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Thursday, 30 Mar 17 - Tux Machines is a community-driven public service/news site which has been around for over a decade and primarily focuses on GNU/LinuxSubscribe now Syndicate content

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Quick Roundup

Type Title Authorsort icon Replies Last Post
Story Licensing FUD and Licensing Advice Roy Schestowitz 18/01/2017 - 8:58pm
Story PulseAudio 10 and Virtual GPU in Linux Roy Schestowitz 18/01/2017 - 8:59pm
Story Development News: LLVM, New Releases, and GCC Roy Schestowitz 18/01/2017 - 9:01pm
Story Red Hat News Roy Schestowitz 18/01/2017 - 9:01pm
Story Security News Roy Schestowitz 18/01/2017 - 9:03pm
Story Debian News (manpages and TeX Live) Roy Schestowitz 18/01/2017 - 9:04pm
Story Linux Devices, Raspberry Pi, and Tizen Roy Schestowitz 18/01/2017 - 9:05pm
Story The Fairphone 2 Running Ubuntu Will Be On Show at MWC17 Roy Schestowitz 18/01/2017 - 9:56pm
Story Solus to Move to GNOME 3.22 Stack Soon, Adopt Linux 4.9 and Bulletproof Updates Roy Schestowitz 19/01/2017 - 12:11am
Story Ubuntu Leftovers Roy Schestowitz 19/01/2017 - 12:18am

How much is Microsoft's patent protection worth?

Filed under
Linux

matt asay: For those who can't be bought, just how much protection are you missing? Not very much, it seems to me, and to a range of open-source legal experts I e-mailed to solicit their opinions.

Basic Linux Tips and Tricks, Part 1

Filed under
Linux

linux planet: This article is intended for people who have some computer expertise, even if it's Windows-only. At a minimum, you should be comfortable with the MS-DOS command line in Windows and have done a bit of Windows Registry editing to give you some experience with configuration files.

New Partnership Extends Linux Foundation’s Work with Japanese Developers

Filed under
Linux

PR: The Linux Foundation and the Information-technology Promotion Agency today announced the signing of a collaboration agreement. The LF and IPA will work together to accelerate adoption of Linux and open source software in areas of technology development, standardization and legal activities.

Ease of Use: But For Who?

Filed under
Linux

blogs.techrepublic.com: I think Linux developers are targeting the wrong people. I think, in a number of instances, Linux developers are targeting themselves as the key user group for their tools. What made me come to that conclusion might surprise you.

FOSS: The major players in Linux and free- and open-source software

Filed under
OSS

iTWire: As free and open source software receives greater attention and recognition, several companies and packages are emerging as clear leaders and important influencers as well as visionaries that are sure to make a mark in the very near future. Here are my picks for who’s making a mark today and tomorrow on the FOSS world.

Open Source Gaming Review: Assault Cube 0.92

Filed under
Gaming

raiden's realm: Assault Cube is an open source 3d shooter done in the old school deathmatch style of gameplay, but with much newer graphics. Gameplay is especially good in this game due to the way it's implemented.

Watching Your Power Consumption With Powertop On Fedora 7

Filed under
HowTos

Powertop is a command-line tool released by Intel that shows you the power consumption of the applications running on your system. It works best on notebooks with Intel mobile processors and can help you find out the programs that put a strain on your notebook battery.

DistroWatch Weekly, Issue 222

Filed under
Linux

This week in DistroWatch Weekly:

  • Reviews: First look at PC-BSD 1.4

  • News: openSUSE 10.3 ready for download, Mandriva closes "Club", interview with Clement Lefebvre, Sabayon Linux updates, Ubuntu "Gutsy" new features
  • Released last week: Linux Mint 3.1, Red Flag Linux 6.0
  • Upcoming releases: openSUSE 10.3, Mandriva Linux 2008
  • Site news: Meet Jim Putman, the DistroWatch Podcast guy
  • Donations: Damn Small Linux receives US$350
  • New additions: Ubuntu Muslim Edition
  • Reader comments

Read more in this week's issue of DistroWatch Weekly....

New Compiz Fusion git packages

Filed under
Software

cyberorg: The packages in home:cyberorg repository are now synced to 30 Sep git checkout. 3D plugin is back, thanks to maniac and onestone, it is much better now.

Flash Player 9 Update

Filed under
Software

labs.adobe.com: A new version of Flash Player 9 Update was released on October 1, 2007. This update, codenamed “Moviestar,” includes new features, enhancements and bug fixes for Windows, Macintosh, and Linux versions of Flash Player 9.

KompoZer revives Mozilla WYSIWYG Web editing software

Filed under
Software

linux.com: In proprietary software, Web page design is dominated by Adobe's Dreamweaver and Microsoft's FrontPage. Free software users have witnessed the rise and fall of several Web design apps, but it has been a while since a new one debuted. Now the next new release is here -- KompoZer, heir to the Mozilla Composer legacy and updated for today's technology.

HP: Linux ready for mission-critical apps

Filed under
Linux

zdnet: Randy Hergett, HP's director of engineering for Open Source and Linux Organization, told ZDNet Asia at the Gelato Itanium Conference and Expo held here today that Linux is ready to be used in some mission-critical applications, despite a perception that there are gaps in areas such as manageability.

