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Saturday, 20 Jan 18 - Tux Machines is a community-driven public service/news site which has been around for over a decade and primarily focuses on GNU/LinuxSubscribe now Syndicate content

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Quick Roundup

Type Titlesort icon Author Replies Last Post
Story 3 open source genealogy tools for mapping your family tree Roy Schestowitz 17/12/2015 - 1:15pm
Story 3 open source personal finance tools for Linux Roy Schestowitz 07/01/2016 - 10:45am
Story 3 tools that make scanning on the Linux desktop quick and easy Roy Schestowitz 23/09/2014 - 8:05pm
Story 4 open source alternatives to Dreamweaver Roy Schestowitz 24/03/2016 - 10:40am
Story 4 open source tools I used to write a Linux book Roy Schestowitz 06/07/2016 - 8:10am
Story 4 steps to creating a thriving open source project Roy Schestowitz 26/05/2015 - 3:48pm
Story 4 tips for how to migrate to Drupal Roy Schestowitz 20/02/2015 - 12:49pm
Story 4 versatile boards for fast, inexpensive IoT development Roy Schestowitz 10/10/2016 - 8:44am
Story 5 open access journals for open source enthusiasts Roy Schestowitz 21/10/2014 - 8:04am
Story 5 open source projects to join in 2015 Roy Schestowitz 05/01/2015 - 6:23pm

Linux Foundation LFCS and LFCE: Alberto Bullo

Filed under
Linux
Interviews

I started using Linux few years ago out of curiosity when my old computer started to get slow and wanted to try something lighter. At the time, I had a disk of Fedora lying around from a conference and managed to get it installed and working. Since then, I started using it for everyday tasks to get more familiar with the alternative software. I really liked the fact that I could select any distro I wanted and have full control of the operating system. I also used Linux for university projects and started to better understand how to use the utilities and services. Open source projects caught my attention when I started using them on my first job as they gave me the ability to adjust the features and code to my needs but also to contribute back to the community. I then started visiting open source conferences to get more involved and became a big fan of the initiative.

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RF-enabled Raspberry Pi add-on brings Google Assistant to gizmos, speakers, and robots

Filed under
Linux

JOY-iT and Elector have launched a $42 “Talking Pi” RPi add-on that enables Google Home/AIY compatible voice activation of home automation devices linked to the Pi’s GPIO, and includes a mic board, PWM servo controls, and support for a 433MHz SRD radio.

Elektor has begun selling a $42, open source voice control add-on board that is programmable via the Google Assistant SDK. Built by Germany based JOY-iT, and marketed by Conrad Business Supplies, the RF-enabled Talking Pi enables voice control of home automation equipment such as smart lights, power sockets, and other gizmos via addressable extensions to the Raspberry Pi’s GPIO.

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How To Install Windows 10 In Virtualbox On Linux

Filed under
Linux

​You might be a developer and just want to try out your application in a Windows environment, or just want the thrill of doing something in Windows 10. Well, the solution might be as easy as using Virtualbox to install windows 10 unlike installing it on your machine, which may bring may problems to your Linux installation such as grub being overwritten.

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OSS Leftovers and Security

Filed under
OSS
Security
  • How to get all the benefits of open source software

    Open source software continues its meteoric rise, as more and more large enterprises weave open source code into various areas of their operations, increasingly shunning the big-name, proprietary software vendors.

    In fact, according to open source software development company, Sonatype, represented locally by 9TH BIT Consulting, 7,000 new open source software projects kick-off around the world every week, while 70,000 new open source components are released. Accessing this massive ‘hivemind’ of software development expertise is a highly attractive prospect for CIOs and business managers in all industries.

  • What is open source?

    What is open source software and how do vendors make their money? We answer your questions

    Open source is the foundation of modern technology. Even if you don't know what it is, chances are you've already used it at least once today. Open source technology helped build Android, Firefox, and even the Apache HTTP server, and without it, the internet as we know it would simply not exist.

    The central idea behind open source is a simple one: many hands make light work. In short, the more people you have working on something, the quicker and easier it is to do. As it applies to software development, this means opening projects up to the public to let people freely access, read and modify the source code.

  • Open Source Initiative Announces New Partnership With Adblock Plus

    Adblock Plus, the most popular Internet ad blocker today, joins The Open Source Initiative® (OSI) as corporate sponsors. Since its very first version, Adblock Plus has been an open source project that has developed into a successful business with over 100 million users worldwide. As such, the German company behind it, eyeo GmbH, has decided it is time to give back to the open source community.

