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Thursday, 25 Aug 16 - Tux Machines is a community-driven public service/news site which has been around for over a decade and primarily focuses on GNU/LinuxSubscribe now Syndicate content

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Quick Roundup

Type Title Author Replies Last Postsort icon
Blog entry Slackware 10.1 srlinuxx 8 27/03/2005 - 4:37am
Story sex bots srlinuxx 2 28/03/2005 - 7:02am
Story 'Game theft' led to fatal attack srlinuxx 1 31/03/2005 - 11:21pm
Story Cannabis: Too much, too young? srlinuxx 2 31/03/2005 - 11:33pm
Blog entry gentoo's april fools srlinuxx 1 01/04/2005 - 4:35pm
Page Real April 1st Screenshot srlinuxx 01/04/2005 - 5:38pm
Spring Forward srlinuxx 03/04/2005 - 6:14am
Story Pope John Paul II dies in Vatican srlinuxx 1 03/04/2005 - 7:27am
Blog entry New Logo srlinuxx 07/04/2005 - 7:07am
Story NoGravity Linux Game Port srlinuxx 07/04/2005 - 2:08pm

Linux Event

Filed under
GNU
Linux

Linux Kernel

Filed under
Linux
  • Bus1: a new Linux interprocess communication proposal

    It is early days yet for bus1. Though it has been under development for a least eight months (based on Git history) and is based on even older ideas, there has been little public discussion. The follow-up comments on the kernel-summit email thread primarily involved people indicating their interest rather than commenting on the design. From my limited perspective, though, it is looking positive. The quality of the code and documentation is excellent. The design takes the best of binder, which is a practical success as a core part of the Android platform, and improves on it. And the development team appears to be motivated towards healthy informed community discussion prior to any acceptance. The tea-leaves tell me there are good things in store for bus1.

  • [Older] Open vSwitch Moves to the Linux Foundation

    Open Source usage and participation has increased across the industry in the last few years, driving the spotlight towards the technology powering the future of open collaboration. Similarly, with the rise of software defined networking (SDN) and network function virtualization (NFV), networking is going through its own star studded moment. As an early pioneer in the SDN space, Open vSwitch has been at the forefront of both of these trends, and has helped pioneer not only the concepts we all understand as SDN, but in the open cloud platform as well. Open vSwitch enables developers to easily connect and move between separate cloud environments. We at IBM have contributed heavily to Open vSwitch as part of our dedication to building the cloud as an open, accessible foundation for innovation – not a destination in and of itself.

  • Kernel 4.4.19 Has Been Released

    Kernel 4.4.19 has been released, bringing an impressive number of fixes.

Security News

Filed under
Security
  • Security and reproducible-build progress in Guix 0.11

    The GNU Guix package-manager project recently released version 0.11, bringing with it support for several hundred new packages, a range of new tools, and some significant progress toward making an entire operating system (OS) installable using reproducible builds.

    Guix is a "functional" package manager, built on many of the same ideas found in the Nix package manager. As the Nix site explains it, the functional paradigm means that packages are treated like values in a functional programming language—Haskell in Nix's case, Scheme in Guix's. The functions that build and install packages do so without side effects, so the system can easily offer nice features like atomic transactions, rollbacks, and the ability for individual users to build and install separate copies of a package without fear that they will interfere. Part of making such a system reliable is to ensure that builds are "reproducible"—meaning that two corresponding copies of a binary built on different systems at different times will be bit-for-bit identical.

  • VeraCrypt Audit Under Way; Email Mystery Cleared Up

    To say the VeraCrypt audit, which begins today, got off to an inauspicious start would be an understatement.

    On Sunday, two weeks after the announcement that the open source file and disk encryption software would be formally scrutinized for security vulnerabilities, executives at one of the firms funding the audit posted a notice that four emails between the parties involved had been intercepted.

  • Cryptocurrency Mining Virus Targets Linux Machines
  • Why The Windows Secure Boot Hack Is a Good Thing

    Most coverage of the subject has been written in that panicky, alarmist prose that makes for exciting news, but the problem is that the invalidation of Secure Boot is a very positive development for everyone concerned, except for Microsoft. Yes, it shows why backdoors for “the good guys” are a terrible idea — yes, it even has far-reaching implications for every piece of computing technology using the UEFI standard. However, I maintain that it will have a positive influence on the direction of security and tech standards moving forward.

