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About Tux Machines

Sunday, 18 Mar 18 - Tux Machines is a community-driven public service/news site which has been around for over a decade and primarily focuses on GNU/LinuxSubscribe now Syndicate content

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Type Title Authorsort icon Replies Last Post
Page openSUSE 10.2 Beta 2 Changelog srlinuxx 11/11/2006 - 7:03pm
Page openSUSE 10.2 RC1 Changelog srlinuxx 24/11/2006 - 8:38pm
Page openSUSE 10.2 RC1 RPMList srlinuxx 24/11/2006 - 8:39pm
Page openSUSE 10.2(r1) RELEASE-NOTES.en.html srlinuxx 25/11/2006 - 6:32pm
Page openSUSE 10.2 Changelog srlinuxx 15/12/2006 - 6:10pm
Page openSUSE 10.2 rpm List srlinuxx 15/12/2006 - 6:18pm
Page openSUSE 10.2 Add-On rpm List srlinuxx 15/12/2006 - 6:18pm
Page PCLinuxOS 2007 Beta 2 RPMList srlinuxx 21/01/2007 - 2:38am
Page openSUSE 10.3a1 Changelog srlinuxx 19/02/2007 - 11:32pm
Page openSUSE 10.3a1 RPM List srlinuxx 19/02/2007 - 11:35pm


AMD Hack Points to Widespread Web Forum Flaws, Attacks

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Malicious hackers are increasingly targeting security vulnerabilities in open-source software that runs bulletin boards and online forums, according to Internet monitoring firm Netcraft.

Which Internet Browser?

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If you're fed up with Microsoft's domination of the browser market and want to experience new features like tabbed browsing before Internet Explorer 7 hits the streets, then here's a round-up of some of the more popular alternatives available and the ones that I have on my system...

VMware goes to free with Server product

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As anticipated, VMware has created a free version of its server partitioning software in the hopes of drawing new customers to its technology. In addition, the move counters open source rival XenSource, which gives away core server virtualization technology known as a hypervisor.


Getting your caffeine buzz started in the shower

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Ah, sweet, sweet caffeine. Whether your chosen delivery device is a Triple Red Eye from Starbucks or a liter of Mountain Dew, nothing beats the gentle jolt into full wakefulness provided by the humble C8H10N4O2 molecule. In a cruel twist of fate, some people are unable to brew a pot of coffee, a latte, or figure out how to open a can of Mountain Dew right after waking up, due to that very same lack of caffeine. What's a caffeine-loving geek to do?

Massachusetts sticks to its ODF guns

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I'll be honest with you. After, Peter Quinn, Massachusetts's CIO, resigned from pressure that he believed could largely be traced back to Microsoft, I didn't think the ODF (OpenDocument Format) had a chance in heck of making it into the state's offices.

It turns out I may be wrong.

Fortifying Linux against common malware

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Securing enterprise Linux desktops against hostile code has gotten easier, thanks to Ingo Molnar's work on the NX enabler patch in Linux kernel 2.6.8 and processor-based, page protection mechanisms. The trick is in the execution, and, as usual, the Microsoft way probably is not the right choice.


Openbox: A lightweight window manager

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Most Linux-based distributions for the masses have either GNOME, KDE, or both desktops, yet the startup times and resources required by both GNOME and KDE make them unsuitable for old or lower-end hardware. My quest for a standards-compliant, fast, lightweight, and extensible window manager led me to Openbox.

The Two Faces of Bill Gates

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Bill Gates was recently named one of Time's "Persons of the Year" for his foundation's work in bringing vaccines to the poor. But bringing laptops running Linux to the poor - he's opposed to it. This week's op-ed piece looks at the two faces of Bill Gates.

uploading with an ftp macro script

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Gather round the hearth, young nerdlings and I will tell you a tale...just let me settle my creaking bones into my rocking chair, let me wipe my rheumy eyes and nose - there, that's better. Now pass me my ear trumpet. Do give me a little prod if I nod off or my voice wavers too much. Are we all settled in now? Yes? Marvellous! Now let me tell you about ftp upload.

