Language Selection

English French German Italian Portuguese Spanish

About Tux Machines

Wednesday, 24 May 17 - Tux Machines is a community-driven public service/news site which has been around for over a decade and primarily focuses on GNU/LinuxSubscribe now Syndicate content

Search This Site

Quick Roundup

Type Title Author Replies Last Postsort icon
Blog entry Slackware 10.1 srlinuxx 8 27/03/2005 - 4:37am
Story sex bots srlinuxx 2 28/03/2005 - 7:02am
Story 'Game theft' led to fatal attack srlinuxx 1 31/03/2005 - 11:21pm
Story Cannabis: Too much, too young? srlinuxx 2 31/03/2005 - 11:33pm
Blog entry gentoo's april fools srlinuxx 1 01/04/2005 - 4:35pm
Page Real April 1st Screenshot srlinuxx 01/04/2005 - 5:38pm
Spring Forward srlinuxx 03/04/2005 - 6:14am
Story Pope John Paul II dies in Vatican srlinuxx 1 03/04/2005 - 7:27am
Blog entry New Logo srlinuxx 07/04/2005 - 7:07am
Story NoGravity Linux Game Port srlinuxx 07/04/2005 - 2:08pm

Here comes Treble: A modular base for Android

Filed under
Android

On the Android team, we view each dessert release as an opportunity to make Android better for our users and our ecosystem partners. One thing we've consistently heard from our device-maker partners is that updating existing devices to a new version of Android is incredibly time consuming and costly.

With Android O, we've been working very closely with device makers and silicon manufacturers to take steps toward solving this problem, and we're excited to give you a sneak peek at Project Treble, the biggest change to the low-level system architecture of Android to date.

Read more

today's leftovers

Filed under
Misc
  • Hardening SSH authentication using Yubikey (1/2)
  • Hardening SSH authentication using Yubikey (2/2)
  • KDE 4/5 Affected By A Root Exploit Vulnerability

    The issue in KAuth paired with a problem in smb4k can allow an attacker to gain root access on a local machine. This exploit has been tested on openSUSE Leap and Fedora 26 Alpha, among other distributions.

    More details on the issue are still coming to light but there is some detailed information via this oss-security posting.

  • Meson and GXml

    After a call, Yannick has pushed a patch to add Meson build system to GXml. This is my first time using Meson and I really love it.

    After a set of patches, I’ve managed to fix most installation and Unit Test integration.

  • Which Apps Would You Like to See as Snaps?

    Which applications would you like to see made available as Snap?

    That’s the question being asked by the Snapcraft community who work on the technology.

  • conjure-up dev summary for week 19

    We sent out a proposal outlining why we wanted to go with a particular solution and made sure to solicit input from the community to either get approval or see if there were any other solutions. Read about that proposal and responses for more details into that process and the pros and cons. The conclusion was to go with our proposal and bundle LXD into conjure-up snap in the same way we do Juju.

    This work has been completed and should make it's way into conjure-up 2.2. Prior to that though we need to make sure to socialize this change as it will cause users existing Localhost deployment to not be easily reachable and also documenting how users can reach their newly deployed containers.

Red Hat News

Filed under
Red Hat
  • Red Hat's Head Of Products On Competing With Docker, Teaming With AWS And A Container Services 'Renaissance' For The Channel

    At open-source technologies giant Red Hat, executives say it's their company—not Docker—that is the player to beat in containers for the enterprise. Paul Cormier, an executive vice president who heads Red Hat's technology and products organizations, sat down with CRN during Red Hat Summit 2017 in Boston and had plenty to say about the competition around containers. "You need a production-ready environment to really start to deploy [containers] and bet your business on it," Cormier said, "and we're the only one that's proved we can do that."

  • Red Hat Release Next Generation of OpenShift Online

    Red Hat have announced the initial availability of the next generation of OpenShift Online, the PaaS cloud application platform. This next edition is re-engineered to be built on top of OpenShift container platform, powered by open source tools such as Docker and Kubernetes.

    OpenShift online is a multi-tenant cloud application platform, which allows developers to develop and run container based applications. It aims to reduce operational overhead by providing on-demand application stacks, automating building and deployment, and streamlining development processes.

  • Market Spotlight: Focusing on Shares of Red Hat, Inc. (NYSE:RHT)

Leftovers: OSS and Sharing

Filed under
OSS
  • CNCF Snares Four New Members for Open Source Container Orchestration

    The Cloud Native Computing Foundation (CNCF) added four new members to its efforts to develop an open source-based container orchestration platform.

