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Monday, 16 Oct 17 - Tux Machines is a community-driven public service/news site which has been around for over a decade and primarily focuses on GNU/LinuxSubscribe now Syndicate content

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pfSense 2.4.0-RELEASE Now Available!

Filed under
Security
BSD

We are excited to announce the release of pfSense® software version 2.4, now available for new installations and upgrades!

pfSense software version 2.4.0 was a herculean effort! It is the culmination of 18 months of hard work by Netgate and community contributors, with over 290 items resolved. According to git, 671 files were changed with a total 1651680 lines added, and 185727 lines deleted. Most of those added lines are from translated strings for multiple language support!

pfSense 2.4.0-RELEASE updates and installation images are available now!

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Also: pfSense 2.4 Released, Rebased To FreeBSD 11.1 & New Installer

7-Way Linux Distribution Comparison On The Intel Core i7 8700K

Filed under
Graphics/Benchmarks

Our latest benchmarking of Intel's 8th Gen Core "Coffee Lake" processors entailed seeing how well the i7-8700K performs on a variety of modern Linux distributions. Tested for this comparison was Ubuntu 17.10, Antergos 17.10, openSUSE Tumbleweed, Clear Linux, Debian Testing, Solus 3, and Fedora 26.

With these seven GNU/Linux distributions they were tested out-of-the-box following a clean install on the i7-8700K setup. Some highlights from these distributions include:

The Arch-based Antergos 17.10 rolling distribution has Linux 4.13.5, GNOME Shell, Mesa 17.2.2, GCC 7.2.0, and EXT4 by default.

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New SODIMM-style COM standard to debut on an Allwinner A20 based module

Filed under
Android
Linux

Olimex unveiled a new “SOM204” form factor for computer-on-modules and previewed an open spec, Allwinner A20 based “A20-SOM204” COM built in the new format.

Last week Olimex announced it was standardizing all future computer-on-modules on a new “SOM204” form factor with an 204-pin SODIMM edge connector. It also previewed the first SOM204 module: the “A20-SOM204,” based on the Allwinner A20 SoC. The module will ship in November with an evaluation board at prices comparable to that of the company’s earlier A20-SOM, says Olimex. Schematics for the A20-SOM204 COM and A20-EVB204 carrier board are already available for free download.

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Rugged i.MX6 touch-panel has optional Nimbelink and supercap backup

Filed under
Linux

Technologic’s open-source, 7-inch “TS-TPC-7990” panel PC runs Linux on an i.MX6, and offers optional WiFi, BT, Nimbelink, supercap, and cabinet.

The TS-TPC-7990 touch panel is designed for HMI applications like industrial automation, medical, automotive, self-service kiosks, and retail point-of-sale terminals. The panel PC is built around NXP’s tried-and-true i.MX6 SoC in either single-core Solo or quad-core Quad Cortex-A9 models. It uses a custom mainboard instead of Technologic’s new i.MX6 based TS-7970 SBC or TS-4900 COM.

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What's New Going To Be In Fedora 27

Filed under
News

​To the delight of its users, the team of developers in charge of the Fedora project officially announced the availability of the beta version of Fedora 27. This new version, which incorporates several important innovations, is distinguished mainly by the absence of an alpha version. However, the Fedora team points out that significant efforts have been made to make this intermediate step unnecessary and to provide a quality product.

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Open source sets sights on killing WhatsApp and Slack

Filed under
OSS

Exclusive The company that writes the open-source software for three-quarters of the world's Internet Message Access Protocol (IMAP) email servers has a plan that could kill off proprietary chat services like Facebook's WhatsApp. And that means you, too, Slack.

German open-source software-as-a-service operation Open-Xchange acquired the IMAP developer Dovecot three years ago, and announced today at the OX Summit in Brussels that it wants to integrate chat into the bundle.

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10 open source alternatives to Minecraft

Filed under
OSS

There's no denying that Minecraft is a favorite game for millions. And being written in Java enables it to run on a variety of platforms, including Linux. With a huge modding community, there are countless Minecraft tinkerers out there who would love to be able to get under the hood and play around with the source code themselves. Unfortunately, the source is not available to the general public.

