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About Tux Machines

Friday, 22 Jun 18 - Tux Machines is a community-driven public service/news site which has been around for over a decade and primarily focuses on GNU/LinuxSubscribe now Syndicate content

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The Mono Crusade

stefanoforenza.com: World is beautiful, and everything is so peaceful right now. Still I have a weird sensation. May this be just the peace before the storm ? Is something starting ? What ?! A war ?…

The Ugly Truth About the Web

linux-mag.com: Tired of Arial and Verdana? Add some sizzle to your Web pages with a new open source project that can render any font in a page.

Virtualization With KVM On Ubuntu 9.04

Filed under
Ubuntu
HowTos

This guide explains how you can install and use KVM for creating and running virtual machines on an Ubuntu 9.04 server. I will show how to create image-based virtual machines and also virtual machines that use a logical volume (LVM).

100 open source gems - part 1

Filed under
Software

tuxradar.com: KDE, Gnome, OpenOffice.org and Firefox - all great software, and all powerful proponents of the free software software movement. But there are thousands of other applications out there that are worth trying.

Dell colours netbook for kids

Filed under
Hardware
Ubuntu
  • Dell colours netbook for kids

  • Dell’s school netbook seems priceworthy to me!
  • Latitude 2100: Dell Netbook for Schools
  • New $369 Dell netbook for schools has germ-busting keyboard
  • Ubuntu to be offered by Dell Australia
  • Dell's Latitude 2100: More Than Just Kid Stuff
  • Amid Linux netbook jitters, Dell stands firm

Flock 2.5 launches with support for Twitter, more services

Filed under
Software

cnet.com: Statistically, Flock is probably not for you. This Web browser, the 2.5 version of which is coming out today, is "designed to be the essential browser for the most active 25 percent of users."

Integrate Google Gadgets with Plasma in Kubuntu 9.04 Jaunty

Filed under
KDE

With the release of KDE 4.2, Google Gadgets became fully integrated into Plasma. You can add them to your desktop with a few clicks of your mouse.

today's leftovers:

Filed under
News
  • Recovering Lost Data Using The Coroner's Toolkit

  • New Firefox Icon: Concept Rendering
  • Glug hosts free talk on OSS migration strategies
  • U Georgia Goes Open Source for Student Portal
  • OOo 3.1: Three nice new features for Writer
  • Matching files and packages in Debian/Ubuntu
  • The New Linux.com: A Review
  • Lenovo’s Revisionist Netbook History
  • Vim made easy: how to get your favorite IDE features
  • Disk Encryption With TrueCrypt
  • Stallman rounds on JavaScript
  • Relive old NES days with Secret Maryo Chronicles
  • Why Linux is not (yet) Ready for the Desktop
  • Foresight Linux 2.2.1
  • Debian / Ubuntu Linux Install Advanced Intrusion Detection
  • Gentoo to Ubuntu Migration Part 2: The College Years
  • 9 of the Best Free Linux Educational Games
  • generalized makefiles
  • Tutorial: Boot Linux Over A Network
  • Portable Zenwalk
  • 10 solid Linux distributions for your netbook
  • Ubuntu One Thoughts

Why People resort to Arch Linux

Filed under
Linux

lazytechguy.com: Arch Linux is a Linux enthusiasts dream. It has a rare reputation of being very basic at the same time very user friendly.

Video overlay controller offers Linux-ready SDK

linuxdevices.com: Advanced Micro Peripherals announced a PC/104-Plus-format multi-channel video controller board with a Linux-compatible software development kit.

Linux, shminux

Filed under
Linux

garnercitizen.com: I keep waiting for the day Linux becomes easy to use for the average person and not just college computer science graduates who have probably been weaned on it.

Managing Ubuntu Linux on the cloud

blogs.computerworld: It's actually pretty darn easy to run a virtual operating system on a server or on the cloud. The real trick is managing them. That's why I'm excited that Canonical, Ubuntu's Linux commercial backer, recently released Canonical Landscape 1.3.

OpenOffice.org: Adoption is Gaining Momentum

Filed under
OOo

ooomarketing.blogspot: The workstations within academic computing labs and classrooms are increasingly occupied by open source software and open platforms.

Proxmox VE 1.2: First Impressions

Filed under
Software

linux-mag.com: Proxmox VE (VE) offers both OpenVZ containers and full virtualization via KVM in the same system. This flexibility provides you with the native speed of OpenVZ virtual machines and the traditional convenience of fully virtualized operating systems.

Linux Netbooks: Hit Microsoft where it ain't

Filed under
Linux

news.cnet.com: In open source or in product development generally, one of the biggest mistakes is to take on a deeply entrenched incumbent on its own turf. Almost inevitably, if you play someone else's game, even if you're a little cheaper/faster/better, you're going to lose.

