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Saturday, 24 Feb 18 - Tux Machines is a community-driven public service/news site which has been around for over a decade and primarily focuses on GNU/LinuxSubscribe now Syndicate content

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Quick Roundup

Type Titlesort icon Author Replies Last Post
Story IBM and RH Join Forces to Enhance Linux Knowledge srlinuxx 24/05/2005 - 2:48pm
Story IBM and Servers Roy Schestowitz 09/10/2015 - 10:49am
Story IBM and Top Linux Distros Team Up to Drag x86 Workloads Onto Power Rianne Schestowitz 23/01/2015 - 9:37am
Story IBM announces 'Beyond Linux' strategy srlinuxx 28/08/2006 - 10:42am
Story IBM Asks Channel To Embrace Linux, Flash, And Software-Defined Storage Roy Schestowitz 19/02/2016 - 11:52am
Story IBM backs Firefox in-house srlinuxx 26/01/2006 - 10:42pm
Story IBM backs open-source Web software srlinuxx 11/04/2005 - 4:27am
Story IBM Bets Big Again on Linux srlinuxx 17/09/2013 - 8:30pm
Story IBM bets big on Spark, calling it the Linux of Big Data analytics Roy Schestowitz 16/06/2015 - 7:40am
Story IBM Bluemix NYC Garage and Blockchain Roy Schestowitz 29/06/2016 - 7:21am

Only Linux can deliver 1 million school laptops within budget: systint

Filed under
Linux

itwire.com: Just as the world's economies started to tank, Australia's Governments got themselves into an economic bind by promising to supply public school children with laptops. However, a leading systems integrator has issued a blueprint for an affordable blanket laptop roll out using Linux and netbooks.

Also: PA Charter School To Deploy 1,400 OLPC XO Laptops

Linux - Stop holding our kids back

Filed under
Linux

linuxlock.blogspot: I cannot either support your efforts or allow them to happen in my classroom. At this point, I am not sure what you are doing is legal. No software is free and spreading that misconception is harmful.

Protecting networks with SmoothWall Express

Filed under
Software

linux.com: Corporations and home users alike need firewall protection. Many choices abound, including some expensive, commercial options that only run on specialized hardware. Others, like SmoothWall Express, are freely downloadable, built on the same technology as the commercial solutions, and even deliver some superior features.

Microsoft revising 'us vs. them' attitude toward open source

Filed under
OSS

linuxworld.com (IDG): An example of how old habits die hard came just last week, when Microsoft's public relations team posted a case study on its PressPass Web site highlighting how a U.K. company called Speedy Hire expects to save US$1.48 million in five years after switching from Linux to Windows.

some howtos:

Filed under
HowTos
  • Cleaning Up Spoken-Word Recorded Audio With Audacity

  • How To Play .RMVB Files In Ubuntu
  • shell Jobs
  • Making the mouse wheel work in Debian
  • Run MS Paint in Linux
  • Using Autocompletion in Ubuntu
  • Transform Ubuntu into a Media Center with XBMC
  • Linux and UNIX How To: Scripting SSH and SFTP
  • Install KDE applications on Windows?
  • Ubuntu 8.10 Intrepid full-function setup
  • Magical apt-clone, broken Nexenta system recovery
  • Removing a Line that Matches a Pattern from a File
  • Using pam_mount to automount filesystems at login
  • tsort: UNIX / Linux Perform Topological Sort
  • aliases
  • More Tips For Documentation Writers
  • Customized my EMacs today

Lenny’s release date III

Filed under
Linux

blog.venthur.de: Two months since my last status update of my initial guess for Lenny’s release date, time for an update:

Give Linux with no surprises

Filed under
Linux

blogs.the451group: In other words, if you’re offering or giving a Linux-based computer this holiday season — whether you’re a big box retailer, online distributor, or Linux fanatic who wants to spread FOSS to family or friends — make sure you tell them it’s Linux.

How to Talk About FOSS Without Sounding Like a Total Dweeb

Filed under
OSS

penguinpetes.com: If you run Linux, BSD, or any other Free and Open Source system, you know that every time you open your mouth about it in day-to-day life, you usually have to stop and explain what it means.

