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Tuesday, 28 Mar 17 - Tux Machines is a community-driven public service/news site which has been around for over a decade and primarily focuses on GNU/LinuxSubscribe now Syndicate content

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Quick Roundup

Type Title Author Replies Last Postsort icon
Blog entry Slackware 10.1 srlinuxx 8 27/03/2005 - 4:37am
Story sex bots srlinuxx 2 28/03/2005 - 7:02am
Story 'Game theft' led to fatal attack srlinuxx 1 31/03/2005 - 11:21pm
Story Cannabis: Too much, too young? srlinuxx 2 31/03/2005 - 11:33pm
Blog entry gentoo's april fools srlinuxx 1 01/04/2005 - 4:35pm
Page Real April 1st Screenshot srlinuxx 01/04/2005 - 5:38pm
Spring Forward srlinuxx 03/04/2005 - 6:14am
Story Pope John Paul II dies in Vatican srlinuxx 1 03/04/2005 - 7:27am
Blog entry New Logo srlinuxx 07/04/2005 - 7:07am
Story NoGravity Linux Game Port srlinuxx 07/04/2005 - 2:08pm

Android Leftovers

Filed under
Android
  • Build Android Apps on Debian using Only Debian Packages

    If you’re an Android developer who prefers to use a Debian machine for home or work, then you may be interested in a guide published by the official Debian blog on how to build Android applications using ONLY Debian packages. At this time, you can build applications only if it targets API Level 23 with build-tools-24 as these are the only versions that are completely Debian at the time of this writing.

  • VAIO's slick metal Windows Phone is resurrected for Android

    VAIO, freed from the Sony yoke, made one ropey-looking Android phone all on its own. Then, learning several lessons, it made a gorgeous, machined slab of aluminum that, unfortunately, ran Windows Phone 10. Now, like practically all other phone makers, its changing tack, introducing the VAIO Phone A: an identical phone that's running Android 6.0.

  • Sony now has to compete against VAIO's new Android phone

    Sony sold off its PC-focused VAIO division back in 2014, but the brand lived on under new management. Now, it’s come back to haunt the tech giant in the mobile market, with a new Android-powered VAIO handset announced today — the VAIO Phone A.

  • How To Install Kali Linux On Android Using Linux Deploy

    Kali Linux for Android: Kali Linux is best operating system for Ethical hackers. It is used by white hat hackers, security researchers and pentesters. Kali Linux come up with the advance features which is beneficial for security purposes . Kali Linux is high software and cannot run in all devices. It is available for limited devices only. But now you can install Kali Linux in Android device, Because of developers of Linux Deploy it is possible to get Linux distributions installed in a chroot using GUI builder. let’s start and learn how to install kali linux on any android.

  • An Android Phone Makes A Better Server Than You’d Think

    There was a time a few years ago when the first Android phones made it to market, that they seemed full of promise as general purpose computers. Android is sort of Linux, right, or so the story went, so of course you must be able to run Linux on an Android phone and do all sorts of cool stuff with it.

    As anyone who tried to root an Android phone from 2010 will tell you, it was a painful and unrewarding process. There was normally a convoluted rooting process followed by somehow squeezing your own Linux filesystem tree onto the device, then chroot-ing into it. You’d then have to set up a VNC server and VNC into it, and eventually you’d feel immensely proud of your very slow tiny-screen Linux desktop that you’d slaved over creating. It was one of those things that’s simple in theory, but extremely convoluted in practice.

  • Android Candy: That App Is for the Birds!
  • New details on the Android O Developer Preview
  • Android O brings fun customizations that set the stage for bigger changes

    The Android O developer preview just dropped, and we’ve been poking around to see what’s new with the latest version. So far, it’s hard to judge the new features on Android O since most require app developers to update their code, but some digging does show tons of interesting settings that hint at what’s to come.

  • Amazon Alexa comes to its first Android phone
  • What do you think Android O stands for? (The 3:59, Ep. 198)

Linux 4.10.5

Filed under
Linux

I'm announcing the release of the 4.10.5 kernel.

All users of the 4.10 kernel series must upgrade.

The updated 4.10.y git tree can be found at:
git://git.kernel.org/pub/scm/linux/kernel/git/stable/linux-stable.git linux-4.10.y
and can be browsed at the normal kernel.org git web browser:
http://git.kernel.org/?p=linux/kernel/git/stable/linux-st...

