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Friday, 20 Jan 17 - Tux Machines is a community-driven public service/news site which has been around for over a decade and primarily focuses on GNU/LinuxSubscribe now Syndicate content

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Quick Roundup

Type Title Authorsort icon Replies Last Post
Story Parsix GNU/Linux 8.15 and 8.10 Users Receive New Security Updates from Debian Roy Schestowitz 10/01/2017 - 12:04am
Story Min Browser Muffles the Web's Noise Roy Schestowitz 10/01/2017 - 12:08am
Story Analysis Of The Top 10 Linux Distributions Of 2016 Roy Schestowitz 10/01/2017 - 12:14am
Story digiKam 5.4.0 is released... Roy Schestowitz 10/01/2017 - 12:19am
Story Parted Magic Linux Live CD Now Ships with ZFS, Linux 4.9.1 and X.Org Server 1.19 Roy Schestowitz 10/01/2017 - 12:22am
Story LTE IoT kits include Raspberry Pi and AWS friendly models Roy Schestowitz 10/01/2017 - 12:28am
Story Security Leftovers Roy Schestowitz 10/01/2017 - 12:37am
Story 'Opening' Hardware Roy Schestowitz 10/01/2017 - 12:37am
Story Openwashing Roy Schestowitz 10/01/2017 - 12:39am
Story Top LibreOffice Alternatives Roy Schestowitz 10/01/2017 - 12:40am

Price up, specs down for low-cost Linux notebook?

Filed under
Linux
Hardware

linuxdevices: As its ship date nears, the price is rising and the specs dropping on Asus's ultra-low-cost, flash-based Linux notebook, according to reports. The EEE PC (3ePC), introduced at Computex, Taipei in June, is now expected to start at about $250, rather than the $190 originally targeted.

Ubuntu Technical Board votes on Compiz for Ubuntu 7.10

Filed under
Ubuntu

arstechnica: The Ubuntu Technical Board voted yesterday to ship Ubuntu 7.10 ("Gutsy") with Compiz enabled by default. Although Compiz has been featured in Ubuntu 7.10 Tribe prerelesases, the board has had difficulty determining whether or not it is reliable and functionally complete enough to warrant inclusion in the final release.

Five Easter Eggs for Linux

Filed under
Linux

linuxhaxor: I have compiled a list of five easter eggs that I came accross over time. Most of them has been around for as long as you can remember but I though it would be fun to compile a list of all the Linux Easter eggs with screen shots.

GTK1.2 doesn’t have to be ugly

Filed under
Software

kmandla.wordpress: There are better, more refined GTK1.2 looks around the Internet, but considering my previous attempts (which I refuse to show), this isn’t too bad.

Why the Linux Desktop will succeed despite itself

Filed under
Linux

desktoplinux: If you expect me to argue with the 13 reasons Kim Brebach gives for why the Linux desktop is unlikely to make it to a desktop near you any time soon, prepare to be disappointed. He's right.

The free software journalism club

Filed under
Misc

jem report: After I posted yesterday's call for stories from or about people who claim to have had comment posts deleted from Groklaw, I received an email from Pamela Jones asking me why I was "doing this." Since such a question presumes a certain level of conspiracy, I replied that the call for stories is self-explanatory. The next email I got on the subject was from Ziff Davis Enterprise editor Steven J. Vaughan-Nichols.

Over 130 line up for inaugural Open Source Awards

Filed under
OSS

computerworld.nz: Among the 130-plus nominations for the inaugural Open Source Awards are a film project, a Hurricane Katrina disaster-help website and Pharmac’s open source publishing system for the Pharmaceutical Schedule.

Hosted apps helping to drive open source

Filed under
OSS

vnunet: An increase in the use of hosted applications such as webmail and Google Apps is driving the adoption of open source software behind the scenes.

Linux is not so simple

Filed under
Linux

blog.lxpages: It seems the average people are constantly being brainwashed by the Linux community about Linux being the perfect replacement to Windows. I don’t necessarily disagree with them on this but I do think that Linux or Ubuntu is still not yet ready for an average grandma or grandpa.

Dealing with Mac-formatted drives on Linux

Filed under
HowTos

FOSSwire: If you deal with Macs at all, you might be curious as to whether Linux is capable of dealing with disks and drives formatted for Mac OS X. The answer is - yes, in most cases, and it is actually quite easy.

