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Thursday, 19 Apr 18 - Tux Machines is a community-driven public service/news site which has been around for over a decade and primarily focuses on GNU/LinuxSubscribe now Syndicate content

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Test your Linux IQ

Filed under
Linux

infoworld.com: You've installed every major Linux distribution on every major brand of hardware. You even carry a USB stick loaded with Linux in your front pocket. For you, the Year of the Linux Desktop was 1996. But how much do you really know about the free OS? Test your mettle with these 20 questions.

Examining Alternative Linux Distributions

Filed under
Linux

informit.com: Have you tried the major Linux distributions such as Ubuntu, Debian, Fedora/RHEL, and OpenSUSE/SLED? Were they not quite right for your needs? The major distros are not the only game in town. Find out the good, the bad, and the ugly about three of the best-known alternatives to the "big" user distros.

Ubuntu 9.04 Release Schedule

Filed under
Ubuntu

softpedia.com: The Ubuntu 9.04 (codename Jaunty Jackalope) development will start in 4 days, on November 6th, and will conclude next year on April 23rd, with the final release.

Free Imaging software - CloneZilla & PartImage - Tutorial

Filed under
Software
HowTos

dedoimedo.com: This article introduces a pair of excellent, free imaging software solutions that you can use to backup your complete systems.

Gaming and Linux software RAID – Your path to pwnage

Filed under
Software

headshotgamer.com: Hard drives are often forgotten as there isn't a huge amount you can do, apart from buy a Western Digital VelociRaptor. There is one more option though, using two (or more) inexpensive drives and RAID them together to increase the speed dramatically. This way you can get to high speed nirvana without destroying your budget.

Slow startup? Bootchart reveals all

Filed under
Software

linux.com: Ever wondered what takes your Linux box so long to boot up? You can see for certain with the Bootchart package. Bootchart logs the entire startup process and produces a clean, graphical representation of its results suitable for everything from troubleshooting to good old-fashioned bragging rights.

The Linux learning curve is flatter than ever

Filed under
Linux

it.toolbox.com/blogs: One of the biggest so called barriers to adopting Linux is what is called the learning curve. Many people describe the learning curve for Linux to be a steep one. It used to be but not any more.

odds & ends & stuff

Filed under
News
  • Linux *is* granny-compatible, since long

  • Upgraded to Ubuntu 8.10, thumbs up
  • Three years of Ubuntu
  • German Foreign Ministry starts open source blitzkreig
  • Software Respositories in openSUSE explained
  • Linux 2.6.28-rc3
  • Open Source Software
  • A few quick tips for apt
  • The path of least resistance
  • Get Cable, Dish and Local TV Listings Using Bash

Top 40 Firefox plugins, extensions and add-ons

Filed under
Moz/FF

tech.blorge.com: Firefox is a very useful and feature-rich browser, we all know that. But aside from being a robust Web browser, Firefox is appealing to more sophisticated users because of the support that it gets from third-party applications developers.

Ubuntu 8.10

Filed under
Ubuntu

celettu.wordpress: I honestly wasn’t sure if I’d write a review… Still, I figure that if you hate Ubuntu you won’t have read any of them, and if you don’t…you can’t have enough Ubuntu!

Ubuntu Weekly Newsletter #115

Filed under
Ubuntu

The Ubuntu Weekly Newsletter, Issue #115 for the week of October 26th - September 1st, 2008 is now available. In this Issue: Ubuntu 8.10 released, Ubuntu 8.10 Server: significant new features, and Over 6 million Forums posts and counting.

few howtos:

Filed under
HowTos
  • using KVM on Mandriva 2009.0

  • Half Life & Condition Zero on openSUSE 11.0
  • NDISwrapper in Ubuntu 8.10 Intrepid Ibex
  • Find the correct number of entries in a directory
  • Detect if daemon is really running

Tips and tricks to tune up KDE 4.1

Filed under
KDE
HowTos

techradar.com: Have you been clinging to KDE 3.5 like a polar bear to the last Arctic ice shelf? If so, now's a good time to consider jumping on to the mainland. The recently released KDE 4.1 is a vast improvement over the original.

What can KOffice 2 Beta 2 offer us?

Filed under
Software

polishlinux.org: KDE4 isn’t the only application under development rush in the KDE world. KDevelop 4 and KOffice 2 are also being migrated to Qt4 and enriched with new features. This time I’m going to check what KOffice 2 Beta 2 can offer.

Do you really need to install Ubuntu 8.10?

Filed under
Ubuntu

itwire.com: Ubuntu fans rejoice, the latest release is upon us in the form of version 8.10, Intrepid Ibex. But can't you just run a software update in Hardy Heron? I'll tell you what's different down to the package level between an upgraded Hardy installation and a fresh Intrepid installation so you can evaluate for yourself.

Ultamatix

Filed under
Software

mjg59.livejournal: First, let me make one thing clear. This isn't constructive criticism. This is just criticism. It's directed at software that's so wrong-headed that there's no way to make it significantly better, and everyone involved would be much better spending their time doing something else instead of trying to fix any of what I'm about to describe.

Linux Hater's Blog dead, long live the redux

Filed under
Linux
Web

itwire.com: On October 25, 2008, the Linux Hater's Blog reached the "eof", or end of file. But if you've been hassled endlessly by Linux lovers and are sick to death of Linux this and Linux that, fear not - the Linux Hater's Redux is born.

openSUSE 11.1: Plasma Desktop Toolbox

Filed under
KDE

kdedevelopers.org: Discussions about the usefulness of the Plasma desktop toolbox arise regularly. Usually it focus on the "Zoom Out"/Activities feature which as also Plasma developers admit is not as far implemented and nicely integrated as of KDE 4.1 as everyone wants it to be.

