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About Tux Machines

Sunday, 04 Dec 16 - Tux Machines is a community-driven public service/news site which has been around for over a decade and primarily focuses on GNU/LinuxSubscribe now Syndicate content

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Quick Roundup

Type Titlesort icon Author Replies Last Post
Story Learn to Play Guitar on Linux with Nootka srlinuxx 19/11/2012 - 11:43pm
Story Learn Ubuntu - The Unity Launcher Rianne Schestowitz 18/09/2014 - 11:01pm
Story Learn Ubuntu with Hackett and Bankwell srlinuxx 12/11/2008 - 11:52pm
Story learning a new shell: zsh srlinuxx 06/10/2009 - 3:46pm
Story Learning about Linux - the easy way srlinuxx 02/10/2008 - 11:16am
Story Learning About Linux Commands srlinuxx 25/08/2006 - 5:41pm
Story Learning from GNOME srlinuxx 16/11/2011 - 1:12am
Story Learning From Google srlinuxx 06/11/2005 - 1:05pm
Story Learning from the open source movement srlinuxx 27/01/2011 - 9:12pm
Story Learning GIMP - Part 1 srlinuxx 16/03/2007 - 7:36pm

My Reader suggestions: PCLinuxOS

Filed under
PCLOS

After the disaster that was Ubuntu 7.04 and Windows Vista clean installs I decided to take readers advice and install PCLinuxOS. While I had tried PCLOS .92 a while back it really wasnt up to snuff of what I needed. I downloaded, burned and installed PCLOS 2007 TR4.

Transfer files between Linux and Windows easily

Filed under
Software

As a System Administrator in a mixed OS environment sometimes there is a need to transfer files across operating systems. Being a Linux fanboy means that I administer my windows clients from my Linux machine. Loving the eye candy means finding a point'n'click way of doing that.

One more Novellite leaves the building

Filed under
SUSE

While John Dragoon (a generally likable and great guy) attempts to confuse the issue as to why people are annoyed with the Microsoft/Novell pact (Hint: John, it's not an interoperability thing, it's a patent thing), the Novell exodus continues...with Walter Knapp, former GM of SUSE Linux (and effective head of the Novell's Linux Impact Team, leaving Novell's Waltham headquarters for other work.

Debian Etch and other Debian Stuff

Filed under
Linux

Several years ago, when I was just starting to use Linux, I remember getting a SUSE machine working and I was quite proud. My second big install was Red Hat and once it was working, I thought I ruled the world. Things were a little different then, not as much automated install...more hands on.

OpenOffice.org Password Cracker is what you make of it

Filed under
OOo

What do you do if you forget the password to your OpenOffice.org files?

First look: Mozilla Thunderbird 2.0

Filed under
Moz/FF

When it comes to choosing an e-mail client... well, there really aren't that many popular options. Corporate e-mail users tend to have their client dictated to them by IT, which usually means Microsoft Outlook or Lotus Notes. For personal use, many people just use the old standbys out of habit: Outlook Express/Windows Mail under Windows and Apple Mail under Mac OS X.

What Is Drupal?

Filed under
Drupal

Drupal is used to build web sites. It's a highly modular, open source web content management framework with an emphasis on collaboration. It is extensible, standards-compliant, and strives for clean code and a small footprint. Drupal ships with basic core functionality, and additional functionality is gained by the installation of modules.

Linux: Merging in 2.6.22

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Linux

Following the release of the 2.6.21 kernel Andrew Morton posted a list of patches in his -mm kernel, summarizing for each his plans as to whether or not they wil be pushed upstream for inclusion in the upcoming 2.6.22 kernel.

SSL and IPsec - An Overview

Filed under
HowTos

SSL requires applications to be modified as it operates above the TCP layer and this happens in user space in linux and other OSes. Whereas IPsec works seamlessly no matter what application and what protocol the application uses. ICMP traffic, UDP traffic and TCP all are protected by IPsec without the user or application developer worrying about it.

PCLinuxOS 2007 Test 4 Screenshots

Filed under
PCLOS

After a month of server issues and other problems, this distribution is back online and with a new test release. PCLinuxOS 2007 Test 4 is the final test release and includes the Linux 2.6.18.8 kernel, KDE 3.5.6, OpenOffice.org 2.2, and other new improvements.

Screenshots.

