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About Tux Machines

Saturday, 29 Apr 17 - Tux Machines is a community-driven public service/news site which has been around for over a decade and primarily focuses on GNU/LinuxSubscribe now Syndicate content

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Quick Roundup

Type Title Authorsort icon Replies Last Post
Story Linux Kernel News Roy Schestowitz 11/12/2016 - 8:24pm
Story MuQSS CPU Scheduler Released For Linux 4.9 Roy Schestowitz 12/12/2016 - 4:27am
Story Solus Project Announces Brisk Menu Applet for MATE Edition, Solbuild, and More Roy Schestowitz 12/12/2016 - 5:06am
Story Security Leftovers Roy Schestowitz 12/12/2016 - 5:56am
Story FOSS Licensing Roy Schestowitz 12/12/2016 - 5:58am
Story Leftovers: OSS and Sharing Roy Schestowitz 12/12/2016 - 5:59am
Story Android Leftovers Roy Schestowitz 12/12/2016 - 5:59am
Story Leftovers: Ubuntu Roy Schestowitz 12/12/2016 - 6:01am
Story Red Hat and Fedora Roy Schestowitz 12/12/2016 - 6:01am
Story Leftovers: Gaming Roy Schestowitz 12/12/2016 - 6:03am

AMD Phenom 9500 Linux Performance

Filed under
Hardware

phoronix: Have you recently upgraded to AMD's Spider platform with their quad-core Phenom processor and are running Linux? If so, and are experiencing kernel panics, stability problems, and even a psychedelic Ubuntu logo, you're not alone. In this article, we'll be looking at the AMD Phenom 9500 performance under Ubuntu 7.10.

Why you should not use pyinotify

Filed under
Linux

serpentine.com: A while ago, I had a need to monitor filesystem modifications, and I looked around for Python bindings for the Linux kernel’s inotify subsystem. At the time, the only existing library was pyinotify, so being a lazy sort, I naturally tried to use it.

Free/Open-source Text Editors

Filed under
Software

junauza.blogspot: A text editor is a type of program used for editing plain text files. Here is a list of valuable free/open-source text editors with graphical user interface (GUI).

Countries Adopting ODF Annual Report and Future Outlook

Filed under
OSS

fanaticattack.com: The OpenDocument Format Alliance (ODF Alliance) is an organization dedicated to educating on the benefits and opportunities of ODF. Launched in March 2006, the ODF Alliance now has over 480 member organizations in 53 countries.

AMD Releases Additional R600 GPU Programming Documentation

Filed under
Hardware

phoronix: In the second NDA-free documentation dump, AMD has just released programming data on the M76 and RS690 graphics processors. In this article, we have information on this just-released data as well as what else the community can expect in the way of documentation in the near future.

a stable arch branch?

Filed under
Linux

kmandla.wordpress: Don’t look now, but it could become a reality. A thread here describes the rationale for a snapshot of Arch at periodic intervals, allowing users to bounce between stable points, rather than use Arch in the rolling fashion it has now.

Firefox 3: Why Bother to Upgrade?

Filed under
Moz/FF

OSWeekly: Despite Firebird eventually maturing into Firefox that we all know today, I can't believe that I have yet to find any indication that the Mozilla team is planning on improving the really lame handling of RSS feeds. Flock is providing users with so much more and despite this, Firefox continues to remain with most of the same features it always has - why? I know. It's Google.

Flock: The browser that makes browsing obsolete

Filed under
Software

telegraph.co.uk: Think of the innovation that's happened in the last decade - the emergence of Google, YouTube and Facebook - and then consider for a moment the comparative lack of innovation in one crucial area: our web browsers, the software we use to access the internet.

gOS: A wake up call for Freedomware marketing

Filed under
Linux

libervis.com: Think gOS. It might not be such a bad advice after all. It's been hyped up, but it sold out. And there may be lessons in its deployment and success for all of us Free Software and GNU/Linux advocates! How can we trust any central entity with our computing activities and our data, an entity which is at that a private profit-driven, shareholder pressured public company?

Who Says Linux Doesn’t Have an Extraordinary MMORPG Game?

