Language Selection

English French German Italian Portuguese Spanish

About Tux Machines

Saturday, 25 Jun 16 - Tux Machines is a community-driven public service/news site which has been around for over a decade and primarily focuses on GNU/LinuxSubscribe now Syndicate content

Search This Site

Dell's secret Linux fling

Filed under
Linux

Dell's love affair with Linux is a clandestine affair these days, conducted in secret, away from disapproving eyes. But now the pair have been spotted in China.

Playing Music in Linux

Filed under
Software

There are a lot of music players available for Linux. If most of them were junk it would be easy to choose one to use regularly, but that's not the case. There are many good quality players, but they all have different features. This article is meant to assist you in choosing the one that's right for you. Try different ones to see which you like best.

RMS transcript on free software and the future of freedom

Filed under
OSS

Below is the table of contents for a transcript I just put online of a 2006 talk by Richard Stallman on "Free Software and the Future of Freedom".

How To Resize ext3 Partitions Without Losing Data

Filed under
Linux
HowTos

This article is about resizing ext3 partitions without losing data. It shows how to shrink and enlarge existing ext3 partitions and how to merge two ext3 partitions. This can be quite useful if you do not use LVM and you realize that your existing partitioning does not meet your actual needs anymore.

Accounting Vendors Block Linux Server Use

Filed under
Linux

We all know Microsoft views Linux as a serious threat and will do just about anything to discourage its use. But why would application vendors who actually face competition from Microsoft help it out in this regard? That's what one reader was wondering after discovering that his customers could no longer use a Linux server with their favorite accounting packages.

Hands on with the Nokia N800

Filed under
Hardware

At this week's Consumer Electronics Show, Nokia introduced the Nokia N800 Internet Tablet, the successor to the Nokia 770. The N800 is more than a beefed-up 770, as it adds a few features not available on the first device. I had a chance to spend about an hour with Nokia's N800 team and get a feel for how the $399/€399 N800 stacks up against its predecessor yesterday at CES and it looks promising.

Open-source system helps victims cope with disasters

Filed under
OSS

VICTIMS of natural disasters will be the first to say that the aftermath of a major flood, earthquake or landslide is a disaster in itself. There is the extreme difficulty of finding the missing and recovering the dead. The victims of the landslide that buried Barangay Guinsaugon in St. Bernard, Southern Leyte, however, had a relatively easier time dealing with their crisis. This is due to the cooperation between IBM Philippines and the National Disaster Coordinating Council.

Red Hat's Fedora project unites Core and Extras efforts

Filed under
Linux

The Fedora Linux project, which is sponsored by Red Hat Inc and provides the core code for its Linux distributions, is set for a reorganization that will unite its Core and Extras package efforts.

10 Signs you've been using Firefox too long...

Filed under
Humor

1. You sit right next to a window but you still just look at your ForecastFox icon to see what it's like outside.

2. You fumble with the TV remote for a minute before remembering that you can't open another channel in a new tab.

KDE 4: Sonnet

Filed under
KDE

The KDE promotion teams gains momentum with the weekly “The Road to KDE 4″ news. Hidden in this weeks release about Koffice you will find some words about Sonnet - the KSpell replacement and therefore the framework that will support you with spell checking.

License compliance issues could affect all BSD-derived distributions

Filed under
Legal

The Gentoo/FreeBSD project, which combines the FreeBSD kernel with Gentoo Linux design principles, is in a fix. Its lead developer, Diego "Flameeyes" Pettenò, discovered licensing issues while working on the libkvm library and the start-stop-daemon -- and Pettenò says that the problem might not be limited to his project, but could trap other BSD-derived projects as well.

Elive rl2 -- Call it what you want Elive makes Enlightenment work

Filed under
Linux
Reviews

There is always something interesting afloat in my email box. I had been working with my new laptop to get another second timer Elive to work, which came out on Christmas day. Elive, the distro named as the fastest climber on distrowatch for 2006, was one of my favorite suprises and one where I truly ended up leaving a distro on my laptop until it died later in the year. So once I published the Dream, of course I get a couple of emails letting me know that Elive also had a great new release out and where was my updated review?

