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Thursday, 23 Nov 17 - Tux Machines is a community-driven public service/news site which has been around for over a decade and primarily focuses on GNU/LinuxSubscribe now Syndicate content

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Games: GameShell, GOG, Oxygen Not Included and More

Filed under
Gaming

Linux 4.15 Will Treat The HTC Vive VR Headset As "Non-Desktop"

Filed under
Linux

Currently if plugging in the HTC Vive for a virtual reality experience on Linux, the head-mounted display (HMD) is treated just as a conventional display. But now with a new set of changes for Linux 4.15, the kernel will know it's a "non-desktop" display.

Besides the DRM leasing support that has already landed during the Linux 4.15 merge window with the main DRM pull request, David Airlie has sent in another pull today for further benefiting SteamVR with Linux 4.15. (And among other benefits, also the AMDGPU priority scheduling landed too for 4.15 as another benefit for VR Linux gaming when using AMD graphics.)

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From Linux to Windows 10: Why did Munich switch and why does it matter?

Filed under
Linux
OSS

Most notable is perhaps the French Gendarmerie, the country's police force, which has switched 70,000 PCs to Gendbuntu, a custom version of the Linux-based OS Ubuntu. In the same country 15 French ministries have made the switch to using LibreOffice, as has the Dutch Ministry of Defence, while the Italian Ministry of Defence will switch more than 100,000 desktops from Microsoft Office to LibreOffice by 2020 and 25,000 PCs at hospitals in Copenhagen will move from Office to LibreOffice.

Matthias Kirschner, president of the Free Software Foundation Europe (FSFE), says this list continues to grow, and that "almost every two weeks you have a new example of free software being used in a public administration".

Read more

Canonical Needs Your Help to Figure Out a Direction for Ubuntu's Mir/Wayland

Filed under
Ubuntu

That's right, Canonical still has a team of developers working on the Mir display server, despite the Unity 8 development being dropped, and it looks like it's going into a different direction this time. The latest work by done Mir's devs involves basic Wayland support implementation, including mouse and keyboard inputs.

Their Wayland Conformance Suite (wlcs) implementation also allow client to connect to the server, as well as to create windows and draw into them, but there's a lot of work to be done before they achieve full Wayland support for Mir, which involves adding essential functions like copy and paste or drag and drop.

Read more

Also: Canonical Developers To The Community: Help Us Figure Out The Direction Of Mir

openSUSE Tumbleweed Operating System Now Powered by Linux Kernel 4.14 LTS

Filed under
SUSE

Linux kernel 4.14 LTS is the latest and greatest kernel for GNU/Linux distributions, and now that it's ready for mass deployments, it will arrive in the software repositories of more distros, and Tumbleweed users are among the first to get it as OpenSuSE Project's Douglas DeMaio reports today.

"The past week brought new features to openSUSE Tumbleweed with a snapshot that included Linux kernel 4.14," said DeMaio. "New features like HDMI Consumer Electronics Control support for Raspberry Pi and the merging of Heterogeneous Memory Management to the mainline this long-term support kernel are promising."

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Security: UEFI, Updates, Uber

Filed under
Security

Recommended Privacy Tools (Apps, Add-Ons, Search Engines) for Ubuntu Users

Filed under
GNU
Linux
Security
Web
HowTos

This is an user-friendly list of tools to protect user's internet privacy for Ubuntu users. The tools including search engine (StartPagec.com), add-ons (HTTPS Everywhere, Disconnect), and programs (DNSCrypt Proxy, OpenVPN) that are easy for beginners to install on Ubuntu. This list introduces the importance of privacy for all of you (yes, please read PrivacyTools.io) and that protecting your privacy is not difficult. This list is kept short so you can learn one by one and exercise them on many computers you have. I wish this helps you a lot!

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KDE: Plasma Mobile and Qt Quick Controls

Filed under
KDE
  • How to emulate Plasma Mobile on your machine with qemu

    If you want to develop for Plasma Mobile, but you don’t have a Mobile device, it is useful to emulate a Plasma Mobile on your desktop or laptop. Earlier this was not documented and has been asked multiple times on how to achieve this.

    This blog post is intended to help install a Plasma Mobile on the qemu-x86.

  • Qt Quick Controls 2: Imagine Style

    Back in April we wrote about image-based styling for Qt Quick Controls 2. Since then, we have made good progress and nailed down some aspects that were still under consideration. We call the new style “Imagine”.

  • Are you ready for Qt Quick Controls 2.3?

