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About Tux Machines

Wednesday, 29 Mar 17 - Tux Machines is a community-driven public service/news site which has been around for over a decade and primarily focuses on GNU/LinuxSubscribe now Syndicate content

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Quick Roundup

Type Title Authorsort icon Replies Last Post
Story Leftovers: Ubuntu Roy Schestowitz 12/04/2016 - 9:39am
Story Under the Hood of Hadoop: Its Journey from Open Source to Self-Service (and more from Hadoop Summitt 2016) Roy Schestowitz 12/04/2016 - 9:47am
Story Containers News Roy Schestowitz 12/04/2016 - 9:51am
Story FreeBsd Vs OpenBsd Roy Schestowitz 12/04/2016 - 10:45am
Story Leftovers: OSS Roy Schestowitz 12/04/2016 - 11:15am
Story Android Leftovers Roy Schestowitz 12/04/2016 - 11:16am
Story Linux/Kernel News Roy Schestowitz 12/04/2016 - 11:22am
Story today's leftovers Roy Schestowitz 12/04/2016 - 11:24am
Story The creators of Linux’s I/O stack just raised $40M for their new storage startup Roy Schestowitz 12/04/2016 - 5:14pm
Story Wine 1.8.2 Roy Schestowitz 12/04/2016 - 5:49pm

Desktop Linux - Felicia Failed in My Office

Filed under
Linux

pclinuxos2007.blogspot: After much discussion my CEO agreed to deploy Linux in our Content Department. Next, the issue on the table was which distribution to deploy.

MSFT vs TomTom: The Q&A

redmonk.com: While it’s true that you hear it here last, generally, a week is a bit much, even for me. But as we’re still fielding questions about the news that Microsoft had filed a complaint over alleged infringed patents against TomTom, Dutch manufacturer of navigation systems, it seems necessary to comment.

Ubuntu is based on Debian unstable

Filed under
Ubuntu

mdzlog.wordpress: From time to time, I see someone remark that Ubuntu uses packages from Debian unstable, and that they don’t think this is a very good idea. I would like to explain why we do this and how it works, and hope that this will enable a less one-sided view of the subject.

Open source microbloggers you should follow

Filed under
OSS

tuxradar.com: If you're a fan of Identi.ca or Twitter and want to follow the alpha geeks of the free sofware world, we've put together a list of people to make it easy for you to find them.

Three Easy Steps to Set-up Anonymous Web Browsing on Linux

Filed under
HowTos

junauza.com: This simple guide will enable you to surf the web anonymously while using Firefox on Linux. But to do this, you will need to install these two important tools.

Qimo, Linux 4 Kids

Filed under
Linux

reddevil62-techhead.blogspot: WHAT is a good age to introduce children to Linux/Free Open Source Software? My children are nine, and they regularly use FOSS without actually realising it or, I suspect, caring.

When the Linux missionaries come a-callin

Filed under
Linux

linuxgeeksunited.blogspot: No one is a bigger fan of Linux more than I. I am sold on it lock, stock and barrel. However, There is liking Linux, encouraging people to try Linux and then there are the Linux missionaries for whom Linux has become a religion.

Freedom vs. Control

Filed under
OSS

mr-oss.com: The lack of Linux tools which can modify enterprise wide linux deployments is helping to slow it's adoption. Linux philosophy is based around freedom from the control. The control is in the hands of the user and the enterprise administer is left out in the cold.

U.S. Schools: Not Ready For Linux

Filed under
Linux

beginlinux.wordpress: US schools are not yet ready for Linux. Yes sad to say, it is not because they can’t do Linux or don’t need a feasible, safe and renewable source for technology. US schools are not ready to accept Linux because they don’t feel the need.

How to run a successful Linux User Group

Filed under
Linux

techradar.com: If there was one thing Linux Format magazine learned from the Readers' Round Table event it organised, it was that us Linux folk like to get out and have a good chat.

How To Run Fully-Virtualized Guests (HVM) With Xen 3.2 On Debian Lenny (x86_64)

Filed under
HowTos

This guide explains how you can set up fully-virtualized guests (HVM) with Xen 3.2 on a Debian Lenny x86_64 host system. HVM stands for HardwareVirtualMachine; to set up such guests, you need a CPU that supports hardware virtualization (Intel VT or AMD-V).

today's leftovers

Filed under
News
  • Fedora 11 preview

  • Become a Linux command line black-belt
  • FLOSS Weekly 59: TuxPaint
  • 5 Minutes of World of Goo
  • PAM hell starts to freeze
  • Bandits: Phoenix Rising Finally Gets A New Beta
  • What the *, Firefox?
  • Drupalcon: Drupal Adds Install Tools, Support
  • Tykes Need Linux Too
  • NVIDIA Releases 180.37 Linux Display Driver

few more howtos:

