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Tuesday, 19 Jun 18 - Tux Machines is a community-driven public service/news site which has been around for over a decade and primarily focuses on GNU/LinuxSubscribe now Syndicate content

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Quick Roundup

Type Title Authorsort icon Replies Last Post
Story 5 Ways Xoopit Extends Gmail adriantry 27/04/2009 - 10:27am
Story Audacity: The Versatile Audio Tool for Everyone adriantry 12/05/2009 - 10:03am
Forum topic Dialup dilemma afs 05/06/2008 - 5:40pm
Blog entry Distribution Release: EnGarde Secure Linux 3.0.21 akramshaikh 08/10/2008 - 7:55am
Blog entry 25 Cool & Beautiful Linux Wallpapers akramshaikh 31/08/2009 - 6:50pm
Blog entry Ubuntu 10.04 LTS Finally Released! akramshaikh 29/04/2010 - 7:18pm
Story Top 10 Addictive games on Linux alieneyes 06/03/2010 - 5:07pm
Blog entry “Can’t locate module” Error in Linux and Data Loss allen 06/10/2008 - 4:52am
Blog entry “No such file or directory” Error in Linux allen 15/10/2008 - 4:47am
Blog entry ‘attempt to access beyond end of device’ Linux Error allen 27/03/2009 - 6:45am

RK3399 SBC has 9-36V DC and optional 4G, WiFi, serial, and HDMI-in modules

Filed under
Android
Ubuntu

ICNexus’ “SBC3100” SBC runs Ubuntu or Android on a Rockchip RK3399 with up to 4GB RAM and 16GB flash plus HDMI 2.0, DP, eDP, MIPI-DSI and -CSI, 9-36V power, optional WiFi/BT, and a mini-PCIe slot with optional 3G or 4G.

Taiwan-based ICNexus’ SBC3100 joins a growing list of SBCs that feature, the hhigh-end Rockchip RK3399 SoC, and like most, it taps the high-end SoC to provide an extensive feature list. Unlike most we’ve seen, however, it is not publicly priced and appears to be a proprietary product, such as Aaeon’s Pico-ITX based RICO-3399.

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Fun With Microsoft

Filed under
Security
  • Intelligence agency National Cyber Security Centre is working with Dixons Carphone on huge data breach

    The National Cyber Security Centre (NCSC), part of GCHQ, said today it is working with Dixons Carphone on mitigation measures, after the retailer said it was investigating a data breach involving 5.9m payment cards and 1.2m personal data records.

    The company announced earlier on that there was an attempt to compromise 5.9m cards in one of the processing systems of Currys PC World and Dixons Travel stores.

  • Spy agency investigates Dixons Carphone bank card data breach
  • Want to Break Into a Locked Windows 10 Device? Ask Cortana (CVE-2018-8140)
  • Cortana Flaw Lets Hackers Access Data, Reset Password On Locked Windows 10 PCs

    Security researchers have found a critical flaw in Windows 10 where Cortana can be manipulated into executing Powershell commands on locked devices.

    Attackers can misuse this vulnerability to retrieve confidential data, reset the password, log into a device, and even execute codes from above the lock screen. The only sense of satisfaction is that it requires physical access to the device.

  • Windows 10 Cumulative Update KB4284835 Might Be Failing to Install as Well

    Windows 10 April 2018 Update has received a new cumulative update as part of this month’s Patch Tuesday cycle, and although it seemed to install correctly at first, it looks like some users are now hitting issues with this new release.
    Windows 10 cumulative update KB4284835 brings several important fixes and it resolves a bug causing the April 2018 Update to fail with a black screen on a number of systems.

    Microsoft says it’s aware of just one known issue in this cumulative update, but as it turns out, KB4284835 fails to install in some cases, eventually causing an infinite loop where the update is listed as successfully installed, only to be re-offered again after every boot.

    There are several posts on reddit pointing to such an issue, and for the time being, no workaround appears to be available. Manually installing the update does not correct this behavior.