And:

  • Linux backup powered by RDiff-Backup

  • How to get PASV FTP to work behind a NAT router with ProFTPD
  • Controlling the size of the $PWD in bash
  • Create Video for an iPod Using Thin Liquid Film

New commercial Linux game slated by year end

Filed under
Gaming

linux.com: Hothead Games will soon be launching a new title based on the popular online Penny Arcade comic strip. Even better, the new game will be available for several platforms at its launch, including Linux.

MEPIS 7.0 Beta4: It's all Coming Together

Filed under
Linux

mepis.org (PR): The 4th Beta of SimplyMEPIS 7.0 has been released by Warren Woodford. The kernel in Beta4 is version 2.6.22.6 which contains more patches from the Kernel Development Team. Wireless-tools and wpasupplicant were updated.

How Open Source Software Can Improve Our Library

Filed under
OSS

degreetutor.com: Remember a time when doing research required us to have to go to the library? Your school had one, and that's probably where you spent most of your library time at. The depth a library can have can range greatly; it all depends on how much money that library gets in funding. Open source software is free for anyone to have.

Axfood is hungry for Red Hat

Filed under
Linux

Enterprise Linux Log: It’s a Wednesday, so that must mean yet another new customer for the folks at Red Hat. Today, it’s Axfood, one of the largest food retailers in Scandinavia.

Ubuntu World Domination in progress

Filed under
Ubuntu

modfree.org: The old question always used to be if linux will ever be as widely used as Windows. For years there were always comments on how Linux was ready for the desktop and getting more and more popular. Well, Ubuntu is clearly the Borg of Linux, users are being converted quicker than a Scientology rally.

Open Source Internet Utilities - Part 1

Filed under
Software

CyberCapital.Org: Here’s the SF day Gift collection from the CyberCapital. From Today on We are gonna list various Open Sources software utilities that you can use to get your work done. This is the first part of the upcoming series of Open Source Internet utilities.

Kernel space: Are Linux developers ignoring bug reports?

Filed under
Linux

LinuxWorld: Linux developers seem to be letting bug reports slip throught the cracks. With 1500 open kernel bugs in the tracking system, and 50 going unanswered on the mailing list, do developers need a better process or just new priorities?

Also:

  • CFS, Focusing on Simplification and Performance

  • BootUtils, Automatically Detecting the Root Volume
  • Virtual Machine Time Accounting
  • Data Errors During Drive Communication

What’s in a name? GNU, Linux, or GNU/Linux?

Filed under
Linux

daveshields.wordpress: I just came across a Slashdot story about an interview with Richard Stallman, Stallman: If you want freedom don’t follow Linus Torvalds. Reading this reminded me of a paper title written by my (then IBM) colleagues Ron Cytron and Jeanne Ferrante: What’s In a Name? Names do matter.

AMD 8.41.7 Display Driver

Filed under
Software

phoronix: After talking for the past week about AMD's new Linux efforts with announcing a new fglrx Linux driver overhaul and releasing ATI GPU specifications without a Non-Disclosure Agreement, the 8.41 fglrx driver is now released. In this article we have a few additional remarks on the AMD 8.41 Linux display driver for ATI Radeon graphics cards.

Also: AMD Releases 900+ Pages Of GPU Specs
And: AMD Specs Already Help Avivo Driver

Top Ten Rejected Ubuntu Version Names

Filed under
Ubuntu
Humor

Linux Online: Linux Online has obtained internal memos from the Ubuntu project regarding the codenames they choose for different releases of Ubuntu. For the first time, we're providing the names that were debated by the development team but were eventually rejected as official Ubuntu version codenames.

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More in Tux Machines

What is Linux?