Working to Rule

Filed under
OSS

tuxdeluxe.org: Office 2007 SP2 contains Microsoft's first native implementation of the file format Open Document Format (ODF). The devil, as always, is in the details.

wicd - A friendly network manager for Linux

Filed under
Software

dedoimedo.com: Linux distros have a broad range of managers. In KDE, the default utility is called KNetworkManager. In Gnome, it is - aptly called - Gnome Network Manager. Some Linux users do not like either of these two. Enter wicd.

Linux and the channel

Filed under
Linux

blogs.zdnet.com: Linux Pundit Bill Weinberg has produced two posts this weekend asking why we don’t have Linux laptops.

Fedora 12 Team Taking Codename Suggestions

Filed under
Linux

ostatic.com/blog: Contributing members of the Fedora community are putting their heads together again to come up with a codename for Fedora 12, and if you've got a good suggestion you've only got until May 23rd to shout it out.

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More in Tux Machines

Ubuntu: Snapcraft, Intel, AMD Patches, and Telemetry

  • SD Times Open-Source Project of the Week: Snapcraft
    Canonical, the company behind operating system and Linux distribution Ubuntu, is looking to help developers package, distribute and update apps for Linux and IoT with its open-source project Snapcraft. According to Evan Dandrea, engineering manager at Canonical, Snapcraft “is a platform for publishing applications to an audience of millions of Linux users.” The project was initially created in 2014, but recently underwent rebranding efforts.
  • Ubuntu 16.04 LTS Now Certified on Select Intel NUC Mini PCs and Boards for IoT Development, LibreOffice 6.0.5 Now Available, Git 2.8 Released and More
    Canonical yesterday announced that Ubuntu 16.04 LTS is certified on select Intel NUC Mini PCs and boards for IoT development. According to the Ubuntu blog post, this pairing "provides benefits to device manufacturers at every stage of their development journey and accelerates time to market." You can download the certified image from here. In other Canonical news, yesterday the company released a microcode firmware update for Ubuntu users with AMD processors to address the Spectre vulnerability, Softpedia reports. The updated amd64-microcode packages for AMD CPUs are available for Ubuntu 18.04 LTS (Bionic Beaver), Ubuntu 17.10 (Artful Aardvark), Ubuntu 16.04 LTS (Xenial Xerus), and Ubuntu 14.04 LTS (Trusty Tahr), "all AMD users are urged to update their systems."
  • Canonical issues Spectre v2 fix for all Ubuntu systems with AMD chips
    JUST WHEN YOU THOUGHT YOU'D HEARD THE END of Spectre, Canonical has released a microcode update for all Ubuntu users that have AMD processors in a bid to rid of the vulnerability. The Spectre microprocessor side-channel vulnerabilities were made public at the beginning of this year, affecting literally billions of devices that had been made in the past two decades.
  • A first look at desktop metrics
    We first announced our intention to ask users to provide basic, not-personally-identifiable system data back in February. Since then we have built the Ubuntu Report tool and integrated it in to the Ubuntu 18.04 LTS initial setup tool. You can see an example of the data being collected on the Ubuntu Report Github page.

Most secure Linux distros in 2018

Think of a Linux distribution as a bundle of software delivered together, based on the Linux kernel - a kernel being the core of a system that connects software to hardware and vice versa – with a GNU operating system and a desktop environment, giving the user a visual way to operate the system via a graphical user interface. Linux has a reputation as being more secure than Windows and Mac OS due to a combination of factors – not all of them about the software. Firstly, although desktop Linux users are on the up, Linux environments are far less common in the grand scheme of things than Windows devices on personal computers. The Linux community also tends to be more technical. There are technical reasons too, including fundamental differences in the way the distribution architecture tends to be structured. Nevertheless over the last decade security-focused distributions started to appear, which will appeal to the privacy-conscious user who wants to avoid the worldwide state-sanctioned internet spying that the west has pioneered and where it continues to innovate. Of course, none of these will guarantee your privacy, but they're a good start. Here we list some of them. It is worth noting that security best practices are often about process rather than the technology, avoiding careless mistakes like missing patches and updates, and using your common sense about which websites you visit, what you download, and what you plug into your computer. Read more

Red Hat and Fedora News

4MLinux 26.0 BETA released.

4MLinux 26.0 BETA is ready for testing. Basically, at this stage of development, 4MLinux BETA has the same features as 4MLinux STABLE, but it provides a huge number of updated packages, including major changes in the core of the system, which now uses the GNU C Library 2.27 and the GNU Compiler Collection 7.3.0. Read more