Features of Phoronix Test Suite 1.4

Filed under
Software

phoronix.com: Phoronix Test Suite 1.4 "Orkdal" will be released tomorrow, and while this release is coming just two months after the release of Phoronix Test Suite 1.2, there are in fact quite a few changes for this Q4'08 release.

What to look for in Ubuntu 9.04

Filed under
Ubuntu

chrisjohnston.org: Ubuntu 8.10 (Intrepid Ibex) has been out for 3 days now, so I figure it’s time to look into the future at Ubuntu 9.04, the Jaunty Jackalope.

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More in Tux Machines

Trisquel 9.0 Development Plans and Trisquel 8.0 Release

  • Trisquel 9.0 development plans
    Just as we release Trisquel 8.0, the development of the next version begins! Following the naming suggestions thread I've picked Etiona, which sounds good and has the fewest search results. We currently do our development in a rented dedicated server in France, and although it is functional it has many performance and setup issues. It has 32 gigs of RAM, which may sound like plenty but stays below the sweet spot where you can create big enough ramdisks to compile large packages without having to ever write to disk during the build process, greatly improving performance. It also has only 8 cores and rather slow disks. The good news is that the FSF has generously decided to host a much larger dedicated build server for us, which will allow us to scale up operations. The new machine will have fast replicated disks, lots of RAM and two 12 core CPUs. Along with renewing the hardware, we need to revamp the software build infrastructure. Currently the development server runs a GitLab instance, Jenkins and pbuilder-based build jails. This combination was a big improvement from the custom made scripts of early releases, but it has some downsides that have been removed by sbuild. Sbuild is lighter and faster and has better crash recovery and reporting.
  • Trisquel 8.0 LTS Flidas
    Trisquel 8.0, codename "Flidas" is finally here! This release will be supported with security updates until April 2021. The first thing to acknowledge is that this arrival has been severely delayed, to the point where the next upstream release (Ubuntu 18.04 LTS) will soon be published. The good news is that the development of Trisquel 9.0 will start right away, and it should come out closer to the usual release schedule of "6 months after upstream release". But this is not to say that we shouldn't be excited about Trisquel 8.0, quite the contrary! It comes with many improvements over Trisquel 7.0, and its core components (kernel, graphics drivers, web browser and e-mail client) are fully up to date and will receive continuous upgrades during Flidas' lifetime. Trisquel 8.0 has benefited from extensive testing, as many people have been using the development versions as their main operating system for some time. On top of that, the Free Software Foundation has been using it to run the Libreplanet conference since last year, and it has been powering all of its new server infrastructure as well!

today's howtos

FOSS Events in Europe: Rust, foss-north, KubeCon + CloudnativeCon Europe 2018

  • Rust loves GNOME Hackfest: Day 1
    This is a report of the first day of the Rust loves GNOME Hackfest that we are having in Madrid at the moment. During the first day we had a round of introductions and starting outlining the state of the art.
  • Madrid GNOME+Rust Hackfest, part 1
    I'm in Madrid since Monday, at the third GNOME+Rust hackfest! The OpenShine folks are kindly letting us use their offices, on the seventh floor of a building by the Cuatro Caminos roundabout. I am very, very thankful that this time everyone seems to be working on developing gnome-class. It's a difficult project for me, and more brainpower is definitely welcome — all the indirection, type conversion, GObject obscurity, and procedural macro shenanigans definitely take a toll on oneself.
  • Five days left
    I use to joke that the last week before foss-north is the worst – everything is done, all that is left is the stress.
  • KubeCon + CloudnativeCon Europe 2018
    The Cloud Native Computing Foundation’s flagship conference will be taking place in Copenhagen from May 2-4. It will cover Kubernetes, Prometheus OpenTracing, Fluentd, Linkerd, gRPC, CoreDNS, and other key technologies in cloud native computing.

Programming: Taxonomy of Tech Debt, Python and More

  • A Taxonomy of Tech Debt
    Hi there. I’m Bill “LtRandolph” Clark, and I’m the engineering manager for the Champions team on LoL. I’ve worked on several different teams on League over the past years, but one focus has been consistent: I’m obsessed with tech debt. I want to find it, I want to understand it, and where possible, I want to fix it. When engineers talk about any existing piece of technology - for example League of Legends patch 8.4 - we often talk about tech debt. I define tech debt as code or data that future developers will pay a cost for. Countless blog posts, articles, and definitions have been written about this scourge of software development. This post will focus on types of tech debt I’ve seen during my time working at Riot, and a model for discussing it that we’re starting to use internally. If you only take away one lesson from this article, I hope you remember the “contagion” metric discussed below.
  • 6 Python datetime libraries
    Once upon a time, one of us (Lacey) had spent more than an hour staring at the table in the Python docs that describes date and time formatting strings. I was having a hard time understanding one specific piece of the puzzle as I was trying to write the code to translate a datetime string from an API into a Python datetime object, so I asked for help.
  • Getting started with Anaconda Python for data science
  • How to install the Moodle learning management system
  • Anatomy of a JavaScript Error
  • Is DevOps compatible with part-time community teams?