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Tuesday, 25 Oct 16 - Tux Machines is a community-driven public service/news site which has been around for over a decade and primarily focuses on GNU/LinuxSubscribe now Syndicate content

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Quick Roundup

Building tomorrow's open source leaders

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Matt Asay: I bumped into Rick Statile, counsel for Red Hat, while in line at Passport Control at London's Gatwick Airport on Sunday. In the course of our conversation Rick mentioned something that I hadn't considered: What happens once you've hired all the open source advocates?

Day 1 With Fedora 7

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Just Another Tech Blog: Installing Fedora was very straight forward. After choosing my default language and keyboard layout, I was met with some partitioning options. Opting for a "custom setup", the partitioner that the Fedora installer provides leaves little to be desired for a basic install.

Granular Linux - What Am I Missing?

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Granular Linux is a Linux distribution based on PCLinuxOS and features the XFCE4 and KDE desktops. It appears to have been in development since about the beginning of 2007 and has had one previous release. The developers of Granular have recently released a test of their upcoming .90 and I thought I'd see what it offered.

Clubbing baby Linux penguins

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Groklaw: If you're clubbing baby seals into a bloody pulp, for example, I can't hear your justifications. You can talk about needing to make a living and how this is how it's always been done, but all I'm thinking is, there is nothing you can say that will make me like you for this. Similarly, when Microsoft joined the SCO "you must pay me forever for my precious IP" club, made up of companies that don't know enough not to club baby Linux penguins, the world said, Ewww.

Ubuntu advances its mobile and embedded project

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desktoplinux: Following two months of planning, Canonical Ltd. has updated the Ubuntu Mobile and Embedded (UME) project's architecture roadmap. UME aims to create a version of the popular Ubuntu desktop Linux OS tailored to the requirements of Intel-based "mobile Internet devices" (MIDs), expected in 2008.

Five great games in Fedora

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Red Hat Mag: Did you know that there are over 150 free games available in Fedora? Next time your weekend plans are spoiled by rain, download a couple of these games instead. You can get all of them through the Add/Remove Software utility in your Applications menu.

No Penguins On Today’s Safari?

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talk bmc: Moments ago Apple announced that Windows users can now download and run their popular Safari web browser. That's right, more Apple software on Windows boxes. Safari is a pretty cool browser, and I do use it on my MacBook Pro. But where's my Safari for Linux? Why wasn't today's announcement about open sourcing Safari?

What the Microsoft/Xandros deal means for Linux

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linux-watch: Microsoft and Linux distributor Xandros on June 4 signed a broad set of collaboration and patent agreements that reminded many of the November 2006 Microsoft/Novell partnership. What do analysts and other Linux vendors think this new deal means for Linux?


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Newsvine: People have been arguing about which Linux desktop environment is better for years. However, we need a "rational" way to decide. So, I've put together a list of things to compare the two.

Achieving Openness: a closer look at ODF & OOXML

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Sam Hiser: An open, XML-based standard for displaying and storing data files (text documents, spreadsheets, and presentations) offers a new and promising approach to data storage and document exchange among office applications. A comparison of the two XML-based formats – OpenDocument Format (“ODF”) and Office Open XML (“OOXML”) – across widely accepted “openness” criteria has revealed substantial differences.

Also: Open Source vs. Proprietary -- Category Perspective

Set the shell prompt and themes in Linux /UNIX Terminal

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Most of us work with a shell prompt. By default most Linux distro displays hostname and current working directory as a prompt. You can easily customize your prompt to display information important to you. You change look and feel by adding colors.

switching to PCLINUX from UBUNTU week 2

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fos-softwares: I am now into my second week of using PCLINUX 2007 (PCLOS) and I am really enjoying it. My biggest problem has been finding a podcast client.

Howto: Sun Java Web Start on Fedora 7

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/home/liquidat: I recently faced the problem of using a java web start application on my machine and wasn’t sure how to do this. It is a small fix others might want to know as well.

Preparations begin for Reiser trial

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InsideBayArea: A courtroom for the murder trial of Hans Reiser was assigned Monday but opening statements aren't slated to begin for several weeks.

