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Thursday, 27 Apr 17 - Tux Machines is a community-driven public service/news site which has been around for over a decade and primarily focuses on GNU/LinuxSubscribe now Syndicate content

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Quick Roundup

Type Title Authorsort icon Replies Last Post
Story 5 Ways Xoopit Extends Gmail adriantry 27/04/2009 - 10:27am
Story Audacity: The Versatile Audio Tool for Everyone adriantry 12/05/2009 - 10:03am
Forum topic Dialup dilemma afs 05/06/2008 - 5:40pm
Blog entry Distribution Release: EnGarde Secure Linux 3.0.21 akramshaikh 08/10/2008 - 7:55am
Blog entry 25 Cool & Beautiful Linux Wallpapers akramshaikh 31/08/2009 - 6:50pm
Blog entry Ubuntu 10.04 LTS Finally Released! akramshaikh 29/04/2010 - 7:18pm
Story Top 10 Addictive games on Linux alieneyes 06/03/2010 - 5:07pm
Blog entry “Can’t locate module” Error in Linux and Data Loss allen 06/10/2008 - 4:52am
Blog entry “No such file or directory” Error in Linux allen 15/10/2008 - 4:47am
Blog entry ‘attempt to access beyond end of device’ Linux Error allen 27/03/2009 - 6:45am

Themes for Ubuntu

Filed under
Ubuntu
  • Flattiance is a Flat Fork of Ubuntu’s Ambiance Theme

    Flattiance is pitched as a “semi-flat fork” of the Ubuntu Ambiance theme. You know, the one that ships out of the box and by default. On the whole Flattiance keeps to the same color palette, with dark browns and orange accents, but it ditches the gradient in app headers in favour of a solid block.

  • A quick look at some essential GNOME Shell tweaks and extensions

    Now that Ubuntu is moving to GNOME Shell, many people will get a bit of a shock at how different the workflow is from Unity to Shell. Here’s a quick look at some essentials to get you going.

Graphics and Games

Filed under
Graphics/Benchmarks
Gaming
  • Compute Shader Patches For Nouveau Pascal
  • Steam For Linux [Steam review]

    Technically, physically, mentally, chemically games are those things which make us feel like a child again. Age doesn’t matter, what matter is that spirit that is inside us, that “gamer” spirit. When I joined Linux two years ago, I installed steam firstly to get my games from windows back. Now I've got a library of limitless free and paid games having my CS: GO too. I am a daily CS: GO, player. All my favorite games are on Linux via steam. That is why I decided to review it for you guys who are new to Linux world and are in a doubt that how to use steam, what is steam? All answers are here. So here is Steam for Linux.

  • A look at Codroids, a puzzle game with a focus on simplicity

Ubuntu and elementary

Filed under
Ubuntu
  • System76 wants to build its own hardware for its Linux-based computers

    System76 is building up quite a name for itself, being one of a very limited number of companies selling only computers running Linux-based operating systems. Now the aim is to branch out; System76 wants to design and build its own hardware, while representing the open source community as it does so.

    At the moment, the hardware used in System76 systems is outsourced, but in the future this will change. The company says that it is moving into phase three of its development cycle, and this "moves product design and manufacturing in house." And you should set your expectations high: "We're about to build the Model S of computers. Something so brilliant and beautiful that reviewers will have to add an 11 to their scores."

  • AppCenter Spotlight: Beta Testers

    Over the past month we’ve been beta testing the new AppCenter with a number of developers, from elementary OS contributors to backers of our Indiegogo campaign. After testing out the submission process and getting some apps into the store (and seeing rapid updates!), I wanted to take a moment to highlight some of the first apps.

  • elementary OS to get improved AppCenter, showing off a few new applications

    I have to hand it to the elementary OS guys, they have a massive focus on design and it does look quite incredible. It is easily one of the best looking Linux distributions, which I do admire. Their new AppCenter, for example, looks extremely clean and clear.

Beijing Zoo is No Place for Pandas

Filed under
Just talk

Pandas in Beijing Zoo
Photo credit: Nick Hopkins

I am a Panda lover. I work as a support engineer in an I.T company here in the United Kingdom. Most of my spare time is spent watching different Panda videos -- both old and new videos. Basically, it is my therapy; a 'stress release' for me. I find them to be adorable and precious creatures. As a matter of fact, I would like to volunteer to come to Sichuan. I want to experience and feel what it's like to be a Panda keeper, to be able to interact with them for real. The Panda is China's National Treasure, so it's a shame to watch the Panda videos from Beijing zoo, as the place is disgusting and not ideal for Pandas to live in (and for sure for all the rest of the animals who unfortunately got stuck in this prison cell).

