Language Selection

English French German Italian Portuguese Spanish

About Tux Machines

Friday, 17 Nov 17 - Tux Machines is a community-driven public service/news site which has been around for over a decade and primarily focuses on GNU/LinuxSubscribe now Syndicate content

Search This Site

3 open source alternatives to AutoCAD

Filed under
OSS

CAD—computer-aided design or computer-aided drafting, depending on who you ask—is technology created to make it easier to create specifications for real-world objects. Whether the object you're building is a house, car, bridge, or spaceship, chances are it got its start in a CAD program of one type or another.

Among the best-known CAD programs is AutoDesk's AutoCAD, but there are many others, proprietary or open source, out there. So how do the open source alternatives to AutoCAD stack up? The answer depends on how you plan to use them.

Read more

Debian-Based Elive Linux Gets New Beta with Better Support for Nvidia, AMD GPUs

Filed under
Debian

The upcoming major Elive 3.0 release is being developed for the past several months under the Elive 2.9.x umbrella, and the latest snapshot is now Elive 2.9.14 beta, which brings fixes to various of the preinstalled apps, as well as under-the-hood improvements.

These include better support for Nvidia and AMD Radeon GPUs, a fix for a crash with the Terminology terminal emulator that occurred when opening new tabs, new desktop scaling factor, as well as automatic selection and sizing of fonts based on your display's DPI and resolution.

Read more

Ubuntu Devs Want to Know How You Feel About Guest Sessions in Ubuntu 18.04 LTS

Filed under
Ubuntu

Canonical kicked off development of Ubuntu 18.04 LTS (Bionic Beaver) at the end of October with a focus on improving the overall stability and reliability of the operating system, being the next long-term supported release and all that. But they also plan on implementing some highly requested features, and one of these is guest sessions.

Software engineer Robert Ancell posted an announcement today on the community hub to get the pulse of the Ubuntu community and how they feel about guest sessions in Ubuntu 18.04 LTS. If you're not aware, Canonical had to remove guest session support in Ubuntu 17.10 (Artful Aardvark) due to the switch to the GNOME desktop and its GDM login manager.

Read more

Games for GNU/Linux

Filed under
Gaming

today's howtos

Filed under
HowTos

GNU Linux-libre 4.14-gnu Released, Still A Battle Deblobbing Driver Firmware

Filed under
GNU
Linux

The Free Software Foundation Latin America team are once again punctual in delivering their updated GNU Linux-libre kernel.

Just hours after Linus Torvalds released Linux 4.14, the libre downstream released GNU Linux-libre 4.14-gnu. This kernel remains focused on removing code dependent upon binary-only/non-free firmware, including drivers needing such support, if they can't run without any firmware blobs nor any free software alternative, they are stripped from this tree. The libre kernel also prevents loading of non-free drivers.

Read more

Also: GNU Linux-libre 4.14-gnu: -ENOFIRMWARE is now available

Security: Proprietary Software and Microsoft's Back Doors

Filed under
Microsoft
Security
  • Hackers Can Use Your Antivirus Software To Spread Malware [Ed: Crackers can use just about any proprietary software to spread other (even more malicious) proprietary software]
  • NYT: NSA Spy Units Forced to 'Start Over' After Leaks, Hacks
  • Media: homeland security USA “shocked” by the data theft [Ed: "shocked" by impact of its own collusion with Microsoft]
  • Report: NSA Hunts for Moles Amid Crippling Information Leaks

    The National Security Agency has spent more than a year investigating a series of catastrophic breaches and has yet to determine whether it’s fighting foreign hackers or a mole inside the agency, The New York Times reports. At the center of the saga is a mysterious group called the Shadow Brokers, which has been taunting the agency with periodic dumps of secret code online—leaks that employees say are much more damaging to national security than the information leaked by former NSA contractor Edward Snowden. Some of the stolen code has been used in global malware attacks such as the WannaCry cyberattack, which crippled hospitals and government institutions across the world. Current and former employees have described a mole hunt inside the agency, with some employees reportedly asked to hand over their passports and undergo questioning. Yet investigators still don’t know who the culprits are, be it an insider who stole an entire thumb drive of sensitive code, or a group of Russian hackers—for some, the prime suspects—who managed to breach NSA defenses. “How much longer are the releases going to come?” one former employee was cited as saying. “The agency doesn’t know how to stop it—or even what ‘it’ is.”