Leftovers: Software

Filed under
Software
  • mutt 1.7.0 released
  • Vim 8 pre-announcement

    Work on Vim 8.0 is coming close to an end. I hope version 8.0 can be released in about two weeks.

    This is a last chance to modify new features in a way that is not backwards compatible. Once 8.0 is out we can’t make changes that would break plugins.

  • digiKam 5.x Photography Application Available For Ubuntu/Linux Mint

    digiKam is digital photo management application for specially designed for KDE desktop environment. Digital photo management program designed to import, organize, enhance, search and export your digital images to and from your computer. It provides a simple interface which makes importing and organizing digital photographs a "snap". The photos are organized in albums which can be sorted chronologically, by folder layout or by custom collections. digiKam enables you to manage large numbers of digital photographs in albums and to organize these photographs for easy retrieval using tags (keywords), captions, collections, dates, geolocation and searches. It has many features for viewing, organizing, processing and sharing your images. Thus, digiKam is a formidable digital asset management (DAM) software including powerful image editing functions. An easy-to-use camera interface is provided, that will connect to your digital camera and download photographs directly into digiKam albums. More than 1000 digital cameras are supported by the gphoto2 library. Of course, any media or card reader supported by your operating system will interface with digiKam.

  • 5 Tools for Monitoring Disk Activity in Linux
  • What is BPF and why is it taking over Linux Performance Analysis?

    The newest tool for observing the Linux operating system is the “Berkeley Packet Filter” (BPF). BPF allows users to run a small piece of code quickly and safely inside the operating system. Originally used for packet filtering, it has since been enhanced from its eponymous use-case to support dynamic tracing of the Linux operating system. For example, it is possible to write a small BPF program that prints every time a particular file was accessed by a user.

today's howtos

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HowTos

Release management in Open Source projects

Filed under
Development
OSS

Open source software is widely used today. While there is not a single development method for open source, many successful open source projects are based on widely distributed development models with many independent contributors working together. Traditionally, distributed software development has often been seen as inefficient due to the high level of communication and coordination required during the software development process. Open source has clearly shown that successful software can be developed in a distributed manner.

The open source community has over time introduced many collaboration systems, such as version control systems and mailing lists, and processes that foster this collaborative development style and improve coordination. In addition to implementing efficient collaboration systems and processes, it has been argued that open source development works because it aims to reduce the level of coordination needed. This is because development is done in parallel streams by independent contributors who work on self-selected tasks. Contributors can work independently and coordination is only required to integrate their work with others.

Relatively little attention has been paid to release management in open source projects in the literature. Release management, which involves the planning and coordination of software releases and the overall management of releases throughout the life cycle, can be studied from many different aspects. I investigated release management as part of my PhD from the point of view of coordination theory. If open source works so well because of various mechanism to reduce the level of coordination required, what implications does this have on release management which is a time in the development process when everyone needs to come together to align their work?

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FarmBot, the open-source CNC farming robot

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OSS

The FarmBot structure fixes directly on top of any standard raised planter box. You can think of it like a 3D printer, but instead of extruding plastic, the tool head deposits seeds, delivers water and rids the box of weeds, all by moving across a gantry. Powered by a Raspberry Pi 3, an Arduino Mega and a motor control shield, the FarmBot brings agricultural automation within the reach of the committed hobbyist.

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Linux Mint 18 “Sarah” KDE – BETA Release

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GNU
KDE
Linux

Linux Mint 18 is a long term support release which will be supported until 2021. It comes with updated software and brings refinements and many new features to make your desktop even more comfortable to use.

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The Philosophy of Open Source in Community and Enterprise Software

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OSS

Open source software is alive and well, backing most of the systems we take for granted every day. Communities like Github have paved the way for more open collaboration and increased contributions. More software today is branded with the marketing gimmick of being moved “into the cloud”, and into subscription models were people perpetually rent software rather than purchase it. Many of the websites we use are walled gardens of free services that are not open, and which make it intentionally difficult to move your data should you become unsatisfied with the service provider. Much of the opens source software being released today is backend technology or developer tools. We are still a far cry away from having the day to day software we use being truly free, not only in cost, but being able to modify it to our needs and run it anywhere we want.

