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Monday, 27 Feb 17 - Tux Machines is a community-driven public service/news site which has been around for over a decade and primarily focuses on GNU/LinuxSubscribe now Syndicate content

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Story Leftovers: OSS and Sharing Roy Schestowitz 26/12/2016 - 3:02pm
Story Android Leftovers Roy Schestowitz 26/12/2016 - 3:04pm
Story Fedora 25 Remixes Roy Schestowitz 26/12/2016 - 3:05pm
Story Red Hat News Roy Schestowitz 26/12/2016 - 3:06pm
Story Leftovers: Gaming Roy Schestowitz 26/12/2016 - 3:08pm
Story today's howtos Roy Schestowitz 26/12/2016 - 3:09pm
Story New Releases Roy Schestowitz 26/12/2016 - 3:10pm
Story GNOME News Roy Schestowitz 26/12/2016 - 3:11pm
Story today's leftovers Roy Schestowitz 26/12/2016 - 3:12pm
Story Today in Techrights Roy Schestowitz 26/12/2016 - 9:23pm

Another Day Another Distro – Part 4 – PCLinuxOS 2007

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PCLOS

Adventures In Open Source: So after my positive experience of Mandriva 2008 it was time to reluctantly pack my bags and move on. My destination this time was PCLinuxOS 2007 which is not a distribution I'd tried before. So without further ado here is what happened:

Red Hat exec: Open Source is mature, disruptive and innovative

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Interviews

Craig Nielsen was one of eight speakers at the WA open source symposium earlier this month. He fills PC World Australia in on where the industry stands and where it is rapidly heading.

GIMP 2.4 preview

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GIMP

Red Hat Mag: Fedora 8 test releases have a surprise for all users interested in graphics: a release candidate for the new GIMP 2.4, meaning the final version will get the stable GIMP 2.41. This is exciting news, as the previous major release, GIMP 2.2, is several years old, and a lot of new features were added in the meantime. In this article, we’ll take a look at some of the most visible new features.

ogg theora videos to avi

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Howtos

I've been writing a Ruby computer programming textbook (the going is slow). Along with the book will be a series of instructional videos on CD showing video computer screen clips with audio narration.

KDE Commit-Digest for 21st October 2007

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KDE

In this week's KDE Commit-Digest: Fortune-teller and Keyboard Layout applets for Plasma, KNewsTicker resurrected for KDE 4.0 as a Plasmoid. Rewrite of <canvas> tag support in KHTML. Various new language syntax highlighting in Kate. Internal database storage work in Digikam.

Where are the American Linux desktop users?

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Linux

desktoplinux: Linux users from around the world are filling out the Linux Foundation's desktop survey. But what John Cherry, the foundation's director of global Linux workgroups, wants to know is, "Where are the responses from the North America?"

Xubuntu 7.10: Solid as usual

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Ubuntu

distrogue: In Linux-land this week, it was pretty much Ubuntu Gutsy, Ubuntu Gutsy, and Ubuntu 7.10. The new additions, Gobuntu and Fluxbuntu, didn't seem to receive as much attention. As is tradition, neither did Xubuntu. But Xubuntu is still a solid system for people with older hardware.

Also: Ubuntu 7.10 Gutsy Gibbon

Hidden Linux : ISO magic

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HowTos

tux love (pc world blogs): In Linux, you don't need to burn a CD or DVD image to a disc to take a look at its contents. Since "everything's a file", it's just a matter of mounting it. So do you mount an ISO file?

Getting to know GNOME

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Software

techrepublic: Linux has come a long way from the early, oft-crashing days. GNOME is now one of the primary desktops for the Linux operating system; not only is it highly customizable, but it is amazingly stable. Jack Wallen explains why Linux -- running GNOME -- is a viable desktop alternative.

AMD 8.42 Driver Brings Fixes, AIGLX!

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Software

phoronix: Today it's now time where the fglrx driver reaches yet another milestone. Not only does today's release address many of the outstanding bugs for the earlier GPU generations while also introducing a few new features, but it also delivers AIGLX support! Yes, you read that right.

The Absent PCLinuxOS Release Cycle

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PCLOS

linux-blog.org: During distro comparisons, many call a lack of release cycle for PCLinuxOS one of its negative aspects. In my opinion, this is the most attractive and positive aspects of the small distribution. PCLinuxOS has a unique approach to releases and updates. Allow me a bit of time to show you the method in my madness on this one.

