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Friday, 06 May 16 - Tux Machines is a community-driven public service/news site which has been around for over a decade and primarily focuses on GNU/LinuxSubscribe now Syndicate content

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Critical Infrastructure Goes Open Source

Filed under
OSS

The electrical grid, water, roads and bridges—the infrastructure we take for granted—is seldom noticed until it's unavailable. The burgeoning open source software movement is taking steps to help rebuild crumbling U.S. civil infrastructure while capitalizing on expansion in emerging markets by providing software building blocks to help develop interoperable and secure transportation, electric power, oil and gas as well as the healthcare infrastructure.

Under a program launched in April called the Civil Infrastructure Platform, the Linux Foundation said the initiative would provide "an open source base layer of industrial grade software to enable the use and implementation of software building blocks for civil infrastructure."

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Where have all the MacBooks gone at Linux conferences?

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Linux

In past years, the vast ocean of Apple logos really undercut any statement of “Linux is great.” People would, inevitably, retort with, “Then why are all the 'Linux People' using Macs?” Admittedly, that was a great point and has been a source of shame for many of us for a very long time.

But now things are different. The Apple logos are (mostly) gone from Linux conferences. This may be an unscientific observation from one person attending a few conferences in North America. Regardless, it's a great feeling.

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Leftovers: Ubuntu

Filed under
Ubuntu
  • Ubuntu 16.04 to-do list

    UBUNTU 16.04 or Xenial Xerus, the latest upgrade of the popular Linux distribution, became available as a free download last month, and early reviews have been favorable. Instead of upgrading my existing Ubuntu 15.10 system, this time I opted for a fresh install. I also decided to give the improved Unity 7 desktop a go, instead of installing my preferred alternative XFCE.

    The installation process was trouble-free, but because I started from scratch, I had quite a bit to add and tweak after the OS itself was installed.

  • Ubuntu Founder Pledges No Back Doors in Linux

    VIDEO: Mark Shuttleworth, founder of Canonical and Ubuntu, discusses what might be coming in Ubuntu 16.10 later this year and why security is something he will never compromise.
    Ubuntu developers are gathering this week for the Ubuntu Online Summit (UOS), which runs from May 3-5, to discuss development plans for the upcoming Ubuntu 16.10 Linux distribution release, code-named "Yakkety Yak."

  • Ubuntu & Other Ubuntu Spins Look At Making Room To Grow

    With Ubuntu's install images continuing to be oversized with pushing 1.4GB on recent releases, Ubuntu developer Steve Langasek has raised the new limit for Ubuntu desktop images to 2GB. Other Ubuntu flavors are also following in this move.

    Langasek has raised the size limit for images now to 2GB for being able to accomodate the current oversized images plus still having room to grow.

  • Ubuntu’s Snap packages aren’t yet as secure as Canonical’s marketing claims

    Canonical has been talking up Snaps, a new type of package format featured in Ubuntu 16.04 LTS. “Users can install a snap without having to worry whether it will have an impact on their other apps or their system,” reads Canonical’s announcement. But this isn’t true, as prominent free software developer Matthew Garrett recently pointed out.

Why not use open source code examples? A Case Study of Prejudice in a Community of Practice

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OSS

We analyzed the perceptions of professional software developers as manifested in the LinkedIn online community, and used the theoretical lens of prejudice theory to interpret their answers in a broader context.

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Highly social Linux nerds worth following

Filed under
Linux

When most people think of “Linux nerds,” the first phrase that comes to mind typically isn’t “super-duper social.” But it should be. If you’ve ever been to a Linux convention, you’ve seen these social Linux butterflies firsthand. And that social nature extends to social media as well.

What follows is a carefully crafted cross section of some incredibly interesting Linux nerds from the various social networks. These are not companies or projects; we’re talking about actual people, speaking for themselves, who are uniquely relevant in the Linux world.

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today's leftovers

Filed under
Misc
  • Inline assembly
  • Learn file management commnad line required for RHCSA
  • Weekly phpMyAdmin contributions 2016-W17
  • Smarthistory: No grand strategies needed, just openness

    For many, open initiatives within higher education may have begun when The New York Times declared 2012 as "The Year of the MOOC." According to the article, "Traditional online courses charge tuition, carry credit and limit enrollment to a few dozen to ensure interaction with instructors. The MOOC, on the other hand, is usually free, credit-less and, well, massive." Today MOOCs may not be living up to the hopes (or hype) of many of their original proponents, but the concept of developing and delivering educational content online is now certainly common practice.