Read more

Also: Linux 4.9.17

Linux 4.4.56

February And March Linux Articles

Filed under
Linux
HowTos

I am aware that it is a while since I added any content to this site. To be honest I have been inundated with work and so I have had little opportunity to write anything worthwhile on this blog.

I am learning new programming techniques for my day job and this has meant watching lots of Pluralsight videos and trying out what I have learned.

This doesn't mean that I have been completely idle when it comes to writing but most of the content I have written has been for Lifewire.com and I wanted to point you in the direction of these articles because I'm sure many of them will be useful to the readers of this site.

Read more

Why you might want to skip Ubuntu 17.04

Filed under
Ubuntu

Linux users have one thing that often sets them apart from their Windows and Mac-using colleagues: They often spend a lot more time fixing things or finding out how to fix things. While this is great for hobbyists and enthusiasts, it’s not great for productivity. For people who need to get stuff done on their laptops and desktops, stability will often take precedence over new features.

Every two years, Canonical offers up a long-term support (LTS) version of the Ubuntu Linux distribution. This year (2017) is an odd year, meaning that while there will be a new version of Ubuntu coming in April, not everyone will want to upgrade. And that’s A-OK.

Read more

Also: Ubuntu Core ported to NXP quad-core ARM Cortex-A53 SoC

This Week's Mesa 17.1-dev + Linux 4.11 Radeon Performance vs. NVIDIA

Filed under
Graphics/Benchmarks

Given all the recent performance work that's landed recently in Mesa Git for Mesa 17.1 plus the Linux 4.11 kernel continuing to mature, in this article are some fresh benchmarks of a few Radeon GPUs with Mesa 17.1-dev + Linux 4.11 as of this week compared to some GeForce graphics cards with the latest NVIDIA proprietary driver.

Basically this article is to serve as a fresh look at the open-source Radeon vs. closed-source NVIDIA Linux gaming performance. The Radeon tests were using the Linux 4.11 kernel as of 20 March and the Mesa 17.1-dev code also as of 20 March. The NVIDIA driver used was the 378.13 release. Ubuntu 16.10 was running on the Core i7 7700K test system.

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Announcing Rockstor 3.9.0

Filed under
GNU
Linux

We’ve just wrapped up a fun release cycle, and it’s my pleasure to announce Rockstor 3.9.0. Our community has been really active and we’ve prioritized nicely to improve on a few different areas. 5 contributors have come together for this release and besides working on new features and bug fixes, we made significant improvements to code quality. @phillxnet has made a big enhancement to the disk management subsystem. I’ve made large code quality improvement to backend Python stack. @MFlyer collaborated with me on that and took upon himself to do the same for all of Javascript stack. He made several ninja style contributions and helped fix many bugs. I’d say this is a nice release with some new stuff and a bunch of useful maintenance updates. Thanks to everyone that made this happen!

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Toughened up PC/104 SBC runs Linux

Filed under
Linux
Hardware

WinSystems unveiled a rugged “PCM-C418” SBC with a dual-core, Vortex86DX3SoC, Fast and Gigabit Ethernet ports, SATA and CF storage, and PC/104 expansion.

The WinSystems PCM-C418 SBC offers a combination of PC/104 expansion, GbE and Fast Ethernet ports, shock and vibration resistance, and a Linux-friendly, x86-based Vortex86DX3 SoC — attributes shared by the Diamond Systems Helix and Adlink CM1-86DX3. Like the Helix, it also supports -40 to 85°C temperatures.

Read more

Blender - Your FOSS 3D Software

Filed under
Linux

If you are into game development, video editing, or 3D modeling as a professional or a hobby, then Blender is a tool you should definitely look at. Blender is a FOSS solution/alternate to many commercial tools that are available and it is able to strongly match most of these commercial tools. Blender is a cross-platform application which means you can not only run it on Linux but also on Windows and MacOS. Blender is well suited to individuals and small studios who benefit from its unified pipeline and responsive development process. It supports the entirety of the 3D pipeline, anything from modeling, rigging, animation, simulation, rendering, compositing and motion tracking, video editing and game creation.

