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Wednesday, 22 Feb 17 - Tux Machines is a community-driven public service/news site which has been around for over a decade and primarily focuses on GNU/LinuxSubscribe now Syndicate content

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The State of Plasma

Filed under
KDE

Over the years, my experience with KDE can best be described as a rollercoaster – on ice, with rocket thrusters. KDE3.5 was a great release, followed by a somewhat mellow, emotionally curbed KDE4, which took years blossoming, and then when it finally gained solid form, it was replaced with KDE5, or rather, Plasma 5.

Since 2014, Plasma has kept me entertained and disappointed in equal measures. At some point, I had it crowned my favorite desktop, and then it went downhill steeply, fast, struggling to recover. Not helping was the slew of bugs and regressions across the distro space, which exacerbated the quality of Plasma and what it could show the world. Today, I would like to explore Plasma from a different angle. Not from the user perspective, but usability perspective. AKA Everything What Plasma Does. After me.

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Wine 2.2

Filed under
Software

Development News:/Trools

Filed under
Development
  • Builder’s Build Pipeline

    One of the core features of Builder is, well, building. So we need to provide the best experience we can. That means we need wide support for build systems and languages. How we get from source code to a product can vary in a multitude of ways.

  • littler 0.3.2

    The third release of littler as a CRAN package is now available, following in the now more than ten-year history as a package started by Jeff in the summer of 2006, and joined by me a few weeks later.

  • What's coming in Weblate 2.12

    Weblate should be released by end of February, so it's now pretty much clear what will be there. So let's look at some of the upcoming features.

    There were many improvements in search related features. They got performance improvements (this is especially noticeable on site wide search). Additionally you can search for strings within translation project. On related topic, search and replace is now available for component or project wide operations, what can help you in case of massive renaming in your translations.

Linus Torvalds at Open Source Leadership Summit

Filed under
Linux
  • Video: Linus Torvalds on How to Build a Successful Open Source Project

    Linux creator Linus Torvalds took the stage at Open Source Leadership Summit this week to share some of his secrets to success in building one of the world’s largest and most successful open source projects.

    After 25 years of development, the Linux kernel last year reached more than 22 million lines of code with more than 5,000 developers from about 500 companies contributing, according to the 2016 Linux Kernel Development Report.

  • Tech industry innovation is bullshit

    Open sauce's Mr Sweary Linus Torvalds has waded into tech companies who keep banging on about innovation.

    Swearing at the Open Source Leadership Summit, Torvalds said he really hates the technology industry's celebration of innovation. He thinks it is smug, self-congratulatory, and self-serving.

Linux Graphics

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Graphics/Benchmarks
Linux

Games for GNU/Linux

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Gaming

Ubuntu MATE 16.04.2 LTS Out Now for Raspberry Pi 3 and 2 with MATE 1.16.1

Filed under
Ubuntu

As part of today's unexpected release of the Ubuntu 16.04.2 LTS (Xenial Xerus) operating system, all the official flavors have also been brought up-to-date, including Ubuntu MATE 16.04.2 LTS for Raspberry Pi 2 and Raspberry Pi 3 devices.

Martin Wimpress proudly announced a few moments ago the availability of the Ubuntu MATE 16.04.2 LTS operating system for Raspberry Pi 2 Model B and Raspberry Pi 3 Model B single-board computers, an optimized build that features the latest stable MATE 1.16.1 desktop environment and supports Bluetooth and Wi-Fi on the Raspberry Pi 3.

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Also: System76 refreshes Ubuntu Linux laptops with Intel Kaby Lake, NVIDIA GTX 10 series, and 4K

Radiotray-NG: A Simple Radio Player for Ubuntu

Security News

Filed under
Security
  • OpenSSL project releases patch to fix critical bug
  • Microsoft's monthlong patch delay could pose risks [Ed: Microsoft is in no hurry because there are back doors it knows about but keeps secret anyway]

    Microsoft has decided to bundle its February patches together with those scheduled for March, a move that at least some security experts disagree with.

    "I was surprised to learn that Microsoft wants to postpone by a full month," said Carsten Eiram, the chief research officer at vulnerability intelligence firm Risk Based Security, via email. "Even without knowing all the details, I find such a decision very hard to justify. They are aware of vulnerabilities in their products and have developed fixes; those should always be made available to customers in a timely fashion."