    Perhaps your history with open educational resources is a bit longer? Before MOOCs, increasing awareness of the costs associated with college texts spawned the open textbook movement. Founded in 1999 at Rice University, OpenStax (then Connexions) began its mission to create open textbooks as freely available educational resources with nonrestrictive licenses, where faculty, researchers, and even students could share and freely adapt educational materials such as courses, books, and reports. While the open textbook movement never really enjoyed the flare of popularity of MOOCs, they too have found advocates and an audience within higher education.

  • 3D printer helps create aBioBot, an open source pipetting robot designed to speed up science

    A team of artists, scientists and engineers has developed a robotic lab assistant based on a modified 3D printer that can intelligently automate and adapt laboratory processes. By eliminating repetition and errors, aBioBot’s mission is to free up scientists’ energy and resources, potentially shortening the time between major scientific breakthroughs.

  • Three Cheers for Monotasking!

    Anyone who has coded—or worked with coders—knows all about this. They complain constantly about interruptions, and with good reason. When they're deep into a problem, switching their attention is costly. They've lost their train of thought, and it can take several minutes to get it back. That's not much of a problem if it happens a few times a day, but it's a real killer if it happens a few times an hour.

  • Pirate Bay visitors infected with crypto-ransomware via bad ads [Ed: Windows]

    Although malvertising attackers have hit a number of torrent sites over the past month, as noted by TorrentFreak, this weekend's premier of the sixth season of Games of Thrones triggered a huge spike in BitTorrent activity. The attackers may have been trying to cash in on a surge in traffic to The Pirate Bay.

Screenshots/Screencasts

Filed under
Reviews

Leftovers: BSD

Filed under
BSD
  • GhostBSD 10.3 to Add ZFS and UDF Support, Will Be Based on FreeBSD 10.3

    The development cycle of the GhostBSD 10.3 has started, and a first Alpha build is now ready for public testing, bringing various new features, several improvements, as well as bug fixes.

    Based on the recently released FreeBSD 10.3 operating system, GhostBSD 10.3 should arrive later this year with support for the ZFS (Z File System) and UFS (Unix File System) filesystems, ZFS encryption support in the installer, as well as quarterly updates to the GhostBSD Software applications, adding more stability to the OS.

  • bsdtalk264 - Down the Gopher Hole

    Playing around with the gopher protocol. Description of gopher from the 1995 book "Student's Guide to the Internet" by David Clark.

GNU/Linux Leftovers

Filed under
GNU
Linux
  • Download Linux Voice issue 18
  • Windows desktop share falls below 90% [Ed: based on Microsoft-connected firm]

    The desktop share of Windows computers worldwide fell below 90 per cent for the first time since it established the mark, according to figures from the web analytics company Net Applications.

    While there were encouraging figures for Microsoft among the various Windows versions, the overall share fell to 89.23 per cent.

  • Linus Torvalds Announces Linux Kernel 4.6 RC6, Dubbed "Charred Weasel"

    It's Sunday night, so Linus Torvalds has announced the release of a new RC build for the upcoming Linux 4.6 kernel series, which has been dubbed "Charred Weasel."

    According to Linus Torvalds, things continue to remain fairly calm in the development cycle of Linux kernel 4.6, which might very well get one more Release Candidate (RC), version RC7, next week, on May 8, 2016. Then, one week later, on May 15, we should be able to get our hands on the final release of Linux kernel 4.6, which will hit the stable repositories of various distributions most probably around June 2016.

  • Reaper Audio Software Is Coming To Linux

    If Audacity and Ardour aren't cutting it for your audio editing needs on Linux, there's another Digital Audio Workstation (DAW) option coming to Linux: Reaper.

    Reaper is a high-end audio production software suite developed by Cockos Software. Reaper has been supported under Windows and OS X for this software that's been around since 2005. With the current development version, native Linux support is coming.

  • Plasma Mobile : New base system

    Last Akademy, the Plasma team revealed the first prototype of the new Plasma Mobile.

    [...]

    Our initial Ubuntu Touch base was Ubuntu 15.04. Eventually, our image started to diverge from the Ubuntu Touch base. For example, we upgraded libhybris to upstream version because libhybris available in Ubuntu archive diverged too much from upstream to be useful in our context. We also had to upgrade to a newer Qt version, and we also needed to upgrade the base system to Ubuntu 16.04 (Xenial Xerus) because we did not have the resources for managing different branches for packaging the latest git KF5/Plasma for 15.04.