Filed under
Gaming

linuxfud.wordpress: Who Says Linux Doesn’t Have an Extraordinary MMORPG (Massive Multiplayer Online Role Playing Game) that’s extremely easer to install (yes, like in Microsoft Windows)?? I love this game!

Are $100 Laptops Doomed?

Filed under
Linux

Newsweek: At next week's Consumer Electronics Show in Las Vegas, the semiconductor giant Intel was planning to demonstrate a prototype of the celebrated One Laptop Per Child "XO" computer that runs not with the original AMD microprocessor but its own chip. But now Intel has broken with OLPC, and once again, One Laptop's founder, Nicholas Negroponte, is charging that the chip giant is messing with his charitable efforts for its own corporate ends.

kubuntu! how could you?

Filed under
SUSE
Ubuntu

quantumsaint.wordpress: During my glorious 10 day vacation I decided to get my hands on the Kubuntu 7.10 DVD iso. It was just waiting to be unleashed upon my new 64 bit dual core setup. No dice. Everything seemed to be going fine and then it gets to a point where it just stops.

Also: The 64 bit Mystery

Linux, Leopard Can't Bite Vista

Filed under
Microsoft

forbes: The reviews are in--and they don't matter one damn bit. Microsoft's Windows Vista went on sale a year ago this month, and despite poor marks from the tech press and heaping helpings of scorn from Mac and Linux aficionados, the operating system has turned into a money machine for Microsoft. Just look at the numbers.

Speaking Truth to Power Sometimes Involves Yelling

Linux Today: My colleague Bruce Byfield made some good points in his recent blog entry "Conspiracy theorists and free software." In it, he outlines his concerns that there is a vocal faction in the free software community that is too obsessed with a certain proprietary company, and that their rants and raves amount to so much rabble-rousing, which ultimately hurts the community at large.

Is Red Hat still relevent? You bet.

Filed under
Linux

montanalinux.org: I recently attended a Linux Installfest and the primary distribution recommended by those heading up the event was Ubuntu. That's all well and good but during their Linux dog-and-pony-show a statement was made regarding Red Hat that struck me.

Speaking Hangman is fun for the whole family

Filed under
Software

linux.com: Speaking Hangman is a cross-platform bilingual game that's both fun and educational, and suitable for the whole family.

A short rant on Ubuntu and dpkg: fsck you, dpkg

Filed under
Ubuntu

rudd-o.com: A long long time ago, in a gal… in an older computer, I had Fedora. RPM — the packaging system in Fedora — was amazing in several aspects. Fast-forward to my contemporary Kubuntu system.

Ubuntu — Beyond the Hype

Filed under
Ubuntu

mandrake.tips.4.free.fr: Since a few years, Ubuntu has been grabbing headlines in the mainstream press. We've seen and read the hype. But whether it's functional, usable, yes even pleasant to use, that's the thing.

PCLinuxOS Magazine January 2008 Released

Filed under
PCLOS

PCLinuxOS Magazine, January 2008 (Issue 17) is available to download. Some highlights include Common Information Commands, How to repair kdeinit problems, and It's Magic!

Linux security: 2007 in review

Filed under
Linux

techtarget.com: New Linux tools and updates kept IT security hacks at bay in 2007. That said, new problems -- such as security risks in virtual machines -- cropped up last year. Here's my round-up of the big Linux security events, software releases and controversies that cropped up in 2007.