    Microsoft took everyone by surprise on Tuesday when it announced that this month's patches had to be delayed because of a "last minute issue" that could have had an impact on customers. The company did not initially specify for how long the patches will be postponed, which likely threw a wre

  • Zero-day flaw around, but Microsoft updates delayed by a month
  • Microsoft misses regular security fix date

    Microsoft has delayed the release of a security update that would have fixed a vulnerability cyber thieves are known to be exploiting.

    The fix was to be released as part of Microsoft's regular monthly security update for its Windows software.

  • How Google reinvented security and eliminated the need for firewalls

    In some ways, Google is like every other large enterprise. It had the typical defensive security posture based on the concept that the enterprise is your castle and security involves building moats and walls to protect the perimeter.

    Over time, however, that perimeter developed holes as Google’s increasingly mobile workforce, scattered around the world, demanded access to the network. And employees complained about having to go through a sometimes slow, unreliable VPN. On top of that, Google, like everyone else, was moving to the cloud, which was also outside of the castle.

  • No Firewalls, No Problem for Google

    On Tuesday at RSA Conference, Google shared the seven-year journey of its internal BeyondCorp rollout where it affirms trust based on what it knows about its users and devices connecting to its networks. And all of this is done at the expense—or lack thereof—of firewalls and traditional network security gear.

  • Android Phone Hacks Could Unlock Millions of Cars

Red Hat and Fedora

Filed under
Red Hat
  • DLT captures $133.4M Red Hat Navy deal

    DLT Solutions will provide the Navy with Red Hat software and services under a five-year, $133.4 million blanket purchase agreement.

    The BPA includes an enterprise license agreement for Red Hat Enterprise Linux, add-ons, and management and provisioning tools such as Red Hat Satellite.

  • Bluetooth in Fedora

    So… Bluetooth. It’s everywhere now. Well, everywhere except Fedora. Fedora does, of course support bluetooth. But even the most common workflows are somewhat spotty. We should improve this.

  • PHP version 7.0.16 and 7.1.2
  • North America and Fedora: Year in Review

    The past year has proven to be both challenging and demanding for our Ambassadors. During the past year there have been a lot of new ideas proposed and more events that are being sought out attempting to expand our base. Many of the ventures have been with hack-a-thons in several states. This has been a relatively new venture in those areas. Since our involvement in these types of events, we quickly discovered that Fedora and the associated spins were a new tool for most of these individuals attending and participating. That was a surprising fact within the community that the young and impressionable individuals seemed to be using Windows more than any other operating system available. Since those few we (Fedora) attended, there has been an increase in the open source software utilization across the board at these types of events, a total and undeniable success.

  • 2016 – My Year in Review

    Before looking too far ahead to the future, it’s important to spend time to reflect over the past year’s events, identify successes and failures, and devise ways to improve. Describing my 2016 is a challenge for me to find the right words for. This post continues a habit I started last year with my 2015 Year in Review. One thing I discover nearly every day is that I’m always learning new things from various people and circumstances. Even though 2017 is already getting started, I want to reflect back on some of these experiences and opportunities of the past year.

    [...]

    Towards the end of summer, in the beginning of August, I was accepted as a speaker to the annual Fedora Project contributor conference, Flock. As a speaker, my travel and accommodation were sponsored to the event venue in Kraków, Poland.

Android Leftovers

Filed under
Android

Ubuntu Leftovers and Devices/PCs With Ubuntu

Filed under
Ubuntu

Linux Lite Among The Best Lightweight Linux Distributions

Filed under
Linux

Today, we will look at Linux lite 3.2. This is neither a distro aiming to be a lightweight distro nor a distro trying to unleash the power of Linux with all apps preloaded. Instead, It tries to strike that perfect balance between them. Now, almost all of the distros aim to do that then, what is so special about this distro which makes it unique. Well, let me introduce to the distro first and I think why it achieved so much more than other distros becomes clear after that.