Linux's Colonel Of The Kernel Andrew Morton: 'Fix More Bugs'

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Linux
Interviews

information week: Andrew Morton, sometimes referred to as the colonel of the kernel, is Linus Torvalds' right hand man when it comes to getting out new kernel releases. In this interview with InformationWeek editor at large, Charles Babcock, he talks about recent kernel development including an assessment of recent patches and tools.

more ubuntu stuff

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Ubuntu
  • New Dirs in Gutsy: Documents, Music, Pictures, Blah, Blah

  • Vista vs Ubuntu: this time, it's virtual
  • October 2007 Team Reports
  • Install multimedia codecs in Ubuntu 7.10 Gutsy Gibbon in 2 easy steps
  • Wubi Installer on Ubuntu 7.10 Distro?
  • There goes the neighborhood

OpenSUSE 10.3: Installing And Running VMware Workstation 6.0.x

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HowTos

linux.wordpress.com: As I had VMware Workstation running on all my previous *SUSE distros, I as well installed the latest available version 6.0.2 on my openSUSE 10.3 desktop. Even though the latest openSUSE 10.3 comes with Virtualbox, problem being with it is that even the latest Virtialbox 1.5.2 doesn’t support running 64-bit guest OS.

Also: Upgrade to java-1_6_0-sun u3 on openSUSE 10.3: fixing alternatives links
And: Surprises in OpenSUSE

Criticism of criticism of Linux

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Linux

beranger: 3+1 rants = Preston St. Pierre opines on Linux.com that X/OS is an undistinguished Red Hat clone, where "undistinguished" is rather disparaging, à la "why do we need it?" My problem is not "which RHEL 5 clone to use", but rather "why is RHEL 5 so castrated"?

How Is Ubuntu Doing as a Server Platform?

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Ubuntu

itjungle.com: Canonical jumped into the Unix distribution business in October 2004 and got into Linux server distribution in June 2006. With the launch last week of Ubuntu 7.10 for desktops and servers last week and the upcoming launch in April 2008 of a new Long Term Support variant of Ubuntu, it is reasonable to stop for a second and try to assess how well or poorly Ubuntu is doing on servers.

Why Ubuntu (Still) Sucks - Part 2

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Ubuntu

infoworld blogs: There's this video on YouTube. It's all about the new "eye candy" in Windows and Ubuntu. Of course, like most attempts by the Linux community to parrot Windows Vista, the aforementioned "eye candy showdown" misses the forest for the trees.

A tour through Ubuntu Gutsy Gibbon

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Ubuntu

tectonic: Last week the Ubuntu team released Ubuntu 7.10, codenamed Gutsy Gibbon, in one of the more hyped releases of the past couple of months. Tectonic joined every other Linux fan in the world in downloading a copy on the the day it was released. Then we spent the weekend working it over.

Little Ubuntu chipping away at mighty Microsoft

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Ubuntu

nzherald.co.nz: If the battle between computer operating systems was won or lost on the basis of which has the cutest name, Ubuntu would surely reign supreme. Ubuntu is a version of Linux, the open-source OS that is chipping away at Microsoft's domination of the software market.

Also: Ubuntu Back on TOP

Free Finance Software for Windows & Linux

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Software

cybernet: Ever since we wrote about Mint, the free finance management site, we have received a few requests from those looking for good software to manage personal finances. I found exactly what I was looking for: Money Manager Ex. Not only is it free, but it is open source and available for both Windows and Linux!

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More in Tux Machines

IP camera design offers triple 4K encoding, runs Android on hexa-core SoC

Intrinsyc’s Android-ready Open-Q 650 IP Camera Reference Design is built on a Snapdragon 650, and supports up to three 4K H.264/H.265 30fps streams. Intrinsyc Technologies has followed up on last year’s Open-Q 410 Wearable Camera Reference Design with a more powerful Open-Q 650 IP Camera Reference Design. Like the 410 model, the 650 IP version runs Android on a Qualcomm Snapdragon SoC. However, it features a faster, hexa-core Snapdragon 650 SoC in place of the quad-core, Cortex-A53 Snapdragon 410. Read more

today's leftovers

  • Manjaro ARM to shut down
    While the project is dying, the team has offered help to anyone who is willing to continue this project. The team will guide through all the process and even teach if needed. If anyone is interested in continuing this project, now is the time. Otherwise we all have to say goodbye to Manjaro-ARM.
  • Manjaro ARM Linux Distro Is Shutting Down, Lack Of Contributors Is The Reason
  • That Was The Week That Was (TWTWTW): Edition 2
    This is the second edition of TWTWTW, a weekly blog proclaiming noteworthy news in the open source world. It provides a concise distilled commentary of notable open source related news from a different perspective. For the second edition, we present a succinct catchup covering software, hardware, book releases, ending with a real Barry Bargain!

