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Sunday, 04 Dec 16 - Tux Machines is a community-driven public service/news site which has been around for over a decade and primarily focuses on GNU/LinuxSubscribe now Syndicate content

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Linux Graphics

Filed under
Graphics/Benchmarks

IoT gateway runs Linux on i.MX6UL, offers Thread and ZigBee

Filed under
Linux

NXP’s Volansys-built, highly secure “Modular IoT Gateway” reference design runs Linux on an i.MX6 UL SoC, and offers Thread, ZigBee, WiFi, and NFC.

NXP has released a Modular IoT Gateway reference design for large-node, 250+ wireless IoT networks. The gateway provides pre-integrated, tested, and RF-certified 802.15.4 mesh networking modules connected via MikroBus connectors, including Thread and ZigBee modules, and soon Bluetooth LE. Other options include an NFC chip for one-tap, no-power commissioning of IoT leaf nodes. The system also offers multiple layers of security.

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GNOME Builder 3.22.3 IDE Lets You Build and Run Flatpak Apps, Supports LLVM 3.9

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GNOME

Today, November 29, 2016, the development team behind the open-source GNOME Builder IDE (Integrated Development Environment) software project announced the availability of version 3.22.3.

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Also: Flatpak 0.6.14 Linux Application Sandboxing and Distribution Framework Out Now

Zentyal Server 5.0 and Peppermint 7 Respin

Filed under
GNU
Linux
  • Zentyal announces Zentyal Server 5.0, major new Linux Small Business Server release

    Zentyal today announced Zentyal Server 5.0, a major new release of the Zentyal Linux Small Business Server. Amid the generalized push for cloud, small and medium business continue requiring on-site server solutions and with this release Zentyal responds to their needs, offering an easy to use all-in-one Linux server with native compatibility with Microsoft Active Directory®.

    Zentyal Server 5.0 is based on Ubuntu Server 16.04 LTS (Xenial Xerus) and comes with the latest versions of all the integrated software. The single most important improvement Zentyal Server 5.0 introduces is the integration of the latest Samba version (Samba 4.5.1) directly from upstream. Due to the fast development of the Samba project, from this version onwards Zentyal will integrate the latest stable Samba packages available upstream. This allows quicker introduction of new Samba features, fixes and updates to Zentyal.

  • Zentyal Server 5.0 Out Now Based on Ubuntu 16.04 LTS, Adds New HTTP Proxy Module

    On November 29, 2016, the Zentyal development team proudly announced the release and immediate availability for download of the Zentyal Server 5.0 Linux-based server-oriented operating system with Active Directory interoperability.

    Based on Ubuntu 16.04 LTS (Xenial Xerus), Zentyal Server 5.0 comes with the latest Open Source software and GNU/Linux technologies, including an untouched Samba 4.5.1 implementation from upstream, which puts a layer of performance to the AD (Active Directory) interoperability of the small business server.

  • Peppermint 7 Respin Released

    Team Peppermint are pleased to announce the release of the Peppermint 7 Respin, in both 32bit and 64bit editions.

  • Peppermint 7 Linux Respin ISO Image Released with Ubuntu 16.04 LTS Goodies, More

    Peppermint OS developer Mark Greaves announced today, November 29, 2016, the release and immediate availability of the first ISO respin image of the Peppermint 7 Linux operating system.

    Sporting all the latest updates from the upstream repositories of the Ubuntu 16.04 LTS (Xenial Xerus) operating system, the Peppermint-7-20161129 image is now powered by the 4.4.0-47 kernel with all the recent security patches. The new ISO also includes the HPLIP (HP Linux Imaging and Printing) software for out-of-the-box support for HP printers and scanners.

Fedora 23 Linux Reaches End of Life on December 20, 2016, Upgrade to Fedora 25

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Red Hat

Red Hat's Fedora Platform and Program Manager Jan Kuřík has informed the community of the Fedora Linux operating system that the Fedora 23 release is about to reach end of life soon.

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Spotify For Linux (How To Install Spotify In Linux)

Filed under
Linux

Spotify is a probably the best music streaming service by a long shot. You can use it on your android phone, in your web browser or on your Windows, Mac. It is also available for the Linux desktop (sort of). ​

Read<br />
more

Git 2.11 has been released

Filed under
Development
  • Git 2.11 has been released
  • Git 2.11 Released With Performance Optimizations

    Git 2.11 has been released as the newest version of this most widely used open-source version control system by free software projects.