The place looks like a ghost town. Lifeless and languished. Knowing that Pandas wear a thick fur on their body, can you imagine what it feels for them in 30C or 35C (summer temperature)? What it probably feels like all the time? Come on, if you really care, you must do something now, otherwise these Pandas will die. Please bring them back to their sanctuary where they really belong.

Linux 4.11 File-System Tests: EXT4, F2FS, XFS & Btrfs

Filed under
Graphics/Benchmarks
Linux

With the Linux 4.11 kernel potentially being released as soon as today, here are some fresh benchmarks of Btrfs / EXT4 / F2FS / XFS on a solid-state drive and comparing the performance of 4.11 Git back to Linux 4.9 and 4.10.

For those wondering if the block/file-system changes of Linux 4.11 have any impact on EXT4/F2FS/XFS/Btrfs for common I/O workloads or how these file-systems are comparing on this latest kernel, here are some benchmarks.

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KDE neon Translations

Filed under
KDE

One of the best things about making software collaboratively is the translations. Sure I could make a UML diagramming tool or whatever all by my own but it’s better if I let lots of other people help out and one of the best crowd-sourcing features of open community development is you get translated into many popular and obscure languages which it would cost a fortune to pay some company to do.

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today's leftovers

Filed under
Misc
  • The Linux Migration: April 2017 Progress Report

    In December 2016, I kicked off a migration to Linux (from OS X) as my primary laptop OS. In the nearly 4 months since the initial progress report, I’ve published a series of articles providing updates on things like which Linux distribution I selected, how I’m handling running VMs on my Linux laptop, and integration with corporate collaboration systems (here, here, and here). I thought that these “along the way” posts would be sufficient to keep readers informed, but I’ve had a couple of requests in the last week about how the migration is going. This post will help answer that question by summarizing what’s happened so far.

    Let me start by saying that I am actively using a Linux-powered laptop as my primary laptop right now, and I have been doing so since early February. All the posts I’ve published so far have been updates of how things are going “in production,” so to speak. The following sections describe my current, active environment.

  • Galago Pro: Look Inside

    Look inside the Galago Pro and see how easy it is to upgrade!

  • Direct3D 9 Over Vulkan Continues Progressing
  • Nouveau 1.0.15 X.Org Driver Released With Pascal Support
  • Arch Linux running natively on Pixel C
  • openSUSE Conference 2017 Schedule Posted

Making GNU/Linux Look Nice

Filed under
GNU
Linux

Lumina Desktop Gets lumina-mediaplayer

Filed under
BSD
  • 1.3.0 Development Preview: lumina-mediaplayer
  • Lumina Desktop Gets Its Own Media Player

    There's now yet another open-source media player, but this time focused on the BSD-focused Qt-powered Lumina Desktop Environment.

    Lumina Media Player is one of the new additions for the upcoming Lumina 1.3. Lumina Media Player's UI is quite simple so far and allows playing of local audio/video files along with basic audio streaming -- currently implemented for Pandora.

Security Leftovers

Filed under
Security

Leftovers: Debian, Ubuntu and Derivatives

Filed under
Debian
Ubuntu
  • Debian Developers Make Progress With RISC-V Port

    Debian developers continue making progress with a -- currently unofficial -- port of their Linux operating system to RISC-V.

    There is a in-progress Debian GNU/Linux port to RISC-V along with a repository with packages built for RISC-V. RISC-V for the uninitiated is a promising, open-source ISA for CPUs. So far there isn't any widely-available RISC-V hardware, but there are embedded systems in the works while software emulators are available.

  • 2×08: Pique Oil
  • [Video] Ubuntu 17.04 KDE
  • deepin 15.4 Released, With Download Link & Mirrors

    deepin 15.4 GNU/Linux operating system has been released at April 19th 2017. I list here one official download link and two faster mirrors from Sourceforge. I listed here the Mega and Google mirrors as well but remember they don't provide direct download. The 15.4 provided only as 64 bit, the 32 bit version has already dropped (except by commercial support). I hope this short list helps you.

Leftovers: OSS and Sharing

Filed under
OSS
  • Overlayfs snapshots

    At the 2017 Vault storage conference, Amir Goldstein gave a talk about using overlayfs in a novel way to create snapshots for the underlying filesystem. His company, CTERA Networks, has used the NEXT3 ext3-based filesystem with snapshots, but customers want to be able to use larger filesystems than those supported by ext3. Thus he turned to overlayfs as a way to add snapshots for XFS and other local filesystems.