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Linux Graphics

Filed under
Graphics/Benchmarks
Linux
  • What's Still Left TODO With The Intel ANV Vulkan Driver

    With yesterday having marked one year since the release of Vulkan as well as one year since the ANV Vulkan driver code was open-sourced, here's a look at some of what's still left to be tackled by this open-source Vulkan Linux driver for HD/Iris Graphics.

  • Nouveau Changes Prepped For Linux 4.11 Kernel

    Ben Skeggs has queued up the planned open-source NVIDIA (Nouveau) driver changes for the imminent Linux 4.11 cycle.

    He now has a linux-4.11 Git branch with the Nouveau DRM driver changes expected for this next kernel cycle.

  • A Lot Of The OpenGL Shader Cache Code Has Landed In Mesa

    Timothy Arceri, who is now working for Valve (on the open-source AMD driver stack after leaving Collabora), has landed significant portions of his work built upon others for providing an on-disk shader cache within Mesa.

Games for GNU/Linux

Filed under
Gaming

KDE in Slackware, Cutelyst 1.4.0 Ready

Filed under
KDE
Slack
  • KDE 5_17.02 for Slackware-current is available

    I am happy to announce my February 2017 release of the ‘ktown’ packages: KDE 5_17.02. What you get in this new release is: KDE Frameworks 5.31.0, Plasma 5.9.2 and Applications 16.12.2. All built on top of Qt 5.7.1.
    Soon, I will compile this version of Plasma 5 on Slackware 14.2 (only 64bit) as well, but I gave priority last few days to the new LibreOffice packages and a new PLASMA5 Live image. The packages that I am releasing today are for Slackware-current only (both 32bit and 64bit). As stated in my previous post, I will no longer be releasing Plasma 5 packages for 32bit Slackware 14.2.

  • New Slackware PLASMA5 Live ISO (with Plasma 5.9)

    To conclude this week’s batch of updates in my repositories I have re-generated the ISO for PLASMA5 Slackware Live Edition – it is based on liveslak 1.1.6.2 and using Slackware-current dated “Mon Feb 13 06:21:22 UTC 2017“.

    If you already use PLASMA5 Live on a USB stick that you do not want to re-format, you should use the “-r” parameter to the “iso2usb.sh” script. The “-r” or refresh parameter allows you to refresh the liveslak files on your USB stick without touching your custom content.

  • Cutelyst 1.4.0 released, C100K ready.

    Thanks to the last batch of improvements and with the great help of jemalloc, cutelyst-wsgi can do 100k request per second using a single thread/process on my i5 CPU. Without the use of jemalloc the rate was around 85k req/s.

    This together with the EPoll event loop can really scale your web application, initially I thought that the option to replace the default glib (on Unix) event loop of Qt had no gain, but after increasing the connection number it handle them a lot better. With 256 connections the request per second using glib event loop get’s to 65k req/s while the EPoll one stays at 90k req/s a lot closer to the number when only 32 connections is tested.

GNOME 3.24's Mutter and GNOME Shell

Filed under
GNOME
  • GNOME 3.24's Mutter Window Manager to Improve HiDPI and EGLStream Support

    Now that we've told you all about the goodies coming to the GNOME Shell user interface when the GNOME 3.24 desktop environment will be released next month on March 22, it's time to see what improvements landed for the Mutter window manager.

    We believe that Mutter is the second most important component of the open-source GNOME desktop environment, and the upcoming major release got a first Beta milestone the other day, bringing us a bunch of interesting improvements. Among these, there's better EGLStream support, along with HiDPI support for the window menu placement.

  • GNOME Shell to Get Night Light Indicator in Status Area for GNOME 3.24 Desktop

    As part of yesterday's GNOME 3.24 Beta desktop environment release, last minute updates for the GNOME Shell user interface and Mutter window manager landed as well with numerous improvements.

    In this article, we'd like to tell you about the new features and improvements that have been implemented in the first Beta release of GNOME Shell, which is the most important component of GNOME 3.24 because without it users couldn't even interact with the desktop environment.

FOSS in surveillance/data collection

Filed under
OSS
  • Why Open Source is Driving the Big Data Market

    The big data market is moving at lightning speed. But when it comes to solutions, there’s a widening chasm between the legacy approach and next-generation developers and vendors.
    While the legacy approach has worked well over the years and still has its place in what is becoming a huge market, there are many signs that open source solutions will be better placed to help business optimise the advantages that big data analysis brings.

