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Security: Updates, Russia, RHEL, Thunderbird and More

Filed under
Security

Ubuntu Budgie 18.04 Review: The Perfect Blend of Ubuntu and Budgie Desktop

Filed under
Reviews
Ubuntu

Solus Linux is loved for many reasons. Its flagship desktop environment Budgie, in my opinion, is the biggest reason to love Solus. While there was no shortage of desktop environments in the Linux domain, the arrival and the acceptance of Budgie desktop environment by a widespread audience, clearly showed that there was a huge scope (or even a need?) for a modern, intuitive and non-intrusive desktop environment.

But all is not well in Solus land. Solus unlike a majority of Linux distros is not based on any other parent distro. Solus is written from scratch and has it’s own package management system and software repository. I loved Solus 3. But as an ardent Linux user, I need the latest packages and support from newer software, which, at the moment is not that good on Solus. The software repository is not as vast as that of Ubuntu. Also, the package manager itself needs to evolve.

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Benchmarks and Phoronix Test Suite

Filed under
Graphics/Benchmarks

Xubuntu 18.04 Bionic Beaver - Middle ground

Filed under
Reviews

Year 2016 was the year of Xfce. Year 2017 belongs to Plasma. This year, so far, it seems MATE is the innovative beast, and Xfce is sort of stagnated, without pushing the initiative. I think secretly the projects are afraid to make things better, because that will break the neverending cycle of development. After all, for devs, the only thing that matters is coding. User experience is an alien concept. And inside this gap, Xubuntu 18.04 fits perfectly. Which means not that well.

The distro did the basics okay - media, phones, apps. Package management can be better, battery life can be better, network support can be better, the visual side of things can be a whole lot better. There were way too many inconsistencies, and the distro lacks the love and fun that it used to have only a year ago. Is it apathy, exhaustion, mere luck? I don't know. But Xubuntu Beaver feels like a product of habit rather than love and passion. And it is not LTS solid. Plus very little actual innovation, which can sort of be excused, but then why all them bugs? Overall, Bionic behaves something like 6.5/10. Worth checking, but for the time being, the other lightweight option - Ubuntu MATE - seems more mature and fun ready. It will be quite interesting to see how things evolve over the coming months. Check it, don't expect any miracles.

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Also:

  • Ubuntu Server development summary – 15 May 2018
  • Top Snaps in April 2018

    In case you missed it, here are some of the snaps we featured during April 2018. Here you’ll find snaps to enhance your productivity, tools for creatives, IDEs for developers and games for the weekend.

    You can stay up to date with our editorial picks by following @snapcraftio on Twitter where we share three new and interesting snaps a week. We’d also love to hear what your favourite snaps are, perhaps you’ve found something we’ve missed.

Creating Virtual Disks Using Linux Command Line

Filed under
Linux

​Linux is indeed a great system with excellent tools at our disposal. There are lots of things that can be achieved using the terminal. One such activity is creating virtual hard drives. Your Linux system should already have the tools required to do this without the need for virtual machine software.

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more

Red Hat: 'Serverless' and Women

Filed under
Red Hat
  • Red Hat Summit: Functions as a Service with OpenWhisk and OpenShift

    Serverless computing (often called Functions-as-a-Service, or FaaS) is one of the hottest emerging technologies today. The OpenWhisk project, currently in incubation at Apache, is an open-source implementation of FaaS that lets you create functions that are invoked in response to events. Our own Brendan McAdams gave a presentation and demo that explained the basics of serverless, how the OpenWhisk project works, and how to run OpenWhisk in OpenShift.

  • Next DevNation Live: Serverless and Servicefull Applications: Where Microservices Complements Serverless, May 17th, 12pm EDT
  • CRN names four Red Hat leaders to its 2018 Women of the Channel list

    We are excited to share that four of Red Hat’s channel leaders have been named to CRN’s 2018 Women of the Channel list. Margaret-Ann Bolton, senior director of Global Partner Marketing; Terri Hall, vice president of Global Cloud and ISV Partners and Alliances; Petra Heinrich, vice president of EMEA Partners and Alliances; and Kim Leavitt, director of Global Partner Marketing, were recognized by CRN for their outstanding work in the channel. Their dedication, leadership and effort has helped to lead to another year of partner successes and innovation for Red Hat. This is the sixth consecutive year that Margaret-Ann has been recognized, third consecutive year for Terri, and the first time for both Petra and Kim.

