Language Selection

English French German Italian Portuguese Spanish

About Tux Machines

Wednesday, 26 Apr 17 - Tux Machines is a community-driven public service/news site which has been around for over a decade and primarily focuses on GNU/LinuxSubscribe now Syndicate content

Search This Site

Review: TinyFlux 1.0

Filed under
Linux

raiden's realm: TinyFlux (aka PcFluxboxOS) is a remastering of PcLinuxOS done in much the same way as TinyMe, but with Fluxbox as the window manager instead of KDE. It's the new kid on the block in an ever increasingly crowded world of Linux distributions.

Making the case for JeOS

Filed under
Linux

blogs.techtarget.com: I recently tried out a test system with an Ubuntu Server 7.10 JeOS build. The JeOS (Just Enough Operating System, pronounced “juice" ) concept for Linux works well if one needs just enough to run a test system.

The Linux Desktop Paradox

Filed under
Software

internetnews.com: Nearly every year for the last decade I've heard some pundit or vendor proclaim from the rooftops: This is the year of the Linux desktop. Yet, year in and year out, the proclamations don't materialize.

Find the items you want with GNOME Do

Filed under
Software

linux.com: Blacktree software's free Quicksilver Mac OS X utility won over users by letting them start typing the name of the file or app they need, and popping up the best matches in a launcher. Quicksilver went open source recently, but you don't have to wait for a port to start using it on your Linux machines. Two clones already exist: Katapult for KDE and the newest competitor, GNOME Do.

KDE Control Centre

Filed under
KDE

Linux Journal: Setting your desktop's wallpaper is only the beginning. The KDE team has cleverly used a Konqueror-style window for the Control Centre with a navigation panel on the left-hand side, giving you access to the various modules.

some more kde 4

Filed under
KDE
  • KDE 4 is available: First impressions

  • KDE 4 Brings Improvements Galore to the Linux Desktop
  • KDE 4.0 - The Official Release
  • KDE 4.0 released: rough, but ready for action

People of openSUSE: James Tremblay

Filed under
Interviews
SUSE

news.opensuse.org: openSUSE Education founder James Tremblay was caught up by ‘People of openSUSE’ to an interesting interview.

Here come the open source IPOs

Filed under
OSS

Matthew Aslett: Fortune magazine has published a list of its hot IPO tips for 2008. Three out of the five - MySQL, Ingres and SugarCRM - are open source companies, while another - Parallels - is an open source project sponsor. Here’s a look.

More KDE 4 Stuff

Filed under
KDE
  • KDE 4: A New Dawn for the Linux Desktop?

  • KDE 4.0 Screenshots Tour
  • Howto Install KDE 4.0 in Ubuntu Gutsy
  • Goodbye Vista, KDE 4.0 Has Arrived!
  • KDE 4.0 is out - a look back
  • cashews for x.org

KDE 4.0 Released

Filed under
KDE

The KDE Community is thrilled to announce the immediate availability of KDE 4.0. This significant release marks both the end of the long and intensive development cycle leading up to KDE 4.0 and the beginning of the KDE 4 era.

Ubuntu Readers get an "A", Cnet blogger an "F"

Filed under
Ubuntu

c|net blog: The first thing you learn when you write about technology is that the people who read your stuff are smarter than you'll ever be. So let me start by saying "Thank you" to all the Linux users who responded to last Friday's post on my travails trying to get Ubuntu 7.10, or "Gutsy Gibbon," to recognize my Linksys WPC300N wireless adapter.

MIB Live Games

Filed under
Gaming

fareast.linuxdiary: MIB Live Games is a treasure trove for Linux gamers; at last count over 100 games, 48 in arcade alone. As it is based on Mandriva 2008 and to say that everything is included out of the box on this remaster of Mandriva 2008 ‘One’ would be an understatement indeed.

Upgrade from 32-bit to 64-bit Fedora Linux without a system reinstall

Filed under
Linux

linux.com: Cross-grading to the 64-bit variant of your Linux distribution can help you use your resources more wisely. ver the years, I've talked to Fedora enthusiasts and Red Hat employees at Linux conferences about doing a cross-grade to 64-bit. I generally heard one solution: reinstall. However, I wanted to see if a cross-grade was feasible at a whole distribution level.

How Do You Install Linux Applications?

Filed under
Software

eWeek blogs: If you are a command line guru, you call upon your zypper, yum, conary, or apt-get from the terminal, and you awk sed grep your way to what you're after. For me, unless I know exactly what package I want--and I often don't--I typically turn to Synaptic.

today's leftovers

Filed under
News
  • Sexy PlexyDesk on the way

  • Killer lasers menace Linux Thinkpads
  • KDE 4.0 in Debian and Ubuntu
  • KDE Commit-Digest for 6th January 2008
  • Snoop / View Other Linux Shell User Typescript of Terminal Session
  • Konsole as a Full Screen Terminal
  • Ubuntu Remote Desktop Sharing
  • OLPC hacked to run Amiga OS
  • Financial group trusts Linux platform to protect customers' assets
  • OOXML Questions Microsoft Cannot Answer in Geneva
  • NVIDIA Plotting Open-Source Strategy?

Can open source cut campaign costs?

Filed under
OSS

Dana Blankenhorn: Having followed computing and politics since 1996 I have long been fascinated with whether scaled Internet-based computing can, in fact, cut the cost of campaigning. This year represents the best test yet of that proposition.

The Fox And The Penguin

Filed under
Moz/FF

ventnorsblog.blogspot: I'm one of the people directly working on a lot of improvements to Firefox 3 especially on Linux and I would like to summarize in this post what I have done personally that you can all look forward to for Firefox 3.

