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Monday, 11 Dec 17 - Tux Machines is a community-driven public service/news site which has been around for over a decade and primarily focuses on GNU/LinuxSubscribe now Syndicate content

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Viewing the Night Sky with Linux Part II: XEphem

Filed under
Software

linuxplanet.com: Part I of this series covered a simple Linux planetarium program, KStars. But there are some questions KStars isn't very good at answering. For viewing closeups of planets, monitoring the motion of the planets, getting precise predictions of events like eclipses, and other such information, you'll do better with a more powerful tool: XEphem.

Red Hat's security issue

Filed under
Linux
Security

blog.perens.com: Last month, Red Hat issued a security bulletin. Not all that went on is clear, but it seems that the servers used to develop and distribute Fedora and Red Hat were accessed by a person with criminal intent. But there are continuing problems with Red Hat's handling of the situation.

Also: Fedora and our security attitude

Mandriva One 2009 - KDE4 - RC1

Filed under
MDV

planetoss.com: Mandriva releases a new version in every six months and this time is no exception. The team released 2009 RC1 which is scheduled for a final release on 9th October. The notable improvements from the previous 2008 Spring release are,

Is PCLinuxOS Stale?

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PCLOS

kzimm.wordpress: Recently, I’ve been reading posts talking about how PCLinuxOS is “stale”, “going downhill”, or even “dying”. They point out that the “current” version of PCLOS is 2007, has an out-of-date kernel, and won’t recognize the latest hardware.

Gates & Seinfeld’s next commercial: Better. With funny parts.

Filed under
Microsoft

blogs.zdnet.com: The second Microsoft commercial featuring Bill Gates and Jerry Seinfeld is out (being broadcast tonight during Big Brother on CBS) and at least this time, there were some funny scenes. And there was clearly a message this time.

SMPlayer: A high quality wrapper

Filed under
Software

linux.com: Loosely speaking, in software terms, a wrapper is something that provides an alternate interface to another object. SMPlayer is an advanced multimedia player wrapped around MPlayer that provides a friendlier and more powerful front end to the underlying application.

How Do Open Source Installations Compare by Operating System?

Filed under
OSS

openlogic.com/blogs: In the previous newsletter we looked at the breakdown of Linux Distributions. Many people have since asked us how open source software compares across different operating systems like Linux, Windows, and Mac, so we decided to take a look at the average number of open source packages found by operating system.

Polk Community College, USF get $812,000 grant to develop Linux curriculum

Filed under
Linux

bizjournals.com: Polk Community College and the University of South Florida Polytechnic have received an $812,726 grant from the National Science Foundation to develop a four-year curriculum for Linux computer system administration. The grant funds will be issued to the two institutions over three years.

The end of physical reboots with Linux

Filed under
Linux

it.toolbox.com/blogs: I was having an interesting conversation with my BSD buddies on whether Ubuntu is suitable/not for servers and I did my usual bragging about the servers not needing to be rebooted. I was then asked about kernel updates.

Viral ethics for Linux users

Filed under
Linux

kmandla.wordpress: A little while ago I found a very intelligent, well presented argument discussing the responsibility of Linux users to install antivirus software. I’m talking about Linux machines acting as carriers.

Mozilla's Proposed 2010 Goals

Filed under
Moz/FF

blog.lizardwrangler.com: What can Mozilla do with our products and our product development processes to move the Internet toward our vision of an open, decentralized, participatory place in the next two years? In my last post I suggested we develop a set of goals to answer this question. Here’s my proposal.

GNU: the revolution turns 25

Filed under
OSS

itwire.com: It's probably a sign of the times we live in that the release of a browser by a commercial organisation like Google merits significantly more coverage than the approaching 25th anniversary of the organisation that gave rise to the free and open source software movement.

Also: The Real Reason to Celebrate GNU's Birthday

Red Flag Linux Olympic Edition fails to medal

Filed under
Linux

linux.com: Red Flag is China's biggest Linux supplier. The Red Flag Linux distribution is based on Red Hat Linux. Red Flag recently announced the release of a beta edition of Red Flag Linux 7, called "Olympic Edition." While it contains the expected bugs of a beta system, it also gives us an opportunity to preview the next release of Red Flag. What I saw didn't blow me away.

Lenovo Launching Linux Netbook

Filed under
Linux

thevarguy.com: In an email to The VAR Guy, Lenovo Senior VP J. Scott Di Valerio describes the PC giant’s evolving Linux strategy, including plans for so-called NetBooks that will launch in September and October. Here’s a look at what Di Valerio had to say.

Also: Lies, Damn Lies, and Retail Linux

Software Freedom Day in Boston

Filed under
OSS

fsf.org: The Free Software Foundation is hosting a Boston event to honor Software Freedom Day, an international holiday that was observed on every continent but Antarctica last year. The FSF will be one of more than 200 teams hosting events around the world.

