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About Tux Machines

Wednesday, 22 Feb 17 - Tux Machines is a community-driven public service/news site which has been around for over a decade and primarily focuses on GNU/LinuxSubscribe now Syndicate content

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Quick Roundup

Type Titlesort icon Author Replies Last Post
Story KDE and Akademy Roy Schestowitz 01/08/2015 - 8:22pm
Story KDE and Akademy Roy Schestowitz 02/08/2015 - 6:19pm
Story KDE and Akademy Roy Schestowitz 05/08/2015 - 12:17pm
Story KDE and Akademy Roy Schestowitz 06/08/2015 - 11:22am
Story KDE and Akademy Roy Schestowitz 07/08/2015 - 9:36am
Story KDE and Akademy Rianne Schestowitz 09/08/2015 - 9:30pm
Story KDE and Akademy Roy Schestowitz 18/08/2015 - 11:14am
Story KDE and Akademy Roy Schestowitz 20/08/2015 - 3:28pm
Story KDE and Akademy Roy Schestowitz 21/08/2015 - 12:02pm
Story KDE and Akademy Rianne Schestowitz 23/08/2015 - 5:33am

Fedora - not that one - provides platform for interoperability

Filed under
Software

linux.com: A group of academicians at Cornell University argue that this new wave of applications should be constructed with interoperability in mind. The result of their research, funded by DARPA and NSF, is Fedora, the Flexible Extensible Digital Object Repository Architecture.

IP firm sued, settled with Novell on different patent in August

Filed under
Legal

zdnet blogs: The IP firm that filed patent litigation against Red Hat and Novell mounted legal threats against many other U.S. software companies in 2007 including Oracle, SAP, Computer Associates, EMC, Adobe, Autodesk, Apple, SPSS — and Novell.

Ubuntu 7.10 (rc) Gutsy Gibbon: Critical review

Filed under
Ubuntu

polishlinux: Ubuntu 7.10 Gutsy Gibbon has been released today. I haven’t tested any alpha or beta versions of the new product from Canonical. I have decided to wait for the Release Candidate, since this has proved to work for me in the past. In short: it did not disappoint me.

Also: Tips for the impatient: downloading Ubuntu Gutsy
And: A gutsy new Linux system
&: How to get great custom effects in Ubuntu’s Gutsy Gibbon

Welcome back, user-defined motion paths in OpenOffice Impress 2.3

Filed under
OOo

OpenOffice.org Tips: Back in the good old days of 1.x, you could draw a line, then draw an object, and make the object move along whatever line that was. It was great. Then the lovely redesign of Impress came, and that user-defined motion path feature got lost along the way. It's back!

Chris Blizzard Joining Mozilla’s Team

Filed under
Moz/FF

thetruthaboutmozilla.wordpress: The infamous Chris Blizzard, who now sits on the board of directors for the Mozilla Corporation and formerly sat on the board for the Mozilla Foundation, will be joining the Mozilla Corporation’s team as a full-time employee.

Smolt now with Hardware Rating Database and Wiki

Filed under
Software

liquidat: Smolt, a hardware statistics collecting program, got a major update. It now supports hardware rating and is connected to a Wiki to share solutions for hardware problems.

No Linux Love for New iPods: Why You Shouldn't Care

Filed under
Sci/Tech

OSWeekly: Newsflash for those of you who believe that we lost iPod support - we never had it in the first place. It's true, and frankly, the fact that Apple has decided to make themselves even more isolated in their own world is fine by me.

Latest incarnation of Novell bringing Linux to Asia

Filed under
SUSE

Bangkok Post: Novell Suse Linux is positioning itself to be the corporate Linux of choice for today's multi-OS corporation thanks to a series of agreements with companies such as SAP and Microsoft. In particular Novell is interested in the government sector in Asia.

These are not the sources we're looking for

Open Source and funky free ethics are no match for a good expensive closed application installed kid. There's a disturbance in the source.

Compiz Fusion Community News, for October 18, 2006

Filed under
Software

smspillaz.wordpress.com: Welcome to another edition of Compiz Fusion Community News. Over the past fortnight we have seen numerous fixes in preparation for the 0.6.0 release and some new features along the way. This week is also a big week for Compiz Fusion due to the release of a new ATI Driver (more about that later), and Ubuntu Gutsy Gibbon.

A cursory look into KDE 4 file management: Dolphin beta

Filed under
Software

Rudd-O: Windows has Explorer. Mac OS has Finder. GNOME has Nautilus. And KDE had, up to a number of months ago, Konqueror. Now, together with the up-and-coming KDE 4, a simple file manager named Dolphin takes on file management. So how does Dolphin stack up?

Drupal: from a drop in the ocean to a big fish in the CMS world

Filed under
Drupal

pcworld: Drupal started out as a college experiment. The Open Source content management system now powers about 200,000 public facing Web sites and numerous intranet sites around the world. In this interview Dries Buytaert tells us all about the project which manifested from a chain of unexpected events.