Doing the impossible: Versora Progression Desktop

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Migration from Windows to Linux has always been one of those tasks that we've all been able to perform from one extent to another, but it hasn't been simple has it? Sure, it can be done, but can it be done easily? That is the ultimate question.

To GPL 3 or not to GPL 3, that is the Linux question

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Linus Torvalds made it clear on January 25th in a message to the Linux Kernel Mailing List (LKML), that as far as he was concerned, the Linux operating system is going to stay under General Public License 2 and not migrate to GPL 3. Discussion of the matter, however, has not come to an end.

Tomorrow's forecast: blue skies and open source

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With increasing attention on the possibilities of open source, twelve CIO executive council members recently came together via a conference call to discuss the role of open source in their organisations, focusing on topics such as this "free" software's total cost of ownership (TCO); making a business case to senior executives; the relationship with the open-source community, which shares code and answers support questions; and what types of projects are best suited for open source.

Nmap-4.00 Released

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Insecure.Org is pleased to announce the immediate, free availability of the Nmap Security Scanner version 4.00 from Nmap has undergone many substantial changes since our last major release (3.50 in February 2004) and we recommend that all current users upgrade.

Feb 2006 of TUX, Issue 10

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The February 2006 issue of TUX is now available for you to download. Topics this month include:
*P2P: The 4 Question
*P2p: Q&A with Mango Parfait
*TUX Explains: KDE Instant Messaging
*TUX Explains: Base
*Diversions: Neverball
*Capsule Review: Mozilla Firefox 1.5

Fill Linux to the Brim with Xen

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Xen aims to be the ultimate virtual machine server. Its developers claim near-native performance, and even have pretty graphs to prove it. It achieves this by modifying the kernels of supported platforms, which of course cannot be done to closed, proprietary operating systems.

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More in Tux Machines

Android/Google: Pixel 2, Xiaomi Kernel Source, David Kleidermacher on Security

  • Google Pixel 2 Portrait Mode Tech Is Now Open Source
    The tech behind the portrait mode on Google Pixel 2  has been made open source by the company. For those who not familiar with it, one of the main draw to the algorithm in the Pixel 2’s camera app is excellent subject isolation without needing additional apparatus such as specialized lens or second camera.
  • Xiaomi releases Oreo kernel source code for the Mi A1
    Xiaomi promised that the Mi A1 would receive Oreo by the end of 2017, and the company hit a buzzer-beater by rolling out Android 8.0 to the Android One device on December 30th. But the kernel source code was nowhere to be found, a violation of the GNU General Public License, version 2 (GPLv2), and an affront to the development and enthusiast community. It's about two-and-a-half months late, but Xiaomi has finally released the Android 8.0 Oreo source code for the Mi A1.
  • Google Says Android Is as Secure as Apple's iOS and Wants You to Know That
    Google's Android security chief David Kleidermacher told CNET today that the Linux-based Android mobile operating system the company develops for a wide range of devices is now as secure as Apple's iOS. Google recently published its "Android Security 2017 Year In Review" report where the company talks about how Android security has matured in the last few years and how it fights to find new ways to protect Android users from malware and all the other nasty stuff you obviously don't want to have on your mobile phone or tablet.

If you owned a 'fat' PlayStation 3 you could be entitled to $65 from Sony because of Linux option

Cast your mind back to when Sony released the original PlayStation 3, and you may well remember claims that the console was also a "computer". The claims were such that Sony suggested that owners could install Linux -- which, technically speaking, they could. However, installing Linux on a PS3 also posed something of a security issue, and Sony backtracked on the "Other OS" feature, killing it will a firmware update. Unsurprisingly, a lawsuit followed, and the result of this is that you could in line for a pay-out. Read more