    Founded in 1998, the OSI protects and promotes open source software, development and communities, championing software freedom in society through education, collaboration, and infrastructure. Adblock Plus is an open source project that aims to rid the Internet of annoying and intrusive online advertising. Its free web browser extensions (add-ons) put users in control by letting them block or filter which ads they want to see.

  • What if Open-Source Software Can Replace Dozens of Multi-Billion Dollar Companies? That is Exactly What Origin Protocol Wants to do Using Blockchain
  • Bonitasoft gets cute on AWS for low-code BPM

    There has been an undeniable popularisation of so-called ‘low-code’ programming platforms.

    This is a strain of technology designed to provide automated blocks of functionality that can be brought together by non-technical staff to perform specific compute and analysis tasks to serve their own business objectives.

  • Red Hat Certification: for developers too!

    Red Hat’s certification program provides validation of IT professionals’ skills and knowledge using our subscription products. Red Hat’s certifications carry credibility in the market because they are all earned by taking one or more hands-on, practical exams that last multiple hours. Like most programs offered by technology vendors, our most familiar certifications are those for system administrators.

  • LXD Weekly Status #30

    The main highlight for this week was the inclusion of the new proxy device in LXD, thanks to the hard work of some University of Texas students!

    The rest of the time was spent fixing a number of bugs, working on various bits of kernel work, getting the upcoming clustering work to go through our CI process and preparing for a number of planning meetings that are going on this week.

  • GitHub Alternative SourceForge Vies for Comeback with Redesigned Site

    SourceForge wants to be more than just another GitHub alternative, but an additional repository for developers to utilize to help gain users.

  • The Clock Is Ticking for Chip Flaw Fixes to Start Working

    Cures for the pervasive Meltdown and Spectre chip flaws aren’t working, and hacks may soon be incoming.

  • Intel: No Financial Meltdown

    Yves here. It is telling that the very measured Bruegel website is pretty bothered that Intel looks likely to get away with relatively little in the way of financial consequences as a result of its Spectre and Meltdown security disasters. This is a marked contrast with Volkswagen, where the company paid huge fines and executives went to jail.

    However, it was the US that went after a foreign national champion. The US-dominated tech press is still frustratingly given the Intel train wrecks paltry coverage relative to their importance.

  • CIP related work during the second half of 2017

    As you probably know by now, I have been involved in the Civil Infrastructure Project (CIP), a Linux Foundation Initiative formed in 2016, representing Codethink, a founder Member and coordinating the engineering work in two areas within the project:

Software: VirtualBox, Dillinger, FBReader, KDE Discover

Filed under
Software
  • Here’s Why Running Linux Distros In VirtualBox Is About To Get Much Better

    With the help of hypervisors like Oracle VirtualBox, one can run operating systems within another pre-installed host operating system and try out the features. When it comes to Linux, the beginners are often advised to try out user-friendly Linux distros in a virtual machine before making the brave jump.

  • Dillinger – A Cloud-Enabled HTML5 Markdown Editor

    Our post today is about another Markdown editor – one that has been termed “the last Markdown editor you will ever use“, presumably because of its full-featured Markdown support and free accessibility.

    We told you about StackEdit the last time so today, we introduce to you, Dillinger.

    Dillinger is an AngularJS powered online HTML5 Markdown editor that is mobile ready, cloud-enabled, supports live preview and offline document storage.

  • FBReader – A Lightweight & Multi-Platform Ebook Reader

    FBReader is an open source multi-platform ebook reader with a minimalist UI and support for a wide range of ebook formats including etf, mobi, ePub, plain text, and HTML, among others.

    It is lightweight and customizable with options for users to choose their preferred fonts, dictionaries, bookmarks, page-turning animations, colors, etc.

    FBReader users have automatic access to a network of book libraries from which they can download and sync both free and paid ebooks to their devices. If you are in need of a modern, lightweight, and ever-improving ebook application for your Linux, Windows, Mac, or smartphone, we recommend you try out FBReader.

  • KDE's Discover Snap Support Is Maturing Too

    While KDE Discover's Flatpak support was declared "production ready", that isn't the only app sandboxing tech they are working on: their Ubuntu Snap support is also coming together nicely.

  • A Fistful of Ports Updates

    Here’s a list of KDE-related stuff (mostly official FreeBSD ports) the KDE-FreeBSD team handled recently. You could call it “a week in the life of some packagers”, packagers who are also otherwise busy with $work-work.