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OpenMandriva Lx 3.0 Performance Benchmarks Against Other Linux/BSD Distributions

Filed under
Graphics/Benchmarks

OpenMandriva Lx 3.0 was released last week and since then many Phoronix readers have inquired about benchmarks of it since it's the first major GNU/Linux distribution using the LLVM Clang compiler by default over GCC.

Thus in continuing my recent BSD and Linux OS performance comparison, here are results of OpenMandriva Lx 3.0 out-of-the-box compared to many other distributions using the same Xeon Skylake hardware platform.

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LinuxCon to Highlight How Linux Has Changed in Its 25 Years

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Linux

When Linus Torvalds first got started on Linux 25 years ago, it was all about the kernel. For Torvalds today, in conversation after conversation, he will almost always reiterate that the kernel is still his primary focus. The difference between Linux today and Linux 25 years ago is that Linux is about much more than just Torvalds, or even the Linux kernel. Linux today is about the wider world that Linux enables. It's a world where the collaborative development model that Linux pioneered has been extended into every realm of software development.

Ten years ago, when I first met Jim Zemlin, his message was about trying to prevent the fragmentation of Linux by having the Linux Standards Base. While fragmentation is still a concern, it's no longer at the top of the list for Linux. Today Linux and the wider ecosystem it helps enable is the basis of the modern world, from the internet of things to smart phones, servers and everything in between.

As Zemlin has said many times in his state of Linux address at LinuxCon events over the years, "Linux is awesome."

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Android makers try to make their phones eye-catching

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Android

It’s getting rarer for phone launches to generate excitement these days — especially in the Android world, where all models use the same underlying Google software. Every year, phones get routine refreshes such as faster processors, better cameras and longer battery life.

But Android phone makers haven’t given up trying to stand out. Samsung, for instance, hopes to encourage upgrades by giving its new Galaxy Note 7 phone an eye scanner for identification and related security features. Other manufacturers are looking beyond the phone entirely, pinning their hopes on innovative accessories. Motorola offers mix-and-match modules that let you upgrade your phone on the fly, while Alcatel is focused on adding virtual-reality features, including a headset.

Read more

today's leftovers

  • Linux Emergency Mode Thoughts

    This week, I listened to the psaltery voice of Bryan Lunduke lovingly berating and belittling his guests on his podcast. Martin Wimpress, whose work with MATE made it the first project I ever donated to was among the guests. He was asked why he based his project on Debian/Ubuntu and to that Martin responded with polite comments about the robustness of the communities around those projects. He’s right and because of that community I didn’t tag him on Google Plus and wait for a reply. I got my answer much, much faster than that.

  • GUADEC 2016: BoFs

    The Birds of a feather sessions at GUADEC was a great opportunity to sit down and get work done. I participated in the engagement team’s BoF which involved lots of brainstorming for GNOME’s 20th birthday. Over the two days we delegated all the different tasks to do and planned what should be done up to and doing the event. Together with Sri I’ll be working on merchandise for the event which among other things could involve beer mugs.

  • My GUADEC experience

    It’s been three days since I got back home and I have to say that I already miss being there with all the GNOME community:).

    I actually didn’t know how this experience would be. I had never actually been to a GNOME meeting before and all my interaction with the community was purely online.

  • iPhone Sales Soften, Fall Over 7% in Q2
  • SoundHound - Music search galore?
  • ReactOS 0.4.2 Officially Released
  • New BlackArch Linux ISO Released with Over 1,500 Penetration Testing, Hacking Tools
  • Address Bar Spoofing Vulnerability Found in Several Browsers

    Chrome, Firefox and other web browsers are plagued by vulnerabilities that can be exploited to spoof their address bar. Some of the affected vendors are still working on addressing the issues.

    Pakistan-based researcher Rafay Baloch discovered that the address bar in Google Chrome, also known as the omnibox, can be tricked into flipping URLs.

    The problem, which affects Chrome for Android, is related to how Arabic and Hebrew text is written from right to left (RTL). If an attacker’s URL starts with an IP address and it contains an Arabic character, the URL’s host and path are reversed.

BSD Leftovers

Filed under
BSD
  • DragonFlyBSD Decides To Drop PulseAudio

    DragonFlyBSD developers have decided to remove PulseAudio from their dports packaging system and patch their desktop software to not depend upon this open-source sound server.

