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Multi-threaded Linux Performance: AMD’s Threadripper 2990WX vs. Intel’s Core i9-7980XE

Filed under
Graphics/Benchmarks

To deliver a full-featured article for launch, my look at AMD’s Ryzen Threadripper 2990WX and 2950X combined Windows and Linux performance in the same article. As it turns out, that was a mistake, since few people noticed we even had Linux benchmarks, despite there being an obvious demand for them.

Before publication, I debated on whether or not I should break Linux performance into its own article, but in this particular case, I opted for the combo because I felt the bigger picture was needed. That’s because in Windows, performance scaling on such a big CPU is hit-or-miss, whereas the Linux kernel seems to support AMD’s biggest no problem.

I am not going to stand here (or sit) and pretend to understand why the 2990WX doesn’t perform so well in all Windows tests, because getting a clear answer out of anyone is tough. No one wants to pass around the blame, but by all appearances, it looks like a bulk of the problem is Windows. This article exists to not only draw attention to that, but also highlight a bit better what the 2990WX is capable of – if the software in question can take advantage of it.

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today's howtos

Filed under
HowTos
  • How to Reconfigure Installed Package in Ubuntu and Debian
  • How to Access Microsoft Exchange in Linux
  • Plasma desktop & HD scaling tutorial

    Say you have a small form-factor device with a high-resolution display. Case in point, my Slimbook Pro2 laptop, which comes with fourteen inches of equity and 1920x1080 pixel grid. This means things are rendered rather small, and if you wish to read or interact with the desktop environment and the applications in a meaningful way, you will strain your eyes - unless you're twenty and a developer, in which case you have bionic eyes.

    Prompted by this serious ergonomic need, I started fiddling with different options and settings, to see if I could adjust the viewability in KDE, and make the small screen shows things in a slightly enlarged manner. This turned out to be a rather long and non-trivial exercise. In this guide, I will show you how to properly and elegantly scale the KDE desktop, GTK applications (both 2.0 and 3.0 editions), Firefox and Chrome browsers with tips that also apply to all operating systems and use cases, and then some. After me.

  • Backup Installed Packages And Restore Them On Freshly Installed Ubuntu System
  • Getting started with Tmux

Graphics: Igalia, Intel, AMD and More

Filed under
Graphics/Benchmarks
  • Igalia Sends Out Another 26 Patches Chipping Away On Intel ARB_gl_spirv Support

    OpenGL 4.6 has been out for more than a year but the Mesa-based drivers (namely RadeonSI and Intel) remain blocked from officially advertising this latest GL revision due to not yet supporting the ARB_gl_spirv extension and related ARB_spirv_extensions.

    Intel Open-Source Technology Center developers and consulting firm Igalia have been working on this key component to OpenGL 4.6 for allowing SPIR-V ingestion (the now common IR to OpenGL / Vulkan / OpenCL) but it's a tall order and even with many patch series still isn't quite to the finish line yet.

  • AMD Contributes 8.5x More Code To The Linux Kernel Than NVIDIA, But Intel Still Leads

    Given all the new hardware enablement work going into the Linux kernel recently, I was curious how the code contributions were stacking up by some of the leading hardware vendors... Here are those interesting numbers.

    As of this morning's Linux 4.19 Git kernel state, I ran some Git statistics for some weekend numbers fun primarily to see how AMD vs. NVIDIA vs. Intel is doing for code contributions.

  • AMD Preps For A Big Linux 4.20 Kernel With Vega 20, Picasso, Raven 2, xGMI, Better DC

    It was a busy Friday for the open-source AMD folks as in addition to releasing AMDGPU DDX 18.1 and the big ROCm 1.9 release, their latest batch of feature changes were also submitted to DRM-Next ahead of the Linux 4.20~5.0 kernel cycle. This is going to be another exciting release for Radeon Linux users.

It's Looking Like WireGuard Could Be Ready In Time For Linux 4.20~5.0

Filed under
Linux
Security

The latest revised patches were sent out on Friday evening for WireGuard, the very promising secure VPN tunnel technology developed over the past few years by Jason Donenfeld.

This marks the fourth time these patches have been revised with this latest series fixing various issues discovered during earlier rounds of review, porting more crypto code to the new Zinc crypto library, documentation improvements, and other code improvements.

