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Tuesday, 21 Aug 18 - Tux Machines is a community-driven public service/news site which has been around for over a decade and primarily focuses on GNU/LinuxSubscribe now Syndicate content

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Robolinux 9.3 Raptor - Bird of prey?

Filed under
Reviews

Robolinux 9.3 Raptor is an interesting project. On one hand, it does most of the basics well, offers good functionality out of the box, comes with modern features and software, and tries to provide unique value through its Stealth VM capability. Quite commendable on that front.

Unfortunately, there are problems, too. The looks are more than questionable, the aggressive focus on donations spoils the experience and even breeds a sense of mistrust, hardware compatibility can be quite a bit better, and there were also some crashes and a dozen papercuts typical of small distros. In the end, it's still Ubuntu, improved and spoiled by the extras. The security card is flashed way too many times, and it creates a sour feeling. This is a neat distro, but it tries too hard.

All in all, it has its own identity, and it could become quite useful to new users, but it's overwhelming in its current guise, and the desktop stability needs to improve, pretty much across the board. It deserves something like 7/10. Well, that said, I'm looking forward to the next release, hopefully with more aesthetic focus and a fully streamlined operating system conversion and migration experience for new users. Now that could really be a killer feature. Take care.

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KDevelop 5.2.4 released

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Development
KDE

As the last stabilization and bugfix release in the 5.2 series, we today make KDevelop 5.2.4 available for download. This release contains a few bug fixes and a bit of polishing, as well as translation updates, and should be a very simple transition for anyone using 5.2.x currently.

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8 Feature Rich Image Viewers for Linux

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Software

Is your default image viewer not giving you the image viewing experience you desire? Do you feel frustrated that it lacks other essential editing capabilities that you think are crucial for a more immersive viewing and editing experience?

In this tutorial, we’ll look some nice alternative image viewer to the default one on Linux and see how to install its packages on Ubuntu, Centos and Arch Linux.

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Also: GIMP 2.10.6 Released with Vertical Text, New Filters and Improvements

An Insight into the Future of TrueOS BSD and Project Trident

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BSD

Last month, TrueOS announced that they would be spinning off their desktop offering. The team behind the new project, named Project Trident, have been working furiously towards their first release. They did take a few minutes to answer some of our question about Project Trident and TrueOS. I would like to thank JT and Ken for taking the time to compile these answers.

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Also:July/August 2018 Issue of the FreeBSD Journal Now Available

Microsoft Entryism

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Microsoft

A checklist for submitting your first Linux kernel patch

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Linux

One of the biggest—and the fastest moving—open source projects, the Linux kernel, is composed of about 53,600 files and nearly 20-million lines of code. With more than 15,600 programmers contributing to the project worldwide, the Linux kernel follows a maintainer model for collaboration.

In this article, I'll provide a quick checklist of steps involved with making your first kernel contribution, and look at what you should know before submitting a patch. For a more in-depth look at the submission process for contributing your first patch, read the KernelNewbies First Kernel Patch tutorial.

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Teaching kids Linux at summer camp

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Linux
OSS

As the late, great mathematician, computer scientist, and educator Seymour Papert once said, "I am convinced that the best learning takes place where the learner takes charge." Unfortunately, most schools stifle children's natural curiosity and creativity, locking down technology and reducing students to consumers of content they have no hand in creating.

This summer, I had an opportunity to test Papert's theory while teaching a session on open source technology to a small group of middle school students at a local summer camp. I used some of open source advocate Charlie Reisinger's methods from his book, The Open Schoolhouse, to give the students the opportunity to explore and create their own knowledge. Reisinger says, "In an open schoolhouse, every student is trusted with learning technology and empowered to rewire and reshape the world."

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Security: Lustre, Aqua Security, Election Security and Reproducible Builds

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Security
  • Fix for July's Spectre-like bug is breaking some supers

    High-performance computing geeks are sweating on a Red Hat fix, after a previous patch broke the Lustre file system.

    In July, Intel disclosed patches for another Spectre-like data leak bug, CVE-2018-3693.

    Red Hat included its own fixes in an August 14 suite of security patches, and soon after, HPC sysadmins found themselves in trouble.

