Language Selection

English French German Italian Portuguese Spanish

About Tux Machines

Sunday, 22 Jan 17 - Tux Machines is a community-driven public service/news site which has been around for over a decade and primarily focuses on GNU/LinuxSubscribe now Syndicate content

Search This Site

Quick Roundup

Type Titlesort icon Author Replies Last Post
Story 3 open source genealogy tools for mapping your family tree Roy Schestowitz 17/12/2015 - 1:15pm
Story 3 open source personal finance tools for Linux Roy Schestowitz 07/01/2016 - 10:45am
Story 3 tools that make scanning on the Linux desktop quick and easy Roy Schestowitz 23/09/2014 - 8:05pm
Story 4 open source alternatives to Dreamweaver Roy Schestowitz 24/03/2016 - 10:40am
Story 4 open source tools I used to write a Linux book Roy Schestowitz 06/07/2016 - 8:10am
Story 4 steps to creating a thriving open source project Roy Schestowitz 26/05/2015 - 3:48pm
Story 4 tips for how to migrate to Drupal Roy Schestowitz 20/02/2015 - 12:49pm
Story 4 versatile boards for fast, inexpensive IoT development Roy Schestowitz 10/10/2016 - 8:44am
Story 5 open access journals for open source enthusiasts Roy Schestowitz 21/10/2014 - 8:04am
Story 5 open source projects to join in 2015 Roy Schestowitz 05/01/2015 - 6:23pm

4.9 is a longterm kernel

Filed under
Linux

Might as well just mark it as such now, to head off the constant
questions. Yes, 4.9 is the next longterm supported kernel version.

Read more

Also: Yes, Linux 4.9 Is A Long-Term Kernel Release

openSUSE Package Management Cheat Sheet

Filed under
SUSE

Debian/Ubuntu have long been my primary Linux distributions, although like all good Linux users I have used Fedora, CentOS, Gentoo, Red Hat, Slackware, Arch Linux, Mageia, and other Linux distributions because why not? It is a feast of riches and the best playground there is.

I became a SUSE employee recently, so naturally I've been spending more time with openSUSE. openSUSE is sponsored by SUSE, and it is an independent community project. There are two openSUSE flavors: Tumbleweed and Leap. Tumbleweed is a bleeding-edge rolling release, containing the latest software versions. Leap is more conservative, and it incorporates core code from SUSE Linux Enterprise Server (SLES) 12. Both are plenty good for everyday use.

Read more

Mozilla News

Filed under
Moz/FF
  • How to get started contributing to Mozilla

    Open source participation offers a sea of benefits that can fine-tune and speed up your career in the tech, including but not limited to real-world technical experience and expanding your professional network. There are a lot of open source projects out there you can contribute to—of small, medium, and large size, as well as unknown and popular. In this article we'll focus on how to contribute to one of the largest and most popular open source projects on the web: Mozilla.

  • Digital Citizens, Let’s Talk About Internet Health

    Today, Mozilla is launching the prototype version of the Internet Health Report. With this open-source research project, we want to start a conversation with you, citizens of the Internet, about what is healthy, unhealthy, and what lies ahead for the Internet.

    When I first fell in love with the Internet in the mid-1990s, it was very much a commons that belonged to everyone: a place where anyone online could publish or make anything. They could do so without asking permission from a publisher, a banker or a government. It was a revelation. And it made me — and countless millions of others — very happy.

    Since then, the Internet has only grown as a platform for our collective creativity, invention and self expression. There will be five billion of us on the Internet by 2020. And vast swaths of it will remain as open and decentralized as they were in the early days. At least, that’s my hope.

    Yet when Facebook’s Mark Zuckerberg shows up on the cover of The Economist depicted as a Roman emperor, I wonder: is the Internet being divided up into a few great empires monopolizing everyday activities like search, talking to friends or shopping? Can it remain truly open and decentralized?

  • Mozilla ditches the dinosaur, unveils new branding only a nerd could love

    The old Netscape browser had a dinosaur named Mozilla as its mascot and codename. When the browser was open sourced in 1998, it used the dinosaur's name and visage as its branding.

  • Mozilla releases The Internet Health Report, an open-source document with version 1.0 coming by year end

GNU/Linux Desktop

Filed under
GNU
Linux
  • Are You Ready For Linux?