Leftovers: OSS

  • ISS Federal Lead Rob Rogers on Agencies’ Open Source Moves & ‘Information Advantage’ Efforts
    ExecutiveBiz recently caught up with ISS Federal Systems Vice President Rob Rogers for this interview to discuss ongoing data-related trends in government and where he sees agencies prioritizing efforts in that arena, plus his ideas for how the government should approach open source methodology. [...] We have seen a significant shift in the past five years around agencies adopting and embracing open source methods. For one, open source technology is the primary catalyst behind some of the most significant progress related to the evolution of “big data” and analytic capabilities, which is used pervasively in the intelligence community. Certain agencies have contributed major projects to the open source community, which further solidifies their position on supporting open source. One notable example is NSA’s contribution of NiFi and Accumulo to the Apache Software Foundation in 2014. If these types of actions are an indicator of the direction that the IC agencies are heading in their support of open source, then the future is bright.
  • Davos 2017: China unites 25 countries to establish Global Blockchain Business Council
    On January 17, the governmental and industrial representatives from China and 25 other countries gathered in Davos, Switzerland for the Davos Forum. According to the latest update provided by Tai Cloud Corporation to EconoTimes, Jamie Elizabeth Smith, the former spokesperson and special assistant of the U.S. president Obama, announced that the Global Blockchain Business Council (GBBC) is formally established. The first national team members include senior executives of World Bank Mariana Dahan, former Estonian President Toomas Hendrik Ilves, former Prime Minister of Haidi Laurent Lamont, former Economy Minister of Ukraine Aivaras Abromavičius.
  • Intel's BigDL deep learning framework snubs GPUs for CPUs
    Last week Intel unveiled BigDL, a Spark-powered framework for distributed deep learning, available as an open source project. With most major IT vendors releasing machine learning frameworks, why not the CPU giant, too? What matters most about Intel's project may not be what it offers people building deep learning solutions on Spark clusters, but what it says about Intel’s ambitions to promote hardware that competes with GPUs for those applications.
  • Google's VR art app is open source and ready to get weird
    Google's Tilt Brush is capable of some pretty impressive results. But what if those 3D paintings and projects you made while strapped into virtual reality could escape into the real world?
  • How is your community promoting diversity?
    Open source software is a great enabler for technology innovation. Diversity unlocks innovation and drives market growth. Open source and diversity seem like the ultimate winning combination, yet ironically open source communities are among the least diverse tech communities. This is especially true when it comes to inherent diversity: traits such as gender, age, ethnicity, and sexual orientation.
  • Walmart’s Contributions to Open Source
    You might first think about open source in the context of outstanding tools for lean startup companies, but open source also finds a welcome home in behemoth, established companies, such as Walmart. In this O’Reilly OSCON video interview with Walmart Lab’s Alex Grigoryan, learn how Walmart both benefits from and contributes back to open source. The key takeaway? Open source allows you to reuse software components in labor saving ways.
  • Librecore: Aiming To Be A Better Libre Spin Of Coreboot
    Librecore is a new project aiming to be a new Coreboot downstream with a focus remaining on providing fully-free system firmware. Separately, Minifree/Libreboot has been accused (and admitted by Leah Rowe) to not paying a vendor for a completed contract. Librecore was formed due to "[Libreboot lead developer Leah Rowe] alienating large portions of the community, plus the stagnant and hard to use libreboot firmware and build system." With Librecore, they are aiming to use industry-standard tools and build environments. Another different design decision is pursuing Petitboot as the payload for a more modern and useful interface over GRUB as a payload.
  • Use of open source software growing across telecom
    Open source software may still be a new model for the telecommunications industry, but it’s rapidly gaining traction as operators look to mimic computing world. While the open source community has quickly gaining ground in the computing space, the traditional telecommunications industry has a history of hardening its siloed approach to networking technology. This was especially apparent at a time when most mobile telecom networks were 2G-based, with 3G technology just coming online in more advanced markets.
  • Open Source Software: What Every In-House Counsel Should Know
    Open source software (OSS) is ubiquitous in software development today, enabling technical innovation, productivity gains, and touching everything from big data and cloud to mobile and embedded. Control modules on the market today commonly include OSS components such as real-time operating systems, libraries, data interfaces, firmware, and display software.
  • 4 Common Open Source License Compliance Failures and How to Avoid Them
    Companies or organizations that don’t have a strong open source compliance program often suffer from errors and limitations in processes throughout the software development cycle that can lead to open source compliance failures. The previous article in this series covered common intellectual property failures. This time, we’ll discuss the four common open source license compliance failures and how to avoid them.