    The new members include Tencent Cloud, which joined as a “Gold” member; Mashape, which signed on as a “Silver” member; and Vevo and Zalando Technology, which both joined the organization as “End-User Supporters.”

  • Kubernetes: The smart person's guide

    As containers have become more important to businesses across the globe, it was necessary to create a system that would allow containers to scale out to meet the needs of enterprise-level deployments. That's where Kubernetes comes into play.

    Unlike Docker, Kubernetes is a very robust ecosystem. Instead of deploying a single container, Kubernetes enables you to deploy multiple containers to multiple hosts, making it ideal for larger deployments and load balancing.

  • How to do time series prediction using RNNs, TensorFlow and Cloud ML Engine

    The Estimators API in tf.contrib.learn (See tutorial here) is a very convenient way to get started using TensorFlow. The really cool thing from my perspective about the Estimators API is that using it is a very easy way to create distributed TensorFlow models. Many of the TensorFlow samples that you see floating around on the internets are not distributed — they assume that you will be running the code on a single machine. People start with such code and then are immeasurably saddened to learn that the low-level TensorFlow code doesn’t actually work on their complete dataset. They then have to do lots of work to add distributed training code around the original sample, and who wants to edit somebody else’s code?

  • TensorFlow: I want to like you, but you're tricksy

    Occasionally a technology comes along that changes the way that people work. Docker has had a profound effect on how applications are deployed in the cloud, Hadoop changed how analysis of big data was done and the R language has disrupted the statistics market.

    And so to TensorFlow, which emerged from the Machine Learning team at the Google Brain project. Building on their experience of a system called DistBelief, TensorFlow is a second-generation framework for the implementation of machine learning at scale.

    Users described their ML models as dataflow graphs, combining a number of machine learning techniques into a single model. TensorFlow itself does nothing to reduce the learning curve found in ML (in fact it might make it steeper), but Google's framework does enormously simplify the deployment of ML models. If you think of ML model construction as a data science then TensorFlow is a Data Engineering tool for deployment.

  • Chrome Gets A GPU Service Scheduler
  • Why Quotas are Hard

    Lets say we allow the explicit allocation of quota from higher to lower. Does this mean that the parent project is reducing its own quota while creating an explicit quota for the lower project? Or does it mean that both quotas need to be enforced? If the quota for sales is set to 10, and the quota for the three node projects are all set to 10, is this legal or an error?

  • Promoting FreeBSD at Events
  • GNU OrgaDoc Aims To Make It Easy To Copy/Sync Documents Between Computers

    But will OrgaDoc serve much of a use in 2017 when for years most multi-computer individuals have probably been using Nextcloud/ownCloud, their own web/FTP servers, or proprietary services like Google Docs and Dropbox to manage files across computers? Do you plan to use OrgaDoc or how do you keep files synced across computers? What about using the Eiffel programming language today? Let us know your thoughts in the forums. Should you want to learn more about GNU OrgaDoc, see the project site.

  • Why we need an open source approach to data management

    Open source communities that form around common challenges allow large groups of individuals to gain knowledge on really complicated aspects of their business and industry, expanding communal learning and continually advancing a topic along the way. Open sourcing a framework that enables data management and is supported by a community of information security professionals provides them with the tools and capabilities necessary in today’s cybersecurity environment, including:

  • The curl user survey 2017

    If you use curl or libcurl, in any way, shape or form, please consider spending a few minutes of your precious time on this. Your input helps us understand where we are and in which direction we should go next.

Leftovers: Gaming

Filed under
Gaming

Wine 2.8

Filed under
Software

Broadcom BCM2835 Thermal Driver For Linux 4.12

Filed under
Linux

The Broadcom BCM2835 SoC, most notably used by various Raspberry Pi boards and other SBCs, will have a thermal driver in the Linux 4.12 kernel.

As part of the thermal updates sent in to Linux 4.12, a BCM2835 SoC thermal driver is being added. The bcm2835_thermal driver exposes the SoC temperature and a critical trip point (80C or whatever is defined by the firmware). It looks like this BCM2835 driver will also work for BCM2836 and BCM2837 SoCs too with the correct DeviceTree information. This thermal driver should be useful for Raspberry Pi users putting their hardware under routine load or in more demanding environments.