GNU/Linux Desktop: Mint, DeX, and Microsoft's Campaign to Undermine LiMux in Munich

Filed under
GNU
Linux
  • [Mint] Monthly News – November 2017

    Many thanks for your donations. Your help and support is greatly appreciated. It empowers us of course but it’s also a huge boost in confidence and motivation. Many thanks to all of you who help our project.

    Linux Mint 18.3 BETA

    The BETA for the Cinnamon and the MATE editions will be released this week.

    We hope you’ll enjoy them and we look forward to receiving your feedback. We’ll announce their official release in a couple of days.

  • Samsung Linux on Galaxy might run full, graphical Linux desktops

    Samsung sometimes tries to be too much like Google and engages in moonshot projects that are often abandoned quickly. So when it launched its new DeX “phone as a desktop” platform, it was natural for some people to wonder how long it would last. At least, for now, it seems that Samsung is investing a sizeable amount of resources to expand its coverage, like its upcoming Linux on Galaxy feature. Samsung just posted a concept video hinting that it could be more than what others have been able to do.

  • Munich council: To hell with Linux, we're going full Windows in 2020

    Hübner said "no final decision has yet been made" on whether LibreOffice will be swapped out for Microsoft Office. "That will be decided at the end of next year when the full cost of such a move will be known."

    Peter Ganten, CEO of Univention in Bremen and a member of the Open Source Business Alliance, told El Reg: "The council of the city of Munich has just executed a decision which they have made long before."

    Not all agree that it is a good decision.

    Ganten said "of course nobody in the open-source community is happy that this decision has been made" and the city will spend "decades of man power" and "millions of euros" on migration (as it did with the LiMux project) while client OSes "becomes more and more unimportant and other organisations are wisely spending their money for platform neutral applications."

    Matthias Kirschner, president of Free Software Foundation Europe in Berlin, said "there were never any studies" pinpointing what people were "unhappy" about. It might have been the LiMux client itself, or perhaps the migration process or lack of support.

    He said he was also not aware of a comparison of the unhappiness of staffers in cities using Windows.

EXT4 In Linux 4.15 Gets Online Resizing When Using Bigalloc, Corruption Fixes

Filed under
Linux

Ted Ts'o was quick to send in the EXT4 file-system and fscrypt file-system encryption framework changes for the just-opened Linux 4.15 merge window.

On the fscrypt front, it's mostly just a random assortment of bug fixes.

With the EXT4 changes, they are a bit more exciting. First up is support for online resizing of EXT4 file-systems when using bigalloc. EXT4 has long supported online resizing but this is for where "EXT4_FEATURE_RO_COMPAT_BIGALLOC" has been enabled while the existing EXT4 resize interfaces remain in shape for 4.15. For those unfamiliar with the bigalloc mode, the EXT4 documentation explains, "The bigalloc feature changes ext4 to use clustered allocation, so that each bit in the ext4 block allocation bitmap addresses a power of two number of blocks. For example, if the file system is mainly going to be storing large files in the 4-32 megabyte range, it might make sense to set a cluster size of 1 megabyte. This means that each bit in the block allocation bitmap now addresses 256 4k blocks."

Read more

Also: Linux Kernel 4.14 LTS Released: Check Out The New And Best Features

pfSense: Not Linux, Not Bad

Filed under
Security
BSD

Through the years, I've used all sorts of router and firewall solutions at home and at work. For home networks, I usually recommend something like DD-WRT, OpenWRT or Tomato on an off-the-shelf router. For business, my recommendations typically are something like a Ubiquiti router or a router/firewall solution like Untangled or ClearOS. A few years ago, however, a coworker suggested I try pfSense instead of a Linux-based solution. I was hesitant, but I have to admit, pfSense with its BSD core is a rock-solid performer that I've used over and over at multiple sites.