But there's good news. Minecraft's popularity has led to many attempts to recreate the game, and others in a similar vein, as open source software. Interested in a free Minecraft alternative? Here's a quick look at some clones and derivatives out there that you really ought to check out.

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Olimex ships open spec Linux laptop and tips new COM format

Filed under
Linux

Olimex has launched its open source, Alwinner A64 based Teres-A64 laptop kit for $284, and unveiled a SOM204 form factor that will debut on an A20 COM.

Back in February, Bulgaria-based Olimex, which is known for its open spec OLinuXino SBCs like the Allwinner A64 based A64-OLinuXino, announced an open source laptop kit based on the same quad-core, Cortex-A53 SoC called the Teres-1. The Ubuntu Mate-supported laptop kit took longer than expected, but it’s finally here as the Teres-A64, selling for 240 Euros ($284) instead of 225 Euros.

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Servers: Containers, Buzzwords, and Debian

Filed under
Server
  • Using Containers? Look for the OCI Seal of Approval

    Some standards have been set for container technology. That's a good thing. Without standards, everybody working on developing a technology goes in separate directions, with no thought about how their implementation will work and play with the work being done by others. Without standards, vendor lock-in is practically unavoidable.

    Until July, when the Open Container Initiative (OCI) released version 1.0 of its specification, there were no standards when it came to containers. Products from one vendor didn't necessarily work with the offerings from another. Obviously, this was a problem for DevOps working in diverse environments.

  • 6 ways to work with database admins in the DevOps world

    DevOps is defined as "unifying the operations and engineering teams," in order to foster a culture of cross-team collaboration, codify how infrastructure is built, and become a more data-driven organization. But it seems databases and the teams that care for them are treated as an exception to this environment. In most companies, databases are still treated like walled gardens, with the database hosts tended to like delicate flowers and the database administrators (DBAs) guarding any and all access to them.

    This walled-garden attitude invariably affects the rest of the organization, from tech ops, to delivery engineering, all the way to product planning, as everyone tries to work around the datastore. Ultimately this reduces the benefits of an agile approach to software development, which is a problem for companies that have been running for a few years and have reached a solid financial footing with loyal paying customers, but are having a hard time shedding that startup skin (the one that flies by the seat of its pants), and are feeling the pressure to achieve a sense of stability in existing and future offerings.

  • Container Runtime Brings Greater Flexibility to Kubernetes and BOSH

    The Cloud Foundry Foundation on Wednesday launched Cloud Foundry Container Runtime, or CFCR, as the default deployment and management platform for containers using Kubernetes and BOSH.

  • Debian and the GDPR

    GDPR is a new EU regulation for privacy. The name is short for "General Data Protection Regulation" and it covers all organisations that handle personal data of EU citizens and EU residents. It will become enforceable May 25, 2018 (Towel Day). This will affect Debian. I think it's time for Debian to start working on compliance, mainly because the GDPR requires sensible things.

Software: XikiHub, qTox, Dash to Panel, Slack Alternatives

Filed under
Software
  • XikiHub: The Social Command Line

    Brief: A new Linux project named XikiHub has been spotted on Kickstarter. It aims to add a social community feature right into the Linux command line.

  • qTox – An Open Source P2P Instant Messaging and VoIP App

    As you probably already know, GNU/Linux has no shortage of VoIP apps. We’ve written on Wire and Discord. And we even compiled a list of The 10 Best Instant Messaging Apps for Linux.

    Today, we’ve got a new app to add to our list of instant messaging apps and it goes by the name of qTox.

    qTox is a free and open source p2p instant messaging, audio and video calls app and is (apparently) the most feature-rich Tox client. As a powerful Tox client, it follows Tox’s design guidelines while maintaining a uniform UI/UX across all the major platforms.

  • Dash to Panel Adds Support for Dynamic Transparency

    The popular Dash to Panel GNOME extension has been updated to support GNOME 3.26.

    The upcoming release will also include support for dynamic transparency, a bit of desktop eye candy that was introduced by GNOME developers in the recent GNOME 3.26 release.

    Dynamic Transparency in Ubuntu 17.10 works on both the top bar (the panel across the top of the screen) and the Ubuntu Dock. When an app window touches either element, or is maximised, the transparency of the dock and panel is reduced to help improve legibility.