Read<br />
more

Wine-Staging 2.4 Released

Filed under
Software
  • [Wine-Staging] Release 2.4

    The Wine Staging release 2.4 is now available.

  • Wine-Staging 2.4 Released

    Wine-Staging 2.4 is now available as the latest experimental Wine build that incorporates various testing/preliminary patches not yet ready for merging into mainline Wine.

GNOME 3.24 is Ready!

Filed under
GNOME
  • GNOME 3.24 released

    This release is the result of 6 months’ hard work by the GNOME community. It contains major new features such as night light, as well as many smaller improvements and bug fixes. GNOME's existing applications have been improved and there is also a new Recipes app. Improvements to our platform include refined notifications and several revamped settings panels.

  • GNOME 3.24 Released With Night Light Mode, Maps Navigation & More

    Matthias Clasen has just announced the official release of GNOME 3.24, codenamed Portland.

  • GNOME 3.24 Desktop Environment Officially Released, Here Is What's New

    The GNOME Project is proud to announce today, March 22, 2017, the official availability of the long-anticipated GNOME 3.24 desktop environment for Linux-based operating systems.

    GNOME 3.24 just finished its six-month development cycle, and it's now the most advanced stable version of the modern and popular desktop environment used by default in numerous GNU/Linux distributions. It was developed since October 2016 under the GNOME 3.23.x umbrella, during which it received numerous improvements.

  • GNOME Photos 3.24.0 Imitates Darktable’s Exposure and Blacks Adjustment Tool

    GNOME Photos developer Debarshi Ray announced today the availability of the GNOME Photos 3.24 major release of the open-source image viewer with basic editing features for the soon-to-be-released GNOME 3.24 desktop environment.

    The GNOME Project will launch tomorrow, March 22, 2017, the final release of the long-anticipated GNOME 3.24 desktop, a massive update that improves all the applications and core components that are usually shipped with the GNOME Stack, including the GNOME Photos app.

Entroware Launches Ubuntu-Powered Kratos Laptop with Nvidia GTX 1050, Kaby Lake

Filed under
Ubuntu

The embargo just expired, so we can now share with you the details of a new Ubuntu-powered laptop from Entroware, which appears to have been designed specifically for gamers.

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Samsung Galaxy Tab S3 review: Android's best foe to the iPad Pro

Filed under
Android
Reviews

I am in productivity hell. For the past week, I’ve been using Samsung’s Galaxy Tab S3 to read Twitter, correspond on Slack, and write articles for this website. The Tab S3 is capable of doing all these things — in some cases, it’s even capable of doing them quite well — but it’s not capable of doing them anywhere near as well as a proper laptop. And in the week I’ve had it, I’ve spent a lot of time wondering why I’d use this tablet as a portable work device instead of a cheaper, more functional computer like a Chromebook.

Read more

Security Leftovers

Filed under
Security
  • Security updates for Tuesday
  • Reproducible Builds: week 99 in Stretch cycle
  • Government Agencies to be Rated on Cybersecurity Using NIST Framework

    The Trump administration has announced that it will impose new metrics on federal agencies related to cybersecurity. Agencies and departments will be required to comply with the framework developed by the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) and report back to the Department of Homeland Security (DHS), the Office of Management and Budget (OMB), and the White House.

    Homeland security advisor Thomas Bossert stated that the President’s budget will include an increase in federal funding to combat cyber threats, and that the administration’s priorities vis-à-vis cybersecurity are to modernize and centralize the existing system. To this end, the Administration intends to partner with business, including Silicon Valley, and state and local governments, on cybersecurity.

  • Firefox gets complaint for labeling unencrypted login page insecure

    The operator of a website that accepts subscriber logins only over unencrypted HTTP pages has taken to Mozilla's Bugzilla bug-reporting service to complain that the Firefox browser is warning that the page isn't suitable for the transmission of passwords.

    "Your notice of insecure password and/or log-in automatically appearing on the log-in for my website, Oil and Gas International, is not wanted and was put there without our permission," a person with the user name dgeorge wrote here (the link was made private shortly after this post went live). "Please remove it immediately. We have our own security system, and it has never been breached in more than 15 years. Your notice is causing concern by our subscribers and is detrimental to our business."