  • Converging Kubes

    Kube, our PIM-Client in the making, is supposed to run on a variety of platforms and form-factors. We aim to provide a consistent look and feel across them all. If you know how to use Kube on your desktop machine, you will know how to use it on your Android phone or tablet as well. So what we are going to do, is building a UI for the phone, allowing it to display multiple pages on the tablet and in the end serving it on the desktop as well. Good idea, right?

  • openSUSE announces first round of accepted proposals

    The first round of proposals for the openSUSE Conference have been accepted and people who submitted a call for papers should log-in to events.opensuse.org and check to see if their talk has been accepted as part of the first round of proposals.

    For proposals that have been accepted, users should confirm their proposal as soon as possible and also register for the conference if they had not done so already.

  • Prepare your Raspberry Pi for space with an Astro Pi flight case

    One year ago this month, I published my first article on Opensource.com. I talked about our Astro Pi program in Students compete for a chance to have their Raspberry Pi code run in space. We've come a long way in that last 12 months—in December, our two Astro Pi units were sent to the International Space Station aboard the Cygnus spacecraft on a resupply mission; closely followed by British ESA astronaut Tim Peake.

Red Hat News

Filed under
Red Hat

Android Leftovers

Filed under
Android

6 colleges turning out open source talent

Filed under
OSS

Most IT departments have project road maps that will require open-source skills, but finding recent college grads with open source talent can be challenging.

Whether your company is planning an open-source-based big data implementation, installing an open-platform file manager, or adopting an open approach to customer relationship management, experts say traditional computer science departments might not be turning out students you need.

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OpenStack Roundup

Filed under
Server
OSS

Ubuntu 16.04 LTS

Filed under
Reviews
Ubuntu

It is always a big deal when Canonical releases a new long-term support version of Ubuntu. Despite Ubuntu's important place in the Linux distribution ecosystem, I should admit right off the bat that I am not a regular user of Ubuntu. I try out each new release of the desktop version Ubuntu and occasionally use Ubuntu Server, but I tend to use Fedora and CentOS for almost all of my daily desktop and server needs. Still, I've always been fascinated by what Canonical is doing with Ubuntu and their Unity desktop environment. Below, I take a look at Ubuntu 16.04 LTS and share my thoughts on the Unity desktop environment and the distribution as a whole.

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Leftovers: Gaming

Filed under
Gaming

Leftovers: KDE

Filed under
KDE
  • KDE Akonadi Support For Microsoft Exchange
  • Akonadi Resource for Microsoft Exchange Web Services (EWS)

    Whether you are a Microsoft hater or a lover, when you have ever had a chance to work for a medium or large corporation, you have probably stumbled upon Microsoft Exchange mail server. While it can be made to talk to regular e-mail clients using standards such as IMAP, POP3 and SMTP, some corporate admins choose not to enable any of the standard mail protocols leaving the user with no choice other than to use Microsoft Outlook. Even if it is possible to use regular e-mail clients they will not be able to explore the full potential of Exchange, as it is not only a mail server but rather a groupware server which includes support for calendar, tasks, contacts and many more.

  • Evaluation of the Qt Quick Scene Graph Performance

    QPainter, which is the base of drawing in KStars, uses an imperative way whereas QtQuick Scene Graph utilizes declarative paradigm. In Scene Graph you add some set of "nodes" (classes with prefix QSG) to the root node that is returned by calling QQuickItem::updatePaintNode() whenever you want to render QQuickItem and manipulate them during the runtime (change position, geometry, material, etc.) This gives possibilities to perform some optimization like batching the nodes to draw them in fewer calls to OpenGL, which can be of tremendous help for us in drawing stars, for example.

  • Hello World!

    As the title suggests it is a lite version for mobile/tablets, slow machines like budget laptops, netbooks, single-board computers like Raspberry Pi, etc. One of the main differences between desktop and lite versions is that the graphics of the latter is based on QML/QtQuick. KStars Lite is built bearing in mind the differences between mouse/touch interfaces and the graphical frontend will be designed according to touch interfaces of mobile platforms.

NZ FOSS Consultation

Filed under
OSS
  • NZ Government open source software licensing consultation

    Open and transparent: NZ Government open source software licensing consultation a success

    A consultation to develop a framework for consistent licensing of New Zealand Government open source software has been carried out successfully in an open and transparent manner, says Paul Stone, Programme Leader Open Government Data at Land Information NZ.

