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Saturday, 25 Jun 16 - Tux Machines is a community-driven public service/news site which has been around for over a decade and primarily focuses on GNU/LinuxSubscribe now Syndicate content

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Quick Roundup

Open source to go under the radar in 2007

Filed under
OSS

We are only two weeks into 2007 and one trend already seems clear. Open source will fly under the radar in 2007.

Ten ways to take over the world, GNU/Linux style

Filed under
Linux

It's a little too late for yet another New Year's resolution list. So here is a list of ten ways to take over the world, GNU/Linux style. Taking small bites and a gradual takeover is a decent goal for Linux in 2007. With the lukewarm reception of Microsoft Vista, GNU/Linux is in a better position than ever to be the migration target. No need to purchase a new system just to run eye candy.

Planned features for Firefox 3

Filed under
Moz/FF

In today’s Firefox 3 (code name Gran Paradiso) meeting, developers released a preliminary list of requirements for Firefox 3. The new target release date is sometime in the third quarter this year.

CES Last-Day Roundup

Filed under
Linux

Traditionally (if something I'm doing for a second year can be considered to have a tradition), the last day of my show reporting is devoted to the strange and the silly at CES. However, given that all of the space yesterday went to OLPC coverage, I'm going to have to mix in some actual products in today's coverage.

SabayonLinux 3.26 on my HP Pavilion Laptop

Filed under
Linux
Reviews
-s

SabayonLinux 3.26 was released on Jan 7, only a short time after 3.25. This maintenance release is the last of the 3.2 series and the team will now concentrate on 3.3. While many reviews shout accolades to this rising star, Tuxmachines once again suffered a loss of data making our experience a bit mixed. This is a short description of our time with SabayonLinux.

Some Facts about openSUSE and Distrowatch Figures - A Correction

Filed under
SUSE

Matthew Aslett of Computer Business Review brings to my attention that a recent article by the Salt Lake Tribune's Bob Mims, "Novell underscores support for free software development", includes an inaccuracy. Because the article has been widely quoted and it is currently linked to on Novell's web site, it seems important to correct it.

UK students offered cash for open source software

Filed under
OSS

British university students are being offered cash incentives to write open source software - and the first beneficiary is a Python programmer from Swansea.

Radio goes the open source route

Filed under
Software

A new generation of broadcasters are to join the world's airwaves after the launch of open-source software which allows people to run a radio station from a single computer for free.

What's black and white and selling everything?

Filed under
Misc

Never mind what the Chinese calendar says. This is going to be the year of the penguin, at least on Madison Avenue. Penguins have long been popular in advertising, but they have become even more so after three successful movies with penguin characters.

What will Ubuntu be doing at LCA?

Filed under
Ubuntu

It is now only a few days until the awesomeness that is Linux.Conf.Au starts. Looking at the line up of speakers, including Ubuntu’s own Jono, Scott, Robert, Matthew and Richard it looks to be pretty awesome.

Building Second Life

Filed under
Software

Following up on my earlier post on the open source release of Second Life, I've now successfully built Second Life from source on both Mac OS X and Ubuntu. The Mac OS X build in Xcode went smoothly. The build in Linux was a little more finicky, but not bad considering that it's still alpha. Read on if you'd like to vicariously live the gory details.

Putting an old laptop to good use with Xubuntu

Filed under
Ubuntu

One day while perusing the back room where the old hardware is kept, I spotted an old laptop in its docking station buried under some other hardware. At my desk I booted it up and in no time was using Windows 95 but I wondered if I could improve the situation a bit. The obvious choice for a new OS was Linux.

Ubuntu Goes Low Spec!

Filed under
Ubuntu

As Ubuntu continues to make its presence known throughout the world, it was only a matter of time before the project spawned an offshoot variation or two that would enable people with lower-spec machines to participate in all that Ubuntu goodness.

'$100 laptop' consumer launch rumours denied

Filed under
OLPC

The organisation working on a low-cost laptop for developing-world education has rushed to deny speculation that the machines may become generally available to the public, following news reports earlier this week.

EditThisPagePHP offers collaboration without the wiki

Filed under
Software

If you want to share your knowledge and ideas with others, you set up a blog. If you want to collaboratively edit Web pages and keep track of changes, you use a wiki. If you need a tool that allows you to quickly set up a page that combines blog and wiki features, with some content versioning capabilities thrown in, you need something like EditThisPagePHP, a PHP script that allows you to create Web pages and do some clever things with them.

Today's Howtos, Tips, Tutorials:

Filed under
HowTos
  • Creating audio CD compilations on Linux

  • Display Your system Information Using Phpsysinfo
  • libGL error: open DRM failed
  • Installing Rainlendar2 on Ubuntu
  • Migrating from shadow passwords to tcb in Linux
  • Hiding arguments from ps
  • Secure your SSH server with Public/Private key authentification

  • convert-wallpaper-format-and-size-examples

UK schools at risk of Microsoft lock-in

Filed under
Microsoft

UK schools and colleges that have signed up to Microsoft Corp's academic licensing programs face the 'significant potential' of being locked in to the company's software, according to an interim review by the UK government agency responsible for technology in education.