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More in Tux Machines

Google in Devices

  • Glow LEDs with Google Home
    For the part one, the custom commands were possible thanks to Google Actions Apis. I used API.AI for my purpose since they had good documentation. I wont go into detail explaining the form fields in Api.ai, they have done a good job with documentation and explaining part, I will just share my configurations screenshot for your quick reference and understanding. In Api.ai the conversations are broken into intents. I used one intent (Default Welcome Intent) and a followup intent (Default Welcome Intent – custom) for my application.
  • Google Assistant SDK preview brings voice agent to the Raspberry Pi
    Google has released a Python-based Google Assistant SDK that’s designed for prototyping voice agent technology on the Raspberry Pi 3. Google’s developer preview aims to bring Google Assistant voice agent applications to Linux developers. The Google Assistant SDK is initially designed for prototyping voice agent technology on the Raspberry Pi 3 using Python and Raspbian Linux, but it works with most Linux distributions. The SDK lets developers add voice control, natural language understanding, and Google AI services to a variety of devices.
  • Huawei, Google create a high-powered single board computer for Android
    The Raspberry Pi is very popular with DIY enthusiasts because of the seemingly endless possibilities of how you can design devices with it. Huawei and Google have created their own single board computer (SBC), but this will probably benefit Android developers more than DIY enthusiasts. The HiKey 960 is a very robust SBC aimed at creating an Android PC or a testing tool for Android apps.
  • Huawei’s $239 HiKey 960 wants to be a high-end alternative to Raspberry Pi
    12.5 million sales in five years – Linaro and Huawei have unveiled a high-end (read: expensive) rival.

Mobile, Tizen, and Android

Leftovers: OSS

  • Is The Open Source Software Movement A Technological Religion?
  • Experts weigh in on open source platforms, market
    In this Advisory Board, our experts discuss the pros and cons of open source virtualization and which platforms are giving proprietary vendors a run for their money.
  • Light a fire under Cassandra with Apache Ignite
    Apache Cassandra is a popular database for several reasons. The open source, distributed, NoSQL database has no single point of failure, so it’s well suited for high-availability applications. It supports multi-datacenter replication, allowing organizations to achieve greater resiliency by, for example, storing data across multiple Amazon Web Services availability zones. It also offers massive and linear scalability, so any number of nodes can easily be added to any Cassandra cluster in any datacenter. For these reasons, companies such as Netflix, eBay, Expedia, and several others have been using Cassandra for key parts of their businesses for many years.
  • Proprietary Election Systems: Summarily Disqualified
    Hello Open Source Software Community & U.S. Voters, I and the California Association of Voting Officials, represent a group of renowned computer scientists that have pioneered open source election systems, including, "one4all," New Hampshire’s Open Source Accessible Voting System (see attached). Today government organizations like NASA, the Department of Defense, and the U.S. Air Force rely on open source software for mission critical operations. I and CAVO believe voting and elections are indeed mission-critical to protect democracy and fulfill the promise of the United States of America as a representative republic. Since 2004, the open source community has advocated for transparent and secure—publicly owned—election systems to replace the insecure, proprietary systems most often deployed within communities. Open source options for elections systems can reduce the costs to taxpayers by as much as 50% compared to traditional proprietary options, which also eliminates vendor lock-in, or the inability of an elections office to migrate away from a solution as costs rise or quality decreases.
  • Microsoft SQL Server on Linux – YES, Linux! [Ed: Marketing and PR from IDG's "Microsoft Subnet"; This headline is a lie from Microsoft; something running on DrawBridge (proprietary Wine-like Windows layer) is not GNU/Linux]

Creative Commons News

  • Creative Commons Is Resurrecting Palmyra
    Creative Commons launched its 2017 Global Summit today with a rather moving surprise: a seven-foot-tall 3D printed replica of the Tetrapylon from Palmyra, Syria. For those who don't know the tragic situation, Palmyra is one of the most historic cities in the world — but it is being steadily destroyed by ISIS, robbing the world of countless irreplaceable artifacts and murdering those who have tried to protect them (the folks at Extra History have a pair of good summary videos discussing the history and the current situation in the city). Among ISIS's human targets was Bassel Khartabil, who launched Syria's CC community several years ago and began a project to take 3D scans of the city, which CC has been gathering and releasing under a CC0 Public Domain license. He was captured and imprisoned, and for the past five years his whereabouts and status have been unknown. As the #FreeBassel campaign continues, Creative Commons is now working to bring his invaluable scans to life in the form of 3D-printed replicas, starting with today's unveiling of the Tetrapylon — which was destroyed in January along with part of a Roman theatre after ISIS captured the city for a second time.
  • Creative Commons: 1.2 billion strong and growing
    "The state of the commons is strong." The 2016 State of the Commons report, issued by Creative Commons this morning, does not begin with those words, but it could. The report shows an increase in adoption for the suite of licenses, but that is not the whole story.