    The consultation considered proposals for consistent policy and guidelines that would extend the NZ Government Open Access and Licensing (NZGOAL) framework to cover open source software as well as government content and data.

  • “Hugely useful” Loomio powers consultation on open source software

    A consultation to develop a framework for consistent licensing of New Zealand Government open source software has been carried out successfully in an open and transparent manner, says Paul Stone, Programme Leader Open Government Data at Land Information NZ.

Git 2.8.2 Popular Source Code Management System Released with Over 18 Bug Fixes

Filed under
Security

The stable 2.8 series of the popular Git source code management system just received its second point release, version 2.8.2, bringing over 18 improvements and bug fixes.

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Leftovers: Ubuntu

Filed under
Ubuntu
  • Installing Ubuntu 16.04 LTS

    In the good tradition of our Ubuntu installation tutorials, as well as at the request of several of our readers, we've decided to publish a new guide that will teach you who to boot and install the Ubuntu 16.04 LTS operating system.

  • Ubuntu 16.04 LTS (aka Xenial Xerus) What’s In The Bits and Bytes?
  • Gorgeous Live Voyager 16.04 Linux OS Comes Hot on the Heels of Ubuntu 16.04 LTS

    The team of developers behind the Live Voyager desktop-oriented operating system have announced today, May 1, 2016, the release and immediate availability for download of Voyager 16.04 LTS.

    Coming hot on the heels of Ubuntu 16.04 LTS (Xenial Xerus), the Voyager 16.04 LTS GNU/Linux distribution is in fact based on the Xubuntu 16.04 LTS flavor, featuring a highly customized Xfce 4.12 desktop environment and a huge collection of open-source tools.

  • Entroware Ubuntu Laptop Launches For $650

    If you are in search of an affordable Ubuntu laptop that comes pre-installed with the Linux-based operating system you might be interested in a new Linux laptop system created by the UK-based company Entroware.

    The new Entroware Orion Ubuntu laptop is equipped with a 14 inch screen offering users a resolution of 1920 x 1080 pixels, and comes with a variety of specification options that include the ability to install a choice of Intel Core i3, i5, or i7 Skylake processors that can be supported by up to 16GB of RAM.

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More in Tux Machines

This Is How the New Linux Mint 18 Cinnamon Theme Looks Like

Linux Mint project leader and maintainer Clement Lefebvre dropped some exciting news today about what users should expect from the upcoming Linux Mint 18 "Sarah" operating system. Read more

The May 2016 Issue of the PCLinuxOS Magazine

The PCLinuxOS Magazine staff is pleased to announce the release of the May 2016 issue. With the exception of a brief period in 2009, The PCLinuxOS Magazine has been published on a monthly basis since September, 2006. The PCLinuxOS Magazine is a product of the PCLinuxOS community, published by volunteers from the community. The magazine is lead by Paul Arnote, Chief Editor, and Assistant Editor Meemaw. The PCLinuxOS Magazine is released under the Creative Commons Attribution- NonCommercial-Share-Alike 3.0 Unported license, and some rights are reserved. In the May 2016 issue: * Netflix On PCLinuxOS: 18 Months Later * TubiTV: A Free Streaming Alternative * ms_meme's Nook: PCLinuxOS Is The Top * PCLinuxOS Family Member Spotlight: jlane01 * GIMP Tutorial: Make A Folded Map * Game Zone: Zombasite * PCLinuxOS Recipe Corner * Tip Top Tips: Update Your BIOS The Easy Way * PCLinuxOS Puzzled Partitions * And much more inside! This month’s magazine cover image was designed by Paul Arnote. Download the PDF (8.1 MB) http://pclosmag.com/download.php?f=2016-05.pdf Download the EPUB Version (4.9 MB) http://pclosmag.com/download.php?f=201605epub.epub Download the MOBI Version (9.0 MB) http://pclosmag.com/download.php?f=201605mobi.mobi Visit the HTML Version http://pclosmag.com/html/enter.html