Read more

Dev/FOSS Events: Kamailio World, Open Source Day, SunCamp, and DebConf14 Throwback

Filed under
Development
OSS
  • Kamailio World and FSFE team visit, Tirana arrival

    This week I've been thrilled to be in Berlin for Kamailio World 2017, one of the highlights of the SIP, VoIP and telephony enthusiast's calendar. It is an event that reaches far beyond Kamailio and is well attended by leaders of many of the well known free software projects in this space.

  • The Open Source Day 2017 conference coming on May 17th in Warsaw

    Nearly 1,000 attendees and several thousand viewers online participates in the annual Open Source Day conference. This Europe’s largest event dedicated to open technology has become a highlight among tech events in the country. The 10th anniversary edition will take place on May 17th at Marriott Hotel in Warsaw.

  • 6 days to SunCamp

    It will be a small event (about 20-25 people), with a more intimate atmosphere than DebConf. There will be people fixing RC bugs, preparing stuff for after the release, or just discussing with other Debian folks.

  • Linus Torvalds Talks to Debian Users

    A little over two-and-a-half years ago, Linus Torvalds spent over an hour taking and answering questions from an audience of developers at DebConf14 in Portland, Oregon. Some of what he said is by now old news, but that’s interesting too, as it serves as a marker for where we’ve been.

Fedora: The Latest

Filed under
Red Hat
  • Nvidia driver improvements for Fedora 25+
  • The latest Sublime Text Editor build on Fedora
  • Track the night sky with Stellarium on Fedora

    Ever looked up at the night sky and tried to identify specific celestial bodies out of the millions you can see? Stellarium is an awesome open source planetarium application available in Fedora to help you identify and track objects in the night sky. Basically, it simulates the night sky and provides labels and other tools to help you know what you are actually looking at.

  • Crouton Fedora + Wayland. Yes, please!

    As of version 50, Chrome OS includes a Wayland server. Even though this is mostly for running Android applications, even my old Toshiba Chromebook which doesn’t have Android support, has Wayland in it. Therefore Crouton Fedora can now fully utilize it and run GUI applications on it, mixed with Chrome OS windows!

  • It's Now Possible To Run Fedora On Chromebooks With Wayland

    With Wayland now being present on Chrome OS for the Android compatibility layer, modifications to Crouton were made to allow Fedora Workstation with Wayland to run atop these Wayland-enabled Chromebooks.

    Using Crouton to load a Linux distribution on a Chromebook/Chromebox no longer has to rely upon using a xorg-server now that Wayland is present on ChromeOS 50+.

Microsoft Windows and Ransom

Filed under
Microsoft
Security
  • Massive ransomware attack hits UK hospitals, Spanish banks [Ed: Microsoft shows its real cost]

    A large number of hospitals, GPs, and walk-in clinics across England have been locked down by a ransomware attack, reports suggest. There are also some reports of a ransomware attack hitting institutions in Portugal and Spain, with telecoms provider Telefonica apparently hit hard. Further attacks have been reported in Russia, Ukraine, and Taiwan. Batten down the hatches: we might be in the middle of a global ransomware attack.

    Multiple sources point to this ransomware attack being based on the EternalBlue vulnerability, which was discovered by the NSA but was leaked by a group calling itself Shadow Brokers last month.

    NHS Digital has confirmed the attack and issued a brief statement, stating that there's no evidence that patient data had been accessed and that the attack was not specifically targeted at the NHS. At this point it isn't clear whether a central NHS network has been knocked offline by the ransomware or whether individual computers connected to the network are being locked out. In any case, a number of hospitals and clinics are reporting that their computer systems are inaccessible, and some telephone services are down too.

  • New ransomware Jaff demands $3,700 payments
  • Updates on CyberSecurity, WordPress and what we're cooking in the lab today.

    This is a Wordfence public service security announcement for all users of computers running any version of Windows.

    We have confirmed that a serious virulent ransomware threat known as WannaCrypt0r/WannaCry has affected Windows computers on shared networks in at least 74 countries worldwide, with 57,000 reported individual cases being affected. And according to the analysis team at Kaspersky Lab, that number is growing fast.

SUSE Security Breach (Again) and Tumbleweed Update

Filed under
SUSE
  • Several openSUSE services disabled due to a security breach

    We have been informed of a security breach of the MF authentication system used by several openSUSE services.

    As a result, the openSUSE services using this authentication method are immediately being set to read-only mode/preventing authentication.

    This includes the openSUSE OBS, wiki, and forums.