Containers and OpenStack

  • Stateful containerized applications with Kubernetes
    To date, almost all of the talk about containers and microservices has been about "stateless" applications. This is entirely understandable because stateless applications are simply easier. However, containers and orchestration have matured to the point where we need to take on the interesting workloads: the stateful ones. That's why two of my talks at SCALE 15x are about databases, containers, and Kubernetes, which is an open source system for automating deployment, scaling, and management of containerized applications. Stateless services are applications like web servers, proxies, and application code, which may handle data, but they don't store it. These are easy to think about in an orchestration context because they are simple to deploy and simple to scale. If traffic goes up, you just add more of them and load-balance. More importantly, they are "immutable"; there is very little difference between the upstream container "image" and the running containers in your infrastructure. This means you can also replace them at any time, with little "switching cost" between one container instance and another.
  • 13 Companies Leading the Way with Containers
    As DevOps has grown in popularity, an increasing number of organizations are looking to containerization technology as a way to simplify and streamline application deployment and management. In fact, the RightScale 2017 State of the Cloud Report found that Docker, the leading containerization tool, was the most popular DevOps tool among the companies it surveyed. Forty percent of the enterprises surveyed said that they use Docker, and 30 percent more said they planned to do so in the future.
  • A Guide to the OpenStack Ocata Release
  • OpenStack Ocata improves core components, containerization
    The OpenStack Foundation has released Ocata, the 15th iteration of the popular open source cloud platform. The latest release has focused on enhancing core compute and networking services and expanding support for application container technologies.
  • RDO Ocata Released
    The RDO community is pleased to announce the general availability of the RDO build for OpenStack Ocata for RPM-based distributions, CentOS Linux 7 and Red Hat Enterprise Linux. RDO is suitable for building private, public, and hybrid clouds. Ocata is the 15th release from the OpenStack project, which is the work of more than 2500 contributors from around the world (source).
  • Walmart Boasts 213,000 Cores on OpenStack
    Two Walmart associates who spoke recently at the Linux Foundation’s Leadership Summit provided some updates on the retailer’s efforts to automate its business. According to Andrew Mitry, a distinguished engineer, Cloud, and Megan Rossetti, a senior engineer, Cloud, the company is expanding its cloud services to encompass more than its e-commerce business. And it’s streamlined its cloud services and DevOps teams into one group for the whole company.
  • Reflections on the first #OpenStack PTG (Pike PTG, Atlanta)
  • A look at OpenStack's newest release, Ocata
    Are you interested in keeping track of what is happening in the open source cloud? Opensource.com is your source for news in OpenStack, the open source cloud infrastructure project.

Leftovers: Software

  • ELC2017: The State of U-Boot
    Thomas Rini of the Konsulko Group presented at this week's Linux Foundation Embedded Linux Conference (ELC2017) about the state of U-Boot. Rini has served as the "head custodian" of U-Boot for the past number of years and presented on the overall state and accomplishments for this Universal Boot Loader most commonly associated with ARM and other architectures.
  • Nuclear - An Electron-Based Music Streaming App for Linux
    Nuclear is a beautifully designed Open Source multiplatform music streaming app that fetches media content from multiple online sources including YouTube and last.fm. The app has a simple yet glossy UI and does an excellent job at playing audio files. It was developed using Electron and can be thought of as the GUI version of mps-youtube with just a few customization features under its belt.
  • Peruse: A Comic Book Reader for Linux Desktops
    There are various comic book reader apps for Linux out there but today we bring you Peruse – an Open Source comic book reader developed by the KDE team to simplify reading comic books on your KDE desktop environment and to make it more pleasurable. Peruse has a simple and intuitive UI but I must admit that it is a just a couple of paces away from boring – the app needs a better-polished look to be able to compete with already famous comic book readers in the market.
  • Calibre 2.80 Open-Source eBook Manager Supports Sideloading of KFX Files, More
    Calibre developer Kovid Goyal is pleased to announce the availability of version 2.80 of his hugely popular, open-source and multi-platform ebook library management software. Calibre 2.80 comes two weeks after Calibre 2.79 and appears to be a major release that introduces quite a bunch of new features and new news source, besides the usual bug fixes. The most significant addition being the ability to sideload KFX files that have been created using the third-party KFX plugin for Calibre.