A step ahead on Drupal 8 with easy accessibility design

The biggest mistake is bigger than Drupal: They don't consider it at all. This isn't a platform thing, it's a problem that is endemic to the web. Big companies get dragged into accessibility via legal threats. Small companies don't even think about it. Just the act of raising accessibility as an issue, and asking your team to keep it in mind throughout the design and development process is a big deal. You have to start somewhere. Read more

today's leftovers

  • Podcast Season 4 Episode 8
    In this episode: Bitcoin scandal. RMS wins an award. Savers and rich people can buy the DragonBox Prya (thanks Canseco!) and Devuan reaches beta. Plus loads of Finds, Neurons and a long-stewing Voice of the Masses.
  • Interop: SDN Growing to $12.5B, SD-WAN to $6B
    "Open source is not just at the bottom of the networking stack, it now goes from layer 2 all the way up to network and security services," Casemore said. "It's significant fact in the market landscape and vendors have to give it due consideration."
  • RcppArmadillo 0.6.700.6.0
    A second Armadillo release 6.700.6 came out in the 6.700 series, and we uploaded RcppArmadillo 0.6.700.6.0 to CRAN and Debian. This followed the usual thorough reverse-dependecy checking of by now 220 packages using.
  • Vivaldi Browser's New Snapshot Adds Editable Mouse Gestures, Tab Improvements
    We've been informed by Vivaldi's Ruarí Ødegaard about the availability of a new snapshot build of the proprietary Vivaldi web browser for all supported platforms, including GNU/Linux, Mac OS X, and Microsoft Windows. Vivaldi Snapshot 1.2.470.11 is now live for those who want to get an early taste of what's coming in the next stable update of the cross-platform web browser, which it looks like it gets a lot of attention lately, especially from those who want to migrate from Chromium-based browsers like Google Chrome or Opera. And today's snapshot introduces editable mouse gestures.
  • GNOME's Nautilus File Manager: "Its Best Moment Since It Was Created"
    At various points in GNOME's history the Nautilus file manager has been less than maintained, but these days the situation is much brighter. GNOME developer Carlos Soriano has come out to write about how great the Nautilus situation is these days. Soriano wrote in a new blog post, "as far as I can see the development status of Nautilus it’s in its best moment since it was created, and part of that is thanks of the status of gtk+ development and the values and vision of GNOME as a project."
  • Neptune Linux 4.5.1 ISO Out Now with USB 3 Boot Support, KDE Plasma 5.6.2
    Neptune developer Leszek Lesner announced the release and general availability of a new Live ISO image for his Neptune Linux rolling operating system, version 4.5.1. The new Neptune Linux 4.5.1 ISO is now ready for download and includes all the updated packages and security patches released in the distribution's main software repositories since Neptune 4.5.
  • My free software activities, April 2016
  • m23 rock 16.2 brings support for Ubuntu 16.04 clients
    From this version on, m23 offers support for m23 clients using Ubuntu 16.04 LTS Xenial Xerus. A set of desktop environments is, of course, included for the new Ubuntu. Friends of the Univention Corporate Servers will be happy to hear that the m23 app is now available in the Univention App Center. As always, several small improvements have also been made to various parts of the software.
  • Unity 8 and Snaps Are the Future of the Ubuntu Desktop, After Ubuntu 16.10
    Today, May 5, 2016, is the last day of the Ubuntu Online Summit 2016, and we've just attended a very exciting session where the Ubuntu developers have discussed the future of the Ubuntu Desktop after Ubuntu 16.10 (Yakkety Yak). You can watch the entire session below if you don't want to read the next paragraphs, but as usual, we'll try to detail and explain a few things for you so that you know now what to expect from future versions of the Ubuntu Linux operating system, on the desktop, of course.
  • Router hackers reach for the fork: LEDE splits from OpenWRT
    A split seems to have emerged in the Linux-router-OS community, with a breakaway group splitting from OpenWRT. OpenWRT is the chief open router firmware implementation, but it has run into headwinds of late. For example, downtime for the group earlier this year was traced back to the small organisation running a single, small, server without redundancy.
  • Samsung’s 360 degree camera will cost just about $350, oh and it runs Tizen !
    Samsung is one of those big guns from the consumer electronics market who has been betting huge on Virtual Reality. After partnering with Oculus for the Gear VR headset which has set its own benchmark for the best untethered VR solution one can buy, now that the headset has been in good shape, Samsung is working out ways to deliver content on it. Samsung have joined hands with multiple partners to provide VR experiences on its Milk VR platform and had also unveiled its own 360 degree camera at Unpacked 2016 event back in february- Gear 360 to let almost anyone to produce 360 degree content that can be viewed on the Gear VR.