  • Video: Women and Open Source

    In this video from the Red Hat Summit, Mary Cochran from Red Hat leads a panel discussion on Women in Open Source.

DOSBox Part 1: Introduction, Startup Scripts and The Keymapper

Filed under
Linux

DOSBox is a great piece of software that allows users to run a huge collection of very old PC software dating back to the 1980s and 1990s on your Linux system. Versions for Windows, MacOS, and others exist as well.

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more

Red Eclipse: A Fast Paced First Person Shooter Game

Filed under
Linux

​Red Eclipse is a fast-paced casual arena shooter game based on Cube 2 engine. Players can play against drones in offline mode or play against other players through networking. Slightly blending to Sci-fi, Red Eclipse features rich environment and fun gameplay.

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Graphics: NVIDIA, AMD/Vega and Mesa

Filed under
Graphics/Benchmarks
  • NVIDIA 390.59 Linux Driver Brings New GPU Support, X.Org Server 1.20 Compatibility

    For those using the long-lived NVIDIA 390 driver series rather than the latest NVIDIA 396 short-lived series (or happen to be stuck on 390 like for Fermi GPU support), the NVIDIA 390.59 Linux driver was released minutes ago.

    Most notable for existing NVIDIA 390 driver series is there is now xorg-server 1.20 compatibility. There is X.Org Server 1.20 support on the NVIDIA 396 series already, but for those using this long-lived driver branch, there is back-ported 1.20 server compatibility.

  • AMDGPU Feature Updates Submitted For Linux 4.18, Bringing Vega M & More

    Alex Deucher of AMD today submitted the initial batch of Radeon/AMDGPU DRM driver feature updates to DRM-Next that in turn are slated to land in the Linux 4.18 merge window in June. There's a fair amount of notable feature work this round for Radeon Linux users.

  • AMD Publishes Open-Source Driver Support For Vega 20

    AMD today published their big set of patches bringing open-source Linux kernel support for the "Vega 20" graphics processor.

    Vega 20 is the rumored 7nm AMD graphics processor that is said to be up to 70% faster than the current leading RX Vega 64 graphics card, according to some reported leaks. Vega 20 is expected to offer up to 32GB of HBM2 memory and be announced this calendar year, but there is some belief that it might just be a deep learning accelerator and not focused as a gaming graphics card or at least not initially.

  • Gallium3D's HUD Gets A Frametime Graph Capability

    In addition to being able to plot the frames per second, CPU usage, and many other possible sensor outputs, the Gallium3D Heads-Up Display (HUD) is now capable of showing the frametime while gaming.

  • Mesa 18.0.4 Coming This Week With More Fixes

    While Mesa 18.1 is expected for release this week, those riding the Mesa 18.0 stable series will also have an 18.0.4 point release coming in the next few days.

    Mesa 18.0.4 is expected for release this Thursday or Friday as the newest point release for this Q1'2018 Mesa series. Mesa 18.0.4 release candidate 1 was issued today with just over two dozen fixes.

  • Mesa 18.0.4 Linux Graphics Stack to Squash Rendering Bugs in Trine & The Witcher

    The Mesa graphics stack for Linux-based operating systems will soon receive a new maintenance update that addresses a few important bugs in some games and improves various of the included open-source graphics drivers.

    Mesa 18.0.4 is expected to arrive this week as the fourth maintenance update to the Mesa 18 series, bringing improvements to the r600 graphics driver for ATI/Radeon GPUs that fix some rendering bugs in the Trine and The Witcher video games, as well as several bug fixes for the Radeon RADV Vulkan driver.

    The Intel ANV Vulkan and Intel i965 OpenGL graphics drivers have been improved as well in this Mesa 18.0.4, which patches a leak in Intel's BLORP code for 4th Generation and 5th Generation Intel Core processors, and adds a few fixes to code emission around 16-bit integers and Image Signal Processor (ISP).