    Running PulseAudio on DragonFlyBSD appears to cause problems for users, similar to PulseAudio in its early days on Linux, "the pulseaudio server didn't seem to work and even caused one CPU to spin at 100% usage. Moreover, it seems that firefox, even if built without pulseaudio, would detect if PA was installed and use it over ALSA resulting in no sound and a spinning CPU," according to John Marino who removed PA from DragonFlyBSD.

  • LLVM Clang 3.9 Still On Track For Release Next Week

    LLVM release manager Hans Wennborg tagged LLVM 3.9.0-rc2 on Thursday and it's still looking like LLVM/Clang 3.9 could ship on schedule next week.

    Hans noted in the RC2 announcement, "This is a release candidate in the very real sense that if nothing new comes up, this is be what the final release looks like. There are currently no open release blockers, and no patches in my merge-queue."

Mozilla News

Filed under
Moz/FF
  • 3 Firefox Add-ons Every Ubuntu User Needs

    Firefox is the default browser in Ubuntu — but it doesn’t integrate with the Unity desktop as well as it could.

    That’s where the following Ubuntu Firefox add-ons come in. These little extras, trivial though they seem, help to bridge the (admittedly few) gaps and missing functionality between browser and OS.

  • Mozilla is changing its look—and asking the Internet for feedback

    Mozilla is trying a rebranding. Back in June, the browser developer announced that it would freshen up its logo and enlist the Internet's help in reaching a final decision. The company hired British design company Johnson Banks to come up with seven new "concepts" to illustrate the company's work, as shown in the gallery above.

    The logos rely on vibrant colors, and several of them recall '80s and '90s style. In pure, nearly-unintelligible marketing speak, Mozilla writes that each new design reflects a story about the company. "From paying homage to our paleotechnic origins to rendering us as part of an ever-expanding digital ecosystem, from highlighting our global community ethos to giving us a lift from the quotidian elevator open button, the concepts express ideas about Mozilla in clever and unexpected ways" Mozilla's Creative Director Tim Murray writes in a blog post.

    Mozilla is soliciting comment and criticism on the seven new designs for the next two weeks, but this is no Boaty McBoatface situation. Mozilla is clear that it's not crowdsourcing a design, asking anyone to work on spec, or holding a vote over which logo the Internet prefers. It's just asking for comments.

Leftovers: Software

Filed under
Software

KDE Leftovers

Filed under
KDE
  • Krita 3.0.1 Alpha Builds

    Last week the merge window closed and Krita entered a four week stabilization phase. Several very interesting branches were merged, with features ranging from a new head-up-display for quickly changing brush settings, a wavelet filter, a threshold filter, to a an upgrade for all number entry boxes: those support maths now! Sadly, we haven’t managed to dot all the i’s on the video-export branch for saving animated gifs and videos, so that’s not in.

  • Queueing up for Plasma 5.8

    It’s been too long since I’ve posted on Planet… I missed you! But despite my slothish activity there are rituals to be followed, and so comes a wallpaper for Plasma 5.8;

    Probably the first thing I’ll mention is that the Plasma 5.8 wallpaper will be shipping with a 4K UHD version. The last wallpaper was meant to have a 4K version, but it simply didn’t happen. Seemingly everyone is beginning to enjoy screens with high pixel densities, so it’s about time we shipped wallpapers to match, and it’s a fun bullet-point for an LTS release.

  • Space Left at the (Non)Party Flat at Akademy/QtCon
  • Conferences I will attend in the next two months
  • Akademy is this year at QtCon along with FSF-E, Qt, VLC and others.

  • Akademy and QtCon -- and the future of QFuture
  • LabPlot is comfortable with FITS

    So we are here, GSoC 2016 is officially over, it's time for the final evaluations, so this will be a closing post for this GSoC. I've learned many things while I was working on my project and I'm really thankful to my mentors, Stefan and Alexander (not officially my mentor, but we talked many times and he helped me many times too). I'll be happy to help in integration of this project in the next release of LabPlot Smile

  • Peruse 1.1 "The Cuppa Release"

    Slightly later than the 21st of June this year, the inaugural release of the Peruse comic book reader was made, and received with while not wide spread excitement, then certainly with mostly positive comments (and some very good suggestions). If you are a software developer yourself, you will know exactly how much this means to me. If you are not: This is what sustains us, what encourages us to continue working on the things we do. Thank you all very much!

