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About Tux Machines

Tuesday, 24 Jan 17 - Tux Machines is a community-driven public service/news site which has been around for over a decade and primarily focuses on GNU/LinuxSubscribe now Syndicate content

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Quick Roundup

Type Title Authorsort icon Replies Last Post
Poll Too Many Distros srlinuxx 2 09/11/2013 - 3:17am
Story More BS from the Evil One. srlinuxx 10/04/2005 - 11:27pm
Story Doom3 for those with little or no PC! srlinuxx 11/04/2005 - 12:49am
Story Vin Diesel going soft on us? srlinuxx 2 06/02/2005 - 4:25pm
Story Linux leaders at open-source summit srlinuxx 10/04/2005 - 11:35pm
Story Moooore Spam! srlinuxx 1 06/02/2005 - 4:12am
Story 50 gmail invites? srlinuxx 1 06/02/2005 - 4:10am
Story This months Cosmo srlinuxx 06/02/2005 - 4:03am
Story Mandrake's Clustering Again srlinuxx 11/04/2005 - 4:58pm
Story I Heard a Rumor - PCLOS 8.1 in the Works? srlinuxx 8 06/12/2008 - 9:45pm

Ubuntu Gutsy Gibbon Tribe 2 Released

Filed under
Ubuntu

LinuxLookup: Gutsy Gibbon Tribe 2, which will in time become Ubuntu 7.10 has just been released for testing. Pre-releases of Gutsy are *not* encouraged for anyone needing a stable system.

Also: Why you should be excited about Ubuntu 7.10
And: Screenshots

TurboLinux Wizpy Review

Filed under
Hardware

Linuxlookup.com has just reviewed the TurboLinux Wizpy. This handheld mp3 player meets USB thumb-drive may be small in stature, but offers a versatile solution for anyone looking for portable web browsing, email, office software and media on the go. In this review we're going to introduce you to the main functions and features of the Wizpy product, but does it truly have a place on the market?

Prof Fizzwizzle and the Molten Mystery - A beautiful puzzle game for Linux

Filed under
Gaming

AllAboutLinux: Remember the time when I reviewed a very beautiful game called FizzBall which runs on Linux and which was developed by a young gaming company called Grubby games ? Well, they have released yet another game called "Prof. Fizzwizzle and the Molten Mystery" - this time a game of puzzles.

How the New OpenOffice Chart Tool Works When You Don't Specify a Data Range

Filed under
HowTos

OpenOffice.org Training, Tips, and Ideas: If you choose Insert > Chart in Calc, in the new tool, without a range selected, it's not much use. You get a big blank chart. In Writer, however, at least in this stage of development of the tool, you get something different.

Yoper 3.0 requires some tinkering

Filed under
Linux
Reviews

linux.com: Yoper claims to be a high-performance Linux distribution optimized for newer processors. I tested a beta of Yoper 3.0 on my desktop a year ago and was so impressed that when 3.0 was released this month, I installed it on my new Hewlett-Packard Pavilion dv6105 notebook. Using it, however, left me disappointed.

Runes Of Avalon Comes To Linux - An Epic Puzzle Game

Filed under
Gaming

gamesindustry.biz: Anawiki Games, www.anawiki.com, has announced their latest LINUX title, Runes of Avalon, www.runesofavalon.com. The game offers a unique combination of match-three and Tetris mechanics, over one hundred levels, three play modes, and an intriguing storyline.

Alleged critical holes in Xvid

Filed under
Security

heise-security: According to reports from several security services, the Xvid 1.1.2 Video Codec Library has a security hole which attackers could use to gain control over a PC. Both Windows and Linux applications are affected.

Postfix Monitoring With Mailgraph And pflogsumm On Debian Etch

Filed under
HowTos

GPL V3, The Q&A: Part 1 & 2

Filed under
OSS

At the end of this week, after 16 years, the Free Software Foundation should bless version three of the GNU General Public License, the sequel to what is arguably the most widely used and most impactful copyright license ever. This is my small contribution towards that understanding.

The Wonders of rsync

Filed under
Software

Linux App Finder: I've known about rsync for a while now, but I never got around to experimenting with it that much. When I decided to start regular automated backups I knew that incremental was the way to go. Downloading my entire server to my local machine everynight just wouldn't cut it. Fortunately rsync provided the perfect solution.