Also: Drupal 4.7.8 and 5.3 released: Security updates and bugfixes.
And: Drupal 6.0 beta 2 released

Playing Microsoft patent poker

Filed under
Microsoft

linux-watch: It’s become an annual event. Steve Ballmer shoots his yap about how Linux and open source violate Microsoft patents. The open-source community says, “OK, show us your cards, your patents,” and Ballmer shuts up for six months or so.

more ubuntu stuff

Filed under
Ubuntu
  • Jono Bacon: 7.10 Released

  • Inside Ubuntu Gutsy 7.10
  • Ubuntu gets Gutsy, but is Linux ready?
  • Gutsy Gibbon Release Notes
  • Official Announcement: Ubuntu 7.10 Released
  • Upgrading to Ubuntu 7.10
  • Five Tips for Ubuntu 7.10 Gutsy Gibbon
  • What's New in Ubuntu 7.10? (a.k.a. Gutsy Gibbon)
  • Doomsday 7.10 is here!

What does the Linux desktop really need?

Filed under
Linux

linux-mag: Once again, the Linux Foundation Desktop Linux (DTL) workgroup is polling users to find out what desktop Linux really needs. While the foundation folks conduct the poll, let me share my top three priorities for the Linux desktop in 2008: Applications, multimedia, and polish.

Bhutan Deploys Linux

Filed under
Linux

pcworld: The Bhutan government liked its first taste of Linux so much that it has come back for seconds, releasing an updated version of its Debian-based operating system that it launched last year.

Using uShare in Gentoo: Part 1

Filed under
HowTos

obsidianprofile.com: This is beginning of a series of articles on how to package an application for Gentoo's Portage. I'm going to start by creating a more advanced rc-script than what I wrote for the BIOS_LEVEL article, then in later entries create an ebuild and show how to put it into portage so you can emerge ushare.

New Ubuntu 7.10: Gutsy Gibbon uncaged

Filed under
Ubuntu

tectonic: Ubuntu today released it's latest version of the popular Linux distribution, Gutsy Gibbon. Gutsy features better power management, improved hardware compatability, easier printer configuration and lots of desktop eye candy.

Also: Gutsy Gibbon step-by-step installation guide with screenshots

Ubuntu and the future of the Linux desktop

Filed under
Ubuntu

matt asay: I will admit to being a Linux desktop nonbeliever. It feels a bit like yesterday's battle fought with the wrong weapons: geekiness rather than ease of use. There's a chance - still a slim one, but a chance nonetheless - that Ubuntu will change that.

The Perfect Server - OpenSUSE 10.3 (32-bit)

Filed under
SUSE
HowTos

This is a detailed description about how to set up an OpenSUSE 10.3 server that offers all services needed by ISPs and hosters.

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More in Tux Machines

Android Leftovers

Google's Upspin Debuts

  • Another option for file sharing
    Existing mechanisms for file sharing are so fragmented that people waste time on multi-step copying and repackaging. With the new project Upspin, we aim to improve the situation by providing a global name space to name all your files. Given an Upspin name, a file can be shared securely, copied efficiently without "download" and "upload", and accessed by anyone with permission from anywhere with a network connection.
  • Google Developing "Upspin" Framework For Naming/Sharing Files
    Google today announced an experimental project called Upspin that's aiming for next-generation file-sharing in a secure manner.
  • Google releases open source file sharing project 'Upspin' on GitHub
    Believe it or not, in 2017, file-sharing between individuals is not a particularly easy affair. Quite frankly, I had a better experience more than a decade ago sending things to friends and family using AOL Instant Messenger. Nowadays, everything is so fragmented, that it can be hard to share. Today, Google unveils yet another way to share files. Called "Upspin," the open source project aims to make sharing easier for home users. With that said, the project does not seem particularly easy to set up or maintain. For example, it uses Unix-like directories and email addresses for permissions. While it may make sense to Google engineers, I am dubious that it will ever be widely used.
  • Google devs try to create new global namespace
    Wouldn't it be nice if there was a universal and consistent way to give names to files stored on the Internet, so they were easy to find? A universal resource locator, if you like? The problem is that URLs have been clunkified, so Upspin, an experimental project from some Google engineers, offers an easier model: identifying files to users and paths, and letting the creator set access privileges.

RPi-friendly home automation kit adds voice recognition support

Following its successful Kickstarter campaign for a standalone Matrix home automation and surveillance hub, and subsequent release of an FPGA-driven Matrix Creator daughter board for use with the Raspberry Pi, Matrix Labs today launched a “Matrix Voice” board on Indiegogo. The baseline board, currently available at early-bird pricing of $45, has an array of 7 microphones surrounding a ring of 18 software-controlled RGBW LEDs. A slightly pricier model includes an MCU-controlled WiFi/Bluetooth ESP32 wireless module. Read more

The Year Of Linux On Everything But The Desktop

The War on Linux goes back to Bill Gates, then CEO of Microsoft, in an “open letter to hobbyists” published in a newsletter in 1976. Even though Linux wouldn’t be born until 1991, Gates’ burgeoning software company – itself years away from releasing its first operating system – already felt the threat of open source software. We know Gates today as a kindly billionaire who’s joining us in the fight against everything from disease to income inequality, but there was a time when Gates was the bad guy of the computing world. Microsoft released its Windows operating system in 1985. At the time, its main competition was Apple and Unix-like systems. BSD was the dominant open source Unix clone then – it marks its 40th birthday this year, in fact – and Microsoft fired barrages of legal challenges to BSD just like it eventually would against Linux. Meanwhile Apple sued Microsoft over its interface, in the infamous “Look and Feel” lawsuit, and Microsoft’s reign would forever be challenged. Eventually Microsoft would be tried in both the US and the UK for antitrust, which is a government regulation against corporate monopolies. Even though it lost both suits, Microsoft simply paid the fine out of its bottomless pockets and kept right at it. Read more