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About Tux Machines

Tuesday, 17 Jan 17 - Tux Machines is a community-driven public service/news site which has been around for over a decade and primarily focuses on GNU/LinuxSubscribe now Syndicate content

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Quick Roundup

Type Titlesort icon Author Replies Last Post
Story KDE or Openbox srlinuxx 19/02/2010 - 11:39pm
Story KDE Outreach Program Roy Schestowitz 04/03/2016 - 12:35pm
Story KDE Partition Manager 2.0.0 Rianne Schestowitz 15/01/2016 - 8:03pm
Story KDE Partition Manager 2.0.1 Rianne Schestowitz 24/02/2016 - 7:31pm
Story KDE Partition Manager 3.0.0 Supports LVM on LUKS and LUKS on LVM Configurations Rianne Schestowitz 20/12/2016 - 1:54am
Story KDE Performance 3 srlinuxx 16/12/2007 - 2:49pm
Story KDE Performance Boost Ahead srlinuxx 31/08/2011 - 2:42am
Story KDE picks Kim Kardashian to promote next release srlinuxx 1 01/04/2010 - 4:41am
Story KDE PIM 4.6 RC1 srlinuxx 16/05/2011 - 2:44am
Story KDE PIM Annual Meeting Pushes Advanced Design, Enterprise Stability srlinuxx 29/01/2007 - 7:41am

Ubuntu Technical Board votes on Compiz for Ubuntu 7.10

Filed under
Ubuntu

arstechnica: The Ubuntu Technical Board voted yesterday to ship Ubuntu 7.10 ("Gutsy") with Compiz enabled by default. Although Compiz has been featured in Ubuntu 7.10 Tribe prerelesases, the board has had difficulty determining whether or not it is reliable and functionally complete enough to warrant inclusion in the final release.

Five Easter Eggs for Linux

Filed under
Linux

linuxhaxor: I have compiled a list of five easter eggs that I came accross over time. Most of them has been around for as long as you can remember but I though it would be fun to compile a list of all the Linux Easter eggs with screen shots.

GTK1.2 doesn’t have to be ugly

Filed under
Software

kmandla.wordpress: There are better, more refined GTK1.2 looks around the Internet, but considering my previous attempts (which I refuse to show), this isn’t too bad.

Why the Linux Desktop will succeed despite itself

Filed under
Linux

desktoplinux: If you expect me to argue with the 13 reasons Kim Brebach gives for why the Linux desktop is unlikely to make it to a desktop near you any time soon, prepare to be disappointed. He's right.

The free software journalism club

Filed under
Misc

jem report: After I posted yesterday's call for stories from or about people who claim to have had comment posts deleted from Groklaw, I received an email from Pamela Jones asking me why I was "doing this." Since such a question presumes a certain level of conspiracy, I replied that the call for stories is self-explanatory. The next email I got on the subject was from Ziff Davis Enterprise editor Steven J. Vaughan-Nichols.

Over 130 line up for inaugural Open Source Awards

Filed under
OSS

computerworld.nz: Among the 130-plus nominations for the inaugural Open Source Awards are a film project, a Hurricane Katrina disaster-help website and Pharmac’s open source publishing system for the Pharmaceutical Schedule.

Hosted apps helping to drive open source

Filed under
OSS

vnunet: An increase in the use of hosted applications such as webmail and Google Apps is driving the adoption of open source software behind the scenes.

Linux is not so simple

Filed under
Linux

blog.lxpages: It seems the average people are constantly being brainwashed by the Linux community about Linux being the perfect replacement to Windows. I don’t necessarily disagree with them on this but I do think that Linux or Ubuntu is still not yet ready for an average grandma or grandpa.

Dealing with Mac-formatted drives on Linux

Filed under
HowTos

FOSSwire: If you deal with Macs at all, you might be curious as to whether Linux is capable of dealing with disks and drives formatted for Mac OS X. The answer is - yes, in most cases, and it is actually quite easy.

And:

  • Linux backup powered by RDiff-Backup

  • How to get PASV FTP to work behind a NAT router with ProFTPD
  • Controlling the size of the $PWD in bash
  • Create Video for an iPod Using Thin Liquid Film

New commercial Linux game slated by year end

Filed under
Gaming

linux.com: Hothead Games will soon be launching a new title based on the popular online Penny Arcade comic strip. Even better, the new game will be available for several platforms at its launch, including Linux.

MEPIS 7.0 Beta4: It's all Coming Together

Filed under
Linux

mepis.org (PR): The 4th Beta of SimplyMEPIS 7.0 has been released by Warren Woodford. The kernel in Beta4 is version 2.6.22.6 which contains more patches from the Kernel Development Team. Wireless-tools and wpasupplicant were updated.