    The original report, from Stanford Research Computing Center, details a failure in LustreNet – a Lustre implementation over InfiniBand that uses RDMA for high-speed file and metadata transfer.

  • Aqua Security Launches Open-Source Kube-Hunter Container Security Tool

    Aqua Security has made its new Kube-hunter open-source tool generally available, enabling organizations to conduct penetration tests against Kubernetes container orchestration deployments.

    Aqua released Kube-hunter on Aug.17, and project code is freely available on GitHub. Rather than looking for vulnerabilities inside of container images, Kube-hunter looks for exploitable vulnerabilities in the configuration and deployment of Kubernetes clusters. The project code is open-source and can be run against an organization's own clusters, with additional online reporting capabilities provided by Aqua Security.

  • Election Security Bill Without Paper Records and Risk Limiting Audits? No Way.

    The Senate is working on a bill to secure election infrastructure against cybersecurity threats, but, unless amended, it will widely miss the mark. The current text of the Secure Elections Act omits the two most effective measures that could secure our elections: paper records and automatic risk limiting audits.

    Cybersecurity threats by their very nature can be stealthy and ambiguous. A skillful attack can tamper with voting machines and then delete itself, making it impossible to prove after the fact that an election suffered interference. Paper records ensure that it is possible to detect and quickly correct for such interference. Automatic audits ensure that such detection actually happens.

  • Reproducible Builds: Weekly report #173

Debian GNU/Linux 9 "Stretch" Receives L1 Terminal Fault Mitigations, Update Now

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Debian

According to the security advisory published on Monday, the new kernel security update addresses both CVE-2018-3620 and CVE-2018-3646 vulnerabilities, which are known as L1 Terminal Fault (L1TF) or Foreshadow. These vulnerabilities had an impact on normal systems, as well as virtualized operating systems, allowing a local attacker to expose sensitive information from the host OS or other guests.

"Multiple researchers have discovered a vulnerability in the way the Intel processor designs have implemented speculative execution of instructions in combination with handling of page-faults. This flaw could allow an attacker controlling an unprivileged process to read memory from arbitrary (non-user controlled) addresses," reads today's security advisory.

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Rugged, sandwich-style Sitara SBC has optimized Linux stack

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Linux

Forlinx’s sandwich-style, industrial temp “OK5718-C” SBC runs Linux on a “FET5718-C” module with a Cortex-A15 based TI AM5718 SoC. Other features include SATA, HDMI, MIPI-CSI, USB 3.0, CAN, and mini-PCIe.

Forlinx Embedded Technology, the Chinese company behind Linux-friendly SBCs such as the TI Sitara AM3354 based OK335xS-II and
The Forlinx i.MX6 SBC, has posted details on a new OK5718-C SBC. Like the OK335xS-II, it’s a Sitara based board, in this case tapping TI’s single-core, Cortex-A15 based Sitara AM5718. Like the i.MX6 SBC, it’s a sandwich-style offering, with the separately available FET5718-C module hosting the up to 1.5GHz AM5718.

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RISC-V and NVIDIA

Filed under
Graphics/Benchmarks
Hardware
  • Open-Source RISC-V-Based SoC Platform Enlists Deep Learning Accelerator

    SiFive introduces what it’s calling the first open-source RISC-V-based SoC platform for edge inference applications based on NVIDIA's Deep Learning Accelerator (NVDLA) technology.

    A demo shown at the Hot Chips conference consists of NVDLA running on an FPGA connected via ChipLink to SiFive's HiFive Unleashed board powered by the Freedom U540, the first Linux-capable RISC-V processor. The complete SiFive implementation is suited for intelligence at the edge, where high-performance with improved power and area profiles are crucial. SiFive's silicon design capabilities and innovative business model enables a simplified path to building custom silicon on the RISC-V architecture with NVDLA.

  • SiFive Announces First Open-Source RISC-V-Based SoC Platform With NVIDIA Deep Learning Accelerator Technology

    SiFive, the leading provider of commercial RISC-V processor IP, today announced the first open-source RISC-V-based SoC platform for edge inference applications based on NVIDIA's Deep Learning Accelerator (NVDLA) technology.

