have the option to press Space bar and wipe the system again and return to the safety of vanilla Chrome OS. Press Ctrl-D to continue into the unknown.

today's leftovers

Filed under
Misc

Graphics: Intel, Mesa, Wayland and Bosch

Filed under
Graphics/Benchmarks
  • Intel's Mesa GLSL Shader Cache Is Speeding Up Game Load Times

    At the start of the month the Intel i965 Mesa driver finally landed its on-disk shader cache, months after the GLSL on-disk shader cache originally landed in core Mesa and wired up for the RadeonSI Gallium3D driver. While you can't play too many shader-heavy games with current Intel integrated graphics, this GLSL shader cache within Mesa 17.4-dev Git is working well for speeding up load times and does provide some frame-rate benefits in games dynamically loading shaders.

  • Bosch Has Been Developing A 3D Window Manager Using Wayland

    In what appears to be research for potential use within in-vehicle infotainment (IVI) systems, Bosch in conjunction with other organizations has been developing a 3D window manager that's built atop Wayland/Weston.

    Wayland is already used within automobiles for IVI purposes, etc, but this is the first we're seeing at least publicly of creating a 3D window manager around it. Harsha Manjula Mallikarjun of Bosch has talked about their work in developing a middleware framework for a 3D window manager that is making use of Wayland's Weston library, libweston. The window manager maps client buffers to 3D shapes like cubes and cylinders.

  • MESA_program_binary_formats Added To The OpenGL Registry

    Intel developers have seen their MESA_program_binary_formats extension added to the official OpenGL registry.

    The extension is really quite simple and just documents the unique format designator to be used by Mesa for ARB_get_program_binary/OES_get_program_binary extensions. Overnight it was merged into the OpenGL Registry.

Software: Nuclide, QEMU, Mailspring, GNOME Calendar and To Do, LibreOffice

Filed under
Software
  • Nuclide – An Open IDE for Mobile and Web Development

    It wasn’t too long ago that we wrote about an IDE that was developed by adding support for advanced debugging and development functions to Atom text editor to create Atom-IDE. We’ve got another such application for you today and it goes by the name of Nuclide.

    Nuclide is a free Electron-based IDE created by combining a collection of Atom’s features to provide IDE-like functions for several programming languages and technologies.

  • “Improving the performance of the qcow2 format” at KVM Forum 2017

    I was in Prague last month for the 2017 edition of the KVM Forum. There I gave a talk about some of the work that I’ve been doing this year to improve the qcow2 file format used by QEMU for storing disk images. The focus of my work is to make qcow2 faster and to reduce its memory requirements.

  • QEMU and function keys (follow-up)

    Since I posted my suggestion for QEMU a few weeks ago, I've learned a few things about QEMU. Thanks so much to the folks who contacted me via email to help me out.

    A brief review of my issue:

    I like to run FreeDOS in QEMU, on my Linux laptop. QEMU makes it really easy to boot FreeDOS or to test new installations. During our run up to the FreeDOS 1.2 release, I tested every pre-release version by installing under QEMU.

  • Mailspring Email Client is now available as a Snap app

    The Mailspring email client is now available as a Snap application on Ubuntu and other Linux distros.

    The part-Electron, part C++ mail app works with most major email providers, lets you add multiple accounts, has fast mail searching, and offers some advanced features, like read receipts and quick reply templates.

  • The Road to 3.28: Calendar and To Do

    It’s been a long time with no news. I guess work and masters are really getting in the way… good news is that I’ll finish masters in 2 months, and will have some free time to devote to this beloved project.

    “Bad” news is that, after almost 6 years, I’ll finally take some time to have a real vacation. I’ll stay 3 weeks out of the loop in February, a time where I’ll be traveling to the other side of the world, watching the sunset at the beach with my wife. Without a computer. While it’s unfortunate to the community, I think this time is necessary for my mental health – I’ve gone way too many times through the almost-burned-out state recently.