  • Git 2.11 Open Source Project Management Tool Officially Released, Download Now

    The Git project, through Jeff King, is proud to announce today, November 29, 2016, the release and general availability of the Git 2.11 open source project management software.

    Git 2.11 arrives approximately three months after the massive Git 2.10 release, and it promises to offer the same level of performance optimizations and improvements, with the addition of a handful of new and useful features and the usual fixes for many of the bugs reported by users since the previous version.

>

Intel's Clear Linux Now Shipping X.Org Server 1.19, Kernel 4.8.11 & Mesa 13.0.1

Filed under
GNU
Linux

Clear Linux's Eva P. Hutanu informs the community of the Linux-based operating system designed for Intel Architecture and built for various cloud use cases about the latest updates that landed for the OS.

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Linux-friendly modules adopt hexa- and octa-core Rockchip SoCs

Filed under
Linux

Theobroma unveiled a Qseven module built around a hexa-core, Cortex-A72/-A53 Rockchip RK3399 SoC, plus a µQseven version based on an octa-core -A53 RK3368.

Austrian Qseven specialists Theobroma Systems announced two computer-on-modules that build on Rockchip SoCs with Linux and Android support. The Qseven-based “RK3399-Q7” features the new Rockchip RK3399, with dual Cortex-A72 cores at up to 2.0GHz and a quad-core bank of Cortex-A53 cores at up to 1.42GHz. It’s billed as the first Qseven module with a Cortex-A72. This appears to be true, although several COMs, such as the eInfochips Eragon 820, have tapped Qualcomm’s Snapdragon 820, which has four “Kyro” cores that roughly mimic the Cortex-A72.

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today's leftovers

Filed under
Misc
  • Micro-Application Services Require Micro-Network Services

    "TCP: Treason uncloaked!" Abhishek Chauhan, VP and CTO at Citrix, launched his LinuxCon North America keynote with a trip down memory lane, when this was an actual Linux kernel log message. What is the significance of this silly message? Chauhan says that when this message was changed to something more benign, back around 2008, he knew it was a sign that Linux was becoming a serious contender. In 2016 Linux turned 25, so he was right.

  • Vapor Brings Compute Capacity to the Edge

    The new Vapor Edge platform is a combination of OpenDCRE, Vapor Core and Vapor Compass. The Vapor Edge can run on Vapor's Chamber server or on standard x86 servers as well.

  • libSoftFloat 1.0 Released, Still Working Towards Emulated FP64 Support For GPUs

    Last week marked the release of libSoftFloat 1.0, the library working to implement double-precision operations in pure GLSL 1.30 via bit twiddling operations and integer math. This is the most hopeful effort yet for getting OpenGL FP64 support exposed for older GPUs that lack native support.

    LibSoftFloat started as a Google Summer of Code 2016 project under the X.Org Foundation umbrella for providing a "soft" FP64 implementation for older GPUs, such as the Radeon HD 5000/6000 series that with R600 Gallium3D don't currently expose OpenGL 4.0 due to lacking FP64 support while the proprietary drivers have long provided such emulated support.

Raspberry Pi and Tizen

Filed under
Linux
  • Raspberry Pi's Open-Source VC4 Graphics Driver Seeing More Performance Work

    Eric Anholt at Broadcom has been focusing his latest VC4 driver efforts on performance tuning.

  • Learning Computer Architecture with Raspberry Pi (Wiley)

    This guide, co-authored by Ebn Upton the designer of the Raspberry Pi, helps you understand the components of this innovative and widely used computer, showing how it works and how to access all of its hardware and software capabilities. It explains what each and every hardware component does, how they relate to one another, and how they correspond to the components of other computing systems.

  • Basketball 3D Game for Tizen Smartphones

    Dumadu Games Pvt Ltd have added another game to the Tizen Store named Basketball 3D. I think there is no need to put what Basketball is and how to play it. Dumadu Games have also made the games Pool 3D, Pocket Bowling 3D HD, Impossible Escape 3D and Tennis Pro 3D.