JAD, WINE, and ASIO, A Neat Tool In Audacity, & Ardour2 RC2

Filed under
Software

I've been teaching one of my students how to play Lonnie Mack's "Memphis", a classic blues-rock instrumental from the early 1960s. Lonnie's no slouch on the guitar, and my student Sam is a sharp learner, so we decided to employ Audacity to help him conquer the more difficult passages.

Fedora: champions of community!

Filed under
Linux

Fedora 7 Test 4 was launched last week and I’m excited! Right now I’m downloading the ISO to try it out and, although I’m aware that there are plenty of new features for me to explore in the distribution itself, many of the elements that have me most excited are changes relating to their infrastructure: they are setting out to empower the community more than any other distribution has.

Why device developers prefer Debian

Filed under
Linux

LinuxDevices.com's survey results consistently show Debian to be the most popular distribution among device developers. For example, our 2007 survey indicated that Debian was used in device-related projects by 13 percent of the survey's 932 participants, roughly double the score of MontaVista, the most popular strictly-embedded distribution.

Linux: ext4 Development Status

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Linux

Theodore Ts'o posted an update on the ext4 filesystem, "I've respun the ext4 development patchset, with Amit's updated fallocate patches. I've added Dave's patch to add ia64 support to the fallocate system call, but *not* the XFS fallocate support patches. (Probably better for them to live in an xfs tree, where they can more easily tested and updated.)

First Look: Firefox 3 Alpha 4

Filed under
Moz/FF

Mozilla has reached another milestone in the development of Firefox 3, releasing version alpha 4 over the weekend. As with the previous alpha releases, Gran Paradiso Alpha 4 is intended primarily for the developer community and is not yet ready for prime-time use.

Alpha 4 brings a number of new enhancements to Firefox 3, which we outlined yesterday.

Dell to choose Ubuntu

Filed under
Ubuntu

Officially, Dell Inc. hasn't said a word yet about which Linux it will be preloading on its desktops and laptops. Several sources within Dell, however, have told DesktopLinux.com that Dell's desktop Linux pick is going to be Ubuntu.

Review of PCLinuxOS 2007 Test Release 4

Filed under
PCLOS
Reviews

I find it hard to explain why I love PClinuxOS as much as I do, especially considering the other day when I decided to drop into Ubuntu to perform some basic tasks. PCLinuxOS is an excellent release and PCLOS2007 is looking like a real contender for most usable Linux 2007. Let's see how test release 4 behaves.

Reject Windows addiction, says advocate

Filed under
Microsoft

Outspoken Australian free software advocate Con Zymaris has labelled Microsoft's plan to offer Windows for $3 dollars to developing nations as an attempt to "addict" users to Microsoft software.

WHY is the transition from Windows to Linux easy for some people?

Filed under
Linux

After I'd closed the lid on the "Ubuntu is not Linux" , uh, mess, Eric over at Binary World has taken up the idea and tried to grapple with it. I don't know, maybe I should dig it up and check for a pulse. But I'm thinking again... (that's always a dangerous sign!)

Here's the nut of the matter: moving from Windows to Linux is easy for some people and hard for others. WHY?

New mutt 1.5.15 has a very nice new feature!

Filed under
Software

Just found today when I was looking to see if I missed something with the mutt sidebar patch (still irritates me that I have to sync a mailbox before jumping to another mailbox in order for the counts in the sidebar to be updated properly), that mutt 1.5.15 was released earlier this month. This is an extremely worthwhile upgrade, especially because it now has SMTP support built-in.