  • LIBREOFFICE MASCOT SURVEY: THE PROGRESS SO FAR

    As you’ve no doubt seen, over the last few months we’ve been looking for a LibreOffice mascot. This is just something fun for our community to use, for instance on T-shirts at events, so it doesn’t have to be ultra slick and professional – it isn’t a replacement for the official branding and logos that we use in the software, website and marketing materials. At the start, we asked for your submissions and received over 300 of them – thank you so much to everyone who contributed!

    Many of them were excellent, but we had to remove quite a few from the following voting round for various reasons (such as potential copyright issues, conflicts with other FOSS projects, and use of the official LibreOffice document logo). If your submission didn’t make it to the voting round, we still really appreciate your input, and we apologies if we didn’t make it clearer why some didn’t get through!

Red Hat: OpenShift Container Platform and Financial News

Filed under
Red Hat

OSS Leftovers

Filed under
OSS
  • From consumers to contributors: The evolution of open source in the enterprise

    The use of open source software is commonplace in enterprises, but many organisations are still reluctant to contribute their own code, despite the benefits it can bring

  • The value of open source software

    A renaissance is happening with open source software. IT managers are constantly searching for new ways to harness the power of open code, especially as more companies move to the cloud.

    [...]

    Anyone can freely use, change, and share open source software in modified or unmodified form. While companies working in commercial open source add value by turning what may appear as raw material to other enterprises into whole products. Embracing an open source mindset is an invitation for innovation, and enables organisations to break free from proprietary vendors.

  • Nuls—the Global Open Source Platform for Blockchain-Based Applications to Be Adopted in Business Scenarios
  • Blockchain shows open source’s fatal flaw—and a way forward

    “26,000 new blockchain projects last year!” screamed the headline. “But only 8 percent remain active!” The implication is that blockchain’s future is at risk, given the high mortality rate among its offspring. Yet nothing could be further from the truth. If anything, we need many more blockchain projects to fail to clear out some of the noise, leaving room for “Linux of blockchain”-type projects to remain.

    And yet there is cause for concern, though not in blockchain specifically. Instead, the greater concern should be for open source, which has never been more popular with software users even as the developer population feeding it has remained flat. Unless we can find ways to encourage more contributions, open source efforts like blockchain threaten to crumble under the weight of user expectations unmet by developer productivity.

  • Open source fisheries give a fillip to fingerling production
  • Why is collaboration so difficult?

    Many contemporary definitions of "collaboration" define it simply as "working together"—and, in part, it is working together. But too often, we tend to use the term "collaboration" interchangeably with cognate terms like "cooperation" and "coordination." These terms also refer to some manner of "working together," yet there are subtle but important differences between them all.

  • China’s National People’s Congress Officially Promulgates Standardization Law

    The National People’s Congress of the People’s Republic of China officially promulgated China’s Standardization Law on November 4, 2017. The original Chinese version can be accessed on the China legislature site. The American National Standards Institute (ANSI) has been closely monitoring the rollout of the reform of China’s standardization system, and has actively engaged the Chinese government throughout the process of updating the standardization law.

The Latest Openwashing

Filed under
Microsoft
OSS

Security: Boeing 757, Security Education Companion, Kaspersky 'Damage Control' and FUD

Filed under
Security

US Government Embrace of FOSS in the Pentagon

Filed under
OSS

Linux 4.15 Development Updates

Filed under
Development
Linux

Games: Project Hospital and More

Filed under
Gaming

WordPress 4.9 “Tipton”

Filed under
OSS

Version 4.9 of WordPress, named “Tipton” in honor of jazz musician and band leader Billy Tipton, is available for download or update in your WordPress dashboard. New features in 4.9 will smooth your design workflow and keep you safe from coding errors.

Featuring design drafts, scheduling, and locking, along with preview links, the Customizer workflow improves collaboration for content creators. What’s more, code syntax highlighting and error checking will make for a clean and smooth site building experience. Finally, if all that wasn’t pretty great, we’ve got an awesome new Gallery widget and improvements to theme browsing and switching.

Read more

GhostBSD 11.1 OS Arrives with Own Software Repository, Drops 32-Bit Support

Filed under
BSD

More than a year in development, GhostBSD 11.1 is based on FreeBSD 11.1 and comes with Xfce and MATE flavors both available for 64-bit (amd64) systems as 32-bit (i386) support is being dropped starting with this release. This is also the first release of the BSD-based OS to ship with its own software package repository.