Red Hat CEO says he talked patents with Microsoft

Reuters: Red Hat Inc. Chief Executive Matthew Szulik said his company last year held talks with Microsoft Corp over a patent agreement that broke down before the software giant signed a deal with Red Hat rival Novell Inc.

Google Desktop released for Linux

Filed under
Google

builderau.com.au: Google has today launched a beta version of Google Desktop search for Linux, a sign of growing support by the Internet giant for Linux on the desktop.

Simple Linux Backup rolls out new rev

Filed under
Software

desktoplinux.com: The Simple Linux Backup project announced the release of version 0.3.2 today. Simple Linux Backup is an easy-to-use program for backing up a desktop Linux system, with a friendly user interface, originator Steven J. Rosen said.

Mesa 7.0 released

Filed under
Software

/home/liquidat: As promised Mesa 7.0 was released. Besides a set of bugfixes the most notable new features are support for OpenGL 2.0 and OpenGL 2.1. This means that, finally after 3 yeas of waiting, the free X.Org graphics drivers can now support newer graphics technology.

The Lesser Apps of KDE - Games

Filed under
Gaming

Raiden's Realm: While many people know that KDE does comes with a selection of games, which most OS's seem to come with these days, few are truly aware of what those games are and how they relate to their mainstream counterparts. In this look at the Lesser Apps of KDE, we'll take a peak at each of the included games and what they are.

Dig into Fedora 7

Filed under
Linux
Reviews

itbusiness.ca: This month I had a chance to install and test Fedora 7, the latest community-based release from the folks at Red Hat. Fedora and Novell's OpenSuse are Ubuntu Linux's two chief "competitors," if you care to frame things that way. All three distros are free downloads; all have vibrant online communities where you can go for tips, troubleshooting, and advice; and all three will hook you up with a modern, friendly environment that you can start exploring right away.

Kernel space: two new filesystems for Linux

Filed under
Linux

LinuxWorld: New filesystem technology for Linux includes high capacity, snapshots, copy-on-write, and on-the-fly corruption detection.

Red Hat profit rises on demand for Linux software

Filed under
Linux

Reuters: Red Hat Inc. reported higher profit on Wednesday on higher sales of its version of Linux software that companies are increasingly choosing over rival products to run business computers and data centers.

Mandriva vs PCLinuxOS

Filed under
Linux

blogbeebe: This past weekend I decided to download Mandriva One KDE (Mandriva Spring 2007 for cheapskates like me) and PCLinuxOS 2007. Both come as Live CDs, so that booting them up and kicking the digital tires a bit is not a problem.

KDE 4 goes on show at aKademy

Filed under
KDE

computerworld: The annual technical conference for the open source KDE desktop project, known as aKademy, will have a special buzz this year as developers from around the world prepare the fourth-generation release which promises all the glitz of Windows Vista and Mac OS X.

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More in Tux Machines

today's howtos

Leftovers: Software

  • HandBrake 1.0.2 Open-Source Video Transcoder Released for Linux, Mac and Windows
    After more than 13 years of development, the HandBrake open-source video transcoding app reached 1.0 milestone on Christmas Eve last year, and the second bugfix release is already available. HandBrake 1.0.2 is full of improvements and bug fixes enhancing the out-of-the-box video, audio, and subtitles support, but also adds various platform specific changes for all supported operating systems, including GNU/Linux, macOS, and Microsoft Windows.
  • SMPlayer 17.1 Open-Source Video Player Introduces Chromecast Support, More
    It's been two and a half months since you last updated your SMPlayer open-source video player, and a new stable release is now available, versioned 17.1, with some exciting features. Sporting initial Chromecast support, SMPlayer 17.1 will let you send video files from your personal computer to your Chromecast device to watch them on your big-screen TV, or your friends for that matter. The feature supports both online and local sources, including those from popular video hosting services like YouTube and Vimeo.
  • Firefox 51 Released with FLAC Support, Better CPU Usage
    A new month means a new release of the venerable Mozilla Firefox web browser. Firefox 51 ships with FLAC support, WebGL 2, and a whole heap more — come see!
  • Mozilla Firefox 51.0 Now Available for Download, Supports FLAC Playback, WebGL 2
    It's not yet official, but the binary and source packages of the Firefox 51.0 web browser are now available for download on your GNU/Linux, macOS, or Microsoft Windows operating system. Mozilla will have the pleasure of unveiling the Firefox 51.0 release tomorrow, January 24, according to the official schedule, but you can already get your hands on the final version of the web browser by downloading the installers for your favorite OS right now from our website (links are at the end of the article).