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KDE: Elisa, Krita and KDE Itinerary

Filed under
KDE
  • KDE's Elisa Music Player 0.3 Enters Beta

    Elisa is one of several options when it comes to music players for the KDE desktop. Elisa 0.3 entered beta this week as another step forward for this relatively young project.

  • The Krita 2018 Fundraiser Starts: Squash the Bugs!

    It’s time for a new Krita fundraiser! Our goal this year is to make it possible for the team to focus on one thing only: stability. Our previous fundraisers were all about features: adding new features, extending existing features. Thanks to your help, Krita has grown at breakneck speed!

    [...]

    As an experiment, Dmitry has just spent about a month on area of Krita: selections. And now there are only a few issues left with selection handling: the whole area has been enormously improved. And now we want to ask you to make it possible for us to do the same with some other important areas in krita, ranging from papercuts to brush engines, from color management to resource management. We’ve dug through the bugs database, grouped some things together and arrived at a list of ten areas where we feel we can improve Krita a lot.

    The list is order of number of reports, but if you support Krita in this fundraiser, you’ll be able to vote for what you think is important! Voting is fun, after all, and we love to hear from you all what you find the most important things.

  • KDE Itinerary - Static Knowledge

    In the previous post on writing custom data extractors for the KItinerary framework, I mentioned we are augmenting extracted data with knowledge from Wikidata. This post will cover this aspect in more detail.

    Static knowledge refers to information that with near certainty don’t change for the duration of your trip, or during a release cycle of our software. That’s things like name, location and timezone of an airport, or the country it belongs to, as opposed to dynamic knowledge like departure gates or platforms, delays, etc.

Programming: Masters and slaves, backing the wrong horse, and Julia

Filed under
Development
  • Redis does a Python, crushes 'offensive' master, slave code terms

    The open-source Redis database, like the Python programming language, is moving away from using the technical terms "master" and "slave" in its documentation and API – to the extent that's possible without breaking things.

    For Python, the decision this week to replace the words "master" and "slave", prompted by undisclosed complaints that they're offensive, led to a backlash.

    Meanwhile, those overseeing Python's CPython repo on Github today locked a pull request purging the words, and deleted several comments. But not before one developer highlighted the irony of executing the word change using the Git version-control software, which still relies heavily on "master" – for example, merging commits in the master branch. (Barely any instances of "slave" appear in Git code, though.)

    The Register asked Python developer Victor Stinner, author of the pull requests and Python bug report at the heart of the issue, whether he would like to discuss the controversy, but he declined. In previous comments, he justified his proposals to strip "master" and "slave" from the widely used programming language by saying some people object to the terms.

  • Backing the wrong horse?

    I started using the Ruby programming in around 2003 or 2004, but stopped at some point later, perhaps around 2008. At the time I was frustrated with the approach the Ruby community took for managing packages of Ruby software: Ruby Gems. They interact really badly with distribution packaging and made the jobs of organisations like Debian more difficult. This was around the time that Ruby on Rails was making a big splash for web application development (I think version 2.0 had just come out). I did fork out for the predominant Ruby on Rails book to try it out. Unfortunately the software was evolving so quickly that the very first examples in the book no longer worked with the latest versions of Rails. I wasn't doing a lot of web development that at the time anyway, so I put the book, Rails and Ruby itself on the shelf and moved on to looking at the Python programming language instead.

    Since then I've written lots of Python, both professionally and personally. Whenever it looked like a job was best solved with scripting, I'd pick up Python. I hadn't stopped to reflect on the experience much at all, beyond being glad I wasn't writing Perl any more (the first language I had any real traction with, 20 years ago).

  • Google's Dataset Search, Julia programming language, and more news

    TechRepublic described this programming language, originating from 2012 and just released as version 1.0, as follows: "designed to combine the speed of C with the usability of Python, the dynamism of Ruby, the mathematical prowess of MatLab, and the statistical chops of R."

    Liked by data scientists and mathematicians, Julia is also used in industries, such as the automotive industry for self-driving cars, and for 3-D printing.

    Julia is open source, counts 700 active contributors, 1,900 registered packages and two-million downloads. Details, download, and documentation can be found on julialang.org.

Security: HackRF, WPScan, BGP

Filed under
Security
  • Course Review: Software Defined Radio with HackRF

    Over the past two days, I had the opportunity to attend Michael Ossman’s course “Software Defined Radio with HackRF” at Toorcon XX. This is a course I’ve wanted to take for several years, and I’m extremely happy that I finally had the chance. I wanted to write up a short review for others considering taking the course.