Red Hat and Fedora

Filed under
Red Hat

Top 4 open source augmented reality SDKs

Filed under
OSS

Advancements in augmented reality (AR) technologies have unearthed possibilities that previously were restricted to our imaginations. Today, it's possible to use sophisticated computer-produced vision to augment our physical environment in entirely new and captivating ways.

The resulting boom has led developers to seek out the best open source AR software development kits (SDKs) to build the next big AR-powered applications and games. This includes people like Swizec, who has spent the past 10 years working in AR and developing apps like the projects shown on LiveEdu.tv.

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Linux Gets Loud

Filed under
Linux

Linux is ready for prime time when it comes to music production. New offerings from Linux audio developers are pushing creative and technical boundaries. And, with the maturity of the Linux desktop and growth of standards-based hardware setups, making music with Linux has never been easier.

Linux always has had a place for musicians looking for inexpensive rigs to record and create music, but historically, it's been a pain to maintain. Digging through arcane documentation and deciphering man pages is not something that interests many musicians.

Loading up Linux is not as intimidating as it once was, and a helpful community is going strong. Beyond tinkering types looking for cheap beats, users range in experience and skill. Linux is still the underdog when it comes to its reputation for thin creative applications though.

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Stable kernels 4.9.108, 4.4.137 and 3.18.113

Filed under
Linux

Video: Linus Torvalds Explains How Linux Still Surprises and Motivates Him

Filed under
Linux

Linus Torvalds took to the stage in China for the first time Monday at LinuxCon + ContainerCon + CloudOpen China 2017 in Beijing. In front of a crowd of nearly 2,000, Torvalds spoke with VMware Head of Open Source Dirk Hohndel in one of their famous “fireside chats” about what motivates and surprises him and how aspiring open source developers can get started. Here are some highlights of their talk.

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NSA could have access to data on Microsoft-owned GitHub

Filed under
Development
Microsoft

The NSA could have access to the code repositories residing on GitHub, which is now owned by Microsoft, if past practices of the Redmond-based software giant are any indicator.

Microsoft announced its acquisition of GitHub on 5 June. The company said at the time that GitHub had about 28 million developers working on 80 million repositories. Microsoft has been one of the bigger code contributors to the site.

The reaction from open-source developers to the acquisition was not exactly been salutary as can be seen from comments on Linux Weekly News.

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Games Leftovers

Filed under
Gaming

Security: Permissions, Misconfigured ADB, and Microsoft Neglect

Filed under
Security
  • Work a command-line interface in Linux with these permissions and prompts

    The command-line interface is an integral part of the Linux management environment. With sudo permissions and remote connectivity, working with a command line is easy.

  • Android Devices With Misconfigured ADB, a Ripe Target for Cryptojacking Malware

    Poorly configured Android devices, where the Android Debug Bridge is left enabled, have become an attractive target for hackers. According to researchers, adversaries are using the common misconfiguration to install cryptojacking malware on a wide selection of Android-based IoT devices ranging from maritime computer systems, TVs, DVRs and some mobile phone models.

    Android Debug Bridge (ADB) is an Android OS developer function that, when enabled, allows remote users to access a Unix shell to conduct command line device maintenance. According to researcher Kevin Beaumont, thousands of Android type devices ship with ADB enabled, allowing hackers to remotely access them.

  • Microsoft reveals which Windows bugs it might decide not to fix

    The Register sometimes hears from security researchers who feel that Microsoft has not responded to bug reports with appropriate haste. This document and its eventual finalised successor should help to explain such incidents to researchers. It’s also of interest to end-users because by explaining bugs that Microsoft won’t rush to fix it offers some more detail about the risks that come with running Windows.

CPTPP jeopardises the future of open source software: OSIA

Filed under
OSS

Open Source Industry Australia (OSIA) is calling upon the federal government to scrap the CPTPP (Comprehensive & Progressive agreement for Trans Pacific Partnership) over provisions that could decimate the Australian open source community.

As the Senate Standing Committee on Foreign Affairs, Defence & Trade conducts its inquiry into the revised international trade agreement that incorporates most of the original TPP’s provisions, OSIA has called for Australia to withdraw from the deal before it is ratified.