Read more

Raspberry Pi and MoodleBox make an accessible e-learning platform pair

Filed under
OSS
HowTos

Are you a teacher, librarian, or homeschooler who's looking for a powerful, secure e-learning solution? MoodleBox may be the answer. Its small footprint on a Raspberry Pi makes it an affordable option with the strength and flexibility of Moodle, the de facto standard in open source learning management systems.

First released in 2002, the Moodle e-learning platform is under continuous development and currently boasts more than 89,000 registered sites worldwide, including colleges, military installations, high schools, and more. It is robust and secure and is guided by a social constructionist pedagogy, according to its website. Moodle’s functionality is supported by numerous plugins, and because it is open source, Moodle has no licensing fees. Typically, Moodle is housed in an on-campus file server or in a public cloud like Moodle.com. If you are new to Moodle, Learn Moodle is a great resource.

Read more

Linux Mint 18.3 "Sylvia" Beta Cinnamon & MATE Editions Now Available to Download

Filed under
Linux

The Linux Mint development team has uploaded today the Linux Mint 18.3 Beta release to the official download mirror, with 64-bit and 32-bit live ISO images of both Cinnamon and MATE editions of the operating system, though no official announcement was published at the moment of writing.

We downloaded both Cinnamon and MATE editions of Linux Mint 18.3 "Sylvia" Beta and took a quick look inside to see what's new. We can confirm that the OS is based on Ubuntu 16.04.3 LTS (Xenial Xerus) and runs the Linux 4.10 HWE (Hardware Enablement) kernel from Ubuntu 17.04 (Zesty Zapus).

Read more

today's leftovers

Filed under
Misc
  • GNU/Linux Is Still Cooking

    t’s true that smartphones have taken a huge share of personal computing away from desktops and notebooks but there are still huge limitations around screen-size, computing power, storage etc. where smartphones are not enough. I’ve long recommended using smartphones and desktop equipment together. Every time I find my text runs outside a text-box or some page is viewable only in portrait mode in Android/Linux, I long for some way to get to GNU/Linux. Today, I get up off the sofa and walk to my desk. Perhaps some day, I’ll dock the smartphone and carry on. Now, I have to reopen work from the desktop PC I call Beast.

  • Samsung teases Linux desktops on Galaxy S8 and Note 8 smartphones, thanks to DeX
  • Mr. Desktop & Mr. Server Episode 8 | CYA!
  • The Latest In Our Massive Linux Benchmarking Setup - November 2017

    Two and a half years ago was the start of the continually evolving effort around turning a basement into a big Linux server room and last year having shared a one year redux in the effort but having been late in a second year redux into this effort and how the systems are configured for our Linux/BSD/open-source benchmarking at scale, here is an update.

  • Linux Release Roundup: Atom, Football Manager 2018, Kdenlive + More

    It’s a Sunday, which means it’s time for a concise roundup of recent Linux releases that didn’t merit their own dedicated post.

    A rather diverse set of apps and projects made releases in the past week, including two of the most popular code editing apps, what is (arguably) the best open-source video editor, and a desktop favoured by an enlightened few.

  •  

  • An Introduction to Linux Mint 18.2
  • [Slackware] LibreOffice 5.4.3 packages available

    The Document Foundation released the third update for LibreOffice 5.4 last week, as you can read on their blog where they write about the new LibreOffice 5.4.3 . My manic-depressive mood-swings are on the manic side at the moment so next to baking sausage rolls (brabantse worstenbroodjes for which I will publish an updated recipe on this blog soon) and a batch of sourdough bread, I finally had the energy to fix the admin interface for the SlackDocs mailing lists, wrestled myself through 14,000+ emails in my administrative mailboxes, wrote a plan to migrate my LAN services from the ageing server to the new server I bought this summer (which involves conversion of several large databases to InnoDB and loads of custom packages), plus I binge-watched almost 2 full seasons of Stranger Things in 3 days’ time. I know I will crash hard in a couple of days but I hope to have a new Plasma ‘ktown’ update before that happens.

OSS Leftovers

Filed under
OSS
  • Exam Results and Pass List #PeruRumboGSoC2018

    This early morning, students from different universities of Lima, Peru came to UNI to take an exam to prove knowledge of programming and GNU/Linux.

