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About Tux Machines

Sunday, 30 Apr 17 - Tux Machines is a community-driven public service/news site which has been around for over a decade and primarily focuses on GNU/LinuxSubscribe now Syndicate content

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Quick Roundup

Type Titlesort icon Author Replies Last Post
Story Jolicloud 1.0 srlinuxx 27/07/2010 - 7:05pm
Story Jolicloud 1.0 Review srlinuxx 06/08/2010 - 12:49am
Story Jolicloud 1.0 review srlinuxx 27/08/2010 - 9:15pm
Story Jolicloud 1.0 Review and Screenshots srlinuxx 2 07/08/2010 - 1:18am
Story Jolicloud 1.0 review – watch out Google Chrome OS srlinuxx 17/08/2010 - 2:57pm
Story Jolicloud 1.1 - Very good, but impolite srlinuxx 18/12/2010 - 8:47pm
Story Jolicloud 1.1 Hands On srlinuxx 27/10/2010 - 10:32pm
Story Jolicloud 1.1 review srlinuxx 1 11/12/2010 - 3:00pm
Story Jolicloud 2 offers a one-stop shop to your social and Cloud storage accounts Roy Schestowitz 22/12/2013 - 12:19pm
Story Jolicloud brings the stupidity of web apps to Linux netbooks. acurrie 1 27/09/2009 - 11:08am

Microsoft to spy on its own workers

Filed under
Microsoft

tech.blorge.com: In a move that makes the phrase “having your finger on the pulse of your company” have a whole new meaning, Microsoft has developed a program that would allow them to spy on their own employees.

AMD Catalyst 8.01 Linux Driver

Filed under
Software

phoronix: AMD has today released the 8.01 Linux Catalyst package, which contains the fglrx 8.45 driver. New in this release are updated packaging scripts and a few fixes, which many have been hopeful for in this release.

PCLinuxOS Day 11 - Documentation and Information

Filed under
PCLOS

ruminationsonthedigitalrealm.org: I am not someone who believes that a Linux distributions sells itself, that technological achievement is enough to push it to the desktop of end users. As long as the educational systems keep on teaching Windows-based skills, there will be a lot of users who need some hand holding, some guidance, some instruction. What does PCLinuxOS have to offer in this regard?

KDE 4.0: Everything that has an end, has a beginning

Filed under
Reviews

By now, every Linux user's heard of KDE 4.0, and the controversy surrounding its release. Here's one partisan KDE user's take on it — with screenshots.

SimplyMEPIS 7.0 is a keeper

Filed under
Linux
Reviews

linux.com: The long awaited SimplyMEPIS 7.0 was finally released just before Christmas, and it was worth the wait. In this mature and sometimes underrated operating system, everything looks good and works well.

Groklaw, Mandriva and Turbolinux

Filed under
MDV

François Bancilhon: Our recent announcement concerning the creation of a joint lab with Turbolinux has generated some controversy. Even PJ, from Groklaw, a site we like very much at Mandriva, showed some concerns and signaled her intention to stop using our Distro.

My thoughts on VectorLinux

Filed under
Linux

Dr Small's Blog: So I was finally able to get VectorLinux downloaded on my limitation of restricted bandwidth, but I was able to do it, so that’s all that matters. Torrents come in handly with my type of bandwidth, considering I can Pause the download Smile

How to Play Prince of Persia on Ubuntu

Filed under
HowTos

softpedia: Prince of Persia is definitely one of my all-time favorite game. It's a third-person action adventure video game published by Ubisoft. Here's what you need to get started:

The First Day of the KDE 4.0 Release Event

Filed under
KDE

dot.kde.org: The first day of the KDE 4.0 Release Event in Mountain View, California, got off to a great start on Thursday, with attendees fuelled by a hearty breakfast provided by Google. Then, the "un-conference" was ready to get underway, and within minutes the first topics were added to the whiteboards.