The curl 7 series reaches 60

Filed under
Software

curl 7.60.0 is released. Remember 7.59.0? This latest release cycle was a week longer than normal since the last was one week shorter and we had this particular release date adapted to my traveling last week. It gave us 63 days to cram things in, instead of the regular 56 days.

7.60.0 is a crazy version number in many ways. We've been working on the version 7 series since virtually forever (the year 2000) and there's no version 8 in sight any time soon. This is the 174th curl release ever.

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Games: Fibrillation HD, Xenosis: Alien Infection, Project Zomboid, Interactive Fiction

Filed under
Gaming
  • Philosophical and mystical horror 'Fibrillation HD' is now on Linux

    Originally released for Windows back in April last year, Linux support officially arrived yesterday. It turns out, a Linux version was requested by a GOL reader way back in October last year. The developer said at that point "Not in the near future, unfortunately." and then suddenly it's here. Always nice to see the unexpected.

  • Xenosis: Alien Infection a retro-inspired, top-down sci-fi adventure is now live on Fig

    Xenosis: Alien Infection [Official Site] is a top-down sci-fi adventure with horror and survival elements that's really coming together nicely. It will fully support Linux and it's now live on Fig.

    I've been speaking with the developer on and off over the last couple months, as they also gave me access to an early build of the game. I do have to say I'm massively impressed by it already! It oozes an incredible atmosphere out of every hole, already performs well and the developer has been quick to fix issues I notified them about. In terms of issues, there's really not many.

  • Vehicles in survival game Project Zomboid are almost ready for the stable build

    The Indie Stone are a few steps closer to getting vehicles into the stable build of survival game Project Zomboid [Official Site], which should make the game pretty damn interesting.

  • Write and Play Interactive Fiction with Open Source Software

    Interactive fiction is a form of computer game which shares many traits with fiction in book form, role-playing games and puzzle-solving. It’s one of the oldest forms of computer games.

    Interactive fiction is a somewhat nebulous phrase. It can refer to text adventures where the player uses text input to control the game, and the game state is relayed with text output. They are known as text adventures. Crowther & Woods invented this form of games in the 1960s when they designed the famous Colossal Cave Adventure, which was available on many mainframe computer systems. They were massively popular when computers were limited to displaying text. Mobile phones offered a resurgence to the genre, given they consume little resources.

Linspire Server 2018 Released

Filed under
GNU
Linux

Today we are pleased to announce the release of Linspire Server 2018 to the public. Linspire Server 2018 is based on Ubuntu Server 16.04. Linspire Server 2018 is a solution for medium to small businesses as well as education facilities. Linspire Server 2018 is available today and will be free to download and use under a self support license. Commercial support is available for customers who want that piece of mind.

Linspire Server 2018 boots by default into a customized XFCE environment for a GUI environment to ease the complexity for customers coming from Windows Server or macOS Server. We use DWM as a secondary window manager and users can use the server as a command line only environment as well.

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Avidemux 2.7 Open-Source Video Editor Adds FFmpeg 3.3 Support, VP9 Decoding Fix

Filed under
OSS

The AviDemux 2.7 stable release is now available with support for the FFMpeg 3.3.x open-source multimedia framework for decoding and encoding video streams. FFmpeg 3.3 "Hilbert" was released last year in April and adds several new decoders, encoders, demuxers, and filters, along with support for spherical videos.

Avidemux 2.7 also adds various UI improvements to the MPlayer eq2 video filter, fixes VP9 decoding, uses rubber bands for crop in filters, implements the Ctrl+Shift+C keyboard shortcut to allow users to copy the current PTS (presentation timestamp) to clipboard, and supports Korean language translation.

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openSUSE Leap 15 Promises Enterprise Migration to SUSE Linux Enterprise (SLE) 15

Filed under
SUSE

Being based on SUSE Linux Enterprise (SLE) 15, the upcoming OpenSuSE Leap 15 operating system borrows a lot of code from upstream, so you can imagine that one of the most attractive features of this release will be the ability to migrate installations to the long-term supported, enterprise-ready SUSE Linux Enterprise (SLE) 15 operating system series for certifications, mass deployments, and everything else you might need from an enterprise OS.

