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Thursday, 24 May 18 - Tux Machines is a community-driven public service/news site which has been around for over a decade and primarily focuses on GNU/LinuxSubscribe now Syndicate content

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Type Title Authorsort icon Replies Last Post
Story Debconf/Debian Leftovers Roy Schestowitz 21/07/2016 - 7:32am
Story Fedora: The Latest Roy Schestowitz 21/07/2016 - 7:33am
Story Red Hat News Roy Schestowitz 21/07/2016 - 7:34am
Story GNOME News Roy Schestowitz 21/07/2016 - 7:35am
Story Leftovers: Software Roy Schestowitz 21/07/2016 - 7:38am
Story today's leftovers Roy Schestowitz 21/07/2016 - 7:40am
Story Games for GNU/Linux Roy Schestowitz 21/07/2016 - 8:18am
Story OpenSUSE 42.2 Alpha 3 Roy Schestowitz 21/07/2016 - 8:21am
Story Microsoft Privacy Violations, Fedora: Season's Pick Roy Schestowitz 21/07/2016 - 8:29am
Story Fedora 24 - And we represent! Roy Schestowitz 21/07/2016 - 8:41am

Testing Out The Nouveau Driver On Fedora 11

Filed under
Linux

phoronix.com: With the forthcoming release of Fedora 11, Red Hat has made the bold (but wise) decision of replacing xf86-video-nv as the default open-source NVIDIA driver with the Nouveau driver instead.

Easily Mount ISO Files in Linux on Right Click

Filed under
HowTos

This article will explain how to add a script to Nautilus so that you can easly mount and unmount ISO files in most linux distros running Gnome (it needs Nautilus to show the desktop).

The Perfect Server - OpenSUSE 11.1 [ISPConfig 3]

Filed under
SUSE
HowTos

This tutorial shows how to prepare an OpenSUSE 11.1 server for the installation of ISPConfig 3, and how to install ISPConfig 3.

some odds & ends:

Filed under
News
  • An Early Look At OpenSolaris 2009.06

  • Scribus and Linux and Comic Strips
  • Find the right Firefox add-ons
  • Worst of the week (roundup)
  • Mother and Ubuntu
  • Linux version of TwickerTape now available
  • Some Off-Season Linux Humor
  • Star Wars Vs. Star Trek: Some Off-Topic Humor
  • Q&A: When Mobility and Open Source Collide
  • Awesome Ubuntu
  • FLOSS Weekly 62: eBox
  • Acer Aspire One D150 running Linux

some howtos:

Filed under
HowTos
  • How to write an interactive shell script

  • How to update ALSA to latest version easily
  • Making a Screencast in Linux
  • Get PDF Word Count In Linux
  • TuxCards - Hierarical notebook for TuxFreaks
  • A handful of Firefox tweaks that will double speed
  • Fixing mplayer Sound
  • How to prepare a system for kernel crash dump analysis
  • Kill X session in Jaunty Jackalope
  • Hudzilla Coding Academy: Project Seven

BitDefender Antivirus for Unices

Filed under
Software

tuxradar.com: Just because you use Linux, it doesn't mean your computer doesn't have viruses or worms. Virus is a catch-all phrase, and BitDefender's designed to catch them all - from executable viruses, script viruses, macro viruses, to backdoors, trojans, spyware, adware, diallers, and more.

Beware of so-called Linux proponents

Filed under
Linux

thebeezspeaks.blogspot: Every now and then you stumble across a blog that is run by a so-called Linux enthusiast. But when you start to look a little closer, you will see that they spread the SOFUD.

The Year of the Linux-powered Robots

Filed under
Linux

junauza.com: In the very near future, robots will become an indispensable tool that man can’t live without. Just like computers. At the moment, there are already different kinds of robots that run on Linux.

Dreamlinux 3.5 Review - Desktop Emphasis

Filed under
Linux

superphysics.awardspace.com: I have been distro hopping a lot in recent times. I was testing a lot of the less known Linuxes but never came across one that had no big problem. Of course, Dreamlinux is a fairly popular Linux distro.

A Short Review of OpenSolaris 2008.11

Filed under
OS

blog.hydrasystemsllc.com: I decided to finally check out OpenSolaris 2008.11. While this release came out back in November of 2008 (hence the 2008.11 naming convention), it has taken me this long to finally give it a chance. Maybe it is because I am still somewhat skeptical with the whole OpenSolaris Project.

Deciding Which Linux Flavor is Best

Filed under
Linux

linuxdistrochoices.com: Even the smallest amount if research into Linux will have illustrated the sheer range of distributions out there. They are all based on the original Linux kernel built by Linus Torvalds (the father of modern Linux) and can all interoperate to varying degrees.

full circle magazine #23, hot from the digital presses!

Filed under
Ubuntu

We’ve got a whole lot of Full Circle goodness for you in this issue! This month: Command and Conquer - Troubleshooting, How-To : Program in C, and Becoming An Ubuntu User.

New Intel IGP Appears In Linux 2.6.30 Kernel

Filed under
Linux

phoronix.com: The merge window for the Linux 2.6.30 kernel is now open and Linus has already accepted a horde of new patches for this next quarterly Linux update.

Pains of OpenSource or Price for Going Free

Filed under
Software

pclinuxos2007.blogspot: In the earlier posts it is mentioned in details of how we planned to move to Linux. But there are still a few glitches that turns it down.

