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Friday, 24 Mar 17 - Tux Machines is a community-driven public service/news site which has been around for over a decade and primarily focuses on GNU/LinuxSubscribe now Syndicate content

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Type Title Authorsort icon Replies Last Post
Story Development News Roy Schestowitz 17/12/2016 - 12:48am
Story Microsoft's embrace, extend, extinguish Roy Schestowitz 17/12/2016 - 12:50am
Story Cloud Foundry Foundation Gets Google Roy Schestowitz 17/12/2016 - 12:51am
Story FOSS in Telecom Roy Schestowitz 17/12/2016 - 12:52am
Story Leftovers: OSS and Sharing Roy Schestowitz 17/12/2016 - 12:53am
Story Mint Releases Roy Schestowitz 17/12/2016 - 12:54am
Story Leftovers: Ubuntu Roy Schestowitz 17/12/2016 - 12:54am
Story Red Hat News Roy Schestowitz 17/12/2016 - 12:55am
Story openSUSE Tumbleweed Updates Roy Schestowitz 17/12/2016 - 12:56am
Story Kernel Space/Linux: Roy Schestowitz 17/12/2016 - 12:57am

A guide to common Linux file and system commands for new users

Filed under
HowTos

raiden's realm: The primary reason for writing this is to help new users develop an understanding of the Linux file system commands. Not all of them, just some of the more common ones. Let's look at what they do and why I would need to use them, what not to do, what each thing means and what it's for.

Firefox 3 Beta 1 takes me on one wild ride

Filed under
Moz/FF

blogbeebe: Always a patsy for the New and Shiny, today I decided to believe what I read about Firefox 3 in the press. I downloaded the tarball, unpacked it, and ran Firefox 3 Beta 1 on my Ubuntu 7.10 system. Loads of fun!

Also: Review: Firefox 3 Beta 1 -- Packed With New Features And Rock Solid
And: Mozilla warns against using new Firefox 3.0 beta

Linux on the line: musings on the CLI / GUI flip-flop

Filed under
Linux

itwire.com: People are a funny lot. One person’s trash is another person’s treasure. And one person’s primary means of instructing a computer is met with disdain by another. There’s a perennial battle between mousers and keyboard jockeys, and “what’s in” appears to go in cycles.

What exactly are “universally accessible formats”?

Matthew Aslett: There was a lot of excitement earlier this week following presidential hopeful Barack Obama’s promise to “put government data online in universally accessible formats” should he make it to the White House.

How Red Hat Linux can help you boost performance and shrink IT costs

Filed under
Linux

itbusiness.ca: Today's IT departments need to do more, with less budget. There are many key benefits inherent in Red Hat Enterprise Linux.

Dealing with .rpmnew and .rpmsave files

Filed under
Software

linux.com: Nobody ever thinks to mention .rpmnew and .rpmsave extensions to new users of Fedora or Red Hat derivatives. Many, I suspect, simply leave them alone, uncertain what to do about them. Yet dealing with them is simply a matter of using a few basic commands, and can be a necessity for ensuring trouble-free upgrades in the future.

GIMP 2.4.2 Released

Filed under
GIMP

Three weeks later enough bug-fixes have piled up to warrant another bug-fix release in the stable GIMP 2.4 series.

Memory test - Firefox 2.0.0.9 vs Firefox 3.0 b 1

Filed under
Moz/FF

blogs.zdnet.com: Does Firefox 3.0 beta 1 do a better job of handling memory than earlier versions? In a test put Firefox 3.0 beta up against Firefox 2.0.0.9 in a series of tests.

Also: Mozilla's chief engineer On leaky memory and bumping blockers

Put a Puppy in your PC

Filed under
Linux

telegraph: If you followed the steps in parts one and two you should have in front of you a copy of Puppy Linux on CD and a PC that is set to boot from the CD/DVD drive. If you are not sure about the latter there's an easy way to find out, join us now as we load Puppy for the first time.

today's leftovers

Filed under
News
  • More progress for ODF

  • What should be proprietary in open source?
  • LJ: Some Linux Audio Updates And Expansions
  • Snort creator Roesch shares secrets of his success
  • Unreal Tournament 3 For Linux MIA
  • ATI HD 2900XT With Open-Source Radeon Driver
  • One "$100 Laptop" for Each Child in Ghana
  • Introducing Mercurial, a distributed version control system
  • Why I Still Use Windows
  • Unreal Tournament 3 and Gears of War Linux Status
  • NTP: be on time, always
  • IBM Claims Symphony is Music to its Ears

Seek Enlightenment for an easy-to-use Linux GUI

Filed under
Software

Jack Wallen: There are many Window Managers available for Linux including the two most popular KDE and GNOME, as well many older ones. Enlightenment has been around for a while, but that doesn't mean it's outdated. It's lightweight, flexible, and reliable.

Linux vs BSD

Filed under
OS

bauer-power.net: BSD family of Unix systems is based upon the source code of real Unix developed in Bell Labs, which was later purchased by the University of California - "Berkeley Software Distribution". The contemporary BSD systems stand on the source code that was released in the beginning of 1990's (Net/2 Lite and 386/BSD release).

some howtos:

Filed under
HowTos
  • Why does xorg’s cpu usage shoot up when using NVidia’s driver?

  • Linux: Double your disk read performance in a single command
  • Linux find the memory used by a program / process using pmap command
  • Ubuntu: Rumint
  • Howto Install qBittorrent in Ubuntu Gutsy
  • Display Linux Session Jobs
  • Fix Ubuntu 7.10 Suspend Issue on Dell M140 Laptop
  • FreeNX Server and Client Installation in Debian Etch

In search of a quality kernel

Filed under
Linux

linuxworld: Discussions of kernel quality are not a new phenomenon on linux-kernel. It is, indeed, a topic which comes up with a certain regularity, more so than with many other free software projects. The size of the kernel, the rate at which its code changes, and the wide range of environments in which the kernel runs all lead to unique challenges; add in the fact that kernel bugs can lead to catastrophic system failures and you have the material for no end of debate.

