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Monday, 19 Mar 18 - Tux Machines is a community-driven public service/news site which has been around for over a decade and primarily focuses on GNU/LinuxSubscribe now Syndicate content

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Type Titlesort icon Author Replies Last Post
Story GNOME 3.14.1 is out Rianne Schestowitz 15/10/2014 - 8:26pm
Story GNOME 3.14.1 Is Out with Improvements for the Shell Rianne Schestowitz 16/10/2014 - 10:35am
Story GNOME 3.14.2 is out Rianne Schestowitz 13/11/2014 - 2:37pm
Story GNOME 3.15.1 Roy Schestowitz 30/10/2014 - 7:54pm
Story GNOME 3.15.2 Released Roy Schestowitz 27/11/2014 - 8:30am
Story GNOME 3.15.4 Rianne Schestowitz 22/01/2015 - 7:52pm
Story GNOME 3.15.4 unstable tarballs due Rianne Schestowitz 16/01/2015 - 2:01am
Story GNOME 3.15.91 released! Rianne Schestowitz 06/03/2015 - 11:02pm
Story GNOME 3.15.92 Release Candidate Roy Schestowitz 19/03/2015 - 10:38am
Story GNOME 3.16 Beta Brings Wayland-Based Log-in Screen Roy Schestowitz 22/02/2015 - 9:00am

Amarok 2.3.1 adds new applets

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Software The Amarok Project has released version 2.3.1 of its popular open source music player for the KDE desktop, code named "Clear Light".

Top 10 Linux Security Tips for System Administrators

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HowTos Like every other Operating System Linux not free from security issues. These issues can be anticipated and averted only with suitable preventive steps.

If Or When Will X12 Actually Materialize?

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Software The first version of the X protocol for the X Window System emerged in 1984 and just three years later we were at version 11. However, for the past 23 years, we have been stuck with X11 with no signs of the twelfth revision being in sight.

E17 review

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intosimple.blogspot: Enlightenment has been quite interesting to me. It has not even got a beta release so far yet I like to use it. That is because, it does things differently. It is very efficient, keeps the CPU far more cooler than any other desktop environment.

Ubuntu 10.04 vs Fedora 13

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Ubuntu Spring is a lovely time of year, when the flowers bloom, the birds sing and community Linux projects release the fruit of their winter labours. Specifically, the Fedora and Ubuntu projects come to the end of their six-month cycles.

Three floppy-based distros

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kmandla.wordpress: This might sound strange, but I generally don’t endorse the floppy distros that are still available here and there on the Internet, and as a general rule, still work fine.

Ode to Summer, Fixer-Uppers and $10 for Courage

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Linux Yes, it is possible to build a Linux computer out of spare parts for next to nothing, but not every Linux fan believes it's a great idea. "Setting someone up with Linux on a junked computer will just set them up to hate Linux," argued Slashdot blogger Barbara Hudson.

First look: Fedora 13 from Red Hat

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Linux It seems like a million moons ago that Red Hat announced the demise of Red Hat Linux in favor of Red Hat Enterprise Linux and embraced the Fedora project as the testing ground for its commercial releases. Last week marked the 13th Fedora release in nearly seven years.

Mozilla opens up more on Firefox 4: Content Security, WebGL coming

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Moz/FF A newly published Mozilla developers' page characterizes Firefox 4 -- whose first public betas may be only a few weeks away -- as feature-laden.

The Perfect Server - Fedora 13 x86_64 [ISPConfig 2]

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This is a detailed description about how to set up a Fedora 13 server that offers all services needed by ISPs and hosters: Apache web server (SSL-capable) with PHP5/Ruby/Python, Postfix mail server with SMTP-AUTH and TLS, BIND DNS server, Proftpd FTP server, MySQL server, Dovecot POP3/IMAP, Quota, Firewall, etc. This tutorial is written for the 64-bit version of Fedora 13, but should apply to the 32-bit version with very little modifications as well. In the end you should have a system that works reliably, and if you like you can install the free webhosting control panel ISPConfig (i.e., ISPConfig runs on it out of the box).