    NEXT3 has a number of shortcomings that he wanted to address with overlayfs snapshots. Though it only had a few requirements, which were reasonably well supported, NEXT3 never got upstream. It was ported to ext4, but his employer stuck with the original ext3-based system, so the ext4 version was never really pushed for upstream inclusion.

  • Five days and counting

    It is five days left until foss-north 2017, so it is high time to get your ticket! Please notice that tickets can be bought all the way until the night of the 25th (Tuesday), but catering is only included is you get your ticket on the 24th (Monday), so help a poor organizer and get your tickets as soon as possible!

  • OpenStack Radium? Maybe…but it could be Formidable

    OK the first results are in from the OpenStack community naming process for the R release. The winner at this point is Radium.

  • Libreboot Wants Back Into GNU

    Early this morning, Libreboot’s lead developer Leah Rowe posted a notice to the project’s website and a much longer post to the project’s subreddit, indicating that she would like to submit (or resubmit, it’s not clear how that would work at this point) the project to “rejoin the GNU Project.”

    The project had been a part of GNU from May 14 through September 15 of last year, at which time Ms. Rowe very publicly removed the project from GNU while making allegations of misdeeds by both GNU and the Free Software Foundation. Earlier this month, Rowe admitted that she had been dealing with personal issues at the time and had overreacted. The project also indicated that it had reorganized and that Rowe was no longer in full control.

  • Understanding the complexity of copyleft defense

    The fundamental mechanism defending software freedom is copyleft, embodied in GPL. GPL, however, functions only through upholding it--via GPL enforcement. For some, enforcement has been a regular activity for 30 years, but most projects don't enforce: they live with regular violations. Today, even under the Community Principles of GPL Enforcement, GPL enforcement is regularly criticized and questioned. The complex landscape is now impenetrable for developers who wish their code to remain forever free. This talk provides basic history and background information on the topic.

  • After Bill Gates Backs Open Access, Steve Ballmer Discovers The Joys Of Open Data

    A few months ago, we noted that the Gates Foundation has emerged as one of the leaders in requiring the research that it funds to be released as open access and open data -- an interesting application of the money that Bill Gates made from closed-source software. Now it seems that his successor as Microsoft CEO, Steve Ballmer, has had a similar epiphany about openness. Back in 2001, Ballmer famously called GNU/Linux "a cancer". Although he later softened his views on software somewhat, that was largely because he optimistically claimed that the threat to Microsoft from free software was "in the rearview mirror". Not really: today, the Linux-based Android has almost two orders of magnitude more market share than Windows Phone.

  • New Open Door Policy for GitHub Developer Program

    GitHub has opened the doors on its three year old GitHub Developer Program. As of Monday, developers no longer need to have paid accounts to participate.

    "We're opening the program up to all developers, even those who don't have paid GitHub accounts," the company announced in a blog post. "That means you can join the program no matter which stage of development you're in,"

  • MuleSoft Joins the OpenAPI Initiative: The End of the API Spec Wars

    Yesterday, MuleSoft, the creators of RAML, announced that they have joined the Open API Initiative. Created by SmartBear Software and based on the wildly popular Swagger Specification, the OpenAPI Initiative is a Linux Foundation project with over 20 members, including Adobe, IBM, Google, Microsoft, and Salesforce.

Mozilla Firefox and Thunderbird

Filed under
Moz/FF
  • Containers, a Great Privacy Add-On Currently in Firefox Test Pilot

    While not Linux specific by any means, here is a Firefox add-on (currently in Firefox Test Pilot) that I've been using and I believe is beneficial to any Firefox user, especially those who want a bit of extra privacy.

    Containers are basically a way of isolating tabs to their own profiles (profile-per-tab, if you like). This isn't quite the same as separate profiles that Firefox allows you to start up the browser with, but the result is quite similar nonetheless: tabs are confined to their particular container, including cookies and login data, meaning you can not only have multiple logins (for example, one login of Gmail in your "Personal" tab container and another completely separate login in your "Work" tab container) but also prevent online trackers from piecing all your online habits together, more or less.

  • Ubuntu might retire Thunderbird
  • Proposal to start a new implementation of Thunderbird based on web technologies

Openwashing

Filed under
OSS

Btrfs Getting RAID 5/6 Fixes In Linux 4.12 Kernel

Filed under
Linux

Not only is the BFQ I/O scheduler coming for mainline Linux 4.12 but there are also some more fixes to Btrfs for improving the file-system's native handling of RAID5 and RAID6 modes.

Last year the Btrfs RAID 5/6 code was found to be in bad shape and potentially unsafe. Since then there were some partial fixes for Btrfs RAID 5/6.