  • WPScan – A Black Box WordPress Vulnerability Scanner

    WordPress is all over the web; it’s the most popular and most used content management system (CMS) out there. Is your website or blog is powered by WordPress? Did you know that malicious hackers are always attacking WordPress sites every minute? If you didn’t, now you know.

    The first step towards securing your website or blog is to perform a vulnerability assessment. This is simply an operation to identify common security loopholes (known to the public), within your site or its underlying architecture.

  • Are BGPs security features working yet?

    This post is a textual version of a talk I gave at NLNOG 2018, You can watch the talk below if that’s your preferred medium: [...]

    BGP has had a problem for quite a while, most of the time when we hear about this in the news outside of the networking word it is referred to as a “BGP Hijack”. Which can be better phrased as “someone routed someone else’s addresses to them”.

Stop using GitHub as a measure of open source contributions

Filed under
Development
Microsoft

It should go without saying, but apparently doesn’t, that GitHub hosts only a fraction of open source projects and activity.

GitHub launched about 10 years ago. Open source and free software development predates GitHub’s existence by twenty years or so. A lot of projects have picked up and moved from their previous homes to GitHub, but many haven’t. GNU projects, for example, aren’t hosted there. Canonical’s Launchpad repository hosts a lot of projects that aren’t on GitHub. Fedora has Pagure, the Eclipse project has its own source control for its projects, as well as the Apache Software Foundation, etc.

Some of those may mirror projects on GitHub, but it’s unclear to me how people who don’t have GitHub accounts are counted when people survey GitHub. I’m skeptical that using GitHub APIs to pull user data to see “what company does so-and-so work for?” is effective when that person hasn’t created a GitHub account.

GitHub metrics are biased towards newer projects, corporate-founded projects, and projects that have a bent towards non-reciprocal licenses.

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Troubleshooting With Git - Git Series Part 3

Filed under
Linux

From time to time, you will encounter problems while using Git. The most common of these is a merge conflict. Fortunately, git will provide solutions to many problems for you. Sometimes, though, there are certain problems that do require the assistance of more experienced people. Most of these problems that I will describe are what I have encountered personally in my line of work.

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The 'New' Microsoft

Filed under
Google
Microsoft
Moz/FF
Web
  • Windows derails Chrome, Firefox installation, promotes Microsoft Edge instead [iophk: "Where are the Microsoft apologists on this? They sure have been quiet."]

    Microsoft is trying a new tactic to get people to use its Edge browser: a warning dialog box that interrupts the installation of other browsers like Mozilla Firefox or Google Chrome.

  • Microsoft tests ‘warning’ Windows 10 users not to install Chrome or Firefox

    While the prompts can be turned off, they’re yet another example of Microsoft infesting Windows 10 with annoying ads and pop-ups. Some similar prompts already appear and attempt to push Chrome or Firefox users to use Edge, but this latest one steps up Microsoft’s war against Chrome even further. It’s not clear why Microsoft thinks it’s a good idea to include these irritating prompts, as all they’re likely to do is anger Windows 10 users rather than convince them to switch to Edge.

  • Microsoft Tests Warning Windows 10 Users About Installing Google Chrome or Mozilla Firefox [iophk: "yeah, Microsoft "loves" FOSS"]

    While the warning does not block the installation, it is a blatant move from Microsoft to try and stop users from downloading a rival's Web browser. As per a CNET report, test was confirmed in Windows 10 version 1809, build 17758.1. It is worth noting that it is a preview release, which will not be available to the general public for another month or so. In a statement to CNET, Microsoft referred to its Windows test programme, and said, "We're currently testing this functionality with insiders only. The Windows Insider Program enables Microsoft to test different features, functionality and garner feedback before rolling out broadly. Customers remain in control and can choose the browser of their choice." The Verge, on the other hand, cites its sources to say the warning will not make its way to the Windows 10 October 2018 Update.

A Summary of deepin 15.6 and 15.7

Filed under
Reviews

Both deepin 15.6 and 15.7 were released at June and August 2018. Here's a short summary of them showing the new features and improvements. You will find new Welcome Intro, new Dark Theme, new Power Saving Mode, reduced RAM usage and smaller ISO size, improvements in System Settings, and new ability of File Manager (renaming partition by right-click, for example). You will see them in this article with GIF animations and screenshots. This article also shows in brief why 15.7 is far better than 15.6 so you can choose it to start deepin for your first time. Enjoy!

