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About Tux Machines

Sunday, 23 Oct 16 - Tux Machines is a community-driven public service/news site which has been around for over a decade and primarily focuses on GNU/LinuxSubscribe now Syndicate content

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Type Title Authorsort icon Replies Last Post
Story When is Debian not Debian? srlinuxx 1 21/10/2005 - 6:12pm
Story Quake 4 Screenshots srlinuxx 1 21/10/2005 - 11:05pm
Story Linux Kernel IPv6 Denial of Service Vulnerability srlinuxx 21/10/2005 - 8:45pm
Story Sony awards prizes to university programming students srlinuxx 21/10/2005 - 8:47pm
Story The CUPS Printing System srlinuxx 21/10/2005 - 8:50pm
Story What do to when apt-get fails srlinuxx 1 22/10/2005 - 12:37am
Story Mandriva 2006.0 srlinuxx 2 22/10/2005 - 12:19pm
Story LG3D-Livecd 2.3 srlinuxx 4 04/11/2005 - 1:58pm
Story University traps infected PCs in its web srlinuxx 22/10/2005 - 1:01pm
Story 2.0 Has Edge over Its StarOffice 8 Cousin srlinuxx 22/10/2005 - 1:05pm

GTK configuration for non-gnome desktop user

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There are a lots of people install and use other windows manager on top of gnome, instead of using metacity by default. Windows manager such as beryl, fluxbox, fvwm etc allows gtk applications to run on top of them with full capabilities. You can also run gtk applications under KDE where by default all KDE native apps are build using QT.

Special Characters made easier in Ubuntu

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If you are using Ubuntu Dapper Drake, you could press CTRL+SHIFT and then the unicode for special characters so you didn’t have to copy and paste them from the Character palette every time you wanted to use them.

Solution 1

If you are using Edgy this will not work any more here is simple tip how to use Special Characters.You need to use compose key

OpenOffice: More Pros Than Cons

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The most obvious pro of (the official name for the software) is that it's free.

OpenOffice is an ongoing project developed collaboratively by users and developers around the globe. They make their handiwork available online at no cost to anyone who wants it, including individuals, employers and schools.

Consensus Approval

Steps to manually mount a USB flash drive in GNU/Linux

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I recently got hold of a 1 GB USB memory stick. But when I tried to mount it in a bare bones Linux distribution (a distribution which has just enough software as is needed), it was not mounted automatically. This is because the auto mounting takes place by means of a program known as hotplug which detects the USB device that is inserted in real time and then mounts it in the desired location.

Linux Desktop – Is it an Option for Normal Users?

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Linux has long held the promise of offering normal users an alternative to Windows. With the arrival of the high priced Windows Vista Support Alert subscriber "Briard" decides to put 12 Linux distros to the test.


Novell BrainShare 2007 Preview

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When Novell's BrainShare users' show opens its doors this Sunday, Microsoft will be on hand for the first time ever. With and without this controversial, recently minted partner, Novell will issue announcements around SUSE Linux in areas that include products, training, and new customer wins, say company sources.

Top Drupal & CiviCRM Gotchas

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Thinking of trying the Drupal open source content management system?

Festival: Linux Text-To-Speech

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Festival is a free software for speech synthesis, it is distributed under an X11-type licence allowing unrestricted commercial and non-commercial use alike.

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

Open Source Flash Library Now Plays YouTube Videos

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Benjamin Otte has Swfdec working with YouTube. Swfdec is a library for decoding and rendering Flash animations. It is still in heavy development. The intended audience are developers or people using it for pretested Flash animations (think embedded here). If you use it on unknown content, expect it to have issues and don't be surprised if it crashes.

The More Things Change

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Sometimes you just look at things and realize that they are just plain funny.

That was what ran through my mind this week when I saw this headline from Computer Business Review: "HSBC Signs Up for Microsoft's SUSE Linux Support." The double-take took a bit to settle in, because for a second I wondered if Microsoft actually owned SUSE Linux now.

K3b 1.0 Released

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I am proud to announce the release of K3b 1.0. After years and years of development, all the sweat (actually in the summer it can get sticky in front of the screen), all the tears (ok, admittedly, not that many), and all the countless hours I spent on a single application finally we have what I think is worth the big 1.