    This blog post takes a brief look at some of the new features in Qt Quick Controls 2.3 released as part of Qt 5.10. See also New Features in Qt 5.10 for a more detailed list.

Linux Foundation and Events: Sysadmins, Cloud Foundry, Linux Foundation Scholarship, 'Hacking' Hardware

Filed under
Linux
  • Open Source Cloud Skills and Certification Are Key for SysAdmins

    System administrator is one of the most common positions employers are looking to fill among 53 percent of respondents to the 2017 Open Source Jobs Report. Consequently, sysadmins with skills in engineering can command higher salaries, as these positions are among the hardest to fill, the report finds.

    Sysadmins are generally responsible for installing, supporting, and maintaining servers or other computer systems, and planning for and responding to service outages and other problems.

  • How Cloud Foundry Helps Developers Embrace Flexibility While Balancing Security

    The intersection of software development, security, and operations can be difficult for some businesses to traverse. Platforms such as Cloud Foundry aim to help organizations bridge the gap, while still focusing on security.

    Snyk CEO and co-founder Guy Podjarny addressed the announcement of the architectural decisions seen by Cloud Foundry in the Cloud Foundry Container Runtime and Cloud Foundry’s continued focus on the BOSH platform in a discussion with TNS founder Alex Williams on today’s episode of The New Stack Makers.

  • #PeruRumboGSoC2018 – Session 2

    Four more sessions are waiting for us, the effort of the participant who has finished and passed the program successfully (based on git, posts, quizzes) will be prized, thanks to the Linux Foundation scholarship and a nice black sweatshirt of the program. Best luck guys!

  • VR Hackathon at FIXME, Lausanne (1-3 December 2017)
  • 10 things I learned about making LEGO bricks glow

    By day, Jen Krieger is chief agile architect at Red Hat, but by night she architects stunning LEGO creations, including a Parisian café she demonstrated in her All Things Open 2017 Lightning Talk, "10 Things I Learned About Making LEGO Bricks Glow."

    Jen wanted to add lighting to her LEGO model, but in the open source maker tradition, she wanted to do it herself instead of simply ordering a pre-fab LEGO lighting kit.

Applications: Snapcraft, Cutegram, LaTeX Editors, Spreadsheet Editors (Like Calc), Vivaldi

Filed under
Software

Security: Uber, Replacing x86 Firmware, 'IoT' and Chromebook

Filed under
Security
  • Key Dem calls for FTC to investigate Uber data breach

    A key Democrat is calling on the Federal Trade Commission (FTC) to investigate a massive Uber breach that released data on 57 million people, as well as the company's delay in reporting the cyber incident.

  • Multiple states launch probes into massive Uber breach
  • Replacing x86 firmware with Linux and Go

    The problem, Minnich said, is that Linux has lost its control of the hardware. Back in the 1990s, when many of us started working with Linux, it controlled everything in the x86 platform. But today there are at least two and a half kernels between Linux and the hardware. Those kernels are proprietary and, not surprisingly, exploit friendly. They run at a higher privilege level than Linux and can manipulate both the hardware and the operating system in various ways. Worse yet, exploits can be written into the flash of the system so that they persist and are difficult or impossible to remove—shredding the motherboard is likely the only way out.

  • Connected sex-toy allows for code-injection attacks on a robot you wrap around your genitals

    However, the links included base-64 encoded versions of the entire blowjob file, making it vulnerable to code-injection attacks. As Lewis notes, "I will leave you to ponder the consequences of having an XSS vulnerability on a page with no framebusting and preauthed connection to a robot wrapped around or inside someones genitals..."

  • Chromebook exploit earns researcher second $100k bounty

    For Google’s bug bounty accountants, lightning just struck twice.

    In September 2016, an anonymous hacker called Gzob Qq earned $100,000 (£75,000) for reporting a critical “persistent compromise” exploit of Google’s Chrome OS, used by Chromebooks.

    Twelve months on and the same researcher was wired an identical pay out for reporting – yes! – a second critical persistent compromise of Google’s Chrome OS.

    By this point you might think Google was regretting its 2014 boast that it could confidently double its maximum payout for Chrome OS hacks to $100,000 because “since we introduced the $50,000 reward, we haven’t had a successful submission.”

    More likely, it wasn’t regretting it at all because isn’t being told about nasty vulnerabilities the whole point of bug bounties?