Also:

  • KDE4: Get More Widgets

  • KDE 4.0 Packages Ready for Sabayon
  • First impressions: KDE 4.0

Come Fly with Fluxbuntu

Filed under
Ubuntu

junauza.blogspot: Fluxbuntu Linux is yet another offshoot of Ubuntu. It uses a Fluxbox window manager as its main aim is to be fast, lightweight, and at the same time full featured. Consequently, the primary objective of Fluxbuntu is to develop an operating system that would be ideal for older or low-end computer machines and even on mobile devices.

today's leftovers

Filed under
News
  • OpenGL - Microsoft left?

  • An Open letter to Mark Shuttleworth
  • The open source development incline
  • CSI: Open Source
  • Linux is greener than Vista
  • New D language pumps up programmer productivity
  • Microsoft Says It Will Release Binary Office Formats - Which?
  • XtreemOS: a Linux-based operating system to support next-generation grids
  • Trac(king) software development
  • Selecting Live Distro for BITA exhibition

A conversation with the autopackage team

Filed under
Interviews

linux.com: Curtis Knight, Isak Savo, and Taj Morton are the lead maintainers and developers of autopackage, a set of tools designed to let developers build and distribute distribution-neutral installation packages. In this interview, they share their vision of the project and where Linux packaging in general is going.

KDE 4.0, A Call for Perspective

Filed under
KDE

linuxtechdaily.com: KDE 4.0 was released last week and all hell seemed to break loose. What I view as a solid first step in a very positive reaction was met with some applause, but generally scorn and complaints. I think some perspective is needed, and I humbly offer to try and provide some.

Miro: Free Television

Filed under
Software

fosswire.com: TV. We all watch it. Chances are you might have a DVR hooked up to your TV so you can watch it at any time. If you pay for cable or satellite access, you are probably getting a little tired of those bills as well. If you’re into the ‘net, get rid of those bills and get Miro.

some howtos & such

Filed under
HowTos
  • Building a Home File Server

  • Streamline browsing and save bandwidth
  • So What is Bashrc?
  • Creating large (>2TB) Linux Partitions
  • New users guide to the terminal
  • Adding Additional Repositories

Arch: the real no-go reason in my case

Filed under
Linux

beranger: I was exaggerating the other day it is not only because of pacman's switches that I won't be using Arch in the predictable future. It's more than that.

Interview: OLPC's Michail Bletsas Part 1 [of 2]

Filed under
OLPC
Interviews

gearlog.com: When Nicholas Negroponte's One Laptop Per Child (OLPC) initiative was first announced, the project was nearly universally lauded by the tech press. We caught up with OLPC's Chief Connectivity Officer, Michail Bletsas, to speak about these issues and the future of One Laptop Per Child.

Criminalist Testifies That Blood Was Found In Reiser House

Filed under
Reiser

wired blog: Jurors judging the murder trial of Linux guru Hans Reiser were provided a glimpse into the prosecution's forensic evidence -- trace amounts of "nice shiny red" blood found inside the defendant's house -- the last place his wife Nina Reiser was seen alive.

Flock 1.1 beta will add web Email, Picasa and more to your web browser

Filed under
Software

downloadsquad: Social web browser Flock is planning to launch 3 major new features in about two weeks. Like its predecessors, Flock 1.1 beta is built on Firefox code but it has a ton of features that make it easier to keep in touch with your social networking services like Facebook, Flickr, Twitter, and YouTube.

PCLinuxOS 2008 on my ThinkPad T61 - Part 2

Filed under
PCLOS

temporaryland.wordpress: As I mentioned on Part 1 of this review the version of PCLinuxOS I am using is the MiniMe 2008 edition. For those of us that already know what applications we need, the MiniMe edition is actually preferred. It is very easy to install the needed applications from Synaptic.

Also: PCLOS Day 10 - 2008 MiniME Edition Impressions

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More in Tux Machines

Kubuntu 17.04 Zesty Zaphod - Kawabuntu!