    The demo will be shown this week at the Hot Chips conference and consists of NVDLA running on an FPGA connected via ChipLink to SiFive's HiFive Unleashed board powered by the Freedom U540, the world's first Linux-capable RISC-V processor. The complete SiFive implementation is well suited for intelligence at the edge, where high-performance with improved power and area profiles are crucial. SiFive's silicon design capabilities and innovative business model enables a simplified path to building custom silicon on the RISC-V architecture with NVDLA.

  • SiFive Announces Open-Source RISC-V-Based SoC Platform with Nvidia Deep Learning Accelerator Technology

    SiFive, a leading provider of commercial RISC-V processor IP, today announced the first open-source RISC-V-based SoC platform for edge inference applications based on NVIDIA’s Deep Learning Accelerator (NVDLA) technology.

    The demo will be shown this week at the Hot Chips conference and consists of NVDLA running on an FPGA connected via ChipLink to SiFive’s HiFive Unleashed board powered by the Freedom U540, the world’s first Linux-capable RISC-V processor. The complete SiFive implementation is well suited for intelligence at the edge, where high-performance with improved power and area profiles are crucial. SiFive’s silicon design capabilities and innovative business model enables a simplified path to building custom silicon on the RISC-V architecture with NVDLA.

  • NVIDIA Unveils The GeForce RTX 20 Series, Linux Benchmarks Should Be Coming

    NVIDIA CEO Jensen Huang has just announced the GeForce RTX 2080 series from his keynote ahead of Gamescom 2018 this week in Cologne, Germany.

  • NVIDIA have officially announced the GeForce RTX 2000 series of GPUs, launching September

    The GPU race continues on once again, as NVIDIA have now officially announced the GeForce RTX 2000 series of GPUs and they're launching in September.

    This new series will be based on their Turing architecture and their RTX platform. These new RT Cores will "enable real-time ray tracing of objects and environments with physically accurate shadows, reflections, refractions and global illumination." which sounds rather fun.

today's leftovers

Filed under
Misc

GNOME Shell, Mutter, and Ubuntu's GNOME Theme

Filed under
GNOME
Ubuntu

Benchmarks on GNU/Linux

Filed under
GNU
Graphics/Benchmarks
Linux
  • Linux vs. Windows Benchmark: Threadripper 2990WX vs. Core i9-7980XE Tested

    The last chess benchmark we’re going to look at is Crafty and again we’re measuring performance in nodes per second. Interestingly, the Core i9-7980XE wins out here and saw the biggest performance uplift when moving to Linux, a 5% performance increase was seen opposed to just 3% for the 2990WX and this made the Intel CPU 12% faster overall.

  • Which is faster, rsync or rdiff-backup?

    As our data grows (and some filesystems balloon to over 800GBs, with many small files) we have started seeing our night time backups continue through the morning, causing serious disk i/o problems as our users wake up and regular usage rises.

    For years we have implemented a conservative backup policy - each server runs the backup twice: once via rdiff-backup to the onsite server with 10 days of increments kept. A second is an rsync to our offsite backup servers for disaster recovery.

    Simple, I thought. I will change the rdiff-backup to the onsite server to use the ultra fast and simple rsync. Then, I'll use borgbackup to create an incremental backup from the onsite backup server to our off site backup servers. Piece of cake. And with each server only running one backup instead of two, they should complete in record time.

    Except, some how the rsync backup to the onsite backup server was taking almost as long as the original rdiff-backup to the onsite server and rsync backup to the offsite server combined. What? I thought nothing was faster than the awesome simplicity of rsync, especially compared to the ancient python-based rdiff-backup, which hasn't had an upstream release since 2009.

OSS Leftovers

Filed under
OSS
  • Haiku: R1/beta1 release plans - at last

    At last, R1/beta1 is nearly upon us. As I’ve already explained on the mailing list, only two non-“task” issues remain in the beta1 milestone, and I have prototype solutions for both. The buildbot and other major services have been rehabilitated and will need only minor tweaking to handle the new branch, and mmlr has been massaging the HaikuPorter buildmaster so that it, too, can handle the new branch, though that work is not quite finished yet.