  • Why microservices are a security issue

    And why is that? Well, for those of us with a systems security bent, the world is an interesting place at the moment. We're seeing a growth in distributed systems, as bandwidth is cheap and latency low. Add to this the ease of deploying to the cloud, and more architects are beginning to realise that they can break up applications, not just into multiple layers, but also into multiple components within the layer. Load balancers, of course, help with this when the various components in a layer are performing the same job, but the ability to expose different services as small components has led to a growth in the design, implementation, and deployment of microservices.

Lumina 1.4 Desktop Environment Debuts with New Theme Engine and ZFS Integrations

Filed under
Linux

Lumina 1.4.0 is a major release that introduces several new core components, such as the Lumina Theme Engine to provide enhanced theming capabilities for the desktop environment and apps written in the Qt 5 application framework. The Lumina Theme Engine comes with a configuration utility and makes the previous desktop theme system obsolete, though it's possible to migrate your current settings to the new engine.

"The backend of this engine is a standardized theme plugin for the Qt5 toolkit, so that all Qt5 applications will now present a unified appearance (if the application does not enforce a specific appearance/theme of it’s own)," said the developer in today's announcement. "Users of the Lumina desktop will automatically have this plugin enabled: no special action is required."

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today's leftovers

Filed under
Misc
  • qBittorrent 4.0 Is a Massive Update of the Open-Source BitTorrent Client

    qBittorrent, the open-source and cross-platform BitTorrent client written in Qt for GNU/Linux, macOS, and Windows systems, has been updated to version 4.0, a major release adding numerous new features and improvements.

    qBittorrent 4.0 is the first release of the application to drop OS/2 support, as well as support for the old Qt 4 framework as Qt 5.5.1 or later is now required to run it on all supported platforms. It also brings a new logo and a new SVG-based icon theme can be easily scaled. Lots of other cosmetic changes are present in this release, and the WebGUI received multiple enhancements.

  • FFmpeg Continues Working Its "NVDEC" NVIDIA Video Decoding Into Shape

    Earlier this month the FFmpeg project landed its initial NVDEC NVIDIA video decoding support after already supporting NVENC for video encoding. These new NVIDIA APIs for encode/decode are part of the company's Video Codec SDK with CUDA and is the successor to the long-used VDPAU video decoding on NVIDIA Linux boxes. That NVDEC support has continued getting into shape.

  • Kobo firmware 4.6.10075 mega update (KSM, nickel patch, ssh, fonts)

    A new firmware for the Kobo ebook reader came out and I adjusted the mega update pack to use it. According to the comments in the firmware thread it is working faster than previous releases. The most incredible change though is the update from wpa_supplicant 0.7.1 (around 2010) to 2.7-devel (current). Wow.

  • 3.5-inch Apollo Lake SBC has dual mini-PCIe slots and triple displays

    Avalue’s Linux-friendly, 3.5-inch “ECM-APL2” SBC features Apollo Lake SoCs, 2x GbE, 4x USB 3.0, 2x mini-PCIe, triple displays, and optional -40 to 85°C.

    Avalue’s 3.5-inch, Apollo Lake based ECM-APL single-board computer was announced a year ago, shortly after Intel unveiled its Apollo Lake generation. Now it has followed up with an ECM-APL2 3.5-incher with a slightly different, and reduced, feature set.

  • 7 Best Android Office Apps To Meet Your Productivity Needs

    Office application is an essential suite that allows you to create powerful spreadsheets, documents, presentations, etc., on a smartphone. Moreover, Android office apps come with cloud integration so that you can directly access the reports from the cloud, edit them, or save them online.

    To meet the productivity need of Android users, the Play Store offers an extensive collection of Android office apps. But, we have saved you the hassle of going through each one of them and provided you a list of the best office apps for Android. The apps that we have picked are all free, although some do have Pro version or extra features available for in-app purchases. You can also refer to this list if you’re looking for Microsoft Office alternatives for your PC.

Distribution Releases

Filed under
GNU
Linux
BSD
  • OpenMandriva Is Going To Do Away With 32-bit Support

    Following in the steps of Ubuntu 17.10 dropping 32-bit desktop images and other Linux distributions also lessening their focus on 32-bit support, OpenMandriva has issued its final i586 release.

    OpenMandriva Lx 3.03 was released on Tuesday with boot speed improvements, updates to Linux/systemd/Mesa, KDE Plasma 5.10.5, LLVM Clang 5.0, and other package upgrades. This is also going to be their last planned release in the OpenMandriva Lx 3 series.

  • OpenMandriva Lx 3.03 - Get it while it’s hot!

    This release Lx 3.03 is an enhancement and upgrade to the previous Lx 3 releases.