GNOME Core Apps Hackfest

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GNOME
  • Whereabouts at the CoreApps Hackfest

    For the past three days I have been to the Core Apps Hackfest in Berlin. It’s been nice and cozy! Kinvolk has some nice facilities that we could borrow and it’s been productive for me even if I missed the first day as anticipated.

  • Core Apps Hackfest – A success!

    The GNOME Core Apps Hackfest just finished, I’m happy to say that it was a success!

    Many people from different backgrounds were able to come, either from the community or from companies like Red Hat, Endless, Kinvolk, etc. all of us involved in different parts of the GNOME project.

Pinebooks

Filed under
GNU
Linux
  • $89 Linux laptop? Check out the new Pinebook from Raspberry Pi rival Pine

    The makers of a popular Raspberry Pi challenger, the $20 Pine A64, have returned with two sub-$100 Linux laptops, called Pinebooks.

    The Pine A64 stood out among developer boards because it was cheap and relatively powerful, helping its maker raise $1.7m on Kickstarter last year with just a $30,000 target.

  • Meet PineBook, a $89 ARM Based Open Source Notebook

    We do have plenty of low-cost laptops in the market, most of them come powered by Windows and can be had in the sub $200 price range. On the other hand, we also have the premium range of laptops that cost above $1000. PineBook is an ultra affordable 64-bit ARM-based Open Source Laptop that comes with a tempting price point of $89 for the 11-inch variant and $99 for the 14-inch variant. The notebook is powered by the Quad-Core Allwinner ARM Cortex A53 64-Bit processor which is also used in the PINE A64 Single Board Computer.

2016 Linux predictions, LinuxQuestions.org Turns 16

Filed under
GNU
Linux
  • 2016 Linux predictions: Which ones came true?

    Roughly one year ago, I made a series of predictions about what would happen in the Linux world during 2016. Let’s take a look at just how wrong I was.

  • LinuxQuestions.org celebrates sweet 16

    I purchased The Linux Bible from a local bookstore, so my first distribution was Yggdrasil. Although the last official release of Yggdrasil was in 1995, it was a popular option early on and ended up being the first Linux distribution available as a live CD. I've used Linux as my main operating system ever since. I like to tinker and understand how things work, so the fact that I could get an operating system that allowed me not only to see how things worked, but also to modify how things worked, enthralled me.

Red Hat and Fedora

Filed under
Red Hat
  • Why open leaders are masters of balance

    Open leaders understand the way these interconnected relationships make their businesses hum. And they recognize the importance of focusing on those relationships to ensure they're healthy, productive—and, above all, balanced.

  • Today’s Market Runner: Red Hat Inc (NYSE:RHT) Institutional Investors Sentiment
  • Pay Close Attention To These Analyst Ratings: Red Hat, Inc. (NYSE:RHT), ConocoPhillips (NYSE:COP)
  • Red Hat Inc 20.6% Potential Upside Now Implied by Rosenblatt
  • Looking back at Fedora 25 Atomic release

    We have Fedora 25 released a few days back. Along with various editions, we also have the Atomic edition out. This release is special for few points, one of them is being the first release from the Atomic Working Group. The another major point is a release where Cloud Base image, and the Atomic image + Vagrant boxes were fully tested by Autocloud project in the whole release cycle.

  • Fedora 25 and the Internet time scale

    One of the pieces of Fedora 25 that most intrigues me is the Wayland display server. Nearly all Linux desktops rely on the X Window System protocol defined almost thirty years ago. X has kept up with interesting trends since then--higher-performance graphics, 3-D, video effects, multiple human languages, touch screens, very large and very small displays, and so on--with increasing difficulty. Wayland is a reworked foundation that will better support the visual effects of the next decade or two.

  • Linux Top 3: Fedora 25, openSUSE 42.2 and Zorin OS 12
  • Enable desktop icons on Fedora 25
  • FUDCon Phnom Penh 2016 – day 1

    The first day of FUDCon was probably one of the best FUDCon days I have seen, so many attendees were reached only in Beijing. In both cases FUDCon was co-hosting with another event, Gnome Asia in Beijing and here in Phnom Penh it was a Barcamp. Well organized and with a lot of other people exposing their open source projects and products.