  •  

Mozilla Leftovers

Filed under
Moz/FF
  • This Week in Rust

    Hello and welcome to another issue of This Week in Rust! Rust is a systems language pursuing the trifecta: safety, concurrency, and speed. This is a weekly summary of its progress and community. Want something mentioned? Tweet us at @ThisWeekInRust or send us a pull request. Want to get involved? We love contributions.

  • My trip in Cuba

    Olemis Lang is one of the founders and very active in promoting open source in Cuba. We’ve had some similar experiences in running user groups (I founded the Python french one a decade ago), and were excited about sharing our experience.

  • Mozilla Files Suit Against FCC to Protect Net Neutrality

    Today, Mozilla filed a petition in federal court in Washington, DC against the Federal Communications Commission for its recent decision to overturn the 2015 Open Internet Order.

GNU: GCC 7.3 and LibrePlanet 2018 Keynote Speakers

Filed under
GNU
  • GCC 7.3 Preparing For Release To Ship Spectre Patches

    GNU developers are preparing to quickly ship GCC 7.3 now in order to get out the Spectre patches, a.k.a. the compiler side bits for Retpoline with -mindirect-branch=thunk and friends.

    It was just this past weekend that the back-ported patches landed in GCC 7 while now GCC 7.3 is being prepared as the branch's next bug-fix point release.

  • Announcing LibrePlanet 2018 keynote speakers

    The keynote speakers for the tenth annual LibrePlanet conference will be anthropologist and author Gabriella Coleman, free software policy expert and community advocate Deb Nicholson, Electronic Frontier Foundation (EFF) senior staff technologist Seth Schoen, and FSF founder and president Richard Stallman.

    LibrePlanet is an annual conference for people who care about their digital freedoms, bringing together software developers, policy experts, activists, and computer users to learn skills, share accomplishments, and tackle challenges facing the free software movement. The theme of this year's conference is Freedom. Embedded. In a society reliant on embedded systems -- in cars, digital watches, traffic lights, and even within our bodies -- how do we defend computer user freedom, protect ourselves against corporate and government surveillance, and move toward a freer world? LibrePlanet 2018 will explore these topics in sessions for all ages and experience levels.

Open Source in 3-D Printing

Filed under
OSS
  • 17,000% Cost Reduction with Open Source 3D Printing: Michigan Tech Study Showcases Parametric 3D Printed Slot Die System

    We often cover the work of prolific Dr. Joshua Pearce, an Associate Professor of Materials Science & Engineering and Electrical & Computer Engineering at Michigan Technological University (Michigan Tech); he also runs the university’s Open Sustainability Technology (MOST) Research Group.

    Dr. Pearce, a major proponent for sustainability and open source technology, has previously taught an undergraduate engineering course on how to build open source 3D printers, and four of his former students, in an effort to promote environmental sustainability in 3D printing, launched a business to manufacture and sell recycled and biodegradable filaments.

  • Open Source 3D printing cuts cost from $4,000 to only $0.25 says new study

    Slot die coating is a means of adding a thin, uniform film of material to a substrate. It is a widely used method for the manufacturing of electronic devices – including flat screen televisions, printed electronics, lithium-ion batteries and sensors.

    Up until recently, slot die components were only machined from stainless steel, restricting development and making the process expensive. Now slot dies for in-lab experimental use can be made on a 3D printer at a fraction of the cost.

  • Dutch firm unveils world's first 3-D-printed propeller

    Three-dimensional (3-D) printing technology has caught the logistics world's attention for its potential to save on warehouse and shipping costs by producing items on demand at any location. In the past two years, for example, UPS Inc. announced plans to partner with software developer SAP SE to build a nationwide network of 3-D printers for use by its customers, and General Electric Co. spent nearly $600 million to buy a three-quarters stake in the German 3-D printing firm Concept Laser GmbH.

    Recently, transportation companies have begun turning to the same technology for another application, creating the actual hardware used in vehicles that move the freight. For instance, in late 2016, global aircraft maker Airbus S.A.S. contracted with manufacturing firm Arconic Inc. to supply 3-D printed metal parts for its commercial aircraft.

Graphics: RadeonSI NIR Backend, RADV Vulkan Driver, Direct Rendering Manager

Filed under
Graphics/Benchmarks
  • RadeonSI NIR Backend Now Supports GLSL 4.50

    The experimental RadeonSI NIR back-end is taking a final step forward for Mesa 18.0.

    Up until today when using the RadeonSI NIR code-path the GLSL (OpenGL Shading Language) version was limited to 1.50 due to not having any tessellation shader support, but now it's supported up through 4.50 -- the GLSL version matching OpenGL 4.5.