  • Riding the memory lane…
  • The Editor Improved!!
  • GSoC'16 Update! Offline Extension of WikiEditor for WikiToLearn!
  • Google Summer of Code'16 Summary
  • QtWebKit Technology Preview 3
  • New QtWebKit Preview Adds NPAPI & Qt Plugin Support

    While upstream Qt developers continue focused on supporting Qt WebEngine as their Chromium-based browser engine environment, others meanwhile have been working on reviving Qt WebKit.

    Some developers have been working to revive QtWebKit and began releasing technology previews of the revised module.

  • Modifier only shortcuts available in Plasma 5.8
  • GSoC 2016 – Final post: TuxPaint, a QML Canvas 2d creation
  • KStars on Windows – Beta version

    Here we are! Google Summer of Code is over and KStars on Windows project is done. It was truly an incredible summer and I am grateful for the opportunity I was given to work on such a great project and learn so much from my mentor, Jasem Mutlaq.

  • Gsoc 2016: Sum up

    Actually Gsoc didnt take me a lot of time but sometimes I still feel burnt out for some reasons. I read a blog post of another Kde – Gsoc student and she also mentioned about the stressful and depression. I think it is shadow part of the IT industry. And we student havent learnt how to deal with it (stress) yet when it comes to real (paid) projects.

  • Isn’t the end, it’s just the beginning – Google Summer of Code 2016

    Tomaz hassled me into submitting a project to Google Summer of Code, a project that until then I had never heard of in my life. KDE was chosen to be one of the communities to be able to host students and projects for KDE entire environment be improved.

More reading comprehension issues in Linux

Filed under
GNU
Linux

Do you know the one difference between incompetent people who use Windows versus those who use Linux? The latter feel entitled and opinionated enough to twitter about their superiority complex. You just don't hear the average folks running Windows complain, because they have better things to do, like watch Youtube. Since you can't do that in Linux, because things break all the time, you masochistically waste your energy fixing your system so it can do what any decent Windows 98 box could 9,000 years ago, and then defend your choice with the classic zeal of a Stockholm Syndrome casualty.

This is an unfair comment toward all the Linux people who do care, do work hard, and do try to make better products, but I am not really sure what's the best way, if any, to convey my message to people with reading ability challenges. This is not a call to improve Linux and make it better and blah blah. I've expressed myself enough times on that. You know what the magic formula is and how to make Linux desktop succeed. It is to listen to me, because I'm always right. So the one piece still left is to sit down and read. There. And please, don't link this article in your blogs or whatever. The first response will be: clickbait. Or: he has disabled comments on his site. Don't. No need. Just read. Carefully. That's all.

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Debian GNU/Linux Birthday : A 23 Years of Journey and Still Counting…

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Debian

On 16th August 2016, the Debian project has celebrated its 23rd anniversary, making it one of the oldest popular distribution in open source world. Debian project was conceived and founded in the year 1993 by late Ian Murdock. By that time Slackware had already made a remarkable presence as one of the earliest Linux Distribution.

Read more

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More in Tux Machines

Linux at 25: How Linux changed the world

I walked into an apartment in Boston on a sunny day in June 1995. It was small and bohemian, with the normal detritus a pair of young men would scatter here and there. On the kitchen table was a 15-inch CRT display married to a fat, coverless PC case sitting on its side, network cables streaking back to a hub in the living room. The screen displayed a mess of data, the contents of some logfile, and sitting at the bottom was a Bash root prompt decorated in red and blue, the cursor blinking lazily. I was no stranger to Unix, having spent plenty of time on commercial Unix systems like OSF/1, HP-UX, SunOS, and the newly christened Sun Solaris. But this was different. Read more