Red Hat News

Filed under
Red Hat

Chromium and Chrome

Filed under
Google
OSS
Web
  • Chromium Rolls Out Enhanced GTK3 Theme Support

    Chromium is sporting greater GTK3 support in its latest daily development snapshots. Developers have begun building the browser with proper GTK3 theme integration enabled by default. I know: hardly ground breaking, but as Chromium (and its more popular sibling, Google Chrome) are widely used by Ubuntu users, it’s a change worth a note.

  • Chrome 58 Beta: IndexedDB 2.0, an improvement to iframe navigation, and immersive full screen for PWAs

    The IndexedDB 2.0 standard is now fully supported in Chrome, making it simpler to work with large data sets in the browser. IDB 2.0 features new schema management, bulk action methods, and more standardized handling of failures.

  • Chrome 58 Beta Supports IndexedDB 2.0, New Developer Features

    Google developers are busy today not only with the Android O Developer Preview but the Chrome team has delivered the first public beta for the upcoming Chrome 58.0.

    The Chrome 58 beta adds full support for IndexedDB 2.0, improvements to iframe navigation by adding a new sandbox keyword to control iframe top navigation behavior, immersive full-screen support for Progressive Web Apps (PWAs), and various other developer changes.

Huawei and SUSE Announce SUSE Linux Enterprise Server Support for KunLun RAS 2.0

Filed under
SUSE
  • Huawei and SUSE Announce SUSE Linux Enterprise Server Support for KunLun RAS 2.0

    Huawei and SUSE have announced SUSE Linux Enterprise Server as the preferred standard operating system (OS) for Huawei’s KunLun RAS 2.0. Based on SUSE Linux Enterprise Server 12 Service Pack 2, the OS supports the unique Reliability, Availability, and Serviceability (RAS 2.0) features of Huawei’s KunLun Mission Critical Server.

    The RAS 2.0 features enable customers to add or remove CPU and memory resources without shutting down the system. These features combine to make KunLun ‘Always Online’. SUSE Linux Enterprise Server provides broad support for mission-critical workloads such as databases and middleware.

  • Huawei and SUSE Announce SUSE Linux Enterprise Server Support for KunLun RAS 2.0

    Huawei and SUSE today announced SUSE Linux Enterprise Server as the preferred standard operating system (OS) for Huawei's KunLun RAS 2.0. Based on SUSE Linux Enterprise Server 12 Service Pack 2, the OS supports the unique Reliability, Availability, and Serviceability (RAS 2.0) features of Huawei's KunLun Mission Critical Server. The RAS 2.0 features enable customers to add or remove CPU and memory resources without shutting down the system. These features combine to make KunLun "Always Online." SUSE Linux Enterprise Server provides broad support for mission-critical workloads such as databases and middleware.

Leftovers: Software

Filed under
Software
  • The time of the year…

    Shotwell 0.26.0 “Aachen” was released. No “grand” new features, more slashing of papercuts and internal reworks. I removed a big chunk of deprecated functions from it, with more to come for 0.28 on our way to GTK+4 and laid the groundworks for better integration into desktop online account systems such as UOA and GOA.

  • Stellarium 0.15.2 Open-Source Astronomical Observatory App Has over 100 Changes

    Stellarium developer Alexander Wolf was proud to announce the release of the second maintenance update to the stable Stellarium 0.15 series of the open-source and cross-platform astronomical observatory application.

    Coming approximately three months after the release of version 0.15.1, Stellarium 0.15.2 is here with over 100 improvements and bug fixes, along with a bunch of new exciting features like an algorithm for DeltaT, orbit visualization data for asteroids, an option for the InfoString group, support for calculating extincted magnitudes of satellites, and sednoids, a new type of Solar system objects.

  • Linux-using mates gone AWOL? Netflix just added Linux support

    If your Linux-using mates suddenly disappear for a day or two, we can explain why: Netflix has just revealed it's fully and formally available on the OS.

    As the streamer points out, Chrome's worked for in-browser playback since 2014. But not officially.

    As of Tuesday, however, “users of Firefox can also enjoy Netflix on Linux.”

    Netflix reckons this is “a huge milestone for us and our partners, including Google, Microsoft, Apple, and Mozilla that helped make it possible.”

  • LibreOffice 5.3.1 is out

    Last week, LibreOffice released version 5.3.1. This seems to be an incremental release over 5.3 and doesn't seem to change the new user interface in any noticeable way.