  • The Slack Threat

    During a long era, electronic mail was the main communication tool for enterprises. Slack, which offer public or private group discussion boards and instant messaging between two people, challenge its position, especially in the IT industry.

    Not only Slack has features known and used since IRC launch in the late ’80s, but Slack also offers file sending and sharing, code quoting, and it indexing for ulterior searches everything that goes through the application. Slack is also modular with numerous plug-in to easily add new features.

    [...]

    Slack is a Web service which uses mainly Amazon Web services and most specially Cloudfront, as stated by the available information on Slack infrastructure.

    Even without a complete study of said infrastructure, it’s easy to state that all the data regarding many innovative global companies around the world (and some of them including for all their internal communication since their creation) are located in the United States, or at least in the hands of a US company, which must follow US laws, a country with a well-known history of large scale industrial espionage, as the whistleblower Edward Snowden demonstrated it in 2013 and where company data access has no restriction under the Patriot Act, as in the Microsoft case (2014) where data stored in Ireland by the Redmond software editor have been given to US authorities.

    [...]

    Officially, Slack stated that “No financial or payment information was accessed or compromised in this attack.” Which is, and by far, the least interesting of all data stored within Slack! With company internal communication indexed—sometimes from the very beginning of said company—and searchable, Slack may be a potential target for cybercriminal not looking for its users’ financial credentials but more their internal data already in a usable format. One can imagine Slack must give information on a massive data leak, which can’t be ignored. But what would happen if only one Slack user is the victim of said leak?

    [...]

    Because Slack service subscription in the long term put the company continuously at risk. Maybe it’s not the employees’ place to worry about it, they just have to do their job the more efficiently possible. On the other side, the company management, usually non-technical, may not be aware of what risks will threaten their company with this technical choice. The technical management may pretend to be omniscient, nobody is fooled.

Kernel and Graphics: LTS, NVIDIA, Mir 0.28, RADV

Filed under
Graphics/Benchmarks
Linux
  • Linux LTS Kernel Support Extended to 6 Years

    Despite being a free and open source OS, Linux has one of the quickest development cycles. Every 70 days, a major new version of the Linux kernel rolls out. This deprecates any older versions except for the few Long Term Support releases. In a sign of changing times, the Linux kernel lifetime is getting a major boost. From now on, the Linux LTS kernel will be supported for a whole 6 years. Jumping up to 6 years is a tripling of the current 2 year support period. This is especially goods news for Android.

  • A Reverse-Engineered Tegra Video Decode Driver Steps Closer To Mainline
  • NVIDIA Releases Linux Graphics Debugger 2.2

    NVIDIA has today released an updated version of their Linux Graphics Debugger to help game/application developers in analyzing issues and performance problems around OpenGL 4.x on GeForce/Quadro GPUs.

  • RADV Vulkan Driver Gets An On-Disk Shader Cache

    The RADV Radeon Vulkan driver in Mesa now supports an on-disk shader cache.

    Timothy Arceri working for Valve who previously spearheaded the RadeonSI OpenGL on-disk shader cache support has added a similar on-disk shader cache for the RADV Vulkan driver. Vulkan supports the concept of a pipeline cache for reusing cached objects between pipelines and runs of a game/application.

  • Another Minor Performance Optimization For RADV

    While Timothy Arceri working for Valve was busy wiring up an on-disk shader cache for RADV, Samuel Pitoiset working for this gaming giant has been tackling some additional optimizations.

  • Mir 0.28 Arrives As A Late Addition To Ubuntu 17.10

    Not that Mir is playing a pivotal role in Ubuntu 17.10 now that the transition has occurred to GNOME Shell and Wayland for this release, the new Mir release should make it into the archive. Mir 1.0 was expected up until yesterday when it was announced Mir 1.0 would be released as Mir 0.28.

  • The RADV Vulkan driver for AMD GPUs now has a shader cache in Mesa, plus more Mesa news

KDE/Qt: Cutelyst 1.9.0, Qt 5.10 Beta in KDE neon, Qt Creator 4.5 Beta

Filed under
KDE
  • Cutelyst 1.9.0 released!

    Cutelyst the Qt web framework got a new release. This is a rather small release but has some important fixes so I decided to roll sooner.