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Behind the GNOME 3.30 Release Video

Filed under
GNOME

With each video I experiment with new workflows. Traditionally I have been involved in every step of the production apart from the voice-over with very few opportunities for others to step in and contribute. With Gitlab’s powerful issue tracking system, this no longer needs to be the case. This has meant that I can spend more time on production in Blender and spread out the other aspects of production to the GNOME community.

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today's leftovers

Filed under
Misc
  • Ubuntu Podcast S11E27 – Twenty-Seven Bones

    This week we’ve been moonlighting on other podcasts and started using DuckDuckGo. Trend Micro get booted from the Apple Store, Intel adopts an AMD display standard, a cheesy history of Linux gaming is published, Amazon Echo now Looks at you and we round up the community news.

  • New Life to KDE – Edu

    Some seeds take a while to grow, and what a while. I’v met Karina Mochetti five years ago when I moved to Campinas, back then I had just started working at Intel and I had finished one of my most glorious software developer tasks, good subversive terrorist that I’m, I made Linus Torvalds program in C++ and talking with a friend that lives in Rio de Janeiro I heard “I have a programmer friend in Campinas, wanna meet?”, well, yes, always.

  • API Changes in Clang

    I’ve started contributing to Clang, in the hope that I can improve the API for tooling. This will eventually mean changes to the C++ API of Clang, the CMake buildsystem, and new features in the tooling. Hopefully I’ll remember to blog about changes I make.

Debian-based Liberado MiniNo Queiles 3.1 LTS, Early Look at Debian-based Elive 3.0 and a DD's Request

Filed under
Debian
  • Liberado MiniNo Queiles 3.1 LTS
  • The Blue Bird Effect: Scanning with an Epson XP 231 multifunction printer on Elive 3

    Mamerto Menapace, an Argentinian monk, wrote a story entitled "El Pajaro Azul" ("The Blue Bird").  In this story, a prince gradually falls very sick and no doctor can determine the source of his disease. A hermit is brought from his mountain as the last hope, and this wise man tells everyone that the prince is dying of nostalgia.  To get cured, the prince must start a journey looking for a rare blue bird. 

    [...]

    In Elive, one has to basically use SciTE as root to open the files dll.conf (to add the line example-backend), epson.conf, and epson2.conf (to add the values that one gets with the comand sane-find-scanner in Terminology).  In my case, I had to uncomment, in both files, the line usb 0x01aa 0x0001 and modify it to read:

    usb 0x04b8 0x1102

    That was it.

    Now I can both print and scan on Elive 3.0

  • Recommendations for software?

    Secondly the excellent Have I Been Pwned site provides an API which allows you to test if a password has been previously included in a leak. This is great, and I've integrated their API in a couple of my own applications, but I was thinking on the bus home tonight it might be worth tying into PAM.

    Sure in the interests of security people should use key-based authentication for SSH, but .. most people don't. Even so, if keys are used exclusively, a PAM module would allow you to validate the password which is used for sudo hasn't previously been leaked.

    So it seems like there is value in a PAM module to do a lookup at authentication-time, via libcurl.

OSS Leftovers

Filed under
OSS
  • Top 3 Open Source Trading Bots With Binance Implications

    Some cryptocurrency traders may be familiar with the Blackbird bot. It is primarily designed for arbitrage purposes and is coded n a language most people can get familiar with. That latter aspect is not unimportant when dealing with open source trading bot solutions. It also means users can change the features of this bot as they see fit, assuming they possess the necessary coding knowledge.

    At this current stage, Binance is not officially supported by the bot. Unlike what people assume, the developers are working on implementing access to this trading platform, at least to open long positions through Blackbird. Anyone with the necessary knowledge can implement this feature as well, thus it will be interesting to see what the future holds for this bot accordingly.

  • The new developer role centers on open source technology

    At the same time, the network core is providing developers with massive compute capabilities that were unheard of not too long ago. That core can power compute-intensive applications such as machine learning and blockchain.

    Many of these improved capabilities, and the potential for innovation, have been fed by open source development. Now, we've got major enterprise initiatives built upon a foundation of open source, developed organically from community-driven products and accessible to anyone, anywhere.