  • Haiku OS R1 Beta Is Finally Happening In September

    It's been five years since the last Haiku OS alpha release for their inaugural "R1" release but next month it looks like this first beta will be released, sixteen years after this BeOS-inspired open-source operating system started development.

  • IBM Scores More POWER Open-Source Performance Optimizations

    Following our POWER9 Linux benchmarks earlier this year, IBM POWER engineers have continued exploring various areas for optimization within the interesting open-source workloads tested. Another batch of optimizations are pending for various projects.

  • DevConf.in 2018

    Earlier this month, I attended DevConf.in 2018 conference in Bengaluru, KA, India. It was sort of culmination of a cohesive team play that began for me at DevConf.cz 2018 in Brno, CZ. I say sort of because the team is already gearing up for DevConf.in 2019.

  • The Unitary Fund: a no-strings attached grant program for Open Source quantum computing

    Quantum computing has the potential to be a revolutionary technology. From the first applications in cryptography and database search to more modern quantum applications across simulation, optimization, and machine learning. This promise has led industrial, government, and academic efforts in quantum computing to grow globally. Posted jobs in the field have grown 6 fold in the last two years. Quantum computing hardware and platforms, designed by startups and tech giants alike, continue to improve. Now there are new opportunities to discover how to best program and use these new machines. As I wrote last year: the first quantum computers will need smart software.

    Quantum computing also remains a place where small teams and open research projects can make a big difference. The open nature is important as Open Source software has the lowest barriers  for others to understand, share and build upon existing projects. In a new field that needs to grow, this rapid sharing and development is especially important. I’ve experienced this myself through leading the Open Source Forest project at Rigetti Computing and also by watching the growing ecosystem of open projects like QISKit, OpenFermion, ProjectQ, Strawberry Fields, XaCC, Cirq, and many others. The hackathons and community efforts from around the world are inspiring.

  • SiFive Announces First Open-Source RISC-V-Based SoC Platform With NVIDIA Deep Learning Accelerator Technology

    SiFive, the leading provider of commercial RISC-V processor IP, today announced the first open-source RISC-V-based SoC platform for edge inference applications based on NVIDIA's Deep Learning Accelerator (NVDLA) technology.

Programming: FOAAS, Jenkins 2, LLVM 6/7 and New Patches

Filed under
Development
  • rfoaas 2.0.0: Updated and extended

    FOAAS upstream recently went to release 2.0.0, so here we are catching up bringing you all the new accessors from FOAAS 2.0.0: bag(), equity(), fts(), ing(), particular(), ridiculous(), and shit(). We also added off_with() which was missing previously. Documentation and tests were updated. The screenshot shows an example of the new functions.

  • Introduction to writing pipelines-as-code and implementing DevOps with Jenkins 2

    One of the key ideas of DevOps is infrastructure-as-code—having the infrastructure for your delivery/deployment pipeline expressed in code—just as the products that flow it.

  • Intel's Beignet OpenCL Driver Updated To Work With LLVM 6/7

    Intel stopped developing their Beignet open-source Linux OpenCL driver in February to concentrate all efforts now around their new Intel OpenCL NEO platform. But commits landed today with a few improvements for those still using Beignet.

    Independent contributor to the Beignet OpenCL stack Rebecca Palmer submitted a number of patches recently that were added to mainline Beignet, the first commits to this OpenCL library since early February.

  • Security updates for Monday

What Does "Ethical" AI Mean for Open Source?

Filed under
OSS
Sci/Tech

It would be an understatement to say that artificial intelligence (AI) is much in the news these days. It's widely viewed as likely to usher in the next big step-change in computing, but a recent interesting development in the field has particular implications for open source. It concerns the rise of "ethical" AI.

In October 2016, the White House Office of Science and Technology Policy, the European Parliament's Committee on Legal Affairs and, in the UK, the House of Commons' Science and Technology Committee, all released reports on how to prepare for the future of AI, with ethical issues being an important component of those reports. At the beginning of last year, the Asilomar AI Principles were published, followed by the Montreal Declaration for a Responsible Development of Artificial Intelligence, announced in November 2017.