  • Qt 5.10 Beta available for testing with KDE neon

    Qt 5.10 Beta was released this week and the neon builder cloud elves have been compiling it away ready for testing.

    There’s no QtWebEngine or Qt3D so stuff which needs those will be broken.

  • Qt Creator 4.5 Beta released

    We are happy to announce the release of Qt Creator 4.5 Beta!

    There has been very little time between the 4.4 release and the 4.5 feature freeze, but 4.5 still comes with a bunch of very nice improvements.

    Locator now does fuzzy camel case matching in the same way as code completion does. Type “c andesu” in locator to open the “AndroidDebugSupport” class.

  • Qt Creator 4.5 Beta Arrives With Few Changes

    Just over one month since the release of Qt Creator 4.4, the 4.5 beta is now available as the latest feature testing release for this Qt/C++ focused integrated development environment.

GNOME/GTK: GNOME 3.28, GTK+ 3, GNOME Photos, GNOME.Asia 2017 and Fractional Scaling

Filed under
GNOME
  • GNOME 3.28 Expected To Ship On Pi Day

    The GNOME team has firmed up the release schedule for the in-development GNOME 3.28 desktop environment.

    GNOME 3.28.0 is expected to be released on 14 March 2018, which many in the tech/mathematics community celebrate each year as Pi day.

  • A scrolling primer

    A few years ago, I wrote a post about scrolling in GTK+ 3. Time for another look!

  • Stable GNOME Photos Flatpaks moved to Flathub
  • Going to GNOME.Asia 2017

    To be honest, I’m really exited about this trip. I’ve never been to ChongQing before.

  • How to Enable Fractional Scaling in Gnome

    Fractional scaling is practically necessary if you’re running a HiDPI display, and you want your desktop to scale uniformly to match your display. It’s always been an issue on Linux, but the latest version of the GNOME desktop has implemented a true fractional scaling feature to keep your desktop looking good.

    Even though GNOME 3.26 does have fractional scaling support, it wasn’t mature enough to make the release. As a result, it’s still a testing feature that you need to enable yourself.

Red Hat and Fedora News

Filed under
Red Hat

Devices: Steampunk, Axiomtek, Digi-Key, Nvidia, Tizen Studio

Filed under
Linux
Hardware
  • The Linux Steampunk Conference Badge

    I prototype, write, speak, and consult on physical computing gadgets and wanted a one-off attention-grabbing conference badge that would break the conversational ice when I walked around trade shows. That quest started a few years ago , with the first generation Arduino Pro-Mini and a 1.8” color TFT screen conference badge.

  • Networking appliance runs Linux on new quad- and octa-core Denverton CPUs

    Axiomtek’s “NA362” net appliance features Intel’s Atom C3538 and C3758 chips, and offers 6x GbE, 4x 10GbE SFP+, mini-PCIe, SATA, and up to 128GB DDR4 RAM.

    Axiomtek’s NA362 network appliance, which sits on the high end of our embedded coverage, gives you a choice of two new members of Intel’s Atom C3000 “Denverton” family: the quad-core C3538 and octa-core C3758. Earlier Linux-friendly Denverton products that we’ve covered were COM Express Basic Type 7 modules that tapped the original 16-core, 2.2GHz C3000. These include DFI’s DV970, Congatec’s Conga-B7AC, and Portwell’s PCOM-B701.

  • Digi-Key ready to ship the mangOH Red open source hardware platform

    Targeted at the industrial IoT and maker communities, mangOH Red is what Sierra Wireless claims to be the most feature-rich, lowest power open source enablement platform on the market.

  • Nvidia sets sights on the driverless revolution with Drive PX Pegasus

    On Tuesday, Nvidia announced a new version of its automotive-grade compute platforms, Drive PX Pegasus. It's recognition that the computational needs of fully autonomous (also known as level 5) vehicles are going to be demanding. Such vehicles will have to fuse inputs from multiple sensors and sensor-types, then make sense of it all with no fuss to get us from A to B. "The reality is we need more horsepower to get to level 5," said Danny Shapiro, Nvidia's senior director of automotive.