    [...]

    However, there are interest students that might not have enough skills as intermediate or advance level in programming on Linux. That is why we consider important to have a general view of the new group throughout the exam, so they can compare their academic achievements at the end of the instructional period.

  • Intel Icelake CPU Target Patch Published For GCC

    While it was just days ago Intel got around to posting the patch for introducing -march=cannonlake support for GCC, this weekend they already posted the patch for its successor with the new Icelake target.

    Icelake is Intel's successor to Cannonlake that likely won't be released until 2019. These 10nm+ CPUs are expected to feature a "Gen 11" graphics processor over Gen 10 coming with Cannonlake. But overall details on Icelake are still scarce given it's a ways out with Cannonlake even not here yet.

  • Inside the mechanical brain of the world’s first robot citizen

    Experts who have reviewed the robot's open-source code, which is posted on GitHub, agree that the most apt description of Sophia is probably a chatbot with a face.

  • Open Source Underwater Glider Wins 2017 Hackaday Prize

    The Open Source Underwater Glider has just been named the Grand Prize winner of the 2017 Hackaday Prize. As the top winner of the Hackaday Prize, the Open Source Underwater Glider will receive $50,000 USD completes the awarding of more than $250,000 in cash prizes during the last eight months of the Hackaday Prize.

    More than one thousand entries answered the call to Build Something That Matters during the 2017 Hackaday Prize. Hardware creators around the globe competed in five challenges during the entry rounds: Build Your Concept, Internet of Useful Things, Wings-Wheels-an-Walkers, Assistive Technologies, and Anything Goes. Below you will find the top five finisher, and the winner of the Best Product award of $30,000.

Security: Minix, Shadow Brokers, Kaspersky

Filed under
Security
  • The Truth About the Intel’s Hidden Minix OS and Security Concerns

    That supplemental unit is part of the chipset and is NOT on the main CPU die. Being independent, that means Intel ME is not affected by the various sleep state of the main CPU and will remain active even when you put your computer in sleep mode or when you shut it down.

  • Security Breach and Spilled Secrets Have Shaken the N.S.A. to Its Core

    Mr. Williams had written on his company blog about the Shadow Brokers, a mysterious group that had somehow obtained many of the hacking tools the United States used to spy on other countries. Now the group had replied in an angry screed on Twitter. It identified him — correctly — as a former member of the National Security Agency’s hacking group, Tailored Access Operations, or T.A.O., a job he had not publicly disclosed. Then the Shadow Brokers astonished him by dropping technical details that made clear they knew about highly classified hacking operations that he had conducted.

  • UK spymasters raise suspicions over Kaspersky software's Russia links

AMD Linux Development

Filed under
Graphics/Benchmarks
  • AMD Zen Temperature Monitoring Queued For Linux 4.15

    We've been expecting it to happen for weeks while indeed the hwmon pull request was indeed sent in today exposing AMD Ryzen / Threadripper / EPYC temperature reporting on Linux.

    The patch to the existing k10temp Linux hwmon driver has been floating around since September for AMD Zen / Family 17h temperature reporting finally being in place. It was staged in hwmon-next and is now called for pulling into the just-opened Linux 4.15 merge window.

  • Mesa Linux Graphics Stack Update Fixes AMD GPU Hang with Vulkan Dota 2 in VR

    Mesa, the open-source graphics stack for Linux-based operating systems, has been updated to this week to version 17.2.5, the fifth stability update to the Mesa 17.2 series.

    While Mesa devs are still working hard on the next major release of the graphics stack, Mesa 17.3, which is expected to arrive next week with numerous exciting new features and enhancements for Intel and AMD Radeon GPUs, they pushed another maintenance update to Mesa 17.2 to fix bugs, memory leaks, hangs, and other issues.