"For the first time, SUSE will support migration from Leap to SLE, which gives system integrators developing on Leap the possibility of moving to an enterprise version for certifications, mass deployments and/or extended Long Term Support," said openSUSE Project. "openSUSE Leap 15 brings plenty of community packages built on top of a core from SUSE Linux Enterprise (SLE) 15 sources, which is the first time the two major releases were built from the beginning in parallel."

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Fedora-Based Korora Linux Takes a Break, No Updates Are Planned in the Future

Filed under
Linux
Red Hat

When a new stable Fedora Linux release hits the streets, the Korora development team starts preparing the next major release of their GNU/Linux distribution, based, of course, on the latest Fedora Linux operating system. But not this time, as the Korora team announced they are taking a break from developing the Korora Linux, which won't be getting any updates in the foreseeable future.

"Korora for the foreseeable future is not going to be able to march in cadence with the Fedora releases. In addition to that, for the immediate future, there will be no updates to the Korora distribution," said one of the developers. "So we are taking a little sabbatical to avoid complete burnout and rejuvenate ourselves and our passion for Korora/Fedora and wider open source efforts."

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Also: Void Linux gave itself to the void, Korora needs a long siesta – life is hard for small distros

What Linux apps on Chrome OS means for open source

Filed under
OS
Linux
OSS

I own a Pixel 2 laptop. Right now, it's collecting dust, which is a shame, as it's some of the best hardware I've ever used. And don't get me wrong, for the longest time I used that Pixel proudly. But eventually I needed more like when edits came back for a book and Google Docs didn't handle MS Office Track Changes, which it can now do, or when I needed to work with an image editor and Pixlr simply wouldn't cut it. In all honesty, there were more moments like that than not.

But I don't consider myself an average user (for which the Chromebook is perfectly suited). So eventually I put the Pixel on a shelf, in favor of a MacBook Pro. Although that particular hardware isn't quite as nice as the Pixel (battery life, keyboard, and screen layout pale in comparison), it allowed me to get my work done without much of a struggle.

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Tiny, Linux-driven i.MX7 module starts at $34 in volume

Filed under
OS
Linux

E-Con’s 55 x 30mm “eSOMiMX7” COM can simultaneously run Linux and FreeRTOS on the Cortex-A7 and MCU-driven i.MX7 SoC. It offers up to 2GB RAM and 64GB eMMC, with options including WiFi/BT, up to 2x GbE, extended temp support, and an “Acacia” carrier.

E-Con Systems’ eSOMiMX7 computer-on-module is the first NXP i.MX7 based model in its line of Linux-driven eSOM branded modules. These include its i.MX6-based 70 x 45mm “μQseven” form-factor eSOMiMX6 and 54 x 20mm eSOMiMX6-micro. Designed for IoT applications, industrial HMI, test and measurement, ebook readers, and wearables, the module supports 800MHz single- or 1GHz dual-core i.MX7 models and is available with an Acacia evaluation kit (see farther below).

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Mozilla: Thunderbird Rebuts EFF, Debugging Modern Web Applications, Firefox Performance, Rust Turning 3

Filed under
Moz/FF
  • Mozilla Thunderbird: EFail and Thunderbird, What You Need To Know

    DO NOT DISABLE ENCRYPTION. We’ve seen recommendations from some outlets to stop using encrypted Email altogether. If you are sending sensitive data via Email, Thunderbird still recommends using encryption to keep those messages safe. You should, however, check the configuration of the applications you use to view encrypted EMail. For Thunderbird, follow our guidelines below to protect yourself.

  • Debugging Modern Web Applications

    Building and debugging modern JavaScript applications in Firefox DevTools just took a quantum leap forward. In collaboration with Logan Smyth, Tech Lead for Babel, we leveled up the debugger’s source map support to let you inspect the code that you actually wrote. Combined with the ongoing initiative to offer first-class JS framework support across all our devtools, this will boost productivity for modern web app developers.