How Open Source Software Can Improve Our Library

Filed under
OSS

degreetutor.com: Remember a time when doing research required us to have to go to the library? Your school had one, and that's probably where you spent most of your library time at. The depth a library can have can range greatly; it all depends on how much money that library gets in funding. Open source software is free for anyone to have.

Axfood is hungry for Red Hat

Filed under
Linux

Enterprise Linux Log: It’s a Wednesday, so that must mean yet another new customer for the folks at Red Hat. Today, it’s Axfood, one of the largest food retailers in Scandinavia.

Ubuntu World Domination in progress

Filed under
Ubuntu

modfree.org: The old question always used to be if linux will ever be as widely used as Windows. For years there were always comments on how Linux was ready for the desktop and getting more and more popular. Well, Ubuntu is clearly the Borg of Linux, users are being converted quicker than a Scientology rally.

Open Source Internet Utilities - Part 1

Filed under
Software

CyberCapital.Org: Here’s the SF day Gift collection from the CyberCapital. From Today on We are gonna list various Open Sources software utilities that you can use to get your work done. This is the first part of the upcoming series of Open Source Internet utilities.

Kernel space: Are Linux developers ignoring bug reports?

Filed under
Linux

LinuxWorld: Linux developers seem to be letting bug reports slip throught the cracks. With 1500 open kernel bugs in the tracking system, and 50 going unanswered on the mailing list, do developers need a better process or just new priorities?

Also:

  • CFS, Focusing on Simplification and Performance

  • BootUtils, Automatically Detecting the Root Volume
  • Virtual Machine Time Accounting
  • Data Errors During Drive Communication

What’s in a name? GNU, Linux, or GNU/Linux?

Filed under
Linux

daveshields.wordpress: I just came across a Slashdot story about an interview with Richard Stallman, Stallman: If you want freedom don’t follow Linus Torvalds. Reading this reminded me of a paper title written by my (then IBM) colleagues Ron Cytron and Jeanne Ferrante: What’s In a Name? Names do matter.

AMD 8.41.7 Display Driver

Filed under
Software

phoronix: After talking for the past week about AMD's new Linux efforts with announcing a new fglrx Linux driver overhaul and releasing ATI GPU specifications without a Non-Disclosure Agreement, the 8.41 fglrx driver is now released. In this article we have a few additional remarks on the AMD 8.41 Linux display driver for ATI Radeon graphics cards.

Also: AMD Releases 900+ Pages Of GPU Specs
And: AMD Specs Already Help Avivo Driver

Top Ten Rejected Ubuntu Version Names

Filed under
Ubuntu
Humor

Linux Online: Linux Online has obtained internal memos from the Ubuntu project regarding the codenames they choose for different releases of Ubuntu. For the first time, we're providing the names that were debated by the development team but were eventually rejected as official Ubuntu version codenames.

Krusader - The Ultimate KDE File Manager

Filed under
KDE

raiden's realm: During my testing I tried several different programs, none of which really gave me what I wanted, especially the ones with explorer type interfaces. Then I stumbled onto Krusader, a file manager that really does things right. But don't take my word for it. Let's go look at all the great things it offers.

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More in Tux Machines

KDE Leftovers

  • Integrate Your Android Device With Ubuntu Using KDE Connect Indicator Fork
    KDE Connect is a tool which allows your Android device to integrate with your Linux desktop. With KDE Connect Indicator, you can use KDE Connect on desktop that support AppIndicators, like Unity, Xfce (Xubuntu), and so on.
  • FirstAid – PDF Help Viewer
    in the recent months, I didn’t find much time to spend on Kate/KTextEditor development. But at least I was now able to spend a bit more time on OpenSource & Qt things even during work time in our company. Normally I am stuck there with low level binary or source analysis work. [...] Therefore, as our GUIs are developed with Qt anyways, we did take a look at libpoppler (and its Qt 5 bindings), which is the base of Okular, too.
  • KBibTeX 0.6.1-rc2 released
    After quite some delay, I finally assembled a second release candidate for KBibTeX 0.6.1. Version 0.6.1 will be the last release in the 0.6.x series.
  • Meet KDE at FOSDEM Next Month
    Next month is FOSDEM, the largest gathering of free software developers anywhere in Europe. FOSDEM 2017 is being held at the ULB Campus Solbosch on Saturday 4th and Sunday 5th of February. Thousands of coders, designers, maintainers and managers from projects as popular as Linux and as obscure as Tcl/Tk will descend on the European capital Brussels to talk, present, show off and drink beer.