"After a year of development, testing, debugging and working on our software package repository, we are pleased to announce the release of GhostBSD 11.1 is now available," reads today's announcement. "With 11.1 we drop 32-bit i386 supports, and we currently maintain our software packages repository for more stability."

Read more

Also: GhostBSD 11.1 Released: FreeBSD With MATE & Xfce Desktop Experience

Slax Linux Distro Gets New Release After Two Years, Drops Slackware for Debian

Filed under
Slack
Debian

Slax 9.2.1 is now available for download as the latest stable release of the Linux distro, and it's the first to be based on Debian GNU/Linux. That's right, Slax no longer lives up to its name and drops Slackware for Debian. As its version number suggests, Slax 9.2.1 is based on Debian GNU/Linux 9.2.1 "Stretch."

"After several years of inactivity Slax project has been brought to life again in new version 9.2.1," said the developer in today's release announcement. "I've decided to go for Debian because it made my life much easier and I believe that it will make yours too."

Read more

5 Coolest Linux Terminal Emulators

Filed under
Linux

Sure, we can get by with boring old GNOME terminal, Konsole, and funny, rickety, old xterm. When you're in the mood to try something new, however, take a look at these five cool and useful Linux terminals.

Read more

Ubuntu MATE 18.04 LTS Will Bring Undecorated Maximized Windows for Mutiny Layout

Filed under
Ubuntu

First off, the development of Ubuntu MATE 18.04 starts based on the core components of its bigger brother, Ubuntu 18.04 LTS, such as the Linux 4.13 kernel, X.Org Server 1.19 display server, Mesa 17.1 graphics stack, and many of the latest security patches from upstream, a.k.a. Debian Testing (Buster) repositories.

And now for the goodies coming to the final Ubuntu MATE 18.04 LTS release next year, as Martin Wimpress and his team promise to bring hardware acceleration to Marco, MATE desktop environment's default window manager, as well as undecorated windows for the Mutiny layout for ex-Unity users.

Read more

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More in Tux Machines

Programming and howtos: Python, Swift and Recipes

Security: Updates, Intel, Torvalds

  • Security updates for Tuesday
  • Intel: We've found severe bugs in secretive Management Engine, affecting millions
    Thanks to an investigation by third-party researchers into Intel's hidden firmware in certain chips, Intel decided to audit its firmware and on Monday confirmed it had found 11 severe bugs that affect millions of computers and servers. The flaws affect Management Engine (ME), Trusted Execution Engine (TXE), and Server Platform Services (SPS).
  • Open Source Security Podcast: Episode 71 - GitHub's Security Scanner
    Josh and Kurt talk about GitHub's security scanner and Linus' security email. We clarify the esoteric difference between security bugs and non security bugs.
  • Linus Torvalds 'sorry' for swearing, blames popularity of Linux itself
    Linux overlord Linus Torvalds has apologised – a bit – for calling some security-centric kernel contributors “f*cking morons”. Torvalds unleashed a profanity-laden rant at Google developer Kees Cook, over the latter's proposal to harden the kernel. Another Google security chap, Matthew Garret, asked Torvalds “ Can you clarify a little with regard to how you'd have liked this patchset to look?” To which Torvalds responded that “I think the actual status of the patches is fairly good with the default warning.”

Benchmarks: Linux Power Use, Sabrent EC-SS31, Phoronix Test Suite 7.6 M3

LinuxAndUbuntu Review Of Ubuntu MATE 17.10

Ubuntu Mate 17.10 is a pretty stable and rock solid distribution which has got most things right. There is nothing unlikable about the distro. However, I feel it could have been a lot better if they had allowed 4 windows to be snapped on each corners and done something about the opaque top panel. The software included are very much standard and even though some of their names have been changed we all know what’s under the hood. Overall Experience has been good. Having already tested Ubuntu with Gnome 3, I can say that Ubuntu Mate 17.10 feels a lot faster and quicker in terms of GUI response. Read more