  • LXLE 16.04.3 "Eclectica" Linux Distro Is Out Now Based on Ubuntu 16.04.3 LTS

    The developers of the Ubuntu-based LXLE GNU/Linux distribution have announced the release of LXLE 16.04.3, the latest update to the Eclectica series based on Ubuntu 16.04 LTS (Xenial Xerus).

    Incorporating all the updates and core components of Ubuntu 16.04.3 LTS, the LXLE 16.04.3 release is here to further integrate various of the components of the MATE and LXQt desktop environments, as well as some from the Linux Mint operating system.

    On top of that, the application menu received improvements to its layout and how items are organization, the system theme was tweaked for consistency, LXhotkey replaces the Obkey Openbox key editor, and Pithos has been removed because it required a user account.

  • pfSense 2.4.2 Open-Source Firewall Patches OpenSSL, Improves Network Performance

    Netgate's Jim Pingle announced the availability of the second maintenance and stabilization update to the latest 2.4 series of pfSense, world's most trusted open-source firewall.

    pfSense 2.4.2 is a security and bugfix release that updates the OpenSSL packages to version 1.0.2m to fix two recently disclosed vulnerabilities (CVE-2017-3736 and CVE-2017-3735), addresses three potential XSS vectors, fixes the VLAN priority handling, and addresses issues with PPP interfaces that have VLAN parents.

Games Leftovers

Filed under
Gaming

OSS Leftovers

Filed under
OSS
  • Julita Inca Chiroque: Parallel Computing Talk
  • Open Source Monitoring Conference: Speakers, Agendas, and Other Details

    One of today’s leading tech conferences, the Open Source Monitoring Conference (OSMC), is back to bring together some of the brightest monitoring experts from different parts of the world. The four-day event will be held at Holiday Inn Nuremberg City Conference in Germany starting today, November 21st, until November 24th.

  • Why a Dallas-area tech startup opened a KC office
  • Open education: How students save money by creating open textbooks

    Most people consider a college education the key to future success, but for many students, the cost is insurmountable. The growing open educational resource (OER) movement is attempting to address this problem by providing a high-quality, low-cost alternative to traditional textbooks, while at the same time empowering students and educators in innovative ways. One of the leaders in this movement is Robin DeRosa, a professor at Plymouth State University in New Hampshire. I have been enthusiastically following her posts on Twitter and invited her to share her passion for open education with our readers. I am delighted to share our discussion with you.

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More in Tux Machines

From Linux to Windows 10: Why did Munich switch and why does it matter?

Most notable is perhaps the French Gendarmerie, the country's police force, which has switched 70,000 PCs to Gendbuntu, a custom version of the Linux-based OS Ubuntu. In the same country 15 French ministries have made the switch to using LibreOffice, as has the Dutch Ministry of Defence, while the Italian Ministry of Defence will switch more than 100,000 desktops from Microsoft Office to LibreOffice by 2020 and 25,000 PCs at hospitals in Copenhagen will move from Office to LibreOffice. Matthias Kirschner, president of the Free Software Foundation Europe (FSFE), says this list continues to grow, and that "almost every two weeks you have a new example of free software being used in a public administration". Read more

Android Leftovers

Canonical Needs Your Help to Figure Out a Direction for Ubuntu's Mir/Wayland

That's right, Canonical still has a team of developers working on the Mir display server, despite the Unity 8 development being dropped, and it looks like it's going into a different direction this time. The latest work by done Mir's devs involves basic Wayland support implementation, including mouse and keyboard inputs. Their Wayland Conformance Suite (wlcs) implementation also allow client to connect to the server, as well as to create windows and draw into them, but there's a lot of work to be done before they achieve full Wayland support for Mir, which involves adding essential functions like copy and paste or drag and drop. Read more Also: Canonical Developers To The Community: Help Us Figure Out The Direction Of Mir

openSUSE Tumbleweed Operating System Now Powered by Linux Kernel 4.14 LTS

Linux kernel 4.14 LTS is the latest and greatest kernel for GNU/Linux distributions, and now that it's ready for mass deployments, it will arrive in the software repositories of more distros, and Tumbleweed users are among the first to get it as OpenSuSE Project's Douglas DeMaio reports today. "The past week brought new features to openSUSE Tumbleweed with a snapshot that included Linux kernel 4.14," said DeMaio. "New features like HDMI Consumer Electronics Control support for Raspberry Pi and the merging of Heterogeneous Memory Management to the mainline this long-term support kernel are promising." Read more