    The result is a whirlwind of creative growth and, not incidentally, a new developer role. Developers are becoming the leading forces for creative development within organizations and a competitive advantage for businesses that are trying to move into the digital age.

  • MDN Changelog for August 2018

    A lot of these were migration PRs, and the migration is now 95% complete, with 10,000 features over 6,300 pages. Some of the remaining migration work will be straightforward. Other data sources will require strategy and format discussions, such as Event support and summary pages. These discussions will be easier with the experience of migrating thousands of simpler features.

    Existing data also got some love. Contributors fixed incorrect data, clarified if and when a browser supported a feature, and celebrated support in new browser releases. We expect a steady stream of maintenance PRs as the project transitions from migration to ongoing maintenance.

    Florian Scholz has worked to make this a community project, organizing the effort with spreadsheets and transitioning to issues as the remaining work becomes manageable. This has been a successful effort, and GitHub insights shows that most contributions were not from MDN staff.

  • FLOSS Weekly 497
    LibreOfficeOnline

    Michael Meeks is the General Manager of Collabora Productivity, leading Collabora Office and Online products, supporting customers and consulting on development alongside an extremely talented team. He serves as a Director of the The Document Foundation, and on the LibreOffice Engineering Steering Committee. Prior to Collabora he was a Novell/SUSE Distinguished Engineer working on various pieces of Free Software infrastructure across the Linux stack to MeeGo, GNOME, CORBA, Nautilus, Evolution and Open Source accessibility, among others.

  • Updated LibreOffice growth infographic (2018)

    Numbers are growing and the Collabora Online Development Edition (CODE) is very popular now, with currently over 7.5 million Docker image pulls! Also, this year we are the top code contributors to LibreOffice with 5302 code commits.

  • IceCat 60.2.0 Pre-release

    GNUzilla is the GNU version of the Mozilla suite, and GNU IceCat is the GNU version of the Firefox browser. Its main advantage is an ethical one: it is entirely free software. While the Firefox source code from the Mozilla project is free software, they distribute and recommend non-free software as plug-ins and addons. Also their trademark license restricts distribution in ways that hinder freedom 0.

    GNU IceCat has multiple practical advantages as well, such as better privacy and security settings, extensive blocking of sites that may track the user's browsing habits, or the inclusion of LibreJS and other extensions that help browse without running non-free javascript.

  • An open-source solution for soaring college costs
  • Fedora Silverblue Test Day Next Week, Nextcloud 14 Released, Plasma 5.4 Beta Now Available, openSUSE's Recent Snapshots and Ansible Tower 3.3 Is Out

    Nextcloud announced the release of version 14 this week. This new version introduces two big security improvements: video verification and signal/telegram/SMS 2FA support. Version 14 also includes many collaboration improvements as well as a Data Protection Confirmation app in compliance with the GDPR. Go here to install.

today's howtos

Filed under
HowTos
  • Working with Linux File Links
  • How To Install Visual Studio Code on Ubuntu 18.04
  • Caching mechanism in ansible-bender
  • Colorize Your GNOME Desktop in Ubuntu
  • FF-Multi-Converter: A Great Application for Linux/Ubuntu/Linux Mint

    You may have heard and used multimedia converter application as audio/video files converter only. FF-Multi-Converter is an application that lets you convert audio/video files to various formats, documents to several formats and images to most used formats. isn't it great? This application is around for a while and you may or may not used it. The most recent version ported to Python3 and now supports most of the Linux distributions.

    FF-Multi-Converter uses FFmpeg for audio/video files conversion, unoconv for documents coversion and ImageMagick utility for image conversion. The main goal of this application is to offer most popular multimedia types in one application and provide different conversion options for them easily through a fairly easy to use graphical interface, you will find this application very handy and useful. It is written using Python3 and PyQt5, released under GNU General Public License (GPL V3).

How Kubernetes' Founder is Building an Un-Distribution at Heptio

Filed under
Server
Interviews
OSS

Unlike other software vendors that are part of the Kubernetes community, Heptio doesn't want to build a software distribution of Kubernetes. Rather, the Heptio Kubernetes Service (HKS) is about support and services to help organizations deploy and manage upstream Kubernetes. It's an approach that Heptio has referred to as being an Un-Distribution.

"Our goal with the whole idea of the un-distribution is we want to provide the best parts of a distribution without necessarily some of the downsides that come along with that," Beda said.