    This is both good and bad news for me. As you know, I have been experimenting with LibreOffice 5.3 since LibreOffice updated the user interface. Version 5.3 introduced the "MUFFIN" interface. MUFFIN stands for My User Friendly Flexible INterface. Because someone clearly wanted that acronym to spell "MUFFIN." The new interface is still experimental, so you'll need to activate it through Settings→Advanced. When you restart LibreOffice, you can use the View menu to change modes.

  • anytime 0.2.2

    A bugfix release of the anytime package arrived at CRAN earlier today. This is tenth release since the inaugural version late last summer, and the second (bugfix / feature) release this year.

  • Tools for PDF modification on Fedora

    There are many options in the Fedora repositories for quickly modifying the page order of a PDF document. In Fedora, two of the easiest-to-use GUI tools for modifying PDFs are PDFMod and PDFShuffler. While GUI tools are well suited to this task, if you need a command line tool, the pdfseparate and pdfunite commands provided by the poppler-utils package can modify PDFs directly from your Terminal. All These tools allow you to remove, add, and rearrange pages and export it to a new document.

Android Leftovers

Filed under
Android
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More in Tux Machines

Leftovers: OSS and Sharing

  • Making your OpenStack monitoring stack highly available using Open Source tools
    Operators tasked with maintaining production environments are relying on monitoring stacks to provide insight to resource usage and a heads-up to threats of downtime. Perhaps the most critical function of a monitoring stack is providing alerts which trigger mitigation steps to ensure an environment stays up and running. Downtime of services can be business-critical, and often has extremely high cost ramifications. Operators working in cloud environments are especially reliant on monitoring stacks due to the increase in potential inefficiency and downtime that comes with greater resource usage. The constant visibility of resources and alerts that a monitoring stack provides, makes it a fundamental component of any cloud.
  • InfraRed: Deploying and Testing Openstack just made easier!
  • The journey of a new OpenStack service in RDO
    When new contributors join RDO, they ask for recommendations about how to add new services and help RDO users to adopt it. This post is not a official policy document nor a detailed description about how to carry out some activities, but provides some high level recommendations to newcomers based on what I have learned and observed in the last year working in RDO.
  • Getting to know the essential OpenStack components better
  • Getting to know core components, speed mentoring, and more OpenStack news
  • Testing LibreOffice 5.3 Notebookbar
    I teach an online CSCI class about usability. The course is "The Usability of Open Source Software" and provides a background on free software and open source software, and uses that as a basis to teach usability. The rest of the class is a pretty standard CSCI usability class. We explore a few interesting cases in open source software as part of our discussion. And using open source software makes it really easy for the students to pick a program to study for their usability test final project.
  • [Older] Drupal member sent out after BDSM lifestyle revealed

    Drupal, like many other open source projects, has a stated goal of welcoming and accepting all people, no matter their heritage, culture, sexual orientation, gender identity or other factors.

  • Controversy Erupts in Open-Source Community After Developer's Sex Life Made Public
    Drupal is a popular open-source content-management system, used to build websites. Like many other open-source projects, Drupal is guided by several committees that are supposed to be accountable to the community and its code of conduct, which enshrines values like "be considerate" and "be respectful." Also like many other open-source projects, Drupal attracts all sorts of people, some of whom are eclectic. Last week, under murky circumstances, Drupal creator Dries Buytaert banned one of the project's technical and community leaders, Larry Garfield. Buytaert attributed the decision to aspects of Garfield's private sex life. Many Drupal users and developers are up in arms about the perceived injustice of the move, exacerbated by what they see as a lack of transparency.
  • HospitalRun: Open Source Software for the Developing World
    When open source software is used for global health and global relief work, its benefits shine bright. The benefits of open source become very clear when human health and human lives are on the line. In this YouTube video, hear Harrisburg, Pennsylvania software developer Joel Worrall explain about HospitalRun software – open source cloud-based software used at developing world healthcare facilities.
  • Scotland emphasises sharing and reuse of ICT
    Scotland’s public administrations should focus on common, shared technology platforms, according to the new digital strategy, published on 22 March. The government says it wants to develop “shared infrastructure, services and standards in collaboration with our public sector partners, to reduce costs and enable resources to be focused on front-line services.”
  • [Older] OpenSSL Re-licensing to Apache License v. 2.0 To Encourage Broader Use with Other FOSS Projects and Products