    The scope and impact of the breach is not yet fully clear. The disabling of authentication is to ensure the protection of our systems and user data while the situation is fully investigated.

  • Tumbleweed: Review of the weeks 2017/18 & 19

    In the last two weeks, a total of 6 snapshots had been released to the wild (0428, 0429, 0430, 0502, 0503, 0505): all those snapshots were mainly in Week 18 – while we were having some struggles this week due to the way the pattern packages are now laid out. The change was slightly more complex than anticipated and small issues crept in here and there. But the change is well worth the effort, as patterns are now smaller chunks with their own respective maintainer groups assigned. For example, the KDE Team has more, and especially more direct, control over their pattern. The same holds, of course, true for all other desktop related patterns: those now live in the respective desktop environment’s devel projects.

CoreOS's Linux platform bolsters enterprise Kubernetes features

Filed under
OS
Linux

Tectonic, CoreOS's Linux platform built to run containers, was revamped this week to version 1.6.2. Underneath that minor point revision label lie some significant changes.

Read more

Open source, $125 NAS SBC has four SATA 3.0 ports

Filed under
OSS

On Kickstarter, an open source, 4-bay “Helios4” NAS SBC runs Armbian on a Marvell Armada 388 SoC, and sells for $125, or $139 for the full case kit with fans.

A Singapore-based startup called Kobol has gone to Kickstarter to pitch an open source network attached storage (NAS) SBC that supports up to 40TB of onboard storage, as well as media streaming and file sharing. The Helios4 Personal Cloud also comes with an optional enclosure kit with bays and dual fans for the board’s four SATA ports. Two USB 3.0 ports are also available.

Read more

CIA Uses "AfterMidnight" and "Assassin" Against Windows

Filed under
Microsoft

Today, May 12th 2017, WikiLeaks publishes "AfterMidnight" and "Assassin", two CIA malware frameworks for the Microsoft Windows platform.

"AfterMidnight" allows operators to dynamically load and execute malware payloads on a target machine. The main controller disguises as a self-persisting Windows Service DLL and provides secure execution of "Gremlins" via a HTTPS based Listening Post (LP) system called "Octopus". Once installed on a target machine AM will call back to a configured LP on a configurable schedule, checking to see if there is a new plan for it to execute. If there is, it downloads and stores all needed components before loading all new gremlins in memory. "Gremlins" are small AM payloads that are meant to run hidden on the target and either subvert the functionality of targeted software, survey the target (including data exfiltration) or provide internal services for other gremlins. The special payload "AlphaGremlin" even has a custom script language which allows operators to schedule custom tasks to be executed on the target machine.

"Assassin" is a similar kind of malware; it is an automated implant that provides a simple collection platform on remote computers running the Microsoft Windows operating system. Once the tool is installed on the target, the implant is run within a Windows service process. "Assassin" (just like "AfterMidnight") will then periodically beacon to its configured listening post(s) to request tasking and deliver results. Communication occurs over one or more transport protocols as configured before or during deployment. The "Assassin" C2 (Command and Control) and LP (Listening Post) subsystems are referred to collectively as" The Gibson" and allow operators to perform specific tasks on an infected target.

Read more

Which Official Ubuntu Flavor Is Best for You?

Filed under
Ubuntu

Up until recently, the official Ubuntu Linux included the in-house Unity desktop and a sixth recognized flavor existed: Ubuntu GNOME -- Ubuntu with the GNOME desktop environment.

When Mark Shuttleworth decided to nix Unity, the choice was obvious to Canonical—make GNOME the official desktop of Ubuntu Linux. This begins with Ubuntu 18.04 (so April, 2018) and we’ll be down to the official distribution and four recognized flavors.

For those already enmeshed in the Linux community, that’s some seriously simple math to do—you know which Linux desktop you like, so making the choice between Ubuntu, Kubuntu, Lubuntu, Mythbuntu, and Ubuntu Budgie couldn’t be easier. Those that haven’t already been indoctrinated into the way of Linux won’t see that as such a cut-and-dried decision.

To that end, I thought it might be a good idea to help newer users decide which flavor is best for them. After all, choosing the wrong distribution out of the starting gate can make for a less-than-ideal experience.

And so, if you’re considering a flavor of Ubuntu, and you want your experience to be as painless as possible, read on.