Leftovers: OSS

  • D-Wave Unveils Open-Source Software for Quantum Computing
    Canada-based D-Wave Systems has released an open-source software tool designed to help developers program quantum computers, Wired reported Wednesday.
  • D-Wave builds open quantum computing software development ecosystem
    D-Wave Systems has released an open source quantum computing chunk of software. Quantum computing, as we know, moves us on from the world of mere 1’s and 0’s in binary to the new level of ‘superposition’ qubits that can represent many more values and therefore more computing power — read this accessible piece for a simple explanation of quantum computing.
  • FOSS Compositing With Natron
    Anyone who likes to work with graphics will at one time or another find compositing software useful. Luckily, FOSS has several of the best in Blender and Natron.
  • Hadoop Creator Doug Cutting: 5 Ways to Be Successful with Open Source in 2017
    Because of my long-standing association with the Apache Software Foundation, I’m often asked the question, “What’s next for open source technology?” My typical response is variations of “I don’t know” to “the possibilities are endless.” Over the past year, we’ve seen open source technology make strong inroads into the mainstream of enterprise technology. Who would have thought that my work on Hadoop ten years ago would impact so many industries – from manufacturing to telecom to finance. They have all taken hold of the powers of the open source ecosystem not only to improve the customer experience, become more innovative and grow the bottom line, but also to support work toward the greater good of society through genomic research, precision medicine and programs to stop human trafficking, as just a few examples. Below I’ve listed five tips for folks who are curious about how to begin working with open source and what to expect from the ever-changing ecosystem.
  • Radio Free HPC Looks at New Open Source Software for Quantum Computing
    In this podcast, the Radio Free HPC team looks at D-Wave’s new open source software for quantum computing. The software is available on github along with a whitepaper written by Cray Research alums Mike Booth and Steve Reinhardt.
  • Why events matter and how to do them right
    Marina Paych was a newcomer to open source software when she left a non-governmental organization for a new start in the IT sector—on her birthday, no less. But the real surprise turned out to be open source. Fast forward two years and this head of organizational development runs an entire department, complete with a promotional staff that strategically markets her employer's open source web development services on a worldwide scale.
  • Exploring OpenStack's Trove DBaaS Cloud Servic
    You can install databases such as MySQL, PostgreSQL, or even MongoDB very quickly thanks to package management, but the installation is not even half the battle. A functioning database also needs user accounts and several configuration steps for better performance and security. This need for additional configuration poses challenges in cloud environments. You can always manually install a virtual machine in traditional settings, but cloud users want to generate an entire virtual environment from a template. Manual intervention is difficult or sometimes even impossible.
  • Mobile Edge Computing Creates ‘Tiny Data Centers’ at the Edge
    “Usually access networks include all kinds of encryption and tunneling protocols,” says Fite. “It’s not a standard, native-IP environment.” Saguna’s platform creates a bridge between the access network to a small OpenStack cloud, which works in a standard IP environment. It provides APIs about such things as location, registration for services, traffic direction, radio network services, and available bandwidth.

Leftovers: Ubuntu and Debian

  • Debian Creeps Closer To The Next Release
    I’ve been alarmed by the slow progress of Debian towards the next release. They’ve had several weird gyrations in numbers of “release-critical” bugs and still many packages fail to build from source. Last time this stage, they had only a few hundred bugs to go. Now they are over 600. I guess some of that comes from increasing the number of included packages. There are bound to be more bad interactions, like changing the C compiler. I hate that language which seems to be a moving target… Systemd seems to be smoother but it still gives me problems.
  • Mir: 2016 end of year review
    2016 was a good year for Mir – it is being used in more places, it has more and better upstream support and it is easier to use by downstream projects. 2017 will be even better and will see version 1.0 released.
  • Ubuntu Still Planning For Mir 1.0 In 2017
    Alan Griffiths of Canonical today posted a year-in-review for Mir during 2016 and a look ahead to this year.
  • Linux Mint 18.1 “Serena” KDE – BETA Release

GNU Gimp Development

  • Community-supported development of GEGL now live
    Almost every new major feature people have been asking us for, be it high bit depth support, or full CMYK support, or layer effects, would be impossible without having a robust, capable image processing core. Øyvind Kolås picked up GEGL in mid-2000s and has been working on it in his spare time ever since. He is the author of 42% of commits in GEGL and 50% of commits in babl (pixel data conversion library).
  • 2016 in review
    When we released GIMP 2.9.2 in late 2015 and stepped over into 2016, we already knew that we’d be doing mostly polishing. This turned out to be true to a larger extent, and most of the work we did was under-the-hood changes. But quite a few new features slipped in. So, what are the big user-visible changes for GIMP in 2016?