    Linux on the Desktop is well past the stage of being a plaything for computer hobbyists but it still isn’t at the stage where it could be considered completely mainstream. There’s still some way to go but Linux is fast gaining ground at an accelerating pace and lots of folks are looking at it as a serious alternative to Windows and Mac. People tend to bring some misconceptions about hardware and software to the table when they seek advice and support as they contemplate making the switch. In this article, I will address a few of the most common complaints I get from folks who come to me for help getting started with Linux. I try to be up-front and honest about what Linux can and can’t do for them but I also am quick to point out that the surest way to have a bad experience with Linux is to approach it too quickly.

  • Home Recording with Ubuntu Studio Part One: Gearing Up

    Twenty years ago, the cost of building a studio for the creation of electronic music was pricey, to say the least. The cost of a computer that was suitable for multimedia production could cost the average musician between $1,000 and $2,000. Add in the cost of recording software, additional instruments and equipment, and one could easily spend between $5,000 and $10,000 just to get started.

    But nowadays, you do not have to break the bank to start making music at home. The price of personal computers has dropped substantially over the past two decades. At the time of this writing, it is possible to get a notebook PC that’s suitable for audio production for around $500. Other pieces of equipment have also dropped in price, making it possible to build a functional recording studio for around $1,000.

    [...]

    In this article, we discussed the feasibility of creating an entry level home recording studio for under $1,000. In the next article of this series, we will start to look at the software needed to turn our collection of hardware into a fully operational recording studio. We will install Ubuntu Studio, a Linux-based operating system that is made for audio recording, and extend its functionality with the software repositories from KXstudio. Looking forward to seeing you.

  • Lunduke Hour: Jan-17-2017, Dell Linux Hardware w/Barton George

KDE Leftovers

Filed under
KDE
  • Get Yourself on www.kde.org
  • Which OpenGL implementation is my Qt Quick app using today?

    Qt Quick-based user interfaces have traditionally been requiring OpenGL, quite unsurprisingly, since the foundation of it all, the Qt Quick 2 scenegraph, is designed exclusively with OpenGL ES 2.0 (the top of the line for mobile/embedded at the time) in mind. As you may have heard, the graphics API story is a bit more inclusive in recent Qt versions, however the default OpenGL-based rendering path is, and is going to be, the number one choice for many applications and devices in the future. This raises the interesting question of OpenGL implementations.

  • Should you still be using QGraphicsView?

    There was a time when the Qt Graphics View Framework was seen as the solution to create modern user interfaces with Qt. Now that Qt Quick 2 has matured does the Graphics View Framework still have a place in Qt?

  • Google Code In ( Gcompris ) 2106-2017

    This year's Google Code In was awesome as before . There were instances of tasks successfully completed by the students . Out of 12 unique tasks 11 tasks were successfully attempted . The students were enthusiastic till the very end of the program. Most of the students solved multiple tasks that provided us with varied ideas .

Red Hat News

Filed under
Red Hat

Raspberry Pi: A closer look at Raspbian PIXEL

Filed under
Linux

Over the past three posts, I have looked at a number of different Linux distributions for various models of the Raspberry Pi - including SUSE/openSUSE, Fedora, Manjaro and Ubuntu MATE, and PiCore Linux. What I haven't done yet is look at the latest version of the Raspberry Pi Foundation's own Linux distribution, Raspbian with their PIXEL desktop. So I will look at that first, and then I will wrap this series up.

I know that I just recently wrote about Raspbian PIXEL, but that was a sort of "what's new" overview, and in this post I want to go much deeper, and in a lot more detail, to provide some comparison to the other Linux distributions that I have been testing. So please bear with me...

Read more

Linux Kernel News

Filed under
Linux
  • Linux: Why do people hate systemd?

    systemd has caused an almost unending amount of controversy in the Linux community. Some Linux users have been unyielding in their opposition to systemd, while others have been much more accepting.

    The topic of systemd came up in a recent thread in the Linux subreddit and the folks there did not pull any punches when sharing their thoughts about it.

  • PulseAudio 10.0 Linux Sound System Released, Offers OpenSSL 1.1.0 Compatibility

    Today, January 19, 2017, sees the official release of the PulseAudio 10.0 open-source sound server for Linux-based operating systems, a major version that introduces many exciting new features.

    PulseAudio 10.0 has been in development for the past seven months, since the June 22, 2016, release of PulseAudio 9.0, which is currently used by default in numerous GNU/Linux distributions.