    OpenSSL Launches New Website to Organize Process, Seeks to Contact All Contributors

  • Austria state secretary promotes open data
    The State Secretary at Austria’s Federal Chancellery, Muna Duzdar, is encouraging the making available of government data as open data. “The administration must set an example and support the open data culture by giving society its data back”, the State Secretary for Digitalisation said in a statement.
  • Study: Hungary should redouble open data initiatives
    The government of Hungary should redouble its efforts to make public sector information available as open data, and actively help to create market opportunities, a government white paper recommends. The ‘White Paper on National Data Policy’ was approved by the government in December.
  • Williamson School Board OKs developing open source science curriculum
    Science textbooks may be a thing of the past in Williamson County Schools. The Williamson County school board approved a proposal Monday night to use open source science resources instead of science textbooks. The switch will require a team of nine teachers to spend a year developing an open source curriculum.
  • How Elsevier plans to sabotage Open Access
    It was a long and difficult road to get the major publishing houses to open up to open access, but in the end the Dutch universities got their much awaited ‘gold deal’ for open access. A recently revealed contract between Elsevier and the Dutch research institutes lays bare the retardant tactics the publishing giant employs to stifle the growth of open access.
  • #0: Introducing R^4
  • RcppTOML 0.1.2

Security Leftovers

  • Security updates for Monday
  • FedEx Will Pay You $5 to Install Flash on Your Machine
    FedEx is making you an offer you can’t afford to accept. It’s offering to give you $5 (actually, it’s a discount on orders over $30) if you’ll just install Adobe Flash on your machine. Nobody who knows anything about online security uses Flash anymore, except when it’s absolutely necessary. Why? Because Flash is the poster child for the “security-vulnerability-of-the-hour” club — a group that includes another Adobe product, Acrobat. How unsafe is Flash? Let’s put it this way: seven years ago, Steve Jobs announced that Flash was to be forever banned from Apple’s mobile products. One of the reasons he cited was a report from Symantec that “highlighted Flash for having one of the worst security records in 2009.” Flash security hasn’t gotten any better since.
  • Every once in a while someone suggests to me that curl and libcurl would do better if rewritten in a “safe language”
  • An insecure dishwasher has entered the IoT war against humanity

    Regel says that he has contacted Miele on a number of occasions about the issue, but had failed to get a response to his missives, and this has no updated information on the vulnerability.

    He added, bleakly that "we are not aware of an actual fix."

  • Monday Witness: It's Time to Reconize a Civil Right Not to be Connected
    Along with death and taxes, two things appear inevitable. The first is that Internet of Things devices will not only be built into everything we can imagine, but into everything we can't as well. The second is that IoT devices will have wholly inadequate security, if they have any security at all. Even with strong defenses, there is the likelihood that governmental agencies will gain covert access to IoT devices anyway. What this says to me is that we need a law that guarantees consumers the right to buy versions of products that are not wirelessly enabled at all.
  • Remember kids, if you're going to disclose, disclose responsibly!
    If you pay any attention to the security universe, you're aware that Tavis Ormandy is basically on fire right now with his security research. He found the Cloudflare data leak issue a few weeks back, and is currently going to town on LastPass. The LastPass crew seems to be dealing with this pretty well, I'm not seeing a lot of complaining, mostly just info and fixes which is the right way to do these things.

Lightroom and Darktable: the verdict two years after switching

In summer 2015, I posted a detailed account of my tentative switch from Windows7 and Lightroom to Linux and Darktable. This was sparked by sudden crashes that were afflicting my system, but in a deeper sense grew from frustration with Windows and, to a lesser degree, with Lightroom. Once I headed for Linux, I decided to plunge in fully and commit to using Ubuntu and free, open-source photo software for several months – at least until the end of that year. That would give me a chance to see whether I could actually run my photography business on the new system. Read more

7 Linux Mainstream Distros Alternatives

Linux Mainstream Distros are quite popular as they have a large number of developers working on them as well as a large number of users using them. In addition, these distros also have strong support system. People often search alternatives for Linux Mainstream Distros but often get confused about which is the best one for them. So listed below are 7 best Linux mainstream distros alternative choices for you. Read more