Open-source software catalog upsets those snubbed

Filed under
OSS

Open-source systems integrator Optaros has released a guide listing and reviewing what it considers the 262 best open-source applications for companies.

Also: Open Source Catalog--interesting but difficult to maintain

Linux: Accessing Files With O_DIRECT

Filed under
Linux

A thread on the lkml began with a query about using O_DIRECT when opening a file. An early white paper written by Andrea Arcangeli to describe the O_DIRECT patch before it was merged into the 2.4 kernel explains, "with O_DIRECT the kernel will do DMA directly from/to the physical memory pointed [to] by the userspace buffer passed as [a] parameter to the read/write syscalls. There are better ways to control the page cache than play games and think that a page cache isn't necessary.

Nokia N800 Internet Tablet First Thoughts Review

Filed under
Reviews

This week Nokia announced the N800, its second generation Internet Tablet. I was able to put this brand new device through its paces at the Consumer Electronics Show.

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More in Tux Machines

Leftovers: OSS

OSS in the Back End

  • Open Source NFV Part Four: Open Source MANO
    Defined in ETSI ISG NFV architecture, MANO (Management and Network Orchestration) is a layer — a combination of multiple functional entities — that manages and orchestrates the cloud infrastructure, resources and services. It is comprised of, mainly, three different entities — NFV Orchestrator, VNF Manager and Virtual Infrastructure Manager (VIM). The figure below highlights the MANO part of the ETSI NFV architecture.
  • After the hype: Where containers make sense for IT organizations
    Container software and its related technologies are on fire, winning the hearts and minds of thousands of developers and catching the attention of hundreds of enterprises, as evidenced by the huge number of attendees at this week’s DockerCon 2016 event. The big tech companies are going all in. Google, IBM, Microsoft and many others were out in full force at DockerCon, scrambling to demonstrate how they’re investing in and supporting containers. Recent surveys indicate that container adoption is surging, with legions of users reporting they’re ready to take the next step and move from testing to production. Such is the popularity of containers that SiliconANGLE founder and theCUBE host John Furrier was prompted to proclaim that, thanks to containers, “DevOps is now mainstream.” That will change the game for those who invest in containers while causing “a world of hurt” for those who have yet to adapt, Furrier said.
  • Is Apstra SDN? Same idea, different angle
    The company’s product, called Apstra Operating System (AOS), takes policies based on the enterprise’s intent and automatically translates them into settings on network devices from multiple vendors. When the IT department wants to add a new component to the data center, AOS is designed to figure out what needed changes would flow from that addition and carry them out. The distributed OS is vendor-agnostic. It will work with devices from Cisco Systems, Hewlett Packard Enterprise, Juniper Networks, Cumulus Networks, the Open Compute Project and others.
  • MapR Launches New Partner Program for Open Source Data Analytics
    Converged data vendor MapR has launched a new global partner program for resellers and distributors to leverage the company's integrated data storage, processing and analytics platform.
  • A Seamless Monitoring System for Apache Mesos Clusters
  • All Marathons Need a Runner. Introducing Pheidippides
    Activision Publishing, a computer games publisher, uses a Mesos-based platform to manage vast quantities of data collected from players to automate much of the gameplay behavior. To address a critical configuration management problem, James Humphrey and John Dennison built a rather elegant solution that puts all configurations in a single place, and named it Pheidippides.
  • New Tools and Techniques for Managing and Monitoring Mesos
    The platform includes a large number of tools including Logstash, Elasticsearch, InfluxDB, and Kibana.
  • BlueData Can Run Hadoop on AWS, Leave Data on Premises
    We've been watching the Big Data space pick up momentum this year, and Big Data as a Service is one of the most interesting new branches of this trend to follow. In a new development in this space, BlueData, provider of a leading Big-Data-as-a-Service software platform, has announced that the enterprise edition of its BlueData EPIC software will run on Amazon Web Services (AWS) and other public clouds. Essentially, users can now run their cloud and computing applications and services in an Amazon Web Services (AWS) instance while keeping data on-premises, which is required for some companies in the European Union.

today's howtos

Industrial SBC builds on Raspberry Pi Compute Module

On Kickstarter, a “MyPi” industrial SBC using the RPi Compute Module offers a mini-PCIe slot, serial port, wide-range power, and modular expansion. You might wonder why in 2016 someone would introduce a sandwich-style single board computer built around the aging, ARM11 based COM version of the original Raspberry Pi, the Raspberry Pi Compute Module. First off, there are still plenty of industrial applications that don’t need much CPU horsepower, and second, the Compute Module is still the only COM based on Raspberry Pi hardware, although the cheaper, somewhat COM-like Raspberry Pi Zero, which has the same 700MHz processor, comes close. Read more