  • RADV Vulkan Driver Now Supports VK_EXT_debug_report

    With the flurry of Mesa development activity with Mesa 18.0 being branched in a few days, the RADV Radeon Vulkan driver picked up support for another extension.

    Building off groundwork laid by Intel ANV, the RADV driver now implements VK_EXT_debug_report. At the moment it doesn't output any messages but can be easily added during development for usage with RenderDoc and other Vulkan debuggers.

  • The DRM Graphics Driver Changes Coming For Linux 4.16

    With being past the cutoff of new features to be merged to DRM-Next for targeting the upcoming Linux 4.16 kernel merge window, here is a recap of the prominent changes to the Direct Rendering Manager drivers for this next kernel cycle.

Will 2018 Be the Year of the Linux Desktop

Filed under
GNU
Linux

The “Year of the Linux Desktop” is a fabled time when Linux finally rises up and becomes the dominant desktop operating system, supplanting Windows.

Now, that might sound ridiculous, but the notion has been fueled over the years by Linux’s rise to dominance in every other market. The vast majority of servers run Linux. Just about every supercomputer runs on Linux. If you have an Android phone, it’s running the Linux kernel. Even the Internet of Things and automotive computers are primarily running some variation of Linux.

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Also:

  • The city of Barcelona is dumping Windows in favor of Linux [iophk: "interjecting Microsoft disinformation about Munich"]

    The plan goes beyond just picking and choosing the best open-source alternatives to Microsoft products out there, as Barcelona will apparently be hiring developers to create bespoke software. The idea is that these projects could potentially be rolled out across other Spanish cities if they’re up to the task.

Google Ditches Goobuntu Linux For Debian-Based gLinux

Filed under
Linux
Debian

It’s not a hidden fact that Google has been using Ubuntu-based Linux distribution called Goobunu for years.

The home-baked distribution used by Google engineers is like a light skin on top of Ubuntu Linux LTS releases. The company has been a customer of Canonical as part of the Ubuntu Advantage Program, so it shouldn’t come as a surprise.

Read more

Also: Google ditches Ubuntu for Debian for internal engineering environment

Games: RUINER, Remnants of Naezith, Rise to Ruins, Super Cane Magic ZERO, Dead Island

Filed under
Gaming

Retpoline Benchmarked

Filed under
Graphics/Benchmarks
  • Benchmarking Retpoline Underflow Protection With Intel Skylake/Kabylake

    Beyond the Retpoline support already found in the mainline Linux kernel, developers are working on Retpoline Underflow support that would be used for Intel Skylake and Kabylake CPUs. RETPOLINE_UNDERFLOW protects against falling back to a potentially poisoned indirect branch predictor when a return buffer underflows and this additional protection is needed for Intel Skylake/Kabylake processors. I ran a couple benchmarks.

  • AMD Retpoline Benchmarks From FX To Threadripper & EPYC

    For those curious about the performance impact of the Retpoline patches as found in the latest Linux 4.15 kernel, here are some benchmarks on an assortment of old and new AMD Linux systems.

Security Leftovers

Filed under
Security

KDE and GNOME Development: Discover, librsvg, GNOME Photos

Filed under
KDE
GNOME
  • This week in Discover

    I guess I’m becoming a Discover developer, since it’s where I seem to spend most of my time these days. It’s just so darn fun since the lead Developer Aleix Pol is super easy to work with, there’s a lot of low-hanging fruit, and with Kirigami, it’s very simple to make consequential changes even when you’re a novice programmer and not very familiar with the codebase. That said, Aleix is still making about 99% of the code changes, and I’m mostly doing UI tweaks, bug screening, promotion, strategy, and work with apps to get their houses in order.

  • Help needed for librsvg 2.42.1

    I have prepared a list of bugs which I'd like to be fixed in the 2.42.1 milestone. Two of them are assigned to myself, as I'm already working on them.

  • GNOME Photos: Happenings

Graphics: NVIDIA and Mesa

Filed under
Graphics/Benchmarks
  • NVIDIA 340.106 Legacy Driver Released For KPTI Compatibility

    For those using the 340 series legacy driver for NVIDIA GeForce 8 and GeForce 9 series GPU support, the 340.106 driver has been released.

  • Mesa 18.0.0 release plan

    As you've know the Mesa 18.0.0 release plan has been available for a while on the mesa3d.org website [1].