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Ubuntu 17.04 Zesty Zapata - Viva la revolucion!

Filed under
Reviews
Ubuntu

Ubuntu 17.04 Zesty Zapus, or let's face it, Zapata, is a decent release. It has nothing to do with the recent announcement. No hidden symbolism or nostalgia. Simply put, some of the old issues seem to have been ironed out, with the focus on hardware support, speed and some rough edges and papercuts here and there. Pretty nice. Good fonts, too!

However, the live session is uber-boring, the multimedia stack is a bit weak, and some of the default applications are just useless, thank you Gnome. There are also several visual bugs lingering about, and they shouldn't be there. Other than that, I don't have anything else negative to say about Zesty. Oh, you still cannot right-click to create new files. Someone needs to have their laptop confiscated for life. Well, if you like Ubuntu or feel like testing, Zesty offers an improvement experience compared to the last several releases. This is a welcome change, and could signal a fresh breath of hope that is so desperately needed. Grade wise, 7/10. Now, your turn to play.

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Ubuntu 17.04 Review: Except for the Horrible DNS Issue (now ‘fixed’), a Good Release. Oh and, Farewell Unity!

Filed under
Reviews
Ubuntu

Apparently, the recently released Ubuntu operating system (17.04) will be the last time Ubuntu will feature its own desktop shell ‘Unity’ which was first introduced back in 2010. So, it survived 7 years, almost. It actually did not ‘survive’, in my opinion, even though I myself was too quick to criticize it (well, back then I was young, somewhat), it thrived! Sure the desktop may have had its flaws, but compared to the GNOME3, the foundation of which Unity was heavily relying upon, Unity was a much sensible desktop shell to use. That is at least my judgement after using it for all these years.

Ubuntu had to let go Unity because, well first they lost the ideological battle (they were never fully trusted by the coding elite of Free Software Movement & they may have had their reasons, granted, but they never trusted what Ubuntu represented ideologically. As a subtle example, observe that despite using the GNOME’s foundation, Ubuntu was always inclined towards using Qt), and secondly, there wasn’t enough man-power to push forward their technological implementations with brute force (Mir & Unity8 are just two examples) because unless the ‘external circumstances’ are already in place, ideas alone cannot change anything.

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Also: Canonical Reboots Convergence; Introduces the No Desktop Environment [Satire]

Ubuntu 17.10 Release Date Announced — What New Features To Expect?

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GNOME/Unity in Ubuntu

today's howtos

Leftovers: Software (Subsurface, GRUB, GIMP, and Todo.txt)

  • Announcing Subsurface 4.6.4
    The Subsurface development team proudly announces the release 4.6.4 of Subsurface, an open source dive log and dive planning program for Windows, Mac and Linux.
  • Subsurface 4.6.4 Open-Source Dive Log and Planning Tool Adds Many Improvements
    The development team behind the Subsurface open-source dive log and dive planning application was proud to announce the immediate availability for download of the Subsurface 4.6.4 release. Subsurface 4.6.4 is the latest stable version of the popular program developed by Linus Torvalds in collaboration with other developers, and adds a great number of improvements over previous builds. These include a new planner mode to calculate minimum gas, better handling of notes when replanning dives, as well as support for the border width setting in printing templates.
  • GRUB 2.02 Bootloader Officially Released with ZFS LZ4 & LVM RAID1 Support, More
    The long-anticipated GRUB 2.02 open-source bootloader software project was finally promoted to the stable channel after being in Beta stages of development for the past few years. The development team took their time to finalize the release of GRUB 2.02, which should soon make its way into the stable software repositories of your favorite operating system, but it's finally here and we want to thank them for all their hard work and the awesome new features and improvements implemented so far.
  • [New] GIMP review
    GIMP (short for GNU Image Manipulation Program) is a free alternative to Photoshop that more than holds its own. But don't think that the lack of a price tag means GIMP is lacking in features; it packs enough punch to genuinely rival Adobe's imaging behemoth. GIMP comes with impressive selection and montage features, various ways to retouch your images, cropping, noise reduction and colour adjustment tools, customisable brushes, gradients and so much more. There's plenty for the more advanced user, too, including layer masks, bezier curves, filters and even an animation package.
  • Todo.txt – A Nifty ToDo Indicator Applet for Ubuntu
    Todo.txt is an extremely simple indicator applet that lets you quickly tick off the tasks contained in your todo.txt file. It lives in the system tray and has options: Edit todo.txt, Clear completed, and refresh. Ultimately, its job is to help you edit your todo.txt file and mark tasks as completed without needing to open a full-fledged text editing application.

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