today's leftovers

  • Zorin OS 12.3 Linux Distro Released: Download The Perfect Windows Replacement
    While listing out the best distros for a Linux beginner, the ease of use and installation are the most critical factors. Such qualities make distros like Linux Mint, Ubuntu, and Zorin OS the most recommended options. In case you’re also concerned about your privacy and security, a shift to the world of Linux becomes a more obvious option. Calling itself a replacement for Windows and macOS, Zorin OS has been established as a beginner-friendly option that offers a smooth ride while making the transition. The latest Zorin OS 12.3 release works to strengthen the basics of the operating system and polishes the whole experience.
  • Ramblings about long ago and far away
    I had originally run MCC (Manchester Computer Center Interim Linux) in college but when I moved it was easier to find a box of floppies with SLS so I had installed that on the 486. I would then download software source code from the internet and rebuild it for my own use using all the extra flags I could find in GCC to make my 20Mhz system seem faster. I instead learned that most of the options didn't do anything on i386 Linux at the time and most of my reports about it were probably met by eye-rolls with the people at Cygnus. My supposed goal was to try and set up a MUD so I could code up a text based virtual reality. Or to get a war game called Conquer working on Linux. Or maybe get xTrek working on my system. [I think I mostly was trying to become a game developer by just building stuff versus actually coding stuff. I cave-man debugged a lot of things using stuff I had learned in FORTRAN but it wasn't actually making new things.]
  • EzeeLinux Show 18.13 | Running Linux On Junk
    A talk about the advantages of running Linux on junk hardware.
  • Best 50 HD Wallpapers for Ubuntu
    Wallpapers are useful in many ways depending on the visual it contains for example if there is a motivational quote on it, it helps to motivate you. The images are the best type of wallpaper because they have an impact on the mind of a human being. So if you are a working professional and have to work continuously on a computer then your desktop cab be a source of inspiration and happiness. So today we are going to share 50 best HD Wallpapers for your Ubuntu which will keep your desktop fresh.
  • Ubuntu Tried Adding Synaptics Support Back To GNOME's Mutter
    GNOME developers previously dropped support for Synaptics and other input drivers from Mutter in favor of the universal libinput stack that is also Wayland-friendly. Canonical developers tried to get Synaptics support on X11 added back into Mutter but it looks clear now that was rejected. Canonical's Will Cooke reported in this week's Ubuntu happenings that they were trying to add upstream support for Synaptics to Mutter, complementing the libinput support. While it's great Canonical trying to contribute upstream to GNOME, Synaptics support was previously dropped as being a maintenance burden and with libinput support getting into rather good shape.
  • Long live Release Engineering
    y involvement in Fedora goes back to late 2003 early 2004 somewhere as a packager for I started by getting a few packages in to scratch some of my itches and I saw it as a way to give back to the greater open source community. Around FC3 somewhere I stepped up to help in infrastructure to rebuild the builders in plague, the build system we used before koji and that we used for EPEL(Something that I helped form) for awhile until we got external repo support in koji. I was involved in the implementation of koji in Fedora, I joined OLPC as a build and release engineer, where I oversaw a move of the OS they shipped from FC6 to F8, and laid a foundation for the move to F9. I left OLPC when Red Hat opensourced RHN Satellite as “spacewalk project” I joined Red Hat as the release engineer for both, after a brief period there was some reorganisation in engineering that resulted in me handing off the release engineering tasks to someone closer the the engineers working on the code. As a result I worked on Fedora full time helping Jesse Keating. When he decided to work on the internal migration from CVS to git I took over as the lead. [...] Recently I have accepted a Job offer to become the manager of a different team inside of Red Hat.

Linux 4.17 Spring Cleaning To Drop Some Old CPU Architectures and Recent Torvalds Interview

  • Linux 4.17 Spring Cleaning To Drop Some Old CPU Architectures
    Longtime Linux kernel developer Arnd Bergmann is working to drop a number of old and obsolete CPU architectures from the next kernel cycle, Linux 4.17. The obsolete CPU architectures set to be removed include Blackfin, CRIS, FR-V, M32R, MN10300, META (Metag), and TILE. Managing to escape its death sentence is the Unicore32 architecture with its port maintainer claiming it's still actively being used and maintained.
  • [Older] Linus Torvalds Interview by Kristaps

    Interviewer: we all know who Linus is, but not many people know he’s also a proficient diver. Why don’t we start at the beginning: where you first started diving, and when you started to take diving seriously.  

    Actually, it was related to open source, in some way. [...]