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Tuesday, 25 Sep 18 - Tux Machines is a community-driven public service/news site which has been around for over a decade and primarily focuses on GNU/LinuxSubscribe now Syndicate content

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Quick Roundup

Type Titlesort icon Author Replies Last Post
Story ​How to easily defeat Linux Encoder ransomware Roy Schestowitz 16/11/2015 - 6:40pm
Story This Album Is So Exclusive That Listeners Must Hack Linux To Hear It Roy Schestowitz 19/05/2014 - 6:42pm
Story Manjaro Linux 16.06 Preview Released Mohd Sohail 07/03/2016 - 4:31am
Story 10 projects to fork in 2016 Roy Schestowitz 29/12/2015 - 11:24am
Story 11 ways to get involved with Humanitarian FOSS Roy Schestowitz 18/02/2015 - 6:52pm
Story 12 open education videos for China Roy Schestowitz 18/09/2014 - 7:54am
Story 2014: Year of open source miracles Roy Schestowitz 25/11/2014 - 3:10pm
Story 2015: The year the UN resets the count Roy Schestowitz 07/01/2015 - 12:13pm
Story 3 Drupal education distros reviewed Roy Schestowitz 10/09/2014 - 7:10pm
Story 3 open source alternatives to Microsoft Publisher Roy Schestowitz 07/07/2016 - 8:34am

5 ways to play old-school games on a Raspberry Pi

Filed under
Linux
Gaming

They don't make 'em like they used to, do they? Video games, I mean.

Sure, there's a bit more grunt in the gear now. Princess Zelda used to be 16 pixels in each direction; there's now enough graphics power for every hair on her head. Today's processors could beat up 1988's processors in a cage-fight deathmatch without breaking a sweat.

But you know what's missing? The fun.

You've got a squillion and one buttons to learn just to get past the tutorial mission. There's probably a storyline, too. You shouldn't need a backstory to kill bad guys. All you need is jump and shoot. So, it's little wonder that one of the most enduring popular uses for a Raspberry Pi is to relive the 8- and 16-bit golden age of gaming in the '80s and early '90s. But where to start?

Read more

Microsoft Flaws and Windows Back Doors (Coordinated with NSA) Show Their Cost/Toll

Filed under
Microsoft
Security

LAS 2018

Filed under
GNOME
  • LAS 2018

    This month I was at my second Libre Application Summit in Denver. A smaller event than GUADEC but personally was my favorite conference so far.

    One of the main goals of LAS has been to be a place for multiple platforms to discuss the desktop space and not just be a GNOME event. This year two KDE members, @aleixpol and Albert Astals Cid, who spoke about release cycle of KDE Applications, Plasma, and the history of Qt. It is always interesting to see how another project solves the same problems and where there is overlap.

    The elementary folks were there since this is @cassidyjames home turf who had a great “It’s Not Always Techincal” talk as well as a talk with @danrabbit about AppCenter which are both very important areas the GNOME Project needs to improve in. I also enjoyed meeting a few other community members such as @Philip-Scott and talk about their use of elementary’s platform.

  • Developer Center Initiative – Meeting Summary 21st September

    Since last blog post there’s been two Developer Center meetings held in coordination with LAS GNOME Sunday the 9th September and again Friday the 21st September. Unfortunately I couldn’t attend the LAS GNOME meeting, but I’ll cover the general progress made here.

The "Chinese EPYC" Hygon Dhyana CPU Support Still Getting Squared Away For Linux

Filed under
Linux
Hardware

Back in June is when the Linux kernel patches appeared for the Hygon Dhyana, the new x86 processors based on AMD Zen/EPYC technology licensed by Chengdu Haiguang IC Design Co for use in Chinese data-centers. While the patches have been out for months, they haven't reached the mainline kernel quite yet but that might change next cycle.

The Hygon Dyhana Linux kernel patches have gone through several revisions and the code is mostly adapting existing AMD Linux kernel code paths for Zen/EPYC to do the same on these new processors. While these initial Hygon CPUs appear to basically be re-branded EPYC CPUs, the identifiers are different as rather than AMD Family 17h, it's now Family 18h and the CPU Vendor ID is "HygonGenuine" and carries a new PCI Express device vendor ID, etc. So the different areas of the kernel from CPUFreq to KVM/Xen virtualization to Spectre V2 mitigations had to be updated for the correct behavior.

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Good Support For Wayland Remote Desktop Handling On Track For KDE Plasma 5.15

Filed under
KDE

The KDE Plasma 5.15 release due out next year will likely be in good shape for Wayland remote desktop handling.

The KDE Plasma/KWin developers have been pursuing Wayland remote desktop support along a similar route to the GNOME Shell camp by making use of PipeWire and the XDG-Desktop-Portal. Bits are already in place for KDE Plasma 5.13 and the upcoming 5.14 release, but for the 5.15 release is now where it sounds like the support may be in good shape for end-users.