  • Linux is part of the IoT security problem, dev tells Linux conference

    The Mirai botnet? Just the “tip of the iceberg” is how security bods at this week's linux.conf.au see the Internet of Things.

    Presenting to the Security and Privacy miniconf at linux.conf.au, embedded systems developer and consultant Christopher Biggs pointed out that Mirai's focus on building a big DDoS cannon drew attention away from the other risks posed by insecure cameras and digital video recorders.

  • The Linux Foundation Brings 3 New Open Source Events to China

    LinuxCon, ContainerCon, and CloudOpen will be held in China this year for the first time, The Linux Foundation announced this week.

    After the success of other Linux Foundation events in the country, including MesosCon Asia and Cloud Foundry Summit Asia, The Linux Foundation decided to offer its flagship LinuxCon, ContainerCon and CloudOpen events in China as well, said Linux Foundation Executive Director Jim Zemlin.

    “Chinese developers and businesses have strongly embraced open source and are contributing significant amounts of code to a wide variety of projects,” Zemlin said. “We have heard the call to bring more open source events to China.”

Dell Has Sold ‘Tens of Millions’ Dollars’ Worth of Linux Laptops

Filed under
GNU
Linux

So popular Linux personality Bryan Lunduke, who recently took an hour out to talk to Dell’s Senior Architect in the office of CTO — try saying that with a mouthful of doughnut — Barton George.

What did he learn?

Well, for one, Dell says it has ‘no plans’ to start shipping its Linux-powered developer laptops with anything other than Ubuntu.

Read more

Open-source voting is the answer to hacking concerns

Filed under
OSS

Will we ever have a voting system that is completely error-proof and impenetrable from malicious forces? Not likely. But the security breaches that are increasingly a part of daily life serve as a call to action.

Every day brings a new report of hacking or suspicious activity, and increasingly with fingers pointing to international actors. Whether it is statewide voter registration databases (Illinois and Arizona; some say more); national party organizations (the Democratic National Committee); utilities (Vermont’s Burlington Electric); or Russia’s state-run television station (RT) suddenly interrupting C-SPAN last week — the incident is still under investigation and not confirmed as a hack — it is all very unsettling and leaves us feeling vulnerable.

Read more

The Many, the Humble, the Ubuntu Users

Filed under
Ubuntu

I have never been much of a leading-edge computing person. In fact, I first got mildly famous online writing a weekly column titled “This Old PC” for Time/Life about making do with used gear — often by installing Linux on it — and after that an essentially identical column for Andover.net titled “Cheap Computing,” which was also about saving money in a world where most online computing columns seemed to be about getting you to spend until you had no money left to spend on food.

Read more

Ubuntu-Based Vinux Linux 5.1 Released for Blind and Partially Sighted People

Filed under
Ubuntu

Vinux Linux, the Ubuntu-based computer operating system designed for blind and partially sighted people, has been updated today, January 18, 2017, to version 5.1.

Based on the Ubuntu 14.04.5 LTS (Trusty Tahr) operating system and offering both the Unity 7 and GNOME Shell 3.10.4 user interfaces, along with the lightweight MATE 1.8 desktop environment, Vinux Linux 5.1 introduces an up-to-date accessibility infrastructure by using Brltty 5.4, Orca 3.22 screen reader & magnifier, and AT-SPI 2.22.

Read more

Also: Forget About OpenGL 4.2, Intel Haswell GPUs Now Support OpenGL 4.5 in Ubuntu

Tizen and Android

Filed under
Android
Linux

Security News

Filed under
Security
  • Reproducible Builds: week 90 in Stretch cycle

    The F-Droid Verification Server has been launched. It rebuilds apps from source that were built by f-droid.org and checks that the results match.

  • 6 Week Progress Update for PGP Clean Room

    One of the PGP Clean Room’s aims is to provide users with the option to easily initialize one or more smartcards with personal info and pins, and subsequently transfer keys to the smartcard(s). The advantage of using smartcards is that users don’t have to expose their keys to their laptop for daily certification, signing, encryption or authentication purposes.

  • New Kali Linux Professional Information Security Certification to debut at Black Hat USA, 2017

    First Official Kali Linux book release will coincide with launch of the new information security training program as the Penetration Testing platform celebrates its 10th anniversary.

  • The flatpak security model – part 1: The basics

    This is the first part of a series talking about the approach flatpak takes to security and sandboxing.