Linux Invades CES: Toys and joys the Linux way

Filed under
Linux

The 2007 International Consumer Electronic Show is one of the ultimate tech-toy and gadget shows on the planet. There's something for nearly anyone, and while not quite a household word, Linux technology has gained rapid stature in the consumer-electronics industry, as demonstrated by vastly increased cognizance of both Linux users and Linux embedded technology.

Microsoft, Novell and Unintended Consequences

Filed under
Microsoft

Remember when AOL thought it was doing the world's researchers a big favor and made a boatload of online user behavior data openly available? Remember the unintended consequences? Well, thanks to Microsoft CEO Steve Ballmer's recent transparency on his beliefs about Linux and Windows, we have a similar unintended educational consequence in the works.

The Road to KDE 4: New KOffice Technologies

Filed under
KDE

In this weeks' edition of the Road to KDE 4, we'll take a look at the up and coming KWord 2.0 as part of the KOffice project. KWord 1.6.1 is already a powerful KDE-integrated word processor, but with KDE 4 technologies, KWord 2.0 promises to be among the most powerful free word processors available.

Fedora Core 6 reaches the 1 million mark in just 74 days

Filed under
Linux

A mere 74 days after its release, Fedora Core 6 (Zod) has been downloaded over 1 million times, according to the project's leader. That works out to approximately nine downloads per minute for more than 10 weeks straight.

Also: Installing Linux-VServer

Marketing Linux - the penultimate barrier

Filed under
Linux

There seems to be a big split in the opinions of those within the Linux community, some think that Linux will never make a big impact in the desktop world and others believe it can and will. Oddly enough I think that both points of view are right. Let me explain what I'm thinking.

Also: Why Linux should be taken over Vista

Learn Perl in 10 easy lessons - Lesson 6

Filed under
HowTos

In the previous lessons we've used a lot of functions that were built-in the language. For instance, we used "split", "print", "chomp" ...etc. What we haven't done yet, is to define our own functions. In Perl we call them subroutines.

Bad-Guy Tools for Good Guys

Filed under
Software

Script kiddies, Far-Eastern organized crime gangs, disgruntled employees: you name them and the chances are that at some point in the future your network will come under attack from them. In fact it probably already has.

Syndicate content

More in Tux Machines

Android Leftovers

IT runs on the cloud, and the cloud runs on Linux. Any questions?

A recent survey by the Uptime Institute of 1,000 IT executives found that 50 percent of senior enterprise IT executives expect the majority of IT workloads to reside off-premise in cloud or colocation sites in the future. Of those surveyed, 23 percent expect the shift to happen next year, and 70 percent expect that shift to occur within the next four years. Read more

Security Leftovers

  • Teardrop Attack: What Is It And How Does It Work?
    In Teardrop Attack, fragmented packets that are sent in the to the target machine, are buggy in nature and the victim’s machine is unable to reassemble those packets due to the bug in the TCP/IP fragmentation.
  • Updating code can mean fewer security headaches
    Organizations with high rates of code deployments spend half as much time fixing security issues as organizations without such frequent code updates, according to a newly released study. In its latest annual state-of-the-developer report, Devops software provider Puppet found that by better integrating security objectives into daily work, teams in "high-performing organizations" build more secure systems. The report, which surveyed 4,600 technical professionals worldwide, defines high IT performers as offering on-demand, multiple code deploys per day, with lead times for changes of less than one hour. Puppet has been publishing its annual report for five years.
  • Over half of world's top domains weak against email spoofing
    Over half of the world's most popular online services have misconfigured servers which could place users at risk from spoof emails, researchers have warned. According to Swedish cybersecurity firm Detectify, poor authentication processes and configuration settings in servers belonging to hundreds of major online domains are could put users at risk of legitimate-looking phishing campaigns and fraudulent emails.

Leftovers: OSS