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Linux developers threaten to pull “kill switch”

Filed under
Development
Linux

Linux powers the internet, the Android in your pocket, and perhaps even some of your household appliances. A controversy over politics is now seeing some of its developers threatening to withdraw the license to all of their code, potentially destroying or making the whole Linux kernel unusable for a very long time.

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Games: SC Controller, PlayOnLinux, OpenRA, Galaxy in Turmoil

Filed under
Gaming

DXVK 0.80 Released

Filed under
Software
  • DXVK 0.80 Released With Initial State Cache, Direct3D 11.1 Feature Level

    Development on DXVK for mapping Direct3D (primarily D3D11) atop Vulkan continues speeding along for boosting Windows gaming on Wine / Steam Play (Proton). Ending out the weekend is the release of DXVK 0.80.

    The DXVK 0.80 features the initial pipeline state cache, which can help reduce stuttering within games on subsequent runs (once the pipeline state has been cached) and all around improve the experience. DXVK also now supports Direct3D Feature Level 11_1, has minor reductions in CPU usage overhead, and has some fixes affecting APU systems, Assetto Corsa, and Project Cars 2.

  • DXVK 0.80 is out with a new cache to reduce stutter and further CPU overhead improvements

    DXVK [GitHub], which provides a Vulkan-based D3D11 and D3D10 implementation for use in Wine has a new build out. The pace of development on this continues to absolutely mesmerise me, with each release bringing something really interesting. Reminder: See my interview with the creator of DXVK here.

KDE: Latest on Usability & Productivity

Filed under
KDE

Linux 4.19-rc5

Filed under
Linux

As almost everyone knows, it's been an "interesting" week from a social
point-of-view. But from the technical side, -rc5 looks totally normal.

The diffstat is a bit higher than previous -rc5's, but the number of
trees pulled is lower, so overall, pretty much all is on track. I'm not
seeing any major "these bugs are not being fixed!" type of reports, so I
can hope that the initial churn that -rc1 threw at everyone is under
control.

The majority size-wise of changes here are with more tests being added
and fixed up, but there is also the usual networking, x86, sound, drm,
ppc, and other fixes. Full details are in the shortlog below.

Read more

Also: Greg Kroah-Hartman Releases Linux 4.19-RC5 Following An "Interesting" Week

The Next Linux Kernel To Support Creative Sound BlasterX AE-5 Sound Cards

Filed under
Linux

The next major Linux kernel cycle whether it is called Linux 4.20 or ends up being called Linux 5.0 as expected is now slated to carry support for the high-end Creative Labs' Sound BlasterX AE-5 sound card.

Earlier this week I reported on Linux patches for the Sound BlasterX AE-5 coming from a contributor. The AE-5 is a ~$150 PCI Express sound card with SABRE32 Ultra Class DAC, BlasterX Acoustic Engine, and other high-end audio features and for suiting to gamers/enthusiasts also has an RGB lighting controller onboard.

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The Reiser4 File-System Is Now Available For The Linux 4.18 Kernel

Filed under
Linux

It took several weeks past the initial stable debut of the Linux 4.18 kernel, but the Reiser4 file-system has now been updated to work with this new kernel build.

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Security: 0-Days and Back Doors

Filed under
Security

OpenShot Video Editor Released 2.4.3 – Here’s What’s New

Filed under
Linux

OpenShot is a cross platform video editor available in Linux, Windows and Mac. This beginner’s friendly to advanced users’ video editor comes with huge set to of tools to create your videos, edit videos, cut, add sliding transitions and many more. The free and open source video editor OpenShot lands with latest release with improvements.

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Ubuntu Studio 18.10 Wallpaper Contest Winners

Filed under
Ubuntu

We would like to thank everyone who participated in our wallpaper contest for Ubuntu Studio 18.10! With 487 votes, the top 5 submissions were chosen. The winners can be found at this link.

Additionally, we’d like to announce the new default wallpaper for 18.10, designed by Ubuntu Studio developer Eylul Dogruel, and is pictured to the right.

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More in Tux Machines

Software and Games: Hegemon, Gift of Parthax, Lutris

  • Hegemon – A Modular System Monitor Application Written In Rust
    When it comes to monitor running processes in Unix-like systems, the most commonly used applications are top and htop, which is an enhanced version of top. My personal favorite is htop. However, the developers are releasing few alternatives to these applications every now and then. One such alternative to top and htop utilities is Hegemon. It is a modular system monitor application written using Rust programming language.
  • Wizard arena-fighter 'Gift of Parthax' is now officially out on Linux
    Announced yesterday after a pretty short beta period, the magical arena fighting game Gift of Parthax is now officially available for Linux. Along with putting the Linux build out in public, their latest release also fixes a few bugs. The developer sent over a key and I've been testing it, the Linux version seems to be working really quite nicely. If you liked the idea of Wizard of Legend, but found it a little too fast for your tastes then Gift of Parthax might be a better fit although it's single-player only.
  • Lutris 0.4.20 is now out, to help you manage all your games plus some Overwatch testing
    I have to admit, the game manager Lutris [Official Site] has come along quite a bit since I last used it. Today, version 0.4.20 was made available. For those not aware of it, Lutris is an application that aims to give you a single place to manage all your games on Linux. It supports native games, Wine, various emulators and so on. The application itself is available under the GPL and the helper scripts to install games can be viewed before using them so it's quite nice.