Abstract discussions of what ethical AI might or should mean became very real in March 2018. It was revealed then that Google had won a share of the contract for the Pentagon's Project Maven, which uses artificial intelligence to interpret huge quantities of video images collected by aerial drones in order to improve the targeting of subsequent drone strikes. When this became known, it caused a firestorm at Google. Thousands of people there signed an internal petition addressed to the company's CEO, Sundar Pichai, asking him to cancel the project. Hundreds of researchers and academics sent an open letter supporting them, and some Google employees resigned in protest.

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SUSE is Still Working for Microsoft

Filed under
Microsoft
SUSE

Red Hat Leftovers

Filed under
Red Hat
  • Kubernetes on Metal with OpenShift

    My first concert was in the mid-80s, when AC/DC came to the Providence Civic Center in Rhode Island, and it was glorious. Music fans who grew up in the 80s will fondly remember the birth of MTV, the emergence of the King of Pop and the heyday of rock-n-roll’s heavy metal gone mainstream era, when long hair and guitar riffs both flowed freely. So recently when Def Leppard joined Journey at Fenway Park in Boston for their 2018 joint tour, I knew I had to be there.

    Metal also dominated the datacenter in the 80s and 90s, as mainframes and minicomputers made way for bare-metal servers running enterprise applications on UNIX and, soon after, open source Linux operating systems powered by Red Hat. Just like heavy metal eventually made way for the angst-filled grunge rock era of the 90s, so too did application provisioning on bare metal make way for the era of virtualization driven by VMWare – with subsequent VM sprawl and costly ELAs creating much angst to this day for many IT organizations.

  • Security Technologies: Stack Smashing Protection (StackGuard)

    In our previous blog, we saw how arbitrary code execution resulting from stack-buffer overflows can be partly mitigated by marking segments of memory as non-executable, a technology known as Execshield. However stack-buffer overflow exploits can still effectively overwrite the function return address, which leads to several interesting exploitation techniques like ret2libc, ret2gets, and ret2plt. With all of these methods, the function return address is overwritten and attacker controlled code is executed when the program control transfers to overwritten address on the stack.

  • Keeping both of your OpenShift Container Platforms Highly Available with Keepalived and HAproxy

    Until Kubernetes Federation hits the prime time, a number of solutions have sprung up as stop gaps to address geographically dispersing multiple cluster endpoints: stretch clusters and multiple clusters across multiple datacenters. The following article discusses how to configure Keepalived for maximum uptime of HAproxy with multiple cluster endpoints. In the following documentation an HAproxy and Keepalived configuration will be discussed in detail to load balance to the cluster(s) endpoints.

    In a production environment a Global server load balancing (GSLB) or Global Traffic Manager (GTM) would be used to give a differing IP address based on the originating location of the request. This would help to ensure traffic from Virginia or New York would get the closest location to the originating request.

  • How to integrate A-MQ 6.3 on Red Hat JBoss EAP 7
  • The Open Brand Project | The helpful guy in the red hat.

    A big part of the Red Hat Open Brand Project has been looking back at our past and examining our roots. It is important that we imbue the new symbol with as much shared meaning from our history and culture as possible. To represent ourselves, we have to understand our origins.

    Before there was Shadowman, before there was a red fedora, before we were an enterprise technology company, and before we helped make open source a driving force of technology innovation, we had our name.

  • October 19th Options Now Available For Red Hat (RHT)
  • Decentralize common Fedora apps with Cjdns

    Are you worried about a few huge corporations controlling the web? Don’t like censorship on centralized social media sites like facebook and twitter? You need to decentralize! The internet was designed to be decentralized. Many common activities, from social media to email to voice calls, don’t actually require a centralized service.

    The basic requirement for any peer to peer application is that the peers be able to reach each other. This is impossible today for most people using IP4 behind NAT (as with most household routers). The IP4 address space was exhausted over a decade ago. Most people are in “IP4 NAT Jail.”

    Your device is assigned a private IP, and translated to the public IP by the router. Without port forwarding to a specific private IP, incoming TCP connections or UDP sessions can’t tell where to forward to, and are dropped. As a result, nothing can connect to your device. You must connect to various public servers to do anything. IP4 NAT Jail forces centralization.