The Penguin parade produces positive fun

Filed under
Linux

toolbox.com/blogs: I don't know if you have ever seen a real penguin parade with real live penguins but if you look closer at those individual penguins you will see that they are not all clones of each other. I would say that penguins of human form, ie, those who use Linux, do so for many reasons as well.

Linux Foundation Technical Advisory Board Elects New Members

Filed under
Linux

linux-foundation.org: The Linux Foundation (LF), the nonprofit organization dedicated to accelerating the growth of Linux, today announced the results of its 2008 Technical Advisory Board (TAB) election, which drew record numbers of candidates and voters.

What's Open About OpenSolaris?

Filed under
OS
Interviews

ddj.com: Timothy Cramer, senior director of OpenSolaris engineering at Sun, talks about the "open" part of OpenSolaris. DDJ: Tim, for clarity's sake, what are the basic differences between the Solaris 10 Operating System and OpenSolaris?

Review & Setup: OpenArena

Filed under
Gaming

simplehelp.net: OpenArena is an open source First Person Shooter based around a Quake engine. It’s fast, violent, and very entertaining. And best of all, it runs on Windows, Linux, and OS X!

Vector Linux 6.0 Beta 2: An Update

Filed under
Linux

reddevil62-techhead.blogspot: I'M having more success with Beta 2 than I had with Beta 1 of Vector's latest distribution - I managed to get it to install, for starters!

Firefox 3.1 Beta 2 Live, Mozilla Already Eyeing Beta 3

Filed under
Moz/FF

crn.com: Firefox 3.1 Beta 2 was released to the public Monday, but Mike Beltzner, director of Firefox development, said that Mozilla is already targeting Firefox 3.1 Beta 3 for a February 2009 release.

FSFE and GPL-Violations.org Release Guide to Handling License Violations

Filed under
OSS

groklaw.net: Free Software Foundation Europe's Freedom Task Force (FTF) and GPL-Violations.org have just formed a partnership that has released a guide to reporting and fixing license violations.

Ubuntu or Fedora. Which one is for you?

Filed under
Linux

tectonic.co.za: For some, Ubuntu 8.10 was something of a disappointment. Not because it is bad, which it is not, but because is feels more like slightly refreshed Ubuntu 8.04 rather than a new release. Fedora 10 on the other hand, does feel a fresher and slightly more exciting.

Storing Files/Directories In Memory With tmpfs

Filed under
Linux
HowTos

You probably know that reading from RAM is a lot of faster than reading files from the hard drive, and reduces your disk I/O. This article shows how you can store files and directories in memory instead of on the hard drive with the help of tmpfs (a file system for creating memory devices).

today's leftovers

Filed under
News
  • In Defense of the Creative Commons Non-Commercial License

  • Acer leads hot netbook market
  • Keeping Tabs (Virtually) on the Ubuntu Developer Summit
  • Moonlight goes 3D
  • Getting started with iptables in Linux
  • Fedora update breaks… Fedora
  • SimCity4 on Ubuntu 8.10
  • Gentoo… finally
  • Alternative to Vista? Try the user friendly PCLINUXOS 2007!
  • Strong Netbook Shipments Buoy Notebook PC Market in Q3'08
  • Mastering the Art of Remastering
  • Sun's Mickos: I'm OK with Monty's MySQL 5.1 rant
  • Open Source: Our Defense Against Lousy Preloaded Software
  • Gnome 3 mockup screenshots
  • The five most important IT trends of 2008
  • Interview with Totem maintainer Bastien Nocera
  • KDE at LinuxDay 2008 in Dornbirn, Austria
  • Browser Speed Test Revisited
  • Creating geographical charts with EuroOffice Map Chart
  • The single most important thing you should know about Ubuntu…
  • Amazon open sources public relations
  • Build a Linux Distro You Can Be Proud Of
  • Linux Kernel Performance Counter Subsystem
  • Criticizing Vista Doesn’t Mean Promoting Ubuntu
  • Software as a Subversive Activity, Part 4: One Geek's Journey from Microsoft Slave to Linux Liberty

some howtos:

Filed under
HowTos
  • Manage your mbox file with Archmbox

  • How To Install Microsoft Core Fonts In Ubuntu Linux
  • Accessing Your Ubuntu Linux System with GDM
  • CUPS failing at startup on Debian Lenny
  • Vim Plugins You Should Know About, Part I
  • HowTo upgrade from Debian Etch to Lenny
  • Know when your drives are failing, with smartd

Where will Linux be in ten years time?

