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About Tux Machines

Thursday, 30 Mar 17 - Tux Machines is a community-driven public service/news site which has been around for over a decade and primarily focuses on GNU/LinuxSubscribe now Syndicate content

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some howtos:

Filed under
HowTos
  • A newbies guide to Fdisk

  • How-to Install Google Earth in Ubuntu
  • Upgrading NVIDIA Drivers in Debian Lenny
  • Linux Shell, Bash tutorial
  • Using Mozilla Prism on Linux
  • How to install deb packages
  • Migrating mailman lists
  • Shell Scripting 101

openSUSE Weekly News, Issue 1

Filed under
SUSE

opensuse news: We are very glad to be able to announce the first ever issue of the openSUSE Weekly News newsletter. The aim of the newsletter is to summarise all the finer details occurring in and around the openSUSE Community.

Big news from Zonbu - The Zonbu Notebook!

Filed under
Linux
Hardware

arsgeek: I’ve just heard from the Zonbu folks this morning and they let me know that as of today Zonbu is releasing a notebook version of their low power, environmentally friendly desktop.

Hans Reiser Portrayed as 'Stressed' Before Nina Vanished, Jurors Bored

Filed under
Reiser

wired.com: A local politician took the witness stand in the Hans Reiser murder trial Wednesday, offering testimony that the defendant was "stressed" and growing deeply frustrated with the divorce courts that had awarded legal custody of their children to his wife.

Is Being 'Gutsy' All It Takes?

Filed under
Ubuntu

serverwatch.com: A number of pundits like to bemoan Linux's supposed lack of an integrated server stack and wail about the difficulty of figuring out what is needed, how toilsome it is to install all the pieces separately, and how arduous it is to configure everything after you have found and installed all the separate pieces. Fortunately they're wrong.

Konqueror: doing it all from one interface

Filed under
KDE

Free Software Magazine: Buried treasure is the most fun, so let’s get that spade out and start digging for a few Konqueror gems. One of the first, best and simplest things you can do is to get an easy speed boost.

Putting Linux in Perspective

Filed under
Linux

Linux Journal: While I was cleaning up my office I ran into the March 1986 issue of UNIX/WORLD, a long-since deceased magazine. I had saved this particular magazine because I am the author of the article featured on the cover: The Unix System on the IBM PC. While what I am writing here may sound like humor, it actually is real. That is, it is about what has happened in the last 20 years.

Enabling Compiz Fusion On An Ubuntu 7.10 Desktop (NVIDIA GeForce FX 5200)

Filed under
Ubuntu
HowTos

This tutorial shows how you can enable Compiz Fusion on an Ubuntu 7.10 (Gutsy Gibbon) desktop (I am using an NVIDIA GeForce FX 5200 graphics card). With Compiz Fusion you can use beautiful 3D effects like wobbly windows or a desktop cube on your desktop.

today's leftovers

Filed under
News
  • gnome is humans; jeff is human; murray is violating the no asshole rule

  • KDE 4 preview
  • New Drupal book: Drupal 5 Themes
  • Mozilla Landscape 2008
  • Asus resolves Eee GPL violation, releases asus_acpi code changes
  • 2nd Linux Foundation Summit In Texas
  • Conspiracy to Suppress KDE, in action
  • Desktop Linux: Look Beyond Wal-Mart
  • Why Linus Isn't "Competing"
  • Dual Booting: ASUS Customised Xandros OS & Ubuntu 7.04/ Feisty Fawn on The ASUS EEE PC 701
  • Ubuntu vs. That Other OS
  • It's the Directory, Stupid

some howtos:

Filed under
HowTos
  • How can I configure Firefox to use the KDE print system?

  • schroot - chroot for any users
  • OOo: Video Tutorial of Creating a Database and Simple Mail Merge
  • Dangerous Linux Commands
  • ffmpegmenu - transcode videos from your file manager
  • HowTo: Display a Tree of Linux Processes
  • Install Drupal 5.3 on Mandriva 2008 or One

Linux killed the One Laptop Per Child project

Filed under
OLPC

codeeleven.blogspot: Part of the concept was to use Linux as the base operating system. The end result was a interface called "Sugar" that was unlike any known computer interface in the developed world. Written in Python, it was definitly unique, though some people find its UI strange and counterintuitive.

Also: $100 Laptop Blocked by “chicken feed” Politics

Ubuntu Wired Networking Woes? Read This Closely

Filed under
Ubuntu

Matt Hartley: It’s enough to make you want to scream, having connectivity issues with your favorite Linux distro. And frankly why most people are best off with a Mac Mini, as it sometimes means getting your hands dirty.

Also: Ubuntu power management nonsense

KDE Commit-Digest for 25th November 2007

Filed under
KDE

In this week's KDE Commit-Digest: A Trash applet, various general improvements, and support for sharing configuration layouts in Plasma. "Undo close tab" feature in Konqueror. Development continues towards Amarok 2.0, with services becoming plugins and support for the Amapche music server.