Linux Game Review: Nexuiz

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Raiden's Realm: Nexuiz is a 3d first person shooter (FPS) done in the old Quake 1 style of gameplay where graphics weren't as important as was the raw fun of pure deathmatch play. Nexuiz has recaptured that spirit of the original FPS games and worked to improve it to a level equal to or greater than today's best shooters.

Using the Navigator to get around in an OpenOffice Calc spreadsheet

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HowTos Training, Tips, and Ideas: I've been talking about using the Navigator in Writer. Here are a few ways to use the Navigator in Calc spreadsheets.

Lunch break diversions: PONG! Multiplayer and Lost Labyrinth

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Gaming Sometimes the simplest game can be every bit as addictive and fun as monster games like Halo 3 or Gears of War. This is probably the reason why games like Pong still remain popular to this day and continue to inspire developers. While there are probably hundreds of versions of Pong-inspired games out there, one that will appeal to hardcore Pong fans and casual players alike is PONG! Multiplayer, a Firefox extension that allows you to indulge in Pong without leaving the comfort of your favorite browser.

KDE Commit-Digest for 10th June 2007

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In this week's KDE Commit-Digest: Umbrello gets a code generator for the D programming language. Further work in Plasma. Initial work to allow the Dolphin file view component to be embedded into Konqueror. More work in the KOrganizer Calendar and KRDC Summer of Code projects, with the start of the Icon Cache, TextTool Plugins in KOffice and Kopete Messenger update projects.

Linus Torvalds remains doubtful on GPL3

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infomatics: Linux creator Linus Torvalds remains sceptical about the upcoming third version of the general public licence (GPLv3). "I still think GPLv2 is simply the better licence," Torvalds wrote in a posting to the Linux Kernel Developer mailing list on Sunday.

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More in Tux Machines

today's howtos

Leftovers: KDE


  • 4 Useful Cinnamon Desktop Applets
    The Cinnamon desktop environment is incredibly popular, and for good reason. Out of the box it offers a clean, fast and well configured desktop experience. But that doesn’t mean that you can’t make it a little better with a few nifty extras. And that’s where Cinnamon Applets come in. Like Unity’s Indicator Applets and GNOME Extensions, Cinnamon Applets let you add additional functionality to your desktop quickly and easily.
  • GNOME Core Apps Hackfest
    The hackfest is aimed to raise the standard of the overall core experience in GNOME, this includes the core apps like Documents, Files, Music, Photos and Videos, etc. In particular, we want to identify missing features and sore points that needs to be addressed and the interaction between apps and the desktop. Making the core apps push beyond the limits of the framework and making them excellent will not only be helpful for the GNOME desktop experience, but also for 3rd party apps, where we will implement what they are missing and also serve as an example of what an app could be.
  • This Week in GTK+ – 21
    In this last week, the master branch of GTK+ has seen 335 commits, with 13631 lines added and 37699 lines removed.