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More in Tux Machines

Leftovers: Gaming

Leftovers: Software

  • Hyper Is a Terminal Emulator Built Using Web Technologies
    A lot of us use the terminal on Ubuntu, typically from an app like GNOME Terminal, Xterm or an app like Guake. But did you know that there’s an JS/HTML/CSS Terminal? It’s called Hyper (formerly/also known as HyperTerm, though it has no relation to the Windows terminal of the same/similar name) and, usefulness aside, it’s certainl a novel proof-of-concept. “The goal of the project,” according to the official website, “is to create a beautiful and extensible experience for command-line interface users, built on open web standards.”
  • Little Kids Having Fun With “Terminal Train” In Ubuntu Linux
    Linux is often stereotyped as the operating system for tech savvy users and developers. However, there are some fun Linux commands that one can use in spare time. A small utility named sl can be installed in Linux to play with the Terminal Train.
  • This Cool 8-Bit Desktop Wallpaper Changes Throughout The Day
    Do you want a dynamic desktop wallpaper that changes throughout the day and looks like the sort of environment you’d be able to catchPokemon in? If so, check out Bit Day wallpapers. Created by Redditor user ~BloodyMarvelous, Bit Day is a collection of 12 high-resolution pixel art wallpapers.
  • This Script Sets Wallpapers from Imgur As Your Desktop Background
    Pyckground is a simple python script that can fetch a new desktop background on the Cinnamon desktop from any Imgur gallery you want. I came across it while doing a bit of background on the Bit Day wallpaper pack, and though it was nifty enough to be of use to some of you. So how does it work?
  • Productivity++
    In keeping with tradition of LTS aftermaths, the upcoming Plasma 5.9 release – the next feature release after our first Long Term Support Edition – will be packed with lots of goodies to help you get even more productive with Plasma!
  • Core Apps Hackfest 2016: report
    I spent last weekend at the Core Apps Hackfest in Berlin. The agenda was to work on GNOME’s core applications: Documents, Files, Music, Photos, Videos, Usage, etc.; to raise their overall standard and to make them push beyond the limits of the framework. There were 19 of us and among us we covered a wide range of modules and areas of expertise. I spent most of my time on the plumbing necessary for Documents and Photos to use GtkFlowBox and GtkListBox. The innards of Photos had already been overhauled to reduce its dependency on GtkTreeModel. Going into the hackfest we were sorely lacking a widget that had all the bells and whistles we need — the idiomatic GNOME 3 selection mode, and seamlessly switching between a list and grid view. So, this is where I decided to focus my energy. As a result, we now have a work-in-progress GdMainBox widget in libgd to replace the old GtkIconView/GtkTreeView-based GdMainView.

Leftovers: OSS and Sharing

  • Did Amazon Just Kill Open Source?
    Back in the days, we used to focus on creating modular architectures. We had standard wire protocols like NFS, RPC, etc. and standard API layers like BSD, POSIX, etc. Those were fun days. You could buy products from different vendors, they actually worked well together and were interchangeable. There were always open source implementations of the standard, but people could also build commercial variations to extend functionality or durability. The most successful open source project is Linux. We tend to forget it has very strict APIs and layers. New kernel implementations must often be backed by official standards (USB, SCSI…). Open source and commercial implementations live happily side by side in Linux. If we contrast Linux with the state of open source today, we see so many implementations which overlap. Take the big data eco-systems as an example: in most cases there are no standard APIs, or layers, not to mention standard wire protocols. Projects are not interchangeable, causing a much worse lock-in than when using commercial products which conform to a common standard.
  • Firebird 3 by default in LibreOffice 5.4 (Base)
    Lots of missing features & big bugs were fixed recently . All of the blockers that were initially mentioned on tracking bug are now fixed.
  • Linux & Open Source News Of The Week — Comma.ai, Patches For Firefox and Tor, And OSS-Fuzz
  • Open Source Malaria helps students with proof of concept toxoplasmosis pill
    A team of Australian student researchers at Sydney Grammar School has managed to recreate the formula for Daraprim, the drug made (in)famous by the actions of Turing Pharmaceuticals last year when it increased the price substantially per pill. According to Futurism, the undertaking was helped along by an, “online research-sharing platform called Open Source Malaria [OSM], which aims to use publicly available drugs and medical techniques to treat malaria.” The students’ pill passed a battery of tests for purity, and ultimately cost $2 using different, more readily available components. It shows the potential of the platform, which has said elsewhere there is, “enormous potential to crowdsource new potential medicines efficiently.” Although Daraprim is already around, that it could be synthesized relatively easily without the same materials as usual is a good sign for OSM.
  • Growing the Duke University eNable chapter
    We started the Duke University eNable chapter with the simple mission of providing amputees in the Durham area of North Carolina with alternative prostheses, free of cost. Our chapter is a completely student-run organization that aims to connect amputees with 3D printed prosthetic devices. We are partnered with the Enable Community Foundation (ECF), a non-profit prosthetics organization that works with prosthetists to design and fit 3D printed prosthetic devices on amputees who are in underserved communities. As an official ECF University Chapter, we represent the organization in recipient outreach, and utilize their open sourced designs for prosthetic devices.

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