today's howtos

OSS Leftovers

  • Editor's Corner—Open source is not 'one size fits all' [Ed: But that's a plus, not a minus. With proprietary software it's one unsuitable thing for everything; doesn't scale.]
    Open source communities are no doubt playing a key role in moving the telecommunications industry forward, but not everyone is on board the bandwagon. Over the past five months or so, we've spent a fair amount of time writing about open source groups and standards development organizations (SDOs) such as the Linux Foundation, MEF, Open Networking Foundation, OpenDaylight, the TM Forum and ETSI, and there's clearly more cooperation afoot for the good of the industry. But artificial intelligence startup B.Yond's chief marketing officer, Rikard Kjellberg, said his company has to be careful when it comes to choosing which open source community to commit its resources to. Kjellberg spoke to FierceTelecom on the heels of the AT&T Spark conference earlier this month.
  • Collabora Had Another Stellar Year For Open-Source Consulting
    The Collabora open-source consulting firm whose expertise spans from the Linux kernel to LibreOffice and X.Org had another successful year. The UK-based company last week reported their 2017 financial position last week providing a glimpse at the viability of open-source / free software consulting.
  • Daniel Stenberg: The Polhem prize, one year later
    Family and friends have gotten a rudimentary level of understanding of what curl is and what it does. I'm not suggesting they fully grasp it or know what an "internet protocol" is now, but at least a lot of people understand that it works with "internet transfers". It's not like people were totally uninterested before, but when I was given this prize - by a jury of engineers no less - that says this is a significant invention and accomplishment with a value that "can not be overestimated", it made them more interested. The little video that was produced helped:
  • Open Source Voice Assistant, Mycroft AI, Named Top Deal By KingsCrowd
  • Service providers increasingly adopt open source for their networks
    Communications service providers (CSPs) are increasingly keen to adopt open source technologies to deliver their services, according to research. At this week’s Open Networking Summit Europe in Amsterdam, delegates heard that DevOps, automation, cloud, big data and analytics, software-defined networking (SDN), and management and orchestration (MANO) were increasingly being supported by open source solutions. Commissioned research questioned 150 CSP representatives across 98 companies worldwide. It found that 98% of CSPs are “confident” that open networking solutions can achieve the same level of performance as traditional networking solutions.
  • Communications Service Providers Overwhelmingly Confident in Open Source Networking Solutions, Survey Finds
  • WLinux Distro for Windows Subsystem for Linux Now Available, openSUSE Call for Hosts, New Firefox Bug, Firefox Collecting Telemetry Data and Creative Commons Releases Significant CC Search Update
    In other Firefox news, the browser evidently is collecting telemetry data via hidden add-ons, ITWire reports. The ITWire post also quotes Mozilla's Marshall Eriwn, director of Trust and Security: "...we will measure Telemetry Coverage, which is the percentage of all Firefox users who report telemetry. The Telemetry Coverage measurement will sample a portion of all Firefox clients and report whether telemetry is enabled. This measurement will not include a client identifier and will not be associated with our standard telemetry."
  • This “Netflix For Open Source” Startup Helps Programmers Get Paid
    Open source developers, especially those who work on lesser known projects, do not get much attention or money for the work they do. While some developers are paid to work on open source projects as a part of their day jobs, they can get overwhelmed by the amount of work these projects require.
  • Portable Computing Language 1.2 Released For OpenCL On CPUs & More
    The Portable Computing Language (a.k.a. POCL or PortableCL) is the effort for getting OpenCL running on CPUs as well as other hardware for this open-source code-base that supports OpenCL 1.2 with some OpenCL 2.0+ functionality. The main "feature" of POCL 1.2 is support for LLVM Clang 7.0 as previously the support was limited to LLVM 6.0, but now this new version of LLVM is supported. The HWLOC 2.0 library is also now supported. There are also some minor feature additions like device-side printf being supported.
  • Robert O'Callahan: More Realistic Goals For C++ Lifetimes 1.0
    Over two years ago I wrote about the C++ Lifetimes proposal and some of my concerns about it. Just recently, version 1.0 was released with a blog post by Herb Sutter. Comparing the two versions shows many important changes. The new version is much clearer and more worked-out, but there are also significant material changes. In particular the goal has changed dramatically.

Money and Press for FOSS FUD firms