Read more

RADV vs. AMDGPU-PRO Vulkan Performance vs. OpenGL In May 2017

Filed under
Graphics/Benchmarks

With the open-source RADV Radeon Vulkan driver recently hitting the milestone of effectively being Vulkan 1.0 compliant, I figured this warranted a good time for running a fresh open-source Vulkan vs. AMDGPU-PRO Vulkan performance comparison on various graphics cards. For additional context, the RadeonSI and AMDGPU-PRO OpenGL numbers are also present to provide additional value.

Read more

Also:

  • VK9 Direct3D-Over-Vulkan Begins Hitting More Advanced Milestones

    The VK9 hobbyist project implementing Direct3D 9 over the Vulkan graphics API is beginning to reach the more challenging milestones.

  • Mesa 17.0.6 Is Coming Soon with Polaris 12 Support for Radeon RADV Vulkan Driver

    A new maintenance update of the Mesa 17.0 3D Graphics Library stable series, which numerous GNU/Linux distributions are currently using in their default install, is being prepped these days.

    We're talking here about Mesa 17.0.6, which is now in the Release Candidate stage of development, promising to bring more than 50 improvements for various supported drivers, as well as core components. The final release of Mesa 17.0.6 is expected this weekend, but let's have a look at what to expect from it.

Leftovers: Gaming

Filed under
Gaming

Con Kolivas and MuQSS 0.155

Filed under
Linux
  • linux-4.11-ck1 / MuQSS CPU scheduler 0.155

    These are patches designed to improve system responsiveness and interactivity with specific emphasis on the desktop, but configurable for any workload. The patchset is mainly centred around the Multiple Queue Skiplist Scheduler, MuQSS.

  • MuQSS CPU Scheduler 0.155 Released

    Con Kolivas has released his latest version of the MuQSS CPU scheduler that succeeds the Brain BFS scheduler.

    MuQSS 0.155 is now available along with his Linux-4.11-ck1 patch series. MuQSS continues to be designed for delivering maximum system responsiveness and interactivity with a focus on desktop workloads.

Syndicate content

More in Tux Machines

More of today's howtos

GNOME News: Black Lab Drops GNOME and Further GNOME Experiments in Meson

  • Ubuntu-Based Black Lab Enterprise Linux 11.0.1 Drops GNOME 3 for MATE Desktop
    Coming about two weeks after the release of Black Lab Enterprise Linux 11, which is based on the Ubuntu 16.04.2 LTS (Xenial Xerus) operating system using the HWE (hardware enablement) kernel from Ubuntu 16.10 (Yakkety Yak), Black Lab Enterprise Linux 11.0.1 appears to be an unexpected maintenance update addressing a few important issues reported by users lately.
  • 3.26 Developments
    My approach to development can often differ from my peers. I prefer to spend the early phase of a cycle doing lots of prototypes of various features we plan to implement. That allows me to have the confidence necessary to know early in the cycle what I can finish and where to ask for help.
  • Further experiments in Meson
    Meson is definitely getting more traction in GNOME (and other projects), with many components adding support for it in parallel to autotools, or outright switching to it. There are still bugs, here and there, and we definitely need to improve build environments — like Continuous — to support Meson out of the box, but all in all I’m really happy about not having to deal with autotools any more, as well as being able to build the G* stack much more quickly when doing continuous integration.

Fedora and Red Hat

Debian and Derivatives

  • Reproducible Builds: week 108 in Stretch cycle
  • Debuerreotype
    The project is named “Debuerreotype” as an homage to the photography roots of the word “snapshot” and the daguerreotype process which was an early method of taking photographs. The essential goal is to create “photographs” of a minimal Debian rootfs, so the name seemed appropriate (even if it’s a bit on the “mouthful” side).
  • The end of Parsix GNU/Linux
    The Debian-based Parsix distribution has announced that it will be shutting down six months after the Debian "Stretch" release.
  • Privacy-focused Debian 9 'Stretch' Linux-based operating system Tails 3.0 reaches RC status
    If you want to keep the government and other people out of your business when surfing the web, Tails is an excellent choice. The Linux-based operating system exists solely for privacy purposes. It is designed to run from read-only media such as a DVD, so that there are limited possibilities of leaving a trail. Of course, even though it isn't ideal, you can run it from a USB flash drive too, as optical drives have largely fallen out of favor with consumers. Today, Tails achieves an important milestone. Version 3.0 reaches RC status -- meaning the first release candidate (RC1). In other words, it may soon be ready for a stable release -- if testing confirms as much. If you want to test it and provide feedback, you can download the ISO now.