Gentoo's Proposed Code of Conduct Adopted

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In no small part due to the wide exposure of a high-profile article published earlier in the week on in-fighting and other disgraceful behaviors from developers and contributors, Gentoo announced a proposed Code of Conduct.

Slower, safer rollouts ahead for Firefox bug fixes

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Mozilla Corp. is changing the way it publishes security fixes for its Firefox browser.

Over the next day, the open-source company plans to begin delivering bug fixes to a select group of beta testers who will try out the upcoming Firefox version before it is released to all Firefox users.

Beryl: Eye Candy For the Linux Desktop

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Ever wanted to take the window open on your desktop and set it on fire? If you happen to be running Linux, you're in luck.

Jaw-dropping 3D desktop effects first came to the Linux desktop by way of the Novell sponsored Compiz effort which got started over a year ago.

A Long Time Ago, In a Wiki Far, Far Away

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The Star Wars Saga carries arguably the largest fan base of any one particular work of fiction. Fanboys and uber-geeks have made the Internet their platform to engage in endless debates surrounding topics such as the exact specifications of the X-Wing Starfighter to whether or not the destruction of the first Death Star was an inside job.

The Intrepid Investigator Report -- Sniffing Powdered Ubuntu CDs Cures Cancer!

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The Intrepid Investigator

Ubuntu Cures Cancer
by reporter Ursula Upton
filed: 16 March 2007 at 13:52.

Yes, it's a genuine miracle. In a scientific study by reputable scientists Borg Benderle and Lamer DiDiot (both affiliated with Shuttlecock University), the study found that sniffing powdered Ubuntu CDs brings about a dramatic reduction in the size of cancer tumors.

Affinity - GNOME desktop search tool

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Affinity is a front end desktop search tool that uses Beagle or Tracker as backend desktop search engine. Some of the current features in Affinity are:

* Front-end to both the Beagle & Tracker desktop search engines.
* Has actions (configurable through Desktop files), which speeds up common tasks.

Learning GIMP - Part 1

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GIMP a.k.a. GNU Image Manipulation Program is a 100% free software created to view and edit almost all image formats out there. Not only that it is the best FREE photo editor, it is also compatible with many operating systems like Linux, Windows or Mac OS X and translated into many languages.

Become a digital video editing guru using Linux tools

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Shooting, editing, and producing video clips has been my passion for about 10 years. As a free software adept, I always tried to perform this process on Linux. This year I have finally found a set of tools that work for me. This article provides a brief tutorial on home video production.

Slightly changed openSUSE 10.2 ISOs released

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today we are releasing slightly changed openSUSE 10.2 ISO images. The reason for putting out those updated ISOs is a license issue, which had to be addressed. The following ISOs have be replaced on the mirrors:

* openSUSE-10.2-GM-Addon-NonOSS-BiArch.iso
* openSUSE-10.2-GM-Addon-NonOSS-ppc.iso
* openSUSE-10.2-GM-DVD-i386.iso
* openSUSE-10.2-GM-DVD-ppc.iso

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More in Tux Machines

today's leftovers

  • Puppet Rolls Out New Docker Image Builds
    Folks who are focused on container technology and virtual machines as they are implemented today might want to give a hat tip to some of the early technologies and platforms that arrived in the same arena. Among those, Puppet, which was built on the legacy of the venerable Cfengine system, was an early platform that helped automate lots of virtual machine implementations. We covered it in depth all the way back in 2008. Earlier this year, Puppet Labs rebranded as simply Puppet, and also named its first president and COO, Sanjay Mirchandani, who came to the company from VMware, where he was a senior vice-president. Now, at PuppetConf, the company has announced the availability of Puppet Docker Image Build, which "automates the container build process to help organizations as they define, build and deploy containers into production environments." This new set of capabilities adds to existing Puppet functionality for installing and managing container infrastructure, including Docker, Kubernetes and Mesos, among others.
  • Five Cool Alternative Open Source Linux Shells
    We are going to look at some of the available Linux shells out there that users have access to free of charge since they are open source, they come in a number of different licenses and this mainly depends on the software creator but in essence one doesn’t have to pay to use the system; so that a major plus in whichever way we look at it. We find that there are different kinds of users when it comes to Linux, the ones who tread carefully preferring to stick to tried and tested software, the other kinds are the ones who dive into the deep end of cutting edge software; head first.
  • openSUSE Tumbleweed – Review of the Week 2016/42
    This was week 42 – The openSUSE LEAP week of the Year. It can’t be a co-incidence that the Release Candidate 1 was announced in Week 42, on the 2nd day (42.2 – European counting, we start our week on Monday, not on Sunday). But also in Tumbleweed things are not standing still: of course many of the things are well in line with what Leap received (like for example Plasma updates), but Tumbleweed rolls at a different pace ahead of the game.