    First of all, a lot of people think of container technology like docker, rkt or systemd-nspawn when they think of linux sandboxing. However, flatpak is fundamentally different to these in that it is unprivileged.

  • Newly discovered Mac malware found in the wild also works well on Linux [Ed: Only if fools are stupid enough to actually INSTALL malware.]

    The malware, which a recent Mac OS update released by Apple is detecting as Fruitfly, contains code that captures screenshots and webcam images, collects information about each device connected to the same network as the infected Mac, and can then connect to those devices, according to a blog post published by anti-malware provider Malwarebytes. It was discovered only this month, despite being painfully easy to detect and despite indications that it may have been circulating since the release of the Yosemite release of OS X in October 2014. It's still unclear how machines get infected.

    [...]

    Another intriguing finding: with the exception of Mac-formatted Mach object file binary, the entire Fruitfly malware library runs just fine on Linux computers.

Solus Goes Flatpak for Better, Reliable Distribution of Third-Party Applications

Filed under
OS

In an unexpected turn of events, Ikey Doherty, the founder and lead developer of the Solus Project announced a few moments ago that he's adopting the well-known Flatpak application sandboxing and distribution framework for the Solus operating system.

Read more

Latest LibreELEC 8.0 Beta Updates Linux Kernel Support Patches for Raspberry Pi

Filed under
Linux

A new development release of the LibreELEC open-source operating system for Raspberry Pi and similar embedded devices has been unveiled recently, versioned 7.95.1 Beta. LibreELEC lets you transform a Raspberry Pi into a HTPC.

Read more

Why Linux Installers Need to Add Security Features

Filed under
Linux
Security

Twelve years ago, Linux distributions were struggling to make installation simple. Led by Ubuntu and Fedora, they long ago achieved that goal. Now, with the growing concerns over security, they need to reverse directions slightly, and make basic security options prominently available in their installers rather than options that users can add manually later.

At the best of times, of course, convincing users to come anywhere near security features is difficult. Too many users are reluctant even to add features as simple as unprivileged user accounts or passwords, apparently preferring the convenience of the moment to reducing the risk of an intrusion that will require reinstallation, or a consultation with a computer expert at eighty dollars an hour.

Read more

Linus Torvalds Announces Subsurface 4.6 Open-Source Dive Log and Planning App

Filed under
Linux
OSS

Linus Torvalds not only works on the Linux kernel, but he's also part of the development team behind the open-source dive log and dive planning application most of you out there know as Subsurface.

Read more

Syndicate content

More in Tux Machines

Linux 4.10-rc5

Things seem to be calming down a bit, and everything looks nominal. There's only been about 250 changes (not counting merges) in the last week, and the diffstat touches less than 300 files (with drivers and architecture updates being the bulk, but there's tooling, networking and filesystems in there too). Read more Also: Linus Torvalds Announces Fifth Linux 4.10 Kernel RC, Everything Looks Nominal Linux 4.10-rc5 Released, Now Codenamed "Anniversary Edition"

Fedora 26 Linux to Enable TRIM for Better Performance of Encrypted SSD Disks

According to the Fedora 26 release schedule, the upcoming operating system is approaching an important milestone, namely the proposal submission deadline for system-wide changes, which is currently set for January 31. Read more Also: Fedora 26 Planning To Enable TRIM/Discard On Encrypted Disks

New CloudLinux 7 and CloudLinux 6 Linux Kernel Security Updates Pushed Into Beta

CloudLinux's Mykola Naugolnyi is informing users of the CloudLinux 7 and CloudLinux 6 enterprise-ready operating systems to upgrade their kernel packages immediately if they are using the Beta channel. Read more

KDE Neon Installer

  • KDE Neon Has Stylish New Install Wizard
    KDE Neon has adopted distro-agnostic Linux installer ‘Calamares’ its unstable developer edition. Calamares replaces the Canonical-developed Ubiquity installer as the default graphical installer used when installing the Ubuntu-based OS on a new machine. The stylish install wizard is already in use on a number of other KDE-based Linux distributions, including Chakra Linux and Netrunner.
  • KDE neon Inaugurated with Calamares Installer
    You voted for change and today we’re bringing change. Today we give back the installer to the people. Today Calamares 3 was released. It’s been a long standing wish of KDE neon to switch to the Calamares installer. Calamares is a distro independent installer used by various projects such as Netrunner and Tanglu. It’s written in Qt and KDE Frameworks and has modules in C++ or Python.