  • FUDCon Phnom Penh 2016 – day 2

    While the first day was a great success, the second day didn’t have the same number of attendees and interest. Unfortunately it was sunday and although the rain season was over, it was raining in the morning.

  • Fedora at PyCon CZ 2016

    The last weekend of October was perfect timing for the annual Python community gathering in Brno, Czech Republic for PyCon CZ. Organized by a wonderful group of people from the PyCon CZ community, it is the second PyCon in the Czech Republic to gather Pythonistas from the whole country and abroad, share knowledge, learn and chat over a cup of coffee. And of course Fedora was there to make sure that everyone knows how Fedora loves Python.

Leftovers: Ubuntu and Debian

Filed under
Debian
Ubuntu
  • Debian Project News - November 28th, 2016

    Welcome to this year's fourth issue of DPN, the newsletter for the Debian community.

  • 4 Snap Apps You Can Install on Ubuntu Right Now

    In the mood to read a quick round-up of a some popular desktop Linux apps that are now available to install as Snappy apps?

    Me too, so I wrote one.

    For the purposes of this post (read: cos i’m lazy) you won’t find apps that are not intended to be distributed widely listed (i.e. apps which require an argument to be passed to install them, like Dekko, LibreOffice, and others).

    If you’re on a metered internet connection (or subsisting on a slow one) installing apps as Snaps probably isn’t the most effective use of your bandwidth. Until Snap frameworks (or whatever Canonical calls Snap dependencies) arrive most Snaps that you install are bundled with everything needed to run.

  • Ubuntu Prepping Its 16.04 "Rolling HWE Kernel"

    Similar to past Ubuntu LTS (Long Term Support) releases, Ubuntu 16.04.2 and beyond will feature hardware enablement kernels back-ported from newer Ubuntu releases in order to allow new hardware to work on these older LTS releases, but now the Xenial Xerus is switching to a concept of a "rolling HWE kernel."

    Canonical's Leann Ogasawara describes the rolling HWE kernel as, "The biggest change is that we are moving to what we refer to as a "rolling HWE kernel" model. Essentially, consumers of an HWE kernel will automatically be upgraded to the next HWE kernel offered in subsequent point releases until reaching the final HWE Kernel offered in 16.04.5." So it's really not like a true rolling Linux kernel, just that you will automatically be upgraded to future HWE kernels with future LTS point releases. It's documented more at this Wiki page.

Android Leftovers

Filed under
Android

Leftovers: OSS and Sharing

Filed under
OSS
  • Even secretive hedge funds can open source their software

    Obviously data-driven investment managers are not going to divulge the secret signals that form the basis of their alpha strategies. But when something is not part of your main business it can help to open source the code, which can then be improved.

    These days open sourcing software is a trend that even large hedge funds such as AHL and AQR in the US taking part in.

  • Guest View: How to play by the eight (unwritten) rules of open source

    When it comes to formal-but-not-formal rules, baseball is king. Don’t talk about a no-hitter in progress, don’t steal a base in a blowout and so on, all getting into the minutiae of the game. But baseball isn’t alone in the world of invisible manuals; the technology industry has their own set of these hidden guidelines. Open source in particular—the transparent world of collaborative code that has birthed such IT miracles as Linux and GNU—follows a strong set of unwritten rules that allow communities to coexist, projects to evolve, and innovation to flourish.

  • OGP Action Plan in Spain: Civil society asks for more openness

    Fifteen civil society representatives in Spain have sent a letter to the Spanish government requesting more transparency and communication during the creation process of the country’s third National Action Plan.

    Earlier this month, the OGP Steering Committee sent a letter to the Spanish government, saying it had failed to meet its commitments to the OGP. “At this moment, the government is preparing the third Action Plan of Spain and we are concerned about the delay in the elaboration, as well as the lack of communication and information about it,” they wrote.

  • Corruption: European governments are still failing [Ed: Microsoft too fails them]
  • Dec. 13: Sacramento State Alumni Chapter to Host Event on Open Source Governance

    Sacramento State University’s Hornets Policy and Politics Alumni (HPPA) Chapter is hosting its "What's Possible: Open-Source Governance" event Dec. 13 to showcase how data and technology can improve government services and facilitate “new kinds” of civic engagement.

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