  • Tizen Studio gets updated to version 1.3 with Native UI builder and standalone RT IDE

OSS and Sharing

Filed under
OSS
  • How an open team can assess threats and opportunities

    You may be familiar with the "SWOT" decision-making tool. It's a methodology for helping teams clearly outline a set of conditions, compare options, and make transparent decisions based on an idea's Strengths, Weaknesses, Opportunities, and Threats ("SWOT"). SWOT is an efficient tool in my strategic planning toolkit.

  • Open-source in India: 3 of 4 coders come from product firms, Amazon leads
  • ONAP Collaborates with MEF on Open Source Efforts, Reaches ‘Tipping Point’ in Subscribers Participating

    Open source community leader ONAP is teaming up with standards body MEF to further harmonize open source efforts ahead of 5G.

    Arpit Joshipura, GM of Networking and Orchestration at the Linux Foundation, told Wireless Week the agreement will allow for “collaboration between open source and open standards.” 

    Both groups said they share the same objectives, including orchestrating services across multiple providers and multiple network technology domains and building a framework for real-time, policy-driven software automation of virtual and physical network functions.

  • Ford invests in Autonomic to make open-source mobility service platform
  • EuroBSDcon 2017: "travel notes" after the conference
  • Metsä Wood: From Desktop Designs to Actual Projects - Join Open Source Wood
  • Penn Libraries to End Partnership with bepress

    This fall, the Penn Libraries will begin exploring open source options for hosting Penn’s institutional repository, ScholarlyCommons, which provides free and open access to scholarly works created by Penn faculty, staff and students.

    For 13 years, Penn Libraries has hosted ScholarlyCommons on the platform Digital Commons, which we contract from the commercial company bepress. Through ScholarlyCommons and other initiatives, the Penn Libraries has enabled Penn authors to lower barriers to accessing scholarship, publish new research, and take advantage of library services that benefit not only our own community but those around the world. For 13 years, bepress was a partner in this endeavor.

    In August, bepress sold their company to Elsevier, a business with a history of aggressive confidentiality agreements, steep price increases, and opaque data mining practices. In their acquisition of bepress and other companies like SSRN and Mendeley, Elsevier demonstrates a move toward the consolidation and monopolization of products and services impacting all areas of the research lifecycle.

  • Equifax website hacked again, this time to redirect to fake Flash update

    In May credit reporting service Equifax's website was breached by attackers who eventually made off with Social Security numbers, names, and a dizzying amount of other details for some 145.5 million US consumers. For several hours on Wednesday the site was compromised again, this time to deliver fraudulent Adobe Flash updates, which when clicked, infected visitors' computers with adware that was detected by only three of 65 antivirus providers.

Programming: Distributed Software, RcppArmadillo, ConCom, HyperCard

Filed under
Development
  • Why Testing Is Important for Distributed Software

    As developers, we often hear that tests are important. Automated testing minimizes the number of bugs released to production, helps prevent regression, improves code quality, supplements documentation, and makes code reviews easier. In short, tests save businesses money by increasing system uptime and keeping developers working on new features instead of fighting fires. While software testing has been around for about as long as software has, I would argue that testing is especially important (and unfortunately more challenging) in modern distributed software systems.

  • RcppArmadillo 0.8.100.1.0
  • ConCom, and calls for programming, charity, and staff (oh my!)
  • HyperCard

    One of my favorite pastimes is imagining and planning to write new coding projects: researching technologies, checking out libraries I might use, making GUI mockups, downloading similar projects.

    I was thinking the other day that it might be fun to create a desktop-based editor that had an HTTP server embedded.  The HTTP server would serve up only one document, which is the document being currently edited, and it would show a live representation of the screen as being show the person editing the document.

    I was thinking it might be fun to re-implement the old HyperCard system.

Oracle and FOSS: Odd Couple

Filed under
OSS
  • Oracle Announced Plans to Open Source All Features of Their JDK and Address Shortcomings in Java EE

    During the opening keynote at JavaOne this year, Oracle announced plans to release Java SE under GPL and to open-source all the features in Oracle’s JDK. The vendor also admitted that Java EE wasn’t fit for the new world of microservices and serverless, and talked about plans to address the issue. Case studies on modern microservices architectures were provided by Alibaba and Spotify. The full keynote video is available on YouTube, but below we’re providing a summary of the key information.

  • Q. Why's Oracle so two-faced over open source? A. Moolah, wonga, dosh

    Oracle loves open source. Except when the database giant hates open source. Which, according to its recent lobbying of the US federal government, seems to be "most of the time".