  • Mesa 18.0 Will Enter Its Feature Freeze Soon

    The Mesa 18.0 feature freeze and release candidate will be issued in the days ahead.

    Emil Velikov quietly updated the Mesa3D release schedule a while back though now he's announced it to the mailing list. The original plan was to do the branching / feature freeze and RC1 on 19 January, but given the short notice, that might be kicked out until next week.

AT&T in Open Network Automation Platform (ONAP)

Filed under
OSS
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More in Tux Machines

Security: OpenSSL, IoT, and LWN Coverage of 'Intelpocalypse'

  • Another Face to Face: Email Changes and Crypto Policy
    The OpenSSL OMC met last month for a two-day face-to-face meeting in London, and like previous F2F meetings, most of the team was present and we addressed a great many issues. This blog posts talks about some of them, and most of the others will get their own blog posts, or notices, later. Red Hat graciously hosted us for the two days, and both Red Hat and Cryptsoft covered the costs of their employees who attended. One of the overall threads of the meeting was about increasing the transparency of the project. By default, everything should be done in public. We decided to try some major changes to email and such.
  • Some Basic Rules for Securing Your IoT Stuff

    Throughout 2016 and 2017, attacks from massive botnets made up entirely of hacked [sic] IoT devices had many experts warning of a dire outlook for Internet security. But the future of IoT doesn’t have to be so bleak. Here’s a primer on minimizing the chances that your IoT things become a security liability for you or for the Internet at large.

  • A look at the handling of Meltdown and Spectre
    The Meltdown/Spectre debacle has, deservedly, reached the mainstream press and, likely, most of the public that has even a remote interest in computers and security. It only took a day or so from the accelerated disclosure date of January 3—it was originally scheduled for January 9—before the bugs were making big headlines. But Spectre has been known for at least six months and Meltdown for nearly as long—at least to some in the industry. Others that were affected were completely blindsided by the announcements and have joined the scramble to mitigate these hardware bugs before they bite users. Whatever else can be said about Meltdown and Spectre, the handling (or, in truth, mishandling) of this whole incident has been a horrific failure. For those just tuning in, Meltdown and Spectre are two types of hardware bugs that affect most modern CPUs. They allow attackers to cause the CPU to do speculative execution of code, while timing memory accesses to deduce what has or has not been cached, to disclose the contents of memory. These disclosures can span various security boundaries such as between user space and the kernel or between guest operating systems running in virtual machines. For more information, see the LWN article on the flaws and the blog post by Raspberry Pi founder Eben Upton that well describes modern CPU architectures and speculative execution to explain why the Raspberry Pi is not affected.
  • Addressing Meltdown and Spectre in the kernel
    When the Meltdown and Spectre vulnerabilities were disclosed on January 3, attention quickly turned to mitigations. There was already a clear defense against Meltdown in the form of kernel page-table isolation (KPTI), but the defenses against the two Spectre variants had not been developed in public and still do not exist in the mainline kernel. Initial versions of proposed defenses have now been disclosed. The resulting picture shows what has been done to fend off Spectre-based attacks in the near future, but the situation remains chaotic, to put it lightly. First, a couple of notes with regard to Meltdown. KPTI has been merged for the 4.15 release, followed by a steady trickle of fixes that is undoubtedly not yet finished. The X86_BUG_CPU_INSECURE processor bit is being renamed to X86_BUG_CPU_MELTDOWN now that the details are public; there will be bug flags for the other two variants added in the near future. 4.9.75 and 4.4.110 have been released with their own KPTI variants. The older kernels do not have mainline KPTI, though; instead, they have a backport of the older KAISER patches that more closely matches what distributors shipped. Those backports have not fully stabilized yet either. KPTI patches for ARM are circulating, but have not yet been merged.
  • Is it time for open processors?
    The disclosure of the Meltdown and Spectre vulnerabilities has brought a new level of attention to the security bugs that can lurk at the hardware level. Massive amounts of work have gone into improving the (still poor) security of our software, but all of that is in vain if the hardware gives away the game. The CPUs that we run in our systems are highly proprietary and have been shown to contain unpleasant surprises (the Intel management engine, for example). It is thus natural to wonder whether it is time to make a move to open-source hardware, much like we have done with our software. Such a move may well be possible, and it would certainly offer some benefits, but it would be no panacea. Given the complexity of modern CPUs and the fierceness of the market in which they are sold, it might be surprising to think that they could be developed in an open manner. But there are serious initiatives working in this area; the idea of an open CPU design is not pure fantasy. A quick look around turns up several efforts; the following list is necessarily incomplete.
  • Notes from the Intelpocalypse
    Rumors of an undisclosed CPU security issue have been circulating since before LWN first covered the kernel page-table isolation patch set in November 2017. Now, finally, the information is out — and the problem is even worse than had been expected. Read on for a summary of these issues and what has to be done to respond to them in the kernel. All three disclosed vulnerabilities take advantage of the CPU's speculative execution mechanism. In a simple view, a CPU is a deterministic machine executing a set of instructions in sequence in a predictable manner. Real-world CPUs are more complex, and that complexity has opened the door to some unpleasant attacks. A CPU is typically working on the execution of multiple instructions at once, for performance reasons. Executing instructions in parallel allows the processor to keep more of its subunits busy at once, which speeds things up. But parallel execution is also driven by the slowness of access to main memory. A cache miss requiring a fetch from RAM can stall the execution of an instruction for hundreds of processor cycles, with a clear impact on performance. To minimize the amount of time it spends waiting for data, the CPU will, to the extent it can, execute instructions after the stalled one, essentially reordering the code in the program. That reordering is often invisible, but it occasionally leads to the sort of fun that caused Documentation/memory-barriers.txt to be written.