Wolvix 2 - Hungry like the wolf

Filed under
Linux

dedoimedo.com: Wolvix is a friendly Slackware-based distribution, featuring the Xfce desktop and a lovely bunch of applications to suit every soul, while leaning on the traditional stability of the Slackware family for rock-solid support. That was my impression the last time I tried Wolvix, version 1.1 called Hunter.

The World Beyond Microsoft

Filed under
Microsoft

polishlinux.org: I started looking at the possible courses of action to happen if Microsoft vanished. What would a Microsoft-free world look like ?

Top 10 Free Linux Games in 2009

Filed under
Gaming

blog.taragana.com: I have seen a lot of gamers who feel that there aren't good games to play on Linux. There's an array of free open source games waiting to run on the Linux platform. So I got the top linux games in 2009. And here I come.

Linux is about choice (pt 2)

Filed under
Linux

nthrbldyblg.blogspot: Part two of my rant deals with another situation that is slightly different - "Why then, do applications (or their developers) decide to take away [or keep] that choice?"

Video Interview with Kernel Developer Peter Anvin

Filed under
Linux

linuxpromagazine.com: Bootloader Syslinux developer Peter Anvin, since 1992 kernel developer, gives an insight into his work. In the video, he tells of how Intel let him "get on with his Linux thing" while at the same time seek his advice in Linux matters, which he enjoys.

today's leftovers:

Filed under
News
  • Comparing boot performance of Ext3, Ext4, and XFS on Ubuntu

  • How To Install Boxee In Ubuntu Linux
  • Using Named Pipes (FIFOs) with Bash
  • Configure a Linux Firewall with Webmin
  • What is Btrfs?
  • Avoid Typing with Autokey
  • Gentoo on the Eee PC
  • Today’s technology WTFLOL, courtesy of Microsoft
  • Using N95 as modem for Ubuntu 8.10
  • Is Using Linux Too Frugal?
  • Linux Basement: Episode 38 - Ramblings and OpenVZ
  • Linux Void 24 - Late Late Late Show
  • Security update for OpenSSL
  • I just had an Epiphany
  • Slideshow: Xandros Presto Beta
  • Yes to new open source business models, no to whinging
  • Writing GNOME Docs, Part III (Let’s write some code!)
  • Beta Testers
  • iGod, the Linux-loving Cyber God
  • Linux Humor: RTFM Man Page
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More in Tux Machines

Linux Foundation: New Members, Certifications and Microsoft Entryism

ETSI/GNU/Linux-based MANO

  • ETSI Open Source MANO announces Release FOUR, moving faster than ever
    ETSI is pleased to announce the availability of OSM Release FOUR. Bringing a large set of new features and enhancements, this version is the most ambitious and innovative OSM Release to date and constitutes a huge leap forward in terms of functionality, user experience and maturity. This new Release brings substantial progress thanks to a number of architectural improvements, which result in a more efficient behaviour and much leaner footprint – up to 75% less RAM consumption. Additionally, its new northbound interface, aligned with ETSI NFV work, and the brand-new cloud-native setup, facilitate OSM’s installation and operation, while making OSM more open and simpler to integrate with pluggable modules and external systems, such as the existing OSS.
  • Open Source MANO Release FOUR lands
    In monitoring, ETSI says OSM Release FOUR's alarm and metric settings are easier to use, and a new policy manager adds push notifications and reactive policy configuration, which the standards body says “opens the door to closed-loop operations”. The monitoring module uses Apache Kafka as its message passing bus, and the module also implements a flexible plugin model so sysadmins can BYO monitoring environment.

today's howtos part 2

Programming: GitLab, Security, Power and Jakarta EE

  • GitLab 10.8 open sources push mirroring
    GitLab 10.8 was released this week with the open sourcing of a highly requested feature. The company announced its push mirroring capability is now open sourced. Push mirroring was originally introduced as a paid feature, but GitLab says it is one of the most frequently requested to be moved into the open-source codebase. This move will add a few new use cases for GitLab Core users, such as freelance developers being able to mirror client repos and users migrating to GitLab being able to use push mirroring to ease the migration path.
  • How Security Can Bridge the Chasm with Development
    Enhancing the relationships between security and engineering is crucial for improving software security. These six steps will bring your teams together. There's always been a troublesome rift between enterprise security teams and software developers. While the friction is understandable, it's also a shame, because the chasm between these teams makes it all the more challenging to build quality applications that are both great to use and safe.
  • Which Programming Languages Use the Least Electricity?
    Can energy usage data tell us anything about the quality of our programming languages? Last year a team of six researchers in Portugal from three different universities decided to investigate this question, ultimately releasing a paper titled “Energy Efficiency Across Programming Languages.” They ran the solutions to 10 programming problems written in 27 different languages, while carefully monitoring how much electricity each one used — as well as its speed and memory usage.
  • How Java EE found new life as Jakarta EE
    The title of this post may seem strange, but if you look a bit into Java EE's recent history, it will make sense. Originally, Sun started and ran Java Enterprise Edition, and later Oracle took over after it acquired Sun. Specifications were driven by a Sun/Oracle-governed process. At more or less regular intervals, they made a new version of the specification available, which was implemented by the server vendors. Those vendors had to license the technology compatibility kits (TCKs) and brand from Oracle. Let's fast-forward a bit. In 2013, Java EE 7 was released, and Oracle began work on EE8, but it did not progress quickly. Meanwhile, new technologies like Docker and Kubernetes came along and changed the way applications run. Instead of running a single fat server process on a big machine, the software is now split into smaller, independent services that run in a (usually) Docker container orchestrated by Kubernetes.