SparkyLinux 5.1

Filed under
GNU
Linux
Reviews

SparkyLinux is a Debian-based distribution for 32- and 64-bit computers. According to Sparky's website, the distro aims to "provide a ready to use, out of the box operating system with a set of slightly customised, lightweight desktop environments." There are no less than 24 desktops to choose from, as well as various "Special" editions. Like Debian, Sparky has three branches, which Sparky refers to as 'editions': Stable, Rolling and Development. For each edition there is a "Home" and "Minimal" version and, to make your choice yet more overwhelming, for each version various ISOs are available. Among others, the Home versions include ISOs for four different desktop environments and the Minimal versions include a "Linux Freedom" ISO. I couldn't find any information about the Linux Freedom version on the Sparky website but I am assuming that it ships with a libre kernel and no non-free packages.

If the download options sound complicated then that is because they are complicated. It doesn't help that the download section on the Sparky website is poorly designed. The pages feature long lists with links to dozens of ISOs and virtually no information to help you pick a suitable image. Worse, what little information is available is ambiguous. Various pages on the Sparky website state that the distro uses Debian's Testing branch while it is in fact built on all three Debian branches. Also, the download page suggests that the Stable editions are recommended - the link to the Stable ISOs is listed first and features an icon of a computer with a green monitor. The Rolling ISOs use the same icon with a red monitor, while the Development branch uses the colour black.

While trying to decide which version of Sparky to install I made the following table, which might make the available flavours a little easier to digest.

Read more

Blockchain, Linux, and FOSS

Filed under
Linux
OSS
  • PayThink Blockchain's potential rivals that of Linux and the Internet

    Every 10 years or so, a technology comes along that shows so much promise that it creates boundless opportunities for developers. Everything from Linux in 1991 to the Internet boom in the early 2000s to today’s blockchain.

    Developers who understand blockchain and get curious about all of its potential uses can both support their organization’s digital transformation, as well as forge a new, lucrative career path for themselves.

  • 80,000+ Blockchain Projects, 8 Percent Survive
  • Most Open-Source Blockchain Projects Are Abandoned Within Six Months

    The blockchain industry has seen major growth over the past few years. Virtually everyone and their dog has come up with a new use case for blockchain technology, even though most of these ideas are not viable whatsoever. It turns out just 8% of the 26,000 open-source blockchain projects created back in 2016 are still around today. That’s a worrisome statistic, albeit not entirely surprising either.

Why Australian enterprises are embracing open source

Filed under
OSS

Cost is another reason. Many organisations are in distress. They're being digitally disrupted, and can no longer justify spending millions of dollars on software licenses, maintenance fees and infrastructure/support costs. Open source software is a way of reducing their operating costs.

A recent TechCrunch survey identified the need for speed and control, scalability and developer network power as major drivers of OSS. Companies are also contributing to open source and encouraging their own developers to engage in open source projects. These aren't just tech firms, but global giants such as Walmart. GE and Goldman Sachs

The result is that open source can be much safer and more stable, due to being "constantly stretched, pushed, moulded and smoothed by their developer communities".

Read more

Syndicate content

More in Tux Machines

Linux File-System Benchmarks On The Intel Optane 900P SSD

Earlier this week I presented out initial Linux benchmarks of the Intel Optane 900P SSD with this 3D XPoint memory U.2 solid-state drive delivering incredible performance figures. Those tests were done with EXT4 while in this article are more tests with other mainline Linux file-systems and also testing some of the different mount options. Read more

Software taking over, but hardware still has a role: Linux expert

Matthias Eckermann (below, right), director of product management for SUSE Linux Enterprise at the the Nuremberg-based company, said in response to queries from iTWire that software-defined infrastructure would bring about a change in existing business processes, and allow new business processes to be implemented. But he said this did not necessarily mean that hardware businesses were staring down the barrel at extinction. Read more

Android Leftovers

5 open source fonts ideal for programming

What is the best programming font? First, you need to consider that not all fonts are created equally. When choosing a font for casual reading, the reader expects the letters to smoothly flow into one another, giving an easy and enjoyable experience. A single character for a standard font is akin to puzzle piece designed to carefully mesh with every other part of the overall typeface. When writing code, however, your font requirements are typically more functional in nature. This is why most programmers prefer to use monospaced fonts with fixed-width letters, when given the option. Selecting a font that has distinguishable numbers and punctuation, is aesthetically pleasing, and has a copyright license that meets your needs is also important. Read more