And the Best Community Linux Is…

Filed under
Linux

Steven J. Vaughan-Nichols: The three biggest community Linuxes are Fedora, OpenSUSE and Ubuntu. They're all popular. They're all good. But which is the best?

Why Microsoft Rattles The Patent Saber

Filed under
Microsoft

Charles Babcock: It must be maddening to believe you command developer loyalties and lead legions worldwide, then watch developers flock to the Linux kernel. Maddening, that is, if you're Microsoft. Why does Microsoft say its patents cover Linux, while at the same time reaching out to other open source code projects?

Also: Windows And The New Coke Syndrome
And: Test Drive Windows Vista For Free Over The Internet

Desktop Linux Trio Offers Look at What's To Come

Filed under
Linux

eWeek: The latest versions of fast-moving OpenSUSE, Ubuntu and Fedora make a strong case for Linux on the desktop, but there's lots of integration work to be done.

Book Review: Linux Firewalls - Attack Detection and Response with iptables, psad, and fwsnort

blogcritics.org: Working in a university environment, one gets used to doing more with less. Security, particularly, seems to never get the budget it deserves though it has increased in recent years. For all their limitations, open-source tools are the vital lifeblood that makes IT work, and work securely, in academia.

OLPC XO vs. Asus Eee PC 701

Filed under
Linux
Hardware

laptopmag.com: While it's not exactly an apples-to-apples comparison (the XO and the Eee PC are intended for two different markets, after all), there's enough similarities between the two to merit a head-to-head comparison. Here's how these two cheap but innovative portables stack up in seven categories.

Reiser Murder Trial Theme Emerging: Wife Was a Good Mom, Bad Mom

Filed under
Reiser

wired blog: Witness No. 3 continued on the stand Tuesday in the Hans Reiser murder trial, and she quickly became the subject of several insults under cross examination by the defendant's attorney.

Red Hat, Novell issue back-to-back announcements

Filed under
Linux

blogs.techtarget.com: In the past 24 hours, the Red Hat Enterprise Linux (RHEL) beta became available to the public through Amazon’s Elastic Compute Cloud service. While RHEL has been available in limited beta for a few weeks, this public beta announcement comes right before Novell’s launch of SUSE Linux Enterprise Real Time 10, its latest enterprise OS offering.

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More in Tux Machines

Security Leftovers

  • Someone is putting lots of work into hacking Github developers [Ed: Dan Goodin doesn't know that everything is under attack and cracking attempts just about all the time?]
    Open-source developers who use Github are in the cross-hairs of advanced malware that has steal passwords, download sensitive files, take screenshots, and self-destruct when necessary.
  • Security Orchestration and Incident Response
    Technology continues to advance, and this is all a changing target. Eventually, computers will become intelligent enough to replace people at real-time incident response. My guess, though, is that computers are not going to get there by collecting enough data to be certain. More likely, they'll develop the ability to exhibit understanding and operate in a world of uncertainty. That's a much harder goal. Yes, today, this is all science fiction. But it's not stupid science fiction, and it might become reality during the lifetimes of our children. Until then, we need people in the loop. Orchestration is a way to achieve that.

Leftover: Development (Linux)

  • Swan: Better Linux on Windows
    If you are a Linux user that has to use Windows — or even a Windows user that needs some Linux support — Cygwin has long been a great tool for getting things done. It provides a nearly complete Linux toolset. It also provides almost the entire Linux API, so that anything it doesn’t supply can probably be built from source. You can even write code on Windows, compile and test it and (usually) port it over to Linux painlessly.
  • Lint for Shell Scripters
    It used to be one of the joys of writing embedded software was never having to deploy shell scripts. But now with platforms like the Raspberry Pi becoming very common, Linux shell scripts can be a big part of a system–even the whole system, in some cases. How do you know your shell script is error-free before you deploy it? Of course, nothing can catch all errors, but you might try ShellCheck.
  • Android: Enabling mainline graphics
    Android uses the HWC API to communicate with graphics hardware. This API is not supported on the mainline Linux graphics stack, but by using drm_hwcomposer as a shim it now is. The HWC (Hardware Composer) API is used by SurfaceFlinger for compositing layers to the screen. The HWC abstracts objects such as overlays and 2D blitters and helps offload some work that would normally be done with OpenGL. SurfaceFlinger on the other hand accepts buffers from multiple sources, composites them, and sends them to the display.
  • Collabora's Devs Make Android's HWC API Work in Mainline Linux Graphics Stack
    Collabora's Mark Filion informs Softpedia today about the latest work done by various Collabora developers in collaboration with Google's ChromeOS team to enable mainline graphics on Android. The latest blog post published by Collabora's Robert Foss reveals the fact that both team managed to develop a shim called drm_hwcomposer, which should enable Android's HWC (Hardware Composer) API to communicate with the graphics hardware, including Android 7.0's version 2 HWC API.

today's howtos

Reports From and About Cloud Native Computing Foundation (CNCF)