Red Hat News

Leftovers: OSS and Sharing

  • The Open Source Way
    "Open source", in the world of IT, is program code that is meant for collaboration and open contribution. Intended to be modified and shared, because by design and spirit, it is meant for the public at large. It’s been said that “"open source" intimates a broader set of values—what we call "the open source way." Open source projects, products, or initiatives embrace and celebrate principles of open exchange, collaborative participation, rapid prototyping, transparency, meritocracy, and community-oriented development.” So it is a natural conclusion that in this age of open and transparent government, that the government IT manager or technician would be one of the first to want to embrace this new role of collaborative team member within a larger community.
  • Another rift in the open source BPM market: @FlowableBPM forks from @Alfresco Activiti
    In early 2013, Camunda – at the time, a value-added Activiti consulting partner as well as a significant contributor to the open source project – created a fork from Activiti to form what is now the Camunda open source BPM platform as well as their commercial version based on the open source core.
  • Pydio, an Open Source File Sharing and Sync Solution, Out in New Version
    If you've followed us here at OStatic, you've probably seen our coverage of open source file sharing, cloud and synchronization tools. For example, we've covered ownCloud and Nextcloud extensively. Not so many people know about Pydio, though, which is out in a new version Pydio7. It's an open source file sharing & sync solution that now has a host of new features and performance upgrades. It's worth downloading and trying. Through a new partnership with Collabora Productivity (the LibreOffice Cloud provider), Pydio7 now combines file sharing, document editing and online collaboration. Users can now not only access documents online, but also co-author new content and work collaboratively.
  • Chrome 55 Beta: Input handling improvements and async/await functions
    Unless otherwise noted, changes described below apply to the newest Chrome Beta channel release for Android, Chrome OS, Linux, Mac, and Windows.
  • Chrome 55 Beta Brings Async/Await To JavaScript
    Google is ending this week by rolling out the Chrome/Chromium 55 web-browser beta. Chrome 55 Beta brings support for the async and await keywords to JavaScript for Promise-based JavaScript coding. Great to see them finally improving the asynchronous JS support.
  • Open-Source Innovations Driving Demand for Hadoop
    AtScale, provider of BI (Business Intelligence) on Hadoop, has released its study titled "The Business Intelligence Benchmark for SQL-on-Hadoop engines," which is a performance test of BI workloads on Hadoop. The report also studies the strengths and weaknesses of Hive, Presto, Impala and Spark SQL, which are the most popular analytical engines for Hadoop.
  • Microsoft CEO Offers SQL Server for Linux Update [Ed: bad idea to use it [1, 2]]
  • New SafariSeat wheelchairs made from bicycle parts help East Africans roam rough terrain
  • SafariSeat, an Open Source Wheelchair for Rural Offroading
    If you’re disabled in a poorly developed part of the world, even a great modern wheelchair may be next to useless. What’s needed is a more off-road design that’s made to be easy to manufacture and repair than something built for a city with sidewalks. SafariSeat is a newly designed open-source wheelchair that hopes to make a big impact for disabled people the world over. It uses push bars for power and has large front wheels and small rear ones to easily roll over large objects. In a novel move, the designers included a moving seat that shifts bit every time you push the bars to help prevent pressure sores on the butt.
  • Five 3D printing projects for Halloween
    With Halloween fast approaching I figured it was time to add some 3D printed decorations to the office. Below are some of my pictures for fun Halloween-themed prints. I tried to pick some models that demonstrate varied printing techniques.