today's leftovers:

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  • New In KDE Partition Manager 1.1 (IV): Improved Size Dialog
  • Google to employees: 'Mac or Linux, but no more Windows'
  • On Teaching Open Source Development
  • Salix Live 13.0
  • Asus launches netbook app store, drops Linux netbook hints
  • Intel's X.Org Driver Runs Even Faster Now
  • Ubuntu Fun
  • Full Circle Side-Pod #1: Hello World… Where Am I?
  • Ubuntu Weekly Newsletter #195
  • A Sleek & Easy Way To Administer Ubuntu – Ubuntu Control Center

some howtos:

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  • Backup and restore Evolution
  • How to Temporarily Switch Languages for One Application
  • Add p7zip (7-Zip) File Archive Support to Ubuntu
  • MySQL in openSUSE 11.3
  • Installing Openbox on Foresight Linux
  • change your desktop wallpaper automatically in KDE 4.4
  • How I (Finally) Got My Brightness Keys Working
  • Booting Linux Mint 9 from a USB key
  • Desktop Facebook Notifier for Ubuntu
  • openSUSE 11.2 Pidgin: Google Talk Audio and Video Support
  • Talika-Gnome Applet to switch between open windows using icons
  • Add more apps to Ubuntu Messaging menu

Zonbu Desktop Mini Review

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Hardware It’s a clever concept, if not exactly a fresh one: Sell or give away a PC, then make your money on a monthly subscription fee.

Telstra’s Linux-based T-Box to launch mid-June

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Hardware Telstra today revealed it would launch its Linux-based T-Box integrated media centre set-top box from mid-June at a stand-alone price point of $299, with a sledload of free and pay-per-view content available and an associated revamp of its broadband plans in the works.

iPed versus iPad: looking for Android tablets As well as churning out millions of electronics devices for sale under upscale brand names like Apple's, China's manufacturers have a tendency to produce lookalikes at low prices, mainly for the Asian markets. The iPed is one of the first.

Open source marks a new era for African independence

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OSS Now, a wave of homegrown programmers, developers and software makers claim to be heralding a new era of African independence.

Chronicling the open source movement - one person at a time

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OSS Ideas are nothing without people to give them life. That's why a Boston woman has set out to write about the people, not the software.

Teach your kids Linux from an early age with Qimo linux for kids

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Linux Qimo is a desktop operating system designed for kids. Based on the open source Ubuntu Linux desktop, Qimo comes pre-installed with educational games for children aged 3 and up. So If you want to teach your children to use Linux from an early age, Qimo is the perfect for your kids.

Will Opensolaris 2010.06 be the next release?

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OS Opensolaris 2010.05 would be the next release after being postponed to release on March this year. Again, Opensolaris lovers around the world might be disappointed because after waiting for it until the end of May there is no official release of Opensolaris. A bad news.

Icons and the FOSS desktop

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OSS Icons have always intimidated me. Except for the mouseover help, two-thirds of the time I would have no idea what function they represent. Shrink them so that they fit on a toolbar, and the obscurity is compounded by illegibility.

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In my last article, I described my latest music problem: I need an additional stage of amplification to make proper use of my new phono cartridge. While my pre-amplifier contains a phono stage, its gain is only suitable for cartridges that output about 5mV, whereas my new cartridge has a nominal output of 0.4mV. Based on my investigation, I liked the looks of the Muffsy phono kits, so I ordered the head amplifier, the power supply, and the back panel. I also needed to obtain a case to hold the boards and the back panel, available online from many vendors. Muffsy does not sell the “wall wart” necessary to power the unit, so I ordered one of those from a supplier in California. Finally, inspecting my soldering iron, solder “sucker,” and solder, I’ve realized I need to do better—so a bit more shopping, online or local, is in order there. Finally, for those, like me, whose soldering skills may be rusty and perhaps were not all that great to begin with, Muffsy kindly offers links to two instructional videos. Read more

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