Also: Software Freedom Day is Coming

Ubuntu to work more with larger Linux community

Filed under
Ubuntu

blogs.computerworld: Those who hate Ubuntu tend to fall into two groups. The other group are those, usually Debian Linux users, who think Ubuntu, which is based on Debian, has 'stolen' their work and that its developers haven't contributed enough back to Debian or the other open-source communities that create Linux-related software. That's about to change.

Also: Shuttleworth: Open-source desktops need a facelift

openSUSE 11.0 Survey Results

Filed under
SUSE

opensuse.org: The openSUSE survey results are out now. The survey we made in July/August time frame attracted over 12,000 participants. Here is a short summary on changes compared to the last one we did approximately 1 1/2 year ago with the openSUSE 10.2 release.

some howtos:

Filed under
HowTos
  • Split and merge large files

  • Run Windows Apps 100% Seamlessly on Ubuntu
  • Howto solve all PulseAudio-related issues in Ubuntu
  • How to create an ubuntu 8.04.1 boot floppy
  • Evaluating Number Grids Using Perl
  • How To Fix Wrong Timestamps On Gmail Messages
  • 10 tips for lazy sysadmins
  • Force Users To Change Their Passwords Upon First Login

Some Reasons NOT to use Linux. Ever. At all.

Filed under
Just talk

Reasons to not even bother trying Linux, ever : ( cue drum roll... )

Installing memcached And The PHP5 memcache Module On Debian Etch (Apache2)

Filed under
HowTos

This guide explains how to install memcached and the PHP5 memcache module on a Debian Etch system with Apache2. memcached is a daemon that can store objects in the system's memory (e.g. results of database queries) which can speed up your web site tremendously.

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More in Tux Machines

KDE and GNOME: Kubuntu, Krita, GNOME Development

  • Kubuntu 18.04 LTS Could Switch to Breeze-Dark Plasma Theme by Default, Test Now
    The latest daily build live ISO images that landed earlier today for Kubuntu 18.04 LTS (Bionic Beaver) apparently uses the Breeze-Dark Plasma theme for the KDE Plasma 5.11 desktop environment by default. However, we've been told that it's currently an experiment to get the pulse of the community. "Users running [Kubuntu] 18.04 development version who have not deliberately opted to use Breeze/Breeze-Light in their System Settings will also see the change after upgrading packages," said the devs. "Users can easily revert back to the Breeze/Breeze-Light Plasma themes by changing this in System Settings."
  • Interview with Rytelier
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  • Grow your skills with GNOME
    For the past 3 years I’ve been working very hard because I fulfill a number of these roles for Builder. It’s exhausting and unsustainable. It contributes to burnout and hostile communication by putting too much responsibility on too few people’s shoulders.
  • GTK4, GNOME's Wayland Support & Vulkan Renderer Topped GNOME In 2017
  • A Lot Of Improvements Are Building Up For GIMP 2.9.8, Including Better Wayland Support
    It's been four months since the release of GIMP 2.9.6 and while GIMP 2.9 developments are sadly not too frequent, the next GIMP 2.9.8 release is preparing a host of changes. Of excitement to those trying to use GIMP in a Wayland-based Linux desktop environment, GIMP's color picker has just picked up support for working on KDE/Wayland as well as some other Color Picker improvements to help GNOME/Wayland too. GIMP's Screenshot plugin also now has support for taking screenshots on KDE/Wayland either as a full-screen or individual windows. Granted, GIMP won't be all nice and dandy on Wayland itself until seeing the long-awaited GTK3 (or straight to GTK4) port.

Red Hat and Fedora

OSS Leftovers

  • How Open Source Databases Unlock Faster Computing
  • The art of the usability interview
    During a usability test, it's important to understand what the tester is thinking. What were they looking for when they couldn't find a button or menu item? During the usability test, I recommend that you try to observe, take notes, capture as much data as you can about what the tester is doing. Only after the tester is finished with a scenario or set of scenarios should you ask questions.
  • This open-source interview approach will help you avoid unconscious bias
    The lack of diversity in tech has been front and center this past year. Large tech companies have publicly vowed to fix the problem. But how? One answer is recognizing, acknowledging, and eliminating unconscious bias from the hiring process.
  • Microsoft Goes All In With Kubernetes
  • OpenBSD Now Officially Supports 64-bit ARM
    OpenBSD has graduated its 64-bit ARM (ARM64) architecture to being officially supported. As outlined in the OpenBSD Journal with a change made this week by lead OpenBSD developer Theo de Raadt, OpenBSD's ARM64 support is now considered officially supported.
  • LLVM Clang 6.0 Now Defaults To C++14
    Up to now LLVM's Clang C/C++ compiler has defaulted to using C++98/GNU++98 as its default C++ standard, but fortunately that's no more. Clang's default C++ dialect is now GNU++14 version of C++14 rather than GNU++98 (C++98). The older versions of the C++ standard remain available and can be set via the -std= argument, just as those previously could have specified C++11 / C++14 / C++17, but now in cases where not specified, GNU++14/C++14 is the default.
  • Tor Browser 7.0.11 is released
    Tor Browser 7.0.11 is now available from the Tor Browser Project page [1] and also from our distribution directory [2].

Android Leftovers