    But first who are the legacy vendors? Typically, they have their own large internal teams, dedicated to building proprietary, bespoke software. They have solid products, reliable technology and well-funded research and development projects.

  • IBM partners with open-source solution provider

    At its annual PartnerWorld Leadership Conference, IBM announced a new partnership with open-source solution provider Hortonworks. The provider primarily deals in Hadoop deployments.

    This new relationship will bring the Hortonworks Data Platform (HDP) to IBM’s Elastic Storage Server (ESS) and Spectrum Scale storage offerings. Essentially, this will eliminate the need for customers to copy data from enterprise storage to a separate analytics platform. This would then ideally lower the time it takes for those customers to respond to data-based queries.

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Security Leftovers

  • Java and Python FTP attacks can punch holes through firewalls
    The Java and Python runtimes fail to properly validate FTP URLs, which can potentially allow attackers to punch holes through firewalls to access local networks. On Saturday, security researcher Alexander Klink disclosed an interesting attack where exploiting an XXE (XML External Entity) vulnerability in a Java application can be used to send emails.
  • Microsoft: no plans to patch known bugs before March [Ed: Microsoft is keeping open 'back doors' that are publicly known about, not just secret ones]
    Microsoft has no plans to issue updates for two vulnerabilities, one a zero-day and the other being one publicised by Google, before the scheduled date for its next round of updates rolls around in March. The company did not issue any updates in February, even though it had been scheduled to switch to a new system from this month onwards. It gave no reason for this, apart from saying: "This month, we discovered a last minute issue that could impact some customers and was not resolved in time for our planned updates today. "After considering all options, we made the decision to delay this month’s updates. We apologise for any inconvenience caused by this change to the existing plan." The Google-disclosed bug was made public last week, and is said to be a flaw in the Windows graphic device interface library that can be exploited both locally and remotely to read the contents of a user's memory.
  • Microsoft issues critical security patches, but leaves zero-day flaws at risk
    Microsoft has patched "critical" security vulnerabilities in its browsers, but has left at least two zero-day flaws with public exploit code. The software giant released numerous patches late on Tuesday to fix flaws in Adobe Flash for customers using Internet Explorer on Windows 8.1 and later, as well as Edge for Windows 10.

Red Hat News

  • Why upstream contributions matter when developing open source NFV solutions.
    When software is developed using open source methods, an upstream repository of the code is accessible to all members of the project. Members contribute to the code, test it, write documentation and can create a solution from that code to use or distribute under license. If an organization follows the main stream or branch of the upstream code their solution will receive all the changes and updates created in the upstream repository. Those changes simply “flow down” to the member’s solution. However, if a member organization forks the code — if they create a solution that strays from the main stream — their solution no longer receives updates, fixes and changes from the upstream repository. This organization is now solely responsible for maintaining their solution without the benefit of the upstream community, much like the baby salmon that took a tributary and then have to fend for themselves rather than remain in the main stream and receive the benefit and guidance of the other salmon making their way to the ocean.
  • HPE and Red Hat Join Forces to Give Customers Greater Choice for NFV Deployments
    Hewlett Packard Enterprise ( NYSE : HPE ) and Red Hat, Inc. ( NYSE : RHT ) announced today they are working together to accelerate the deployment of network functions virtualization (NFV) solutions based on fully open, production-ready, standards-based infrastructures. HPE plans to offer ready-to-use, pre-integrated HPE NFV System solutions and HPE Validated Configurations incorporating Red Hat OpenStack Platform and Red Hat Ceph Storage for communications service providers (CSPs).
  • Red Hat Joins the OpenPower Foundation
    As part of our commitment to delivering open technologies across many computing architectures, Red Hat has joined the OpenPOWER Foundation, an open development community based on the POWER microprocessor architecture, at the Platinum level. While we already do build and support open technologies for the POWER architecture, the OpenPOWER Foundation is committed to an open, community-driven technology-creation process – something that we feel is critical to the continued growth of open collaboration around POWER.
  • Buy, Sell or Hold? Analysts Approach: HCA Holdings, Inc. (HCA), Red Hat, Inc. (RHT)?

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