The open source software peak body has identified loosely worded clauses within the chapter on electronic commerce that could have major impacts on creators and users of open source software.

The offending section is Article 14.17 of the CPTPP, which prohibits requirements for transfer or access to the source code of computer software. OSIA argues that the exceptions within this article are far too narrow and ‘carelessly worded’, leaving them entirely susceptible to interpretation.

Read more

Former Munich Mayor Warns Against Negative Effects Of City’s Re-Migration To Microsoft

Filed under
GNU
Linux
Microsoft

The former mayor of Munich, Christian Ude (Social Democratic Party), clashed with the new head of IT of the Bavarian capital over the city’s re-migration from Linux to Microsoft at an event organised by the Green Party yesterday.

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Linux Foundation: Updates on ONAP and the R Consortium

Filed under
Linux
  • ONAP’s Second Code Release, Beijing, Enables the Software to Use Kubernetes

    The O​pen Network Automation Platform (ONAP)​ project today issued its second software release — Beijing. It includes more support for containers and some functionality for service providers to deploy ONAP across geographically dispersed data centers.

    The ONAP project gave clues that it was working with the container orchestrator Kubernetes in March when the two projects conducted a joint demonstration at the Open Networking Summit (ONS).

  • ONAP ‘Beijing’ Paves Way for Cloud-Native Network Functions

    The Linux Foundation's LF Networking group announced availability for the second version of ONAP, or the Open Network Automation Platform that is codenamed “Beijing," which is being used by AT&T and several other large carriers to manage and automate network traffic and security.

    Beijing follows "Amsterdam," which was a first release late last year that integrated the code bases from two other carrier orchestration projects, one from AT&T and the other from the largest providers in China, said LF Networking General Manager Arpit Joshipura, in an interview with eWEEK.

  • ONAP Beijing release targets deployment scenarios

    Deployability is the name of the game with the Linux Foundation's latest Open Network Automation Platform architecture.

    Central to the ONAP Beijing release are seven identified "dimensions of deployability," said Arpit Joshipura, general manager of networking and orchestration at the Linux Foundation. These seven deployability factors comprise usability, security, manageability, stability, scalability, performance and resilience.

  • R Consortium is soliciting your feedback on R package best practices

    With over 12,000 R packages on CRAN alone, the choice of which package to use for a given task is challenging. While summary descriptions, documentation, download counts and word-of-mouth may help direct selection, a standard assessment of package quality can greatly help identify the suitability of a package for a given (non-)commercial need. Providing the R Community of package users an easily recognized “badge” indicating the level of quality achievement will make it easier for users to know the quality of a package along several dimensions. In addition, providing R package authors and maintainers a checklist of “best practices” can help guide package development and evolution, as well as help package users as to what to look for in a package.

New Stable Kernel and Fingerprint Readers' Support in Linux

Filed under
Linux
  • Linux 4.17.1 Kernel Released

    For those that prefer waiting until the first point release of a new kernel series before upgrading, Linux 4.17.1 is out today.

    Greg Kroah-Hartman announced the Linux 4.17.1 kernel today barely a week and a half since 4.17.0 made its initial debut. It's largely been quiet on the 4.17 front with 4.17.1 containing just a handful of bug fixes affecting PCI, network, and other minor driver fixes representing a bulk of the changes. Only about one hundred lines of code was shifted around for this initial point release and none of the fixes are security related.

  • Fingerprint reader support, the second coming

    Fingerprint readers are more and more common on Windows laptops, and hardware makers would really like to not have to make a separate SKU without the fingerprint reader just for Linux, if that fingerprint reader is unsupported there.

    The original makers of those fingerprint readers just need to send patches to the libfprint Bugzilla, I hear you say, and the problem's solved!

    But it turns out it's pretty difficult to write those new drivers, and those patches, without an insight on how the internals of libfprint work, and what all those internal, undocumented APIs mean.

    Most of the drivers already present in libfprint are the results of reverse engineering, which means that none of them is a best-of-breed example of a driver, with all the unknown values and magic numbers.

