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Thursday, 28 Jul 16 - Tux Machines is a community-driven public service/news site which has been around for over a decade and primarily focuses on GNU/LinuxSubscribe now Syndicate content

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Type Title Authorsort icon Replies Last Post
Story Android Leftovers Roy Schestowitz 18/07/2016 - 9:50am
Story Fedora News Roy Schestowitz 18/07/2016 - 9:51am
Story today's leftovers Roy Schestowitz 18/07/2016 - 9:53am
Story Canonical and Proprietary Forums Software (Again Cracked) Roy Schestowitz 18/07/2016 - 4:28pm
Story Games for GNU/Linux Roy Schestowitz 19/07/2016 - 3:18am
Story OSS Leftovers Roy Schestowitz 19/07/2016 - 3:57am
Story Enter new tool for newbie: Handy Linux Roy Schestowitz 19/07/2016 - 4:00am
Story Qt WebBrowser 1.0 Roy Schestowitz 19/07/2016 - 4:20am
Story Linux Kernel/Graphics Roy Schestowitz 19/07/2016 - 4:26am
Story Security News Roy Schestowitz 19/07/2016 - 4:47am

My kids Top 6 Linux games

Filed under
Gaming

bapoumba.wordpress: We are leaving for a short vacation week, I’ve been begged not to leave my laptops at home. Here are the reasons why:

openSUSE Weekly News, Issue 18

Filed under
SUSE

opensuse.org: Issue #18 of openSUSE Weekly News is now out. In this issue: openSUSE Project Releases Major Update to openSUSE Build Service, Counting down to 11.0 - Get your counter here, and Tips and Tricks: Colored shell.

Memory Corruption Bug Solved, 2.6.25 Expected Today

Filed under
Linux

kerneltrap.org: "Finally found it ... the patch below solves the sparsemem crash and the test system boots up fine now," announced Ingo Molnar. He described the patch as fixing a "memory corruption and crash on 32-bit x86 systems."

Reiser Prosecutor to Jurors: 'You Know He Killed Her'

Filed under
Reiser

blog.wired.com: The prosecutor in the Hans Reiser murder trial on Wednesday continued for a second day to poke at Linux programmer Hans Reiser's defense to accusations he murdered his wife two years ago.

Free Open Source Software Is Costing Vendors $60 Billion

Filed under
OSS

PR: "Open Source software is raising havoc throughout the software market. It is the ultimate in disruptive technology, it represents a real loss of $60 billion in annual revenues to software companies."

Novell CEO: Linux for the consumer desktop will take years

Filed under
SUSE

infoworld.com: Ronald Hovsepian acknowledges that Novell's Suse Linux will be slow to catch on in the consumer realm as the market needs several years to grow and mature.

Firefox 2.0.0.14 now available for download

Filed under
Moz/FF

mozilla.org: As part of Mozilla Corporation’s ongoing stability and security update process, Firefox 2.0.0.14 is now available for Windows, Mac, and Linux. We strongly recommend that all Firefox users upgrade.

The 7 Habits of Highly Effective Linux Users

Filed under
Linux

hehe2.net: Switching to Linux can be very daunting, most seasoned Linux users experienced that first hand. After all, at some point they were also “noobs”. Over here I compiled a list of 7 habits that I feel someone has told me when I started out.

Why Mac OS X Sucks and Linux Rocks

Filed under
Linux
Mac

junauza.com: As some of you may know, I had my very first taste of Mac a few weeks ago. I got a Macbook Pro (Penryn) which comes with the standard OS X Leopard. But for the sake of sanity, I immediately installed Linux.

some howtos:

Filed under
HowTos
  • Howto: Create TTY User to view logs via TTY in Ubuntu Linux

  • HowTo: Copy and Paste A Text File into Another Text File via Terminal
  • Tips and tricks: How do I capture the output of “top” to a file?
  • Mounting archives with FUSE and archivemount
  • Hidden Linux : VirtualBox
  • Mandriva : HOWTO add easily officials and third parties repos
  • Fun with Conky, part 3
  • Block Bad IP Ranges with iplist in Ubuntu Linux
  • Tertiary menu in Drupal

Mandriva One 2008.1 and old laptop: alas ....

Filed under
MDV

seputarlinux.blogspot: Several months ago, I had a chance to try running the live cd version of Mandriva One (version 2008) on my old laptop. At that time I was very impressed, it was beautiful, very user-friendly and everything just worked flawlessly. So when Mandriva One 2008.1 Spring was out several days ago, I was very excited.

BeleniX 0.7 OpenSolaris Desktop

Filed under
OS

phoronix.com: Long before Sun's Project Indiana came about, BeleniX has been one of our favorite GNU/Solaris distributions. BeleniX has been a LiveCD based upon OpenSolaris, but with yesterday's release of BeleniX 0.7 it is now a source-level derivative of the Project Indiana blend of OpenSolaris. Today we're taking a quick look at this new release.

Tips & Tricks from PCLinuxOS Forum

Filed under
PCLOS

pclinuxos2007.blogspot: Visiting PCLinuxOS Forum has been one of my hobbies. It updates my linux computing skills by providing me with the most practical solutions. Here is a list of some important tips and tricks directly from PCLinuxOS Forum.

Linux for Grandma - Part III, Finale

Filed under
Linux

technocrat.net: It has been a few months since I have set my 83-year old grandmother with a desktop PC running Kubuntu 7.10. I configured everything in advance. I gave her some basic training on the things she will do regularly.

A Salute to Ubuntu Volunteers

Filed under
Ubuntu

tycheent.wordpress: Recently, on another site, someone suggested that the development and marketing of Ubuntu was done by paid staff of Canonical. Having been actively involved in the Arizona Team for 8 months I would like to say that I consider such a comment to be FUD fostered for the sole purpose of disparaging against Ubuntu and the people that make it work.

Emulation station: GP2X F-200 gaming handheld reviewed

Filed under
Hardware
Gaming

arstechnica.com: For the uninitiated, the GP2X is a line of handheld, personal entertainment players manufactured by a South Korean company called GamePark Holdings. We're reviewing the latest version, the GP2X F-200. The GP2X F-200 offers an open source, multifunctional, alternative to the proprietary handheld systems currently offered at retail in North America.

Asus Eee 900 to hit shelves on 1 May

Filed under
Linux
Hardware

news.zdnet: The second version of Asus' low-cost subnotebook, the Eee PC, will go on sale on 1 May. The Eee 900, which will come with an operating-system choice of Linux or Windows, will cost £329. The Linux version will have 20GB of solid-state storage on-board.

Also: ASUS Eee PC 900 review roundup

Review: Dream Linux 3.0 - Is It Really A Dream?

Filed under
Linux

adventuresinopensource.blogspot: Today's victim... sorry guest is the Brazilian distribution Dream Linux 3.0, a Debian-based distro I'd heard quite a bit about but never actually used. After a while out of the game would I still remember how to do this? Well, I'll leave that up to you to judge but here's how I got on...

Ubuntu takes early lead in Open Source Census

Filed under
OSS

community.zdnet: Ninety percent of participants have Ubuntu, and about half are in the US (with an impressive and results-bending 33 percent from Finland). Two thirds of them are small businesses (ten to 49 people).

Ubuntu Linux upgrade: Why you should try it

Filed under
Ubuntu

computerworlduk.com: If there is a single complaint that is laid at the feet of Linux time and time again, it's that the operating system is too complicated and arcane for casual computer users to tolerate. Ubuntu, the user-friendly distribution sponsored by Mark Shuttleworth's Canonical, has made a mission out of dispelling such complaints entirely.

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Fork YOU! Sure, take the code. Then what?

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