GNOME Online Desktop: Touching the Face of GOD

Filed under
Software

earthweb.com: One of the reoccurring ideas in revisions of the desktop is to tie it more closely to the Internet. The idea was last popular in the late 1990s, when one example of it was the use of KDE's Konqueror for both web browsing and file management. Now, with the GNOME Online Desktop (GOD), the idea has been revived to reflect the rise of social networks and file sharing.

Catching up with the times: openSUSE 10.3

Filed under
SUSE

paulgiannaros.blogspot: Instead of sampling one of York's many fine clubs tonight, I stayed in and finally got around to installing openSUSE 10.3. "Impressive" sums the experience up.

KDE 4 snapshot screenshots

Filed under
KDE

Sebastian Kgler: Without ado, here's a bunch of screenshots of how KDE 4.0 currently looks like. Please note that this is very recent, and not all of it is part of the just-released KDE 4.0 RC1. It's that fresh.

15 Signs that you are addicted to Linux

Filed under
Linux
Humor

foogazi.com: Here are 15 signs that you are addicted to Linux:

1. You bring a live CD with you whenever you’ll be using a computer away from your house.

2. Every time a friend or relative complains about their computer being slow due to spyware, adware and viruses, you tell them to install Linux.

Hardy recommends handling

Filed under
Ubuntu

kmandla.wordpress: It looks like a feature of package handling in Hardy is going to be a little different. This might come into play if you try to conserve disk space, or if you’re like me and you resent aptitude’s tendency to rake in all kinds of rubbish for one tiny application.

Recovering Data from Windows systems by using Linux

Filed under
HowTos

port25.technet.com: We have all run into cases where Windows fails to load for one reason or another. The problem may be hardware or a software failure, and the problem may seem to be irrecoverable. Yet often Linux can be used to help recover data that otherwise might be lost.

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More in Tux Machines

Games and CrossOver

Red Hat and Fedora

Android Leftovers

Leftovers: OSS and Sharing

  • CoreOS Tectonic Now Installs Kubernetes on OpenStack
    CoreOS and OpenStack have a somewhat intertwined history, which is why it's somewhat surprising it took until today for CoreOS's Tectonic Kubernetes distribution to provide an installer that targets OpenStack cloud deployments.
  • Docker and Core OS plan to donate their container technologies to CNCF
    Containers have become a critical component of modern cloud, and Docker Inc. controls the heart of containers, the container runtime. There has been a growing demand that this critical piece of technology should be under control of a neutral, third party so that the community can invest in it freely.
  • How Blockchain Is Helping China Go Greener
    Blockchain has near-universal applicability as a distributed transaction platform for securely authenticating exchanges of data, goods, and services. IBM and the Beijing-based Energy-Blockchain Labs are even using it to help reduce carbon emissions in air-polluted China.
  • An efficient approach to continuous documentation
  • The peril in counting source lines on an OSS project
    There seems to be a phase that OSS projects go through where as they mature and gain traction. As they do it becomes increasingly important for vendors to point to their contributions to credibly say they are the ‘xyz’ company. Heptio is one such vendor operating in the OSS space, and this isn’t lost on us. :) It helps during a sales cycle to be able to say “we are the a big contributor to this project, look at the percentage of code and PRs we submitted”. While transparency is important as is recognizing the contributions that key vendors, focus on a single metric in isolation (and LoC in particular) creates a perverse incentive structure. Taken to its extreme it becomes detrimental to project health.
  • An Open Source Unicycle Motor
    And something to ponder. The company that sells this electric unicycle could choose to use a motor with open firmware or one with closed firmware. To many consumers, that difference might not be so significant. To this consumer, though, that’s a vital difference. To me, I fully own the product I bought when the firmware is open. I explain to others that they ought to choose that level of full ownership whenever they get a chance. And if they join a local makerspace, they will likely meet others with similar values. If you don’t yet have a makerspace in your community, inquire around to see if anyone is in the process of forming one. Then find ways to offer them support. That’s how we do things in the FOSS community.
  • The A/V guy’s take on PyCon Pune
    “This is crazy!”, that was my reaction at some point in PyCon Pune. This is one of my first conference where I participated in a lot of things starting from the website to audio/video and of course being the speaker. I saw a lot of aspects of how a conference works and where what can go wrong. I met some amazing people, people who impacted my life , people who I will never forget. I received so much of love and affection that I can never express in words. So before writing anything else I want to thank each and everyone of you , “Thank you!”.
  • Azure Service Fabric takes first tentative steps toward open source [Ed: Microsoft Peter is openwashing a patent trap with back doors]
  • Simulate the Internet with Flashback, a New WebDev Test Tool from LinkedIn
  • Mashape Raises $18M for API Gateway Tech
    Casado sees Mashape's Kong API gateway in particular as being a particularly well positioned technology. Kong is an open-source API gateway and microservice management technology.
  • PrismTech to Demonstrate Open Source FACE 2.1 Transport Services Segment (TSS) Reference Implementation at Air Force FACE Technical Interchange Meeting
    PrismTech’s TSS reference implementation is being made available under GNU Lesser General Public License (LGPL) v3 open source license terms.
  • How Open-Source Robotics Hardware Is Accelerating Research and Innovation

    The latest issue of the IEEE Robotics & Automation Magazine features a special report on open-source robotics hardware and its impact in the field.