    Yes, Oracle has recently joined the Cloud Native Computing Foundation (CNCF) to up its support for open-source Kubernetes and, yes, it has long supported (and contributed to) Linux. And, yes, Oracle has even gone so far as to (finally) open up Java development by putting it under a foundation's stewardship.

    Yet this same, seemingly open Oracle has actively hammered the US government to consider that "there is no math that can justify open source from a cost perspective as the cost of support plus the opportunity cost of forgoing features, functions, automation and security overwhelm any presumed cost savings."

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More in Tux Machines

OSS Leftovers

  • 20 Most Promising Open Source Solution Providers - 2017
    Open source has become an imperative part of every developer’s arsenal. The potential to gather assistance from the community and the capacity to link into a range of systems and solutions make open source incredibly powerful. As open source software becomes ubiquitous, and used by the vast majority of enterprises throughout the world, 2017 is all set for vendors of application delivery controller (ADC) to start providing improved and tighter integration packages for various open source projects, especially surrounding ADC-generated telemetry. Companies have been extensively using their analytics and machine learning capabilities for quite some time to identify actionable patterns from the collected data. With the rising demand for business intelligence, this year is foreseen to be the year of information superiority with businesses, leveraging data as a key differentiator. In the past couple of years, containers have been emerging as an imminent trend. As the business focus starkly shifts on rightsizing of resources, containers are expected to become a common phenomenon, giving businesses the ability to leverage highly portable assets and make the move into micro services much simpler. Adjacently, automation has become essential now. Mostly intensified by DevOps adoption, the automation of software delivery and infrastructure changes have freed developers to spend more time creating and less time worrying about infrastructure.
  • DevOps pros and open source: Culturally connected
    Like chocolate and peanut butter, DevOps and open source are two great tastes that taste great together. For many DevOps pros, it's the perfect cultural and technical match.
  • Interoperability: A Case For Open Source - GC@PCI Commentary
    He continues: “An open source model allows companies to see the assumptions behind the calculation and lowers the cost of entry into the cat modeling business. More importantly, the standardized and interoperable hazard, vulnerability and financial modules included in a true open source model facilitate the collaboration of data from insurers, reinsurers, entrepreneurs, scientists, computer programmers and individuals, all of which may result in a new generation of cat models.”
  • DevOps Skills Are Key to Collaboration within Organizations
    DevOps is one of the most highly sought skills employers are seeking to fill among 57 percent of respondents in the 2017 Open Source Jobs Report, from Dice and The Linux Foundation. Specifically, firms are looking for developers (73 percent) and DevOps engineers (60 percent).
  • Projects You Can Help With For Advancing Open-Source NVIDIA "Nouveau" Graphics
    Longtime Nouveau contributor Karol Herbst has been working on an updated list of project ideas for new contributors or those that may be wanting to participate in an Endless Vacation of Code / Google Summer of Code.
  • Join The Linux Foundation at Open Source Summit EU for Booth Swag, Project Updates, and More
    Going to Open Source Summit EU in Prague? While you’re there, be sure stop by The Linux Foundation training booth for fun giveaways and a chance to win one of three Raspberry Pi kits.
  • Oracle Promises To Open Source Oracle JDK And Improve Java EE
    Oracle had already announced it would be moving Java EE to the Eclipse Foundation, and the announcements at JavaOne move the language further to a more vendor-neutral future. It's worth noting that the keynote was preceded by a Safe Harbor disclaimer in which Oracle said it could not be held to plans made during the speech, so nothing is actually certain.
  • Linux Kernel Community Enforcement Statement
  • Linux Kernel Gets An "Enforcement Statement" To Deal With Copyright Trolls
    Greg Kroah-Hartman on the behalf of the Linux Foundation Technical Advisory Board has today announced the Linux Kernel Community Enforcement Statement. This statement is designed to better fend off copyright trolls. Among the copyright troll concerns is how a Netfilter developer has been trying to enforce his personal copyright claims against companies for "in secret and for large sums of money by threatening or engaging in litigation."
  • An enforcement clarification from the kernel community
    The Linux Foundation's Technical Advisory board, in response to concerns about exploitative license enforcement around the kernel, has put together this patch adding a document to the kernel describing its view of license enforcement. This document has been signed or acknowledged by a long list of kernel developers. In particular, it seeks to reduce the effect of the "GPLv2 death penalty" by stating that a violator's license to the software will be reinstated upon a timely return to compliance.