Chromebooks Now Run Android, GNU/Linux and Windows Software (via CodeWeavers/Wine)

Filed under
GNU
Linux
Google
  • CodeWeavers Demo a Windows app Running on a Chromebook using Linux and Wine

    As you may know Google is bringing Linux apps to Chromebooks — but did you realise that the feature could pave the way for Windows apps, too?

    Yup, we’re talking Wine, the Windows software compatibility that is a staple part of the Linux app ecosystem.

    Be it for Adobe Photoshop or games like Fortnite and WoW, Wine is the go-to fudge when you need an app that lacks a native Linux equivalent.

  • Here are all the Chromebooks that run Android and Linux apps

    In May of 2016, Google first announced that it would be releasing updates to Chrome OS that would allow Android apps on Chromebook. While the rollout of suppport for Android apps on Chromebook devices has been slow, there are now a healthy number of first and third-party devices that can run the hundreds of millions of apps available from the Google Play Store. In May 2016, Google revealed that it would also start adding Linux app support to Chromebooks by lacing them in a Debian-based virtual machine. The company’s own Pixelbook is the first Chromebook that can run Linux apps, although just in a preview release.

  • Acer Chromebook 13 and Spin 13 may be first Chromebooks to ship with day-1 Linux app support

    Google revealed Linux app support for Chromebooks at this year's I/O conference, but at the time the only supported device was the first-party Pixelbook. The 2nd device to get the feature was Samsung's ARM-powered Chromebook Plus, and other recently released devices Like HP's Chromebook x2 haven't had Linux app support at all. But, if a recent commit is any indicator, Acer's Chromebook 13 and Chromebook Spin 13 may be the first Chromebooks to run Linux apps from day 1, no update necessary.

  • Linux apps on Chromebooks makes running Windows apps easier

    Now that Google is allowing users of (some) Chromebooks to run Linux applications alongside Chrome apps, there’s an odd side effect: it’s also easier to run some Windows applications.

    CrossOver from CodeWeavers is a utility that adds a compatibility layer to Mac and Linux that allows you to install and run some Windows applications on those platforms. A few years ago the developers of CrossOver released an Android version that could run on Chromebooks that support Android apps.

Intel and OpenIoT Summit EU

Filed under
Hardware
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Containers and 'Clouds'

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Mozilla: Motion, Contributors, Testday, ActivityMonitor, San Francisco Oxidation

  • Firefox has a motion team?! Yes we do!
    Motion may sometimes feel like an afterthought or worse yet “polish”. For the release of Firefox Quantum (one of our most significant releases to date), we wanted to ensure that motion was not a second class citizen and that it would play an important role in how users perceived performance in the browser. We (Amy & Eric) make up the UX side of the “motion team” for Firefox. We say this in air quotes because the motion team was essentially formed based on our shared belief that motion design is important in Firefox. With a major release planned, we thought this would be the perfect opportunity to have a team working on motion.
  • Firefox 61 new contributors
    With the upcoming release of Firefox 61, we are pleased to welcome the 59 developers who contributed their first code change to Firefox in this release, 53 of whom were brand new volunteers!
  • QMO: Firefox 61 Beta 14 Testday Results
    As you may already know, last Friday – June 15th – we held a new Testday event, for Firefox 61 Beta 14. Thank you all for helping us make Mozilla a better place!
  • IOActivityMonitor in Gecko
    This is a first blog post of a series on Gecko, since I am doing a lot of C++ work in Firefox these days. My current focus is on adding tools in Firefox to try to detect what's going on when something goes rogue in the browser and starts to drain your battery life. We have many ideas on how to do this at the developer/user level, but in order to do it properly, we need to have accurate ways to measure what's going on when the browser runs. One thing is I/O activity. For instance, a WebExtension worker that performs a lot of disk writes is something we want to find out about, and we had nothing to track all I/O activities in Firefox, without running the profiler. When Firefox OS was developed, a small feature was added in the Gecko network lib, called NetworkActivityMonitor.
  • San Francisco Oxidation meeting notes
    At last week’s Mozilla All Hands meeting in San Francisco we had an Oxidation meeting about the use of Rust in Firefox. It was low-key, being mostly about status and progress. The notes are here for those who are interested.