Linux Kernel News and Microsoft Breaks PowerShell

  • Coherent Accelerators, FPGAs, and PLD Microconference Accepted into 2016 Linux Plumbers Conference
    It has been more than a decade since CPU core clock frequencies stopped doubling every 18 months, which has shifted the search for performance from the "hardware free lunch" to concurrency and, more recently, hardware accelerators. Beyond accelerating computational offload, field-programmable gate arrays (FPGAs) and programmable logic devices (PLDs) have long been used in the embedded space to provide ways to offload I/O or to implement timing-sensitive algorithms as close as possible to the pin.
  • Linux's brilliant career, in pictures
    Aug. 25 marks the 25th anniversary of Linux, the free and open source operating system that's used around the globe in smarphones, tablets, desktop PCs, servers, supercomputers, and more. Though its beginnings were humble, Linux has become the world’s largest and most pervasive open source software project in history. How did it get here? Read on for a look at some of the notable events along the way.
  • Quarter Century of Innovation – aka Happy Birthday Linux!
    Happy birthday Linux. You’ve defined how we should be using and adoption technology. You’ve disrupted and continue to disrupt, industries all over the place. You’ve helped define what it means to share ideas openly and freely. You’ve shown what happens when we collaborate and work together. Free and Open Source is a win-win for all and Linux is the Gold Standard of that.
  • Microsoft Open Source Czar Takes Spotlight at LinuxCon [Ed: Microsoft paid for this]
  • Windows Update borks PowerShell – Microsoft won't fix it for a week
    You'd be forgiven for thinking Microsoft is actively trying to stop people using Windows 10 Anniversary Edition. A patch this week broke one of the key features of the OS: PowerShell.

Android Leftovers

  • Xiaomi Redmi Note 4 unveiled in China, priced at $135
    Xiaomi took the wraps off their latest smartphone offering, the Redmi Note 4, earlier today, and as is expected from the budget-friendly Redmi series, the device offers a premium look, specifications, and features, and more importantly, an ultra-affordable price tag. The Redmi Note 4 retains the premium full metal unibody construction that was introduced with its predecessor, but now comes with a brushed metal finish and chamfered edges that looks and feels even better. The design language is quite similar as well, with the Redmi Note 4 also coming with a fingerprint scanner on the back. Under the hood, the Redmi Note 4 comes with a 5.5-inch Full HD display that is covered with a 2.5D curved glass panel. The phone is powered by a MediaTek Helio X20 processor, that is backed by the Mali-T880MP4 GPU and 2 GB or 3 GB of RAM. 16 GB or 64 GB are the on-board storage options available, which also dictates how much RAM you get, and you also get expandable storage via microSD card to cover all your needs. Keeping everything running is a huge 4,100 mAh battery.
  • New study finds iPhones fail far more often than Android phones
    Apple customers are generally a shockingly loyal bunch. The company’s high repeat customer rate can be attributed to a combination of factors that concern iPhones themselves as well as Apple’s industry-leading customer service. Dealing with Apple’s customer care department has always been a pleasure compared to dealing with rival companies, and iPhones themselves have historically been very reliable, offering a consistently smooth user experience that people love.
  • Relax, Spire can now connect to Android phones
    Spire, the wearable that promises to help you with healthy breathing and mindfulness, was previously only available for iOS devices. But that should change with an update rolling out now.
  • Android 7.0 Nougat: Small changes that make a big difference in UX
    The seventh iteration of Android (Nougat) has finally been released by the mighty Google. If you happen to be the owner of a Nexus device, you might see this update very soon. Everyone else...you know the drill. So after an extended period of waiting for the update to trickle through your carrier and onto your device, what can you expect to happen to your Android device once its center has become a creamier shade of Nougat?
  • Two Nokia Android smartphones show up in benchmark
    Nokia is definitely coming out with a few Android smartphones later this year, but today's Nokia has little in common with the company that ruled the mobile phone industry for years. For starters, the devices that will be released this year, or the next, will be made by a third-party company. Nokia won't be manufacturing phones anymore and most likely it won't manage the way they are sold through retailers and authorized resellers.
  • Proxima bae, Instagram scams, Android goes full crypto: ICYMI
  • PayPal adds proper Nexus Imprint fingerprint login support on Android
  • Google Duo has been downloaded 5 million times on Android since its release

Comparison of the Samsung Z1 vs Z2 vs Z3 Tizen smartphones

Compare Samsung Z1, Z2, and Z3 Tizen Smartphones Lets do a quick history lesson: The first Tizen Smartphone was the Samsung Z1, then came the Z3, and yesterday was the turn of the 4G touting Z2 to take centre stage. On the whole the Z2 is very similar to the Z1 and can be thought of a Z1 2016 edition with the inclusion of 4G cellular connectivity and updated software with user requested features. Read more