OSS Leftovers

  • 20 Most Promising Open Source Solution Providers - 2017
    Open source has become an imperative part of every developer’s arsenal. The potential to gather assistance from the community and the capacity to link into a range of systems and solutions make open source incredibly powerful. As open source software becomes ubiquitous, and used by the vast majority of enterprises throughout the world, 2017 is all set for vendors of application delivery controller (ADC) to start providing improved and tighter integration packages for various open source projects, especially surrounding ADC-generated telemetry. Companies have been extensively using their analytics and machine learning capabilities for quite some time to identify actionable patterns from the collected data. With the rising demand for business intelligence, this year is foreseen to be the year of information superiority with businesses, leveraging data as a key differentiator. In the past couple of years, containers have been emerging as an imminent trend. As the business focus starkly shifts on rightsizing of resources, containers are expected to become a common phenomenon, giving businesses the ability to leverage highly portable assets and make the move into micro services much simpler. Adjacently, automation has become essential now. Mostly intensified by DevOps adoption, the automation of software delivery and infrastructure changes have freed developers to spend more time creating and less time worrying about infrastructure.
  • DevOps pros and open source: Culturally connected
    Like chocolate and peanut butter, DevOps and open source are two great tastes that taste great together. For many DevOps pros, it's the perfect cultural and technical match.
  • Interoperability: A Case For Open Source - GC@PCI Commentary
    He continues: “An open source model allows companies to see the assumptions behind the calculation and lowers the cost of entry into the cat modeling business. More importantly, the standardized and interoperable hazard, vulnerability and financial modules included in a true open source model facilitate the collaboration of data from insurers, reinsurers, entrepreneurs, scientists, computer programmers and individuals, all of which may result in a new generation of cat models.”
  • DevOps Skills Are Key to Collaboration within Organizations
    DevOps is one of the most highly sought skills employers are seeking to fill among 57 percent of respondents in the 2017 Open Source Jobs Report, from Dice and The Linux Foundation. Specifically, firms are looking for developers (73 percent) and DevOps engineers (60 percent).
  • Projects You Can Help With For Advancing Open-Source NVIDIA "Nouveau" Graphics
    Longtime Nouveau contributor Karol Herbst has been working on an updated list of project ideas for new contributors or those that may be wanting to participate in an Endless Vacation of Code / Google Summer of Code.
  • Join The Linux Foundation at Open Source Summit EU for Booth Swag, Project Updates, and More
    Going to Open Source Summit EU in Prague? While you’re there, be sure stop by The Linux Foundation training booth for fun giveaways and a chance to win one of three Raspberry Pi kits.
  • Oracle Promises To Open Source Oracle JDK And Improve Java EE
    Oracle had already announced it would be moving Java EE to the Eclipse Foundation, and the announcements at JavaOne move the language further to a more vendor-neutral future. It's worth noting that the keynote was preceded by a Safe Harbor disclaimer in which Oracle said it could not be held to plans made during the speech, so nothing is actually certain.
  • Linux Kernel Community Enforcement Statement
  • Linux Kernel Gets An "Enforcement Statement" To Deal With Copyright Trolls
    Greg Kroah-Hartman on the behalf of the Linux Foundation Technical Advisory Board has today announced the Linux Kernel Community Enforcement Statement. This statement is designed to better fend off copyright trolls. Among the copyright troll concerns is how a Netfilter developer has been trying to enforce his personal copyright claims against companies for "in secret and for large sums of money by threatening or engaging in litigation."
  • An enforcement clarification from the kernel community
    The Linux Foundation's Technical Advisory board, in response to concerns about exploitative license enforcement around the kernel, has put together this patch adding a document to the kernel describing its view of license enforcement. This document has been signed or acknowledged by a long list of kernel developers. In particular, it seeks to reduce the effect of the "GPLv2 death penalty" by stating that a violator's license to the software will be reinstated upon a timely return to compliance.

Tizen and Android Leftovers

Tizen and Android Leftovers