Linux Still Doesn't Make It on the Desktop

Filed under
Linux

computerworld: Many people now believe that Linux represents a viable alternative. Unfortunately, despite major strides in recent years — notably the Ubuntu release — Linux still isn’t viable for most end users or organizations.

Speaking of Linux and the spirit of open source

Filed under
OSS

matt asay: It's almost shameful how paltry Justin Steinman's understanding of open source is. I don't say this to denigrate Justin personally, but when I read things like this from Groklaw I just can't understand how Novell manages to say "open source" with a straight face.

Simplified Mandatory Access Control Kernel

Filed under
Linux

kernelTRAP: "Smack is the Simplified Mandatory Access Control Kernel," Casey Schaufler said posting the third version of his patchest. He explained, "Smack implements mandatory access control (MAC) using labels attached to tasks and data containers, including files, SVIPC, and other tasks. Smack is a kernel based scheme that requires an absolute minimum of application support and a very small amount of configuration data."

Improving checkpatch

Filed under
Linux

kernelTRAP: "This version brings a number of new checks, and a number of bug fixes," Andy Whitcroft noted in his announcement for version 0.10 of checkpatch.pl, used by Linux kernel developers to scan their code for common mistakes. Ingo Molnar expressed concern, "your checkpatch patch itself produces 22 warnings."

Main Menue Applet: Preferences and Administration

Filed under
Software

The gnome main menu applet was created as another effort for people to try and use awn and get rid of all their gnome bars. Well as another stride in this direction more has been added to this applet.

KDE Commit-Digest for 30th September 2007

Filed under
KDE

In this week's KDE Commit-Digest: Beginnings of a list view, and an applet browser integrated into Plasma. Optimisations in Konqueror. More work, including image practice support in Parley. XMP metadata support in Digikam, with new splashscreens announced.

Jews, Gentiles, and the Open Source Definition

Filed under
OSS

Matt Asay: On the one hand, you have the free software purists (of which I'm increasingly part) who demand strict adherence to The Law (of open source). On the other, you have a growing "gentile" body of open-source converts, some of which don't want to have to live by old-school "ordinances" of open source.

Did you ever wonder..?

Filed under
OSS

oneandoneis2: There's an interesting article linked from places like Linux Devices and Linux Watch on the whole GPL v2 / GPL v3 thing. But it reminded my of something I wondered about a while ago: Namely, if software companies had had more faith in copyright in the early days, would GNU or Linux ever have happened?

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More in Tux Machines

Security Leftovers

  • Security updates for Thursday
  • Security Tips for Installing Linux on Your SysAdmin Workstation
    Once you’ve chosen a Linux distro that meets all the security guidelines set out in our last article, you’ll need to install the distro on your workstation.
  • Fedora 26 crypto policy Test Day today (2017-03-30)!
  • Open-source developers targeted in sophisticated malware attack
    For the past few months, developers who publish their code on GitHub have been targeted in an attack campaign that uses a little-known but potent cyberespionage malware. The attacks started in January and consisted of malicious emails specifically crafted to attract the attention of developers, such as requests for help with development projects and offers of payment for custom programming jobs. The emails had .gz attachments that contained Word documents with malicious macro code attached. If allowed to execute, the macro code executed a PowerShell script that reached out to a remote server and downloaded a malware program known as Dimnie.
  • A scramble at Cisco exposes uncomfortable truths about U.S. cyber defense
    When WikiLeaks founder Julian Assange disclosed earlier this month that his anti-secrecy group had obtained CIA tools for hacking into technology products made by U.S. companies, security engineers at Cisco Systems (CSCO.O) swung into action. The Wikileaks documents described how the Central Intelligence Agency had learned more than a year ago how to exploit flaws in Cisco's widely used Internet switches, which direct electronic traffic, to enable eavesdropping. Senior Cisco managers immediately reassigned staff from other projects to figure out how the CIA hacking tricks worked, so they could help customers patch their systems and prevent criminal hackers or spies from using the same methods, three employees told Reuters on condition of anonymity.
  • NTPsec: a Secure, Hardened NTP Implementation
    Network time synchronization—aligning your computer's clock to the same Universal Coordinated Time (UTC) that everyone else is using—is both necessary and a hard problem. Many internet protocols rely on being able to exchange UTC timestamps accurate to small tolerances, but the clock crystal in your computer drifts (its frequency varies by temperature), so it needs occasional adjustments. That's where life gets complicated. Sure, you can get another computer to tell you what time it thinks it is, but if you don't know how long that packet took to get to you, the report isn't very useful. On top of that, its clock might be broken—or lying. To get anywhere, you need to exchange packets with several computers that allow you to compare your notion of UTC with theirs, estimate network delays, apply statistical cluster analysis to the resulting inputs to get a plausible approximation of real UTC, and then adjust your local clock to it. Generally speaking, you can get sustained accuracy to on the close order of 10 milliseconds this way, although asymmetrical routing delays can make it much worse if you're in a bad neighborhood of the internet.
  • Zelda Coatings
    I assume that every permutation of scams will eventually be tried; it is interesting that the initial ones preyed on people's avarice and dishonesty: "I will transfer millions to your bank account, then you share with me" - with subsequent scams appealing to another demographic: "I want to donate a large sum to your religious charity" - to perhaps capture a more virtuous but still credulous lot. Where will it end ?

Tizen and Android

Linux and Linux Foundation

Mesa and Intel Graphics