    Modern JS frameworks and build tools play a critical role today. Frameworks like React, Angular, and Ember let developers build declarative user interfaces with JSX, directives, and templates. Tools like Webpack, Babel, and PostCSS let developers use new JS and CSS features before they are supported by browser vendors. These tools help developers write simpler code, but generate more complicated code to debug.

  • Firefox Performance Update #8

    Talos is a framework that we use to measure various aspects of Firefox performance as part of our continuous integration pipeline.

    There are a number of Talos “suites”, where each suite contains some number of tests. These tests, in turn, report some set of numbers that are then stored and graphable via our graph viewer here.

    Here’s a full list of the Talos tests, including their purpose, the sorts of measurements they take, and who’s currently a good person to ask about them if you have questions.

    A lot of work has been done to reduce the amount of noise in our Talos tests, but they’re still quite sensitive and noisy. This is why it’s often necessary to do 5-10 retriggers of Talos test runs in order to do meaningful comparisons.

    Sometimes Talos detects regressions that aren’t actually real regressions1, and that can be a pain. However, for the times where real regressions are caught, Talos usually lets us know much faster than Telemetry or user reports.

    Did you know that you can get profiles from Try for Talos runs? This makes it much simpler to diagnose Talos regressions. Also, we now have Talos profiles being generated on our Nightly builds for added convenience!

  • This Week in Rust 234
  • Thoughts on retiring from a team

    The Rust Community Team has recently been having a conversation about what a team member’s “retirement” can or should look like. I used to be quite active on the team but now find myself without the time to contribute much, so I’m helping pioneer the “retirement” process. I’ve been talking with our subteam lead extensively about how to best do this, in a way that sets the right expectations and keeps the team membership experience great for everyone.

  • Rust turns three

    Three years ago today, the Rust community released Rust 1.0 to the world, with our initial vision of fearless systems programming. As per tradition, we’ll celebrate Rust’s birthday by taking stock of the people and the product, and especially of what’s happened in the last year.

    [...]

    Finally, the Rust community continues to work on inclusivity, through outreach programs like Rust Reach and RustBridge, as well as structured mentoring and investments in documentation to ease contribution. For 2018, a major goal is to connect and empower Rust’s global community, which we’re doing both through conference launches in multiple new continents, as well as work toward internationalization throughout the project.

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More in Tux Machines

Plasma 5.12.5 bugfix update for Kubuntu 18.04 LTS – Testing help required

Are you using Kubuntu 18.04, our current LTS release? We currently have the Plasma 5.12.5 LTS bugfix release available in our Updates PPA, but we would like to provide the important fixes and translations in this release to all users via updates in the main Ubuntu archive. This would also mean these updates would be provide by default with the 18.04.1 point release ISO expected in late July. Read more

New Arduino boards include first FPGA model

Arduino launched a “MKR Vidor 4000” board with a SAMA21 MCU and Cyclone 10 FPGA, as well as an “Uno WiFi Rev 2” with an ATmega4809 MCU. Both boards have a crypto chip and ESP32-based WiFi module. In conjunction with this weekend’s Maker Faire Bay Area, Arduino launched two Arduino boards that are due to ship at the end of June. The MKR Vidor 4000 is the first Arduino board equipped with an field programmable . The Intel Cyclone 10 FPGA. will be supported with programming libraries and a new visual editor. The Arduino Uno WiFi Rev 2, meanwhile, revises the Arduino Uno WiFi with a new Microchip ATmega4809 MCU. It also advances to an ESP32-based u-blox NINA-W102 WiFi module, which is also found on the Vidor 4000. Read more

DragonFlyBSD 5.3 Works Towards Performance Improvements

Given that DragonFlyBSD recently landed some SMP performance improvements and other performance optimizations in its kernel for 5.3-DEVELOPMENT but as well finished tidying up its Spectre mitigation, this weekend I spent some time running some benchmarks on DragonFlyBSD 5.2 and 5.3-DEVELOPMENT to see how the performance has shifted for an Intel Xeon system. Read more

Red Hat News: KVM, OpenStack Platform 13 and More