The paradox of choice

Filed under
OLPC

radian.org: People were already making a fuss about Nicholas’ claim that we’re working with Microsoft on supporting dual-boot with Windows XP, and now Bruce Perens writes a lachrymal — if entirely misinformed — missive about OLPC selling out to Microsoft. Yes, we’ve been meeting with Microsoft about their XP port.

PCLinuxOS Day 6 - Start with the Control Center, Ending with Webmin

Filed under
PCLOS

ruminations: The next few days/articles I will spend time in the PCLinuxOS control center. It is a central hub for all kinds of system-related tasks, which at least means you need to have administrator rights.

Review: Asus EEE PC 701 4G notebook computer

Filed under
Hardware

vnunet.com: Although notebook computers are cheaper today than ever before, it's still rather unusual to see one for sale for less than £350. Asus's oddly-named Eee PC, then, is rather unusual. Not only is it a complete notebook computer that costs just £220 including VAT, but it's both tiny and portable.

Also: OLPC's XO: early hands-on

Syndicate content

More in Tux Machines

Leftovers: OSS

  • Top 4 CDN services for hosting open source libraries
    A CDN, or content delivery network, is a network of strategically placed servers located around the world used for the purpose of delivering files faster to users. A traditional CDN will allow you to accelerate your website's images, CSS files, JS files, and any other piece of static content. This allows website owners to accelerate all of their own content as well as provide them with additional features and configuration options. These premium services typically require payment based on the amount of bandwidth a project uses. However, if your project doesn't justify the cost of implementing a traditional CDN, the use of an open source CDN may be more suitable. Typically, these types of CDNs allow you to link to popular web-based libraries (CSS/JS frameworks, for example), which are then delivered to your web visitors from the free CDN's servers. Although CDN services for open source libraries do not allow you to upload your own content to their servers, they can help you accelerate libraries globally and improve your website's redundancy.
  • Users stand up, speak out, and deliver data on OpenStack growth
    Last week, the OpenStack Foundation announced the results of its ninth user survey. OpenStack users responded in record-breaking numbers to participate, and their voices as revealed in the data tell the real story of OpenStack. The OpenStack community is growing, thriving with new users, deployments, code contributions, and collaborations, all on the rise. User diversity is expanding across geographies and organizational sizes. And OpenStack's ability to integrate with innovative technologies is paving the way for advancements not even dreamed of just five years ago.
  • How to get started learning to program

Huawei, Google supercharge Android with new Raspberry Pi-like board

Prepare to run Android at blazing fast speeds on a new Raspberry Pi-like computer developed by Huawei. Huawei's HiKey 960 computer board is priced at US$239 but has some of the latest CPU and GPU technologies. Google, ARM, Huawei, Archermind, and LeMaker all played roles in developing the board. The HiKey 960 is meant to be a go-to PC for Android or a tool to develop software and drivers for the OS. The board development was backed by Linaro, an organization that develops software packages for the Android OS and ARM architecture. Read more

Debian Derivatives: Q4OS and Devuan

  • Debian-Based Q4OS 1.8.4 Operating System Lets Users Select Alternative Desktops
    Today, April 26, 2017, the developers behind the Debian-based Q4OS GNU/Linux distribution announced the release of the fourth stability and security update of the Q4OS 1.8 "Orion" series. Q4OS 1.8.4 comes almost two months after the release of the previous point release, and besides incorporating all the security patches backported from the upstream repositories of the Debian GNU/Linux 8 "Jessie" operating system series, it adds an exciting new feature, namely the integration of alternative desktop environments.
  • Which is Free, Which is Open … [Also]

    Devuan and Debian need not defer to the Open Source Initiative regarding what is Open Source, since the OSI is just using Debian's Free Software Guidelines. Debian's Free Software Guidelines are a definition of Free Software, not specifically Open Source. At the time they were created, RMS personally approved of them as "a good definition of Free Software".

Leftovers: Software

  • Luminance HDR 2.5.0 Released, Here’s How to Install it on Ubuntu
    Luminance HDR is an open-source tool that lets you create and edit high-dynamic-range images (HDR) on Linux, Windows and macOS. The app recently got its first major update in several years and I figured it was something a few of you might wanna know about (and hey, we’ve featured a couple of other photography tools recently).
  • SMPlayer 17.4.2 Open-Source Media Player Supports MPlayer's ffhevcvdpau Decoder
    A new stable update of the open-source and cross-platform SMPlayer media player was announced recently, versioned 17.4.2, for all supported operating systems, including GNU/Linux and Microsoft Windows. SMPlayer 17.4.2 is now the latest stable release of the popular media player applications, and it looks like it ships with various exciting improvements and new features. One of these is support for using the ffhevcvdpau decoder from the MPlayer project, but only on Linux-based operating systems.
  • Gyazo – An Easy Way to Capture Screenshots, GIFs and Save Websites
    Gyazo is a screen capturing application with which you can quickly take quality shots of your screen and also create GIFs on the fly with a simple click. It is as simple to use as another screen capture tool we wrote on earlier, Peek, but Gyazo seems to have an edge in terms of functionality, customizability, and extension; at least, for now.
  • The many ways of running firefox on OpenBSD

    Maybe i haven't talked about it enough on the lists, but since i've been maintaining the various mozillas in the portstree (cvs log says i started around firefox 3.6.something... 7 years ago. *sigh*) a lot of things changed, so i wanted take the 6.1 release as an occasion to sum up the various ways one could run which version of which firefox on which version of OpenBSD.