OSS Leftovers

  • Berkeley launches RISELab, enabling computers to make intelligent real-time decisions
  • Amazon, Google, Huawei, and Microsoft sponsor UC Berkeley RISELab, AMPLab's successor
  • Brotli: A new compression algorithm for faster Internet
    Brotli is a new open source compression algorithm designed to enable an Internet that's faster for users. Modern web pages can often be made up of dozens of megabytes of HTML, CSS, and JavaScript, and that's before accounting for images, videos, or other large file content, which all makes for hefty downloads. Such loads are why pages are transferred in compressed formats; they significantly reduce the time required between a website visitor requesting a web page and that page appearing fully loaded on the screen and ready for use. While the Brotli algorithm was announced by Google in September 2015, only recently have the majority of web browsers have adopted it. The HTTP servers Apache and nginx now offer Brotli compression as an option. Besides Google, other commercial vendors (such as Cloudflare and DreamHost) have begun to deploy support for Brotli as well.
  • New Year’s resolution: Donate to 1 free software project every month
    Free and open source software is an absolutely critical part of our world—and the future of technology and computing. One problem that consistently plagues many free software projects, though, is the challenge of funding ongoing development (and support and documentation). With that in mind, I have finally settled on a New Year’s resolution for 2017: to donate to one free software project (or group) every month—or the whole year. After all, these projects are saving me a boatload of money because I don’t need to buy expensive, proprietary packages to accomplish the same things.
  • Toyota and Ford Promote Open Source Smartphone Interfaces
    Ford and Toyota have formed a four-automaker consortium to speed up the deployment of open source software for connected in-car systems, according to a report by Bloomberg. The SmartDeviceLink Consortium, which includes Mazda, PSA Group, Fuji, and Suzuki, aims to prevent Apple and Google from controlling how drivers connect smartphones to their vehicles. Suppliers Elektrobit, Harma, Luxoft, QNX, and Xevo have also joined the organization, which is named after an open source version of Ford’s AppLink connectivity interface, a system used in over 5 million vehicles globally.
  • What your code repository says about you
    "You only get one chance to make a first impression," the old saying goes. It's cliche, but nevertheless sound, practical advice. In the realm of open source, it can make the difference between a project that succeeds and a project that fails. That's why making a positive first impression when you release a repo to the world is essential—at least if your motivations involve gaining users, building a community of contributors, and attracting valuable feedback.
  • The Open Source Way of Reaching Across Languages
    I don’t speak Spanish, but that doesn’t mean I can’t learn some important things from this video. The visuals alone are quite instructive. At my public library job, I mentor a number of wonderful Latino youth. One of them might ask me about open source CAD software — and I’ll direct them right to this FOSS Force article. Of course, I subscribed to the YouTube channel of the creator of this video, and also clicked on its like button. If the screencast creator comes back to look at this video in February, they’ll find that they have a number of new subscribers, a number of likes for the video and the video view count might be more than 100. All those indicators will be encouragement for them to make their next open source screencast. And so it goes. That’s how we support each other in the open source world.
  • School systems desperate for standards-aligned curricula find hope
    Open Up Resources is a nonprofit collaborative formed by 13 U.S. states that creates high-quality, standards-aligned open educational resources (OERs) that are openly licensed under CC BY-SA 4.0. Unlike other providers, Open Up Resources provides curriculum-scale OER options; they believe that while many people seem to know where to find supplemental materials, most curriculum directors would not know where to look if they were planning a textbook adoption next year.
  • Visual Studio Test joins Microsoft's open source push [Ed: More openwashing of proprietary software from Microsoft, which interjects surveillance into compiled code]
  • Microsoft Open-Sources DirectX Shader Compiler [Ed: Windows lock-in.]

Red Hat's Survey in India