Beda said that generally what happens with a distribution of an open source project is that a software vendor takes the upstream code, cleans it up so it's fit for enterprise consumption and then shipping a combination of tools that are prove to work well together.

"Upstream Kubernetes doesn't need a lot of clean up, because the community is so strong and we want to keep it that way," he said.

As such, a lot of the work that Heptio is involved with is all upstream with effort to make Kubernetes easier to install and use. Beda said that Heptio is putting a lot of effort into the kubeadm installer effort from the upstream project as well as the cluster API effort. As part of HKS, Beda said that Heptio is developing a set of validated designs, which integrate best practices for deployment.

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Graphics: AMD and NVIDIA Latest

Filed under
Graphics/Benchmarks
  • AMD ROCm 1.9 Available WIth Vega 20 Support & Upstream Kernel Compatibility

    For months we have been looking forward to ROCm 1.9 as the latest feature update to the Radeon Open Compute stack while on Friday that big release finally took place. This ROCm update for GPU compute purposes has a lot of new features.

    Initially we were looking forward to ROCm 1.9 for Ubuntu 18.04 LTS support, which ended up being back-ported to the 1.8 series. But other headlining features of ROCm 1.9 include Vega 20 "Vega 7nm" support, a ROCm System Management Interface (ROCm SMI) library, HIP/HPCC improvements, rocprof for ROCm profling, compatibility with the upstream AMDKFD support now found in the mainline Linux kernel (Linux 4.17+), and various other improvements.

  • NVIDIA Publishes An In-Depth Look At Turing

    Next week is when the GeForce RTX 2080 "Turing" graphics cards will begin to ship while today is when NVIDIA lifted the embargo on "unboxing" videos/pictures and talking more about this new GPU microarchitecture.

    NVIDIA has posted their own in-depth Turing architecture look. Go check it out if you want to learn more about Turing's quite fascinating design and improvements over particularly the GeForce GTX 1000 "Pascal" series.

    Unfortunately no unboxing/reports on our end today... NVIDIA still appears to be not too interested in Linux gamers for the GeForce RTX 2080 series. While they have sent out hardware for many of the past launches, for Turing I am having a difficult time even getting them to respond to my inquiries. I am told by at least one NVIDIA'ian though that there will be Linux drivers in time for launch-day... We'll see.

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More in Tux Machines

WireGuard Picks Up A Simpler Kconfig, Zinc Crypto Performance Fix

WireGuard lead developer Jason Donenfeld sent out the fifth revision of the WireGuard and Zinc crypto library patches this week. They've been coming in frequently with a lot of changes with it looking like this "secure VPN tunnel" could reach the Linux 4.20~5.0 kernel. With the WireGuard v5 patches there are various low-level code improvements, a "saner" and simpler Kconfig build-time configuration options, a performance regression for tcrypt within the Zinc crypto code has been fixed and is now even faster than before, and there is also now a nosimd module parameter to disable the use of SIMD instructions. Read more

Microsoft Demonstrates Why Proprietary Software Cannot be Trusted

  • This Windows file may be secretly hoarding your passwords and emails
    If you're one of the people who own a stylus or touchscreen-capable Windows PC, then there's a high chance there's a file on your computer that has slowly collected sensitive data for the past months or even years. [...] The handwriting feature is there since Windows 8 which means the vulnerability has been there for many years. However, if you don’t store valuable information like passwords or email on your PC, you aren’t much likely to get affected much.
  • This Windows File Might Be Secretly Collecting Sensitive Data Since Windows 8
    There is a Windows file named WaitList.dat that covertly collects your passwords and email information, with the help of Windows Search Indexer service. Digital Forensics and Incident Response (DFIR) expert Barnaby Skeggs first discovered the information about the file back in 2016 but wasn’t paid much attention. However, in after a new and exclusive interview with ZDNet – it appears that the file, in fact, is reasonably dangerous.

The best editor for PHP developers who work in Linux OS

Every programmer knows that coding is fun! Don't you agree with me? However, to be an absolutely professional PHP developer, we have to know a lot about all the specific details of coding. Selecting the editor you are going to use to happily code is not an easy decision and must be taken unhurriedly. If you are a beginner, you may try a great code editor with a rich functionality and very flexible customization which is known as Atom Editor, the editor of the XXI century. You may say that we have many pretty alternatives available. Read the explanation below, and the introduced information will knock you off! Read more

Android Leftovers