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Android Leftovers

Mozilla on Fellows, Software Patents and Volunteer Add-on

  • Mozilla Announces 26 New Fellows in Openness, Science, and Tech Policy
    These technologists, activists, and scientists will spend the next 10 to 12 months creating a more secure, inclusive, and decentralized internet A neuroscientist building open-source hardware. A competition expert studying net neutrality enforcement in Nigeria. A technologist studying tools that combat disinformation. These are just three of Mozilla’s latest Fellows — 26 technologists, activists, and scientists from more than 10 countries. Today, we’re announcing our 2018-2019 cohort of Fellows, who begin work on September 1, 2018.
  • AV1 and the Video Wars of 2027
    Author’s Note: This post imagines a dystopian future for web video, if we continue to rely on patented codecs to transmit media files. What if one company had a perpetual monopoly on those patents? How could it limit our access to media and culture? The premise of this cautionary tale is grounded in fact. However, the future scenario is fiction, and the entities and events portrayed are not intended to represent real people, companies, or events.
  • Volunteer Add-on Reviewer Applications Open
    Thousands of volunteers around the world contribute to Mozilla projects in a variety of capacities, and extension review is one of them. Reviewers check extensions submitted to addons.mozilla.org (AMO) for their safety, security, and adherence to Mozilla’s Add-on Policies. Last year, we paused onboarding new volunteer extension reviewers while we updated the add-on policies and review processes to address changes introduced by the transition to the WebExtensions API and the new post-review process.

Games Leftovers

  • The Linux version of Graveyard Keeper is now available on GOG
    Need to hide a few bodies? Graveyard Keeper is now available for Linux on GOG after being missed at the release. It was actually added a day or so after the initial release. Sometimes the Linux version is missing when a game is released on GOG, as the Linux team at GOG discover issues in it. The game did indeed have some pressing issues at release, a fair few have been fixed now so it is quite a bit better.
  • Life is Strange 2 officially revealed with a new trailer
    While we don't yet know about Linux support, I will honestly be shocked if Feral Interactive didn't port Life is Strange 2. Especially since they ported the original to Linux and are currently porting Before the Storm which is a little delayed.
  • The Jackbox Party Pack 5 now has a Steam page and it's going to release with Linux support
    Currently scheduled to release "Fall 2018", The Jackbox Party Pack 5 is the latest pack of crazy party games from Jackbox Games, Inc. and it should be coming out with Linux support.
  • Combat helicopters are coming to War Thunder in the next update
    Gaijin Entertainment have announced that combat helicopters are coming to War Thunder [Steam, Official Site] along with a teaser trailer.
  • The action RPG Underworld Ascendant is now releasing in November
    The action RPG Underworld Ascendant [Official Site] from OtherSide Entertainment is now going to release on November 15th and they have a new trailer. They previously said it would be September, so hopefully the extra time will make it a better game. Last we heard from them, they were still planning Linux support although they didn't have a specific date nailed down for the Linux version just yet, so do keep that in mind.
  • Bloodstained: Ritual of the Night delayed again, this time until 2019
    Not for the first time, Bloodstained: Ritual of the Night has been delayed and will now launch in 2019. Writing in a Kickstarter update, they confirmed it's to increase the quality of the game as a whole after they gathered feedback from a special backer demo. Delays sadly happen and if we can get a decent game out of this then I will be happy. Hopefully it will give them time to ensure the Linux version is nicely polished too. The Vita version was cancelled along with this announcement.
  • Die for Valhalla! is an action RPG that has you possess enemies and objects
    A supernatural Valkyrie with the ability to possess things, what could possibly go wrong? Go ahead and Die for Valhalla! Released back at the end of May with full Linux support, Die for Valhalla! offers an action-RPG with single-player and local co-op options for up to four people.
  • BATTLETECH has an expansion named FLASHPOINT coming out this November
    Even though they still haven't managed to get the Linux version out yet, Harebrained Schemes and Paradox Interactive have announced the FLASHPOINT expansion for BATTLETECH. As a reminder, we spoke to the developer earlier this month about the Linux version which they do hope to release soon.