Leftovers: OSS and Sharing

  • Puppet Unveils New Docker Build and Phased Deployments
    Puppet released a number of announcements today including the availability of Puppet Docker Image Build and a new version of Puppet Enterprise, which features phased deployments and situational awareness. In April, Puppet began helping people deploy and manage things like Docker, Kubernetes, Mesosphere, and CoreOS. Now the shift is helping people manage the services that are running on top of those environments.
  • 9 reasons not to install Nagios in your company
  • Top 5 Reasons to Love Kubernetes
    At LinuxCon Europe in Berlin I gave a talk about Kubernetes titled "Why I love Kubernetes? Top 10 reasons." The response was great, and several folks asked me to write a blog about it. So here it is, with the first five reasons in this article and the others to follow. As a quick introduction, Kubernetes is "an open-source system for automating deployment, scaling and management of containerized applications" often referred to as a container orchestrator.
  • Website-blocking attack used open-source software
    Mirai gained notoriety after the Krebs attack because of the bandwidth it was able to generate — a record at well over 600 gigabits a second, enough to send the English text of Wikipedia three times in two seconds. Two weeks later, the source code for Mirai was posted online for free.
  • Alibaba’s Blockchain Email Repository Gains Technology from Chinese Open Source Startup
    Onchain, an open-source blockchain based in Shanghai, will provide technology for Alibaba’s first blockchain supported email evidence repository. Onchain allows fast re-constructions for public, permissioned (consortium) or private blockchains and will eventually enable interoperability among these modes. Its consortium chain product, the Law Chain, will provide technology for Ali Cloud, Alibaba’s computing branch. Ali Cloud has integrated Onchain’s Antshares blockchain technology to provide an enterprise-grade email repository. Onchain provides the bottom-layer framework for Ali Cloud, including its open-source blockchain capabilities, to enable any company to customize its own enterprise-level blockchain.
  • Netflix on Firefox for Linux
    If you're a Firefox user and you're a little fed up with going to Google Chrome every time in order to watch Netflix on your Linux machine, the good news is since Firefox 49 landed, HTML5 DRM (through the Google Widevine CDM (Content Decryption Manager) plugin) is now supported. Services that use DRM for HTML5 media should now just work, such as Amazon Prime Video. Unfortunately, the Netflix crew haven't 'flicked a switch' yet behind the scenes for Firefox on Linux, meaning if you run Netflix in the Mozilla browser at the moment, you'll likely just come across the old Silverlight error page. But there is a workaround. For some reason, Netflix still expects Silverlight when it detects the user is running Firefox, despite the fact that the latest Firefox builds for Linux now support the HTML5 DRM plugin.
  • IBM Power Systems solution for EnterpriseDB Postgres Advanced Server
    The primary focus of this article is on the use, configuration, and optimization of PostgreSQL and EnterpriseDB Postgres Advanced Server running on the IBM® Power Systems™ servers featuring the new IBM POWER8® processor technology. Note: The Red Hat Enterprise Linux (RHEL) 7.2 operating system was used. The scope of this article is to provide information on how to build and set up of PostgreSQL database from open source and also install and configure EnterpriseDB Postgres Advanced Server on an IBM Power® server for better use. EnterpriseDB Postgres Advanced Server on IBM Power Systems running Linux® is based on the open source database, PostgreSQL, and is capable of handling a wide variety of high-transaction and heavy-reporting workloads.
  • Valgrind 3.12 Released With More Improvements For Memory Debugging/Checking
  • [Valgrind] Release 3.12.0 (20 October 2016)
  • Chain Launches Open Source Developer Platform [Ed: If it’s openwashing, then no doubt Microsoft is involved]
  • LLVM Still Looking At Migration To GitHub
    For the past number of months the LLVM project has been considering a move from their SVN-based development process to Git with a focus on GitHub. That effort continues moving forward.
  • Lumina Desktop 1.1 Released With File Manager Improvements
    Lumina is a lightweight Qt-based desktop environment for BSD and Linux. We show you what's new in its latest release, and how you can install it on Ubuntu.
  • Study: Administrations unaware of IT vendor lock-in
    Public policy makers in Sweden have limited insight on how IT project can lead to IT vendor lock-in, a study conducted for the Swedish Competition Authority shows. “An overwhelming majority of the IT projects conducted by schools and public sector organisations refer to specific software without considering lock-in and different possible negative consequences”, the authors conclude.
  • How open access content helps fuel growth in Indian-language Wikipedias
    Mobile Internet connectivity is growing rapidly in rural India, and because most Internet users are more comfortable in their native languages, websites producing content in Indian languages are going to drive this growth. In a country like India in which only a handful of journals are available in Indian languages, open access to research and educational resources is hugely important for populating content for the various Indian language Wikipedias.
  • Where to find the world's best programmers
    One source of data about programmers' skills is HackerRank, a company that poses programming challenges to a community of more than a million coders and also offers recruitment services to businesses. Using information about how successful coders from different countries are at solving problems across a wide range of domains (such as "algorithms" or "data structures" or specific languages such as C++ or Java), HackerRank's data suggests that, overall, the best developers come from China, followed closely by Russia. Alarmingly, and perhaps unexpectedly, the United States comes in at 28th place.