Docker 1.13, Containers, and DevOps

  • Introducing Docker 1.13
    Today we’re releasing Docker 1.13 with lots of new features, improvements and fixes to help Docker users with New Year’s resolutions to build more and better container apps. Docker 1.13 builds on and improves Docker swarm mode introduced in Docker 1.12 and has lots of other fixes. Read on for Docker 1.13 highlights.
  • Docker 1.13 Officially Released, Docker for AWS and Azure Ready for Production
    Docker announced today the general availability of Docker 1.13, the third major update of the open-source application container engine for GNU/Linux, macOS, and Microsoft Windows operating systems. Docker 1.13 has been in development for the past couple of months, during which it received no less than seven RC (Release Candidate) versions that implemented numerous improvements for the new Swarm Mode introduced in Docker 1.12, a few security features, as well as a new Remote API (version 1.25) and Client.
  • Distributed Fabric: A New Architecture for Container-Based Applications
    There’s a palpable sense of excitement in the application development world around container technology. Containers bring a new level of agility and speed to app development, giving developers the ability to break large monolithic apps into small, manageable microservices that can talk to one another, be more easily tested and deployed, and operate more efficiently as a full application. However, containers also demand a new architecture for the application services managing these microservices and apps, particularly in regards to service discovery — locating and consuming the services of those microservices.
  • DevOps trends emerging for 2017 and beyond
    Finally, one of the biggest trends for 2017 will not be just a focus on engaging and implementing some of these DevOps best practices into your enterprise, but a sweeping adoption of the DevOps/agile culture. This is because one of the most important – if not the absolute most key –tenets to a successful DevOps organization is culture. The enterprises that most espouse the shared responsibility, the empowered autonomous teams, the can-do attitudes, and the continuous learning environment in which DevOps thrives will see the biggest benefits.

Kernel Space/Linux

  • Optimizing Linux for Slow Computers
    It’s interesting, to consider what constitutes a power user of an operating system. For most people in the wider world a power user is someone who knows their way around Windows and Microsoft Office a lot, and can help them get their print jobs to come out right. For those of us in our community, and in particular Linux users though it’s a more difficult thing to nail down. If you’re a LibreOffice power user like your Windows counterpart, you’ve only really scratched the surface. Even if you’ve made your Raspberry Pi do all sorts of tricks in Python from the command line, or spent a career shepherding websites onto virtual Linux machines loaded with Apache and MySQL, are you then a power user compared to the person who knows their way around the system at the lower level and has an understanding of the kernel? Probably not. It’s like climbing a mountain with false summits, there are so many layers to power usership. So while some of you readers will be au fait with your OS at its very lowest level, most of us will be somewhere intermediate. We’ll know our way around our OS in terms of the things we do with it, and while those things might be quite advanced we’ll rely on our distribution packager to take care of the vast majority of the hard work.
  • Long-Term Maintenance, or How to (Mis-)Manage Embedded Systems for 10+ Years
    In this presentation, kernel hacker Jan Lübbe will explain why apparently reasonable approaches to long-term maintenance fail and how to establish a sustainable workflow instead.
  • Linux 4.9 Is the Next Long-Term Supported Kernel Branch, Says Greg Kroah-Hartman
    Linux kernel maintainer Greg Kroah-Hartman confirmed today, January 19, 2017, in a short message, on his Google+ page, that the Linux 4.9 branch is now marked as "longterm," or as some of you know as LTS (Long-Term Support). The story behind Linux kernel 4.9 becoming the next long-term supported series dates from way before it's launch last month, on December 11, when Linus Torvalds officially announced the new branch. It all started back on August 12, 2016, when Greg Kroah-Hartman dropped a quick Google+ post to say "4.9 == next LTS kernel."
  • Maintainers Don't Scale
    First let’s look at how the kernel community works, and how a change gets merged into Linus Torvalds’ repository. Changes are submitted as patches to mailing list, then get some review and eventually get applied by a maintainer to that maintainer’s git tree. Each maintainer then sends pull request, often directly to Linus. With a few big subsystems (networking, graphics and ARM-SoC are the major ones) there’s a second or third level of sub-maintainers in. 80% of the patches get merged this way, only 20% are committed by a maintainer directly. Most maintainers are just that, a single person, and often responsible for a bunch of different areas in the kernel with corresponding different git branches and repositories. To my knowledge there are only three subsystems that have embraced group maintainership models of different kinds: TIP (x86 and core kernel), ARM-SoC and the graphics subsystem (DRM).