Filed under
Linux

it.toolbox.com/blogs: I have said it before and I will say it again. Linux is the fastest growing operating system that I know of. I do not mean in market share, it is a free (as in beer) operating system, although it is moving up in the marketplace pretty fast. I mean the actual operating system itself.

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More in Tux Machines

FATHOM releases Crystallon

  • FATHOM releases Crystallon, an open-source software for lattice-based design
    Lattice structures are integral to 3D printed designs, and Aaron Porterfield, an industrial designer at additive manufacturing service bureau FATHOM, has developed Crystallon, an open source project for shaping them into structures.
  • FATHOM Introduces Open Source Software Project for Generating 3D Lattice Structures
    California-based FATHOM, which expanded its on-site managed services and announced important partnerships with Stratasys and Desktop Metal last year, is introducing a fascinating new open source project called Crystallon, which uses Rhino and Grasshopper3D to create lattice structures. FATHOM industrial designer Aaron Porterfield, also an Instructables member, developed the project as an alternative to designing lattices with commercially available software. He joined the company’s design and engineering team three years ago, and is often a featured speaker for its Design for Additive Manufacturing (DfAM) Training Program – and as the project developer, who better to explain the Crystallon project?

Kernel and Graphics: Machine Learning, Mesa, Wayland/Mir, AMDGPU

  • AI-Powered / Machine Learning Linux Performance Tuning Is Now A Thing
    A year and a half ago I wrote about a start-up working on dynamically-tuned, self-optimizing Linux servers. That company is now known as Concertio and they just launched their "AI powered" toolkit for IT administrators and performance engineers to optimize their server performance. Concertio Optimizer Studio is their product making use of machine learning that aims to optimize Linux systems with Intel CPUs for peak performance by scoping out the impact of hundreds of different tunables for trying to deliver an optimal configuration package for that workload on that hardware.
  • Pengutronix Gets Open-Source 3D Working On MX8M/GC7000 Hardware
    We've known that Pengutronix developers had been working on i.MX8M / GC7000 graphics support within their Etnaviv open-source driver stack from initial patches posted in January. Those patches back at the start of the year were for the DRM kernel driver, but it turns out they have already got basic 3D acceleration working.
  • SDL Now Disables Mir By Default In Favor Of Wayland Compatibility
    With Mir focusing on Wayland compatibility now, toolkits and other software making direct use of Mir's APIs can begin making use of any existing Wayland back-end instead. GTK4 drops the Mir back-end since the same can be achieved with the Wayland compatibility and now SDL is now making a similar move.
  • Mesa 18.1 Receives OpenGL 3.1 With ARB_compatibility For Gallium3D Drivers
    Going back to last October, Marek of AMD's open-source driver team has been working on ARB_compatibility support for Mesa with a focus on RadeonSI/Gallium3D. Today that work was finally merged. The ARB_compatibility support allows use of deprecated/removed features of OpenGL by newer versions of the specification. ARB_compatibility is particularly useful for OpenGL workstation users where there are many applications notorious for relying upon compatibility contexts / deprecated GL functionality. But ARB_compatibility is also used by a handful of Linux games too.
  • AMDGPU In Linux 4.17 Exposes WattMan Features, GPU Voltage/Power Via Hwmon
    AMD's Alex Deucher today sent in the first pull request to DRM-Next of AMDGPU (and Radeon) DRM driver feature material that will in turn be merged with the Linux 4.17 kernel down the road. There's some fun features for AMDGPU users coming with this next kernel! First up, Linux is finally getting some WattMan-like functionality after it's been available via the Windows Radeon Software driver since 2016. WattMan allows for more fine-tuning of GPU clocks, voltages, and more for trying to maximize the power efficiency. See the aforelinked article for details but currently without any GUI panel for tweaking all of the driver tunables, this WattMan-like support needs to be toggled from the command-line.

Wine and Ganes: World of Warcraft, Farm Together, Madcap Castle, Cityglitch

Security Leftovers