US Sanctions Against Chinese Android Phones, LWN Report on Eelo

  • A new bill would ban the US government from using Huawei and ZTE phones
    US lawmakers have long worried about the security risks posed the alleged ties between Chinese companies Huawei and ZTE and the country’s government. To that end, Texas Representative Mike Conaway introduced a bill last week called Defending U.S. Government Communications Act, which aims to ban US government agencies from using phones and equipment from the companies. Conaway’s bill would prohibit the US government from purchasing and using “telecommunications equipment and/or services,” from Huawei and ZTE. In a statement on his site, he says that technology coming from the country poses a threat to national security, and that use of this equipment “would be inviting Chinese surveillance into all aspects of our lives,” and cites US Intelligence and counterintelligence officials who say that Huawei has shared information with state leaders, and that the its business in the US is growing, representing a further security risk.
  • U.S. lawmakers urge AT&T to cut commercial ties with Huawei - sources
    U.S. lawmakers are urging AT&T Inc, the No. 2 wireless carrier, to cut commercial ties to Chinese phone maker Huawei Technologies Co Ltd and oppose plans by telecom operator China Mobile Ltd to enter the U.S. market because of national security concerns, two congressional aides said. The warning comes after the administration of U.S. President Donald Trump took a harder line on policies initiated by his predecessor Barack Obama on issues ranging from Beijing’s role in restraining North Korea to Chinese efforts to acquire U.S. strategic industries. Earlier this month, AT&T was forced to scrap a plan to offer its customers Huawei [HWT.UL] handsets after some members of Congress lobbied against the idea with federal regulators, sources told Reuters.
  • Eelo seeks to make a privacy-focused phone
    A focus on privacy is a key feature being touted by a number of different projects these days—from KDE to Tails to Nextcloud. One of the biggest privacy leaks for most people is their phone, so it is no surprise that there are projects looking to address that as well. A new entrant in that category is eelo, which is a non-profit project aimed at producing not only a phone, but also a suite of web services. All of that could potentially replace the Google or Apple mothership, which tend to collect as much personal data as possible.

today's howtos

Mozilla: Resource Hogs, Privacy Month, Firefox Census, These Weeks in Firefox

  • Firefox Quantum Eats RAM Like Chrome
    For a long time, Mozilla’s Firefox has been my web browser of choice. I have always preferred it to using Google’s Chrome, because of its simplicity and reasonable system resource (especially RAM) usage. On many Linux distributions such as Ubuntu, Linux Mint and many others, Firefox even comes installed by default. Recently, Mozilla released a new, powerful and faster version of Firefox called Quantum. And according to the developers, it’s new with a “powerful engine that’s built for rapid-fire performance, better, faster page loading that uses less computer memory.”
  • Mozilla Communities Speaker Series #PrivacyMonth
    As a part of the Privacy Month initiative, Mozilla volunteers are hosting a couple of speaker series webinars on Privacy, Security and related topics. The webinars will see renowned speakers talking to us about their work around privacy, how to take control of your digital self, some privacy-security tips and much more.
  • “Ewoks or Porgs?” and Other Important Questions
    You ever go to a party where you decide to ask people REAL questions about themselves, rather than just boring chit chat? Us, too! That’s why we’ve included questions that really hone in on the important stuff in our 2nd Annual Firefox Census.
  • These Weeks in Firefox: Issue 30