Let us continue with the spring season distro testing. Next on the menu: Kubuntu. After many years of offering bland, emotionless releases, we had a cautiously reasonable Yakkety Yak edition, so me hopes are high for today. And for today, we will examine the latest Kubuntu, which officially bears the name of Zesty Zapus, but once again, like my recent Ubuntu review, my version of the distro's name is totally better. So allow me to ask thee, what is the answer to Linux, multiverse and constant forking? Read more

A switch to Android and 50 Essential Android Apps

  • Good Game: A switch to Android not as difficult as anticipated
    It’s not quite like learning a new language or how to ride a bike, but at times it does feel a little bit like both. After nearly 10 years of faithful Apple consumption — listening to iTunes, watching an Apple TV, reading iBooks — I did something completely unexpected this month: I made the leap from the neatly walled garden of Apple’s smartphone, smart watch and tablet and into the wilds of the loosely controlled world of Android gadgets. I could blame the change on a variety of must-need wearable, quasi-smart doodads, or virtual reality, or even an edge-to-edge screened smartphone that looks like you’re carrying a piece of the sky around in your pocket. But the real culprit for my leap of consumer faith isn’t one single Samsung product; it was an ecosystem of them.
  • The 50 Essential Android Apps (2017)

Red Hat and Fedora

Leftovers: OSS

  • Anonymous Open Source Projects
    He made it clear he is not advocating for this view, just a thought experiment. I had, well, a few thoughts on this. I tend to think of open source projects in three broad buckets. Firstly, we have the overall workflow in which the community works together to build things. This is your code review processes, issue management, translations workflow, event strategy, governance, and other pieces. Secondly, there are the individual contributions. This is how we assess what we want to build, what quality looks like, how we build modularity, and other elements. Thirdly, there is identity which covers the identity of the project and the individuals who contribute to it. Solomon taps into this third component.
  • Ostatic and Archphile Are Dead
    I’ve been meaning to write about the demise of Ostatic for a month or so now, but it’s not easy to put together an article when you have absolutely no facts. I first noticed the site was gone a month or so back, when an attempt to reach it turned up one of those “this site can’t be reached” error messages. With a little checking, I was able to verify that the site has indeed gone dark, with writers for the site evidently losing access to their content without notice. Other than that, I’ve been able to find out nothing. Even the site’s ownership is shrouded in mystery. The domain name is registered to OStatic Inc, but with absolutely no information about who’s behind the corporation, which has a listed address of 500 Beale Street in San Francisco. I made an attempt to reach someone using the telephone number included in the results of a “whois” search, but have never received a reply from the voicemail message I left. Back in the days when FOSS Force was first getting cranked up, Ostatic was something of a goto site for news and commentary on Linux and open source. This hasn’t been so true lately, although Susan Linton — the original publisher of Tux Machines — continued to post her informative and entertaining news roundup column on the site until early February — presumably until the end. I’ve reached out to Ms. Linton, hoping to find out more about the demise of Ostatic, but haven’t received a reply. Her column will certainly be missed.
  • This Week In Creative Commons History
    Since I'm here at the Creative Commons 2017 Global Summit this weekend, I want to take a break from our usual Techdirt history posts and highlight the new State Of The Commons report that has been released. These annual reports are a key part of the CC community — here at Techdirt, most of our readers already understand the importance of the free culture licensing options that CC provides to creators, but it's important to step back and look at just how much content is being created and shared thanks to this system. It also provides some good insight into exactly how people are using CC licenses, through both data and (moreso than in previous years) close-up case studies. In the coming week we'll be taking a deeper dive into some of the specifics of the report and this year's summit, but for now I want to highlight a few key points — and encourage you to check out the full report for yourself.
  • ASU’s open-source 'library of the stars' to be enhanced by NSF grant
  • ASU wins record 14 NSF career awards
    Arizona State University has earned 14 National Science Foundation early career faculty awards, ranking second among all university recipients for 2017 and setting an ASU record. The awards total $7 million in funding for the ASU researchers over five years.