Filed under
HowTos
  • Ubuntu Tweak 0.4.6

  • Analyzing boot performance of OpenSuse 11.1 with bootchart
  • How to Tunnel Web Traffic with SSH Secure Shell
  • Howto Setup Wireless on a Fujitsu Siemens Li 2727 notebook
  • Debian Lenny Minimal Desktop
  • How to use a WiFi interface
  • Debugging Wifi on Ubuntu Linux
  • Ubuntu-Change Icon Size
  • Lenny Laptop: Wifi Setup

Improved Linux Screen Space Management With PekWM

Filed under
Software

oreilly.com: With the growing popularity of netbooks more and more people are using small screens which support lower resolutions. The challenge for those who do a great deal of multitasking and tend to have lots of windows open is finding a good way to manage them on a small screen.

Why Do You Use Linux?

Filed under
Linux

linuxloop.com: At some point, nearly everyone who uses Linux has someone ask them “what’s that?” This question almost invariably leads to “why is it better than <other operating system>?” What do you say?

In defence of Ubuntu against old school hackers

Filed under
Ubuntu

seemanta.wordpress: I have been using Ubuntu since version 5.04 came out. And let me add, this is the damnest Linux distro out there today !! I was a Debian devotee but after 4 years of Ubuntu, now I am a born-again Ubuntu convert.

From the End of the Beginning to the Beginning of the End

Filed under
OSS

opensource.org: When Eric Raymond posted the first of the Halloween Documents in 1998, it marked the end of the beginning for open source. That is to say those documents demonstrated that the logical superiority of the open source development model had penetrated the most headstrong corporate skull in the proprietary software universe: Microsoft.

Ubuntu: Community for Human beings

Filed under
Ubuntu

doctormo.wordpress: The ubuntu community is one of the most enjoyable I’ve ever been a part of, it has a much more diverse set of people and ideas than other development communities, but retains a strict sense of community and togetherness.

Also: The ubuntuforums are ::evil::

Who should Software Freedom sue on FAT32?

Filed under
Microsoft
OSS
Legal

blogs.zdnet.com: Microsoft owns FAT32, but it didn’t appear to pursue its rights. Until the TomTom case. At which point Jeremy Allison of Samba says Microsoft had secret cross-licensing deals with all those other guys which violate the GPL. So who should Software Freedom sue?

Review of Exherbo Linux (From A User’s Perspective)

Filed under
Linux

halffull.org: Exherbo is a Linux distribution led by a small team of opinionated developers. It’s lean, to say the least, but when they give you a solution for something you can believe it’s well engineered and that it does that task well - nothing more.

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Games and Emulation

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Koozali SME Server 8.2 Reaches End of Life on March 31, Upgrade to Koozali SME 9

Koozali Foundation, through Terry Fage, announced the availability of a final set of updates for the Koozali SME Server 8.2 operating system, which will reach end of life this week. Patching some of the reported bugs, the new packages released today for Koozali SME Server 8.2 are e-smith-ibays-2.2.0-16.el5.sme.noarch.rpm, e-smith-manager-2.2.0-14.el5.sme.noarch.rpm, smeserver-clamav-2.2.0-15.el5.sme.noarch.rpm, smeserver-locale-*-2.2.0-56.el5.sme.noarch.rpm, and smeserver-yum-2.2.0-26.el5.sme.noarch.rpm. Read more

Development News

  • GCC for New Contributors
    I’m a relative newcomer to GCC, so I thought it was worth documenting some of the hurdles I ran into when I started working on GCC, to try to make it easier for others to start hacking on GCC. Hence this guide.
  • #1: Easy Package Registration
    Last month, Brian Ripley announced on r-devel that registration of routines would now be tested for by R CMD check in r-devel (which by next month will become R 3.4.0). A NOTE will be issued now, this will presumably turn into a WARNING at some point. Writing R Extensions has an updated introduction) of the topic.
  • Emacs as C IDE and JHBuild
    Although Builder clearly is The Future as GNOME IDE, I still all my coding in Emacs, mostly because I have been using it for such a long time that my brain is to all the shortcuts and workflows. But Emacs can be a good IDE too. The most obvious everyday features that I want from an IDE are good source code navigation and active assistance while editing. In the first category are tasks like jumping to symbol's definition, find all callers of a function and such things. For editing, auto-completion, immediate warnings and error reporting, semantic-aware re-factoring are a must. Specifically for GNOME related development, I need all this to also work with JHBuild.