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Monday, 23 Oct 17 - Tux Machines is a community-driven public service/news site which has been around for over a decade and primarily focuses on GNU/LinuxSubscribe now Syndicate content

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Quick Roundup

Type Titlesort icon Author Replies Last Post
Story 3 open source genealogy tools for mapping your family tree Roy Schestowitz 17/12/2015 - 1:15pm
Story 3 open source personal finance tools for Linux Roy Schestowitz 07/01/2016 - 10:45am
Story 3 tools that make scanning on the Linux desktop quick and easy Roy Schestowitz 23/09/2014 - 8:05pm
Story 4 open source alternatives to Dreamweaver Roy Schestowitz 24/03/2016 - 10:40am
Story 4 open source tools I used to write a Linux book Roy Schestowitz 06/07/2016 - 8:10am
Story 4 steps to creating a thriving open source project Roy Schestowitz 26/05/2015 - 3:48pm
Story 4 tips for how to migrate to Drupal Roy Schestowitz 20/02/2015 - 12:49pm
Story 4 versatile boards for fast, inexpensive IoT development Roy Schestowitz 10/10/2016 - 8:44am
Story 5 open access journals for open source enthusiasts Roy Schestowitz 21/10/2014 - 8:04am
Story 5 open source projects to join in 2015 Roy Schestowitz 05/01/2015 - 6:23pm

Fedora: Fedora Workstation and Fedora Council

Filed under
Red Hat
  • Looking back at Fedora Workstation so far

    So I have over the last few years blogged regularly about upcoming features in Fedora Workstation. Well I thought as we putting the finishing touches on Fedora Workstation 27 I should try to look back at everything we have achieved since Fedora Workstation was launched with Fedora 21. The efforts I highlight here are efforts where we have done significant or most development. There are of course a lot of other big changes that has happened over the last few years by the wider community that we leveraged and offer in Fedora Workstation, examples here include things like Meson and Rust. This post is not about those, but that said I do want to write a post just talking about the achievements of the wider community at some point, because they are very important and crucial too. And along the same line this post will not be speaking about the large number of improvements and bugfixes that we contributed to a long list of projects, like to GNOME itself. This blog is about taking stock and taking some pride in what we achieved so far and major hurdles we past on our way to improving the Linux desktop experience.

  • Resigning from Fedora Council for Fedora 27

    Since I became a Fedora contributor in August 2015, I’ve spent a lot of time in the community. One of the great things about a big community like Fedora is that there are several different things to try out. I’ve always tried to do the most help in Fedora with my contributions. I prefer to make long-term, in-depth contributions than short-term, “quick fix”-style work. However, like many others, Fedora is a project I contribute to in my free time. Over the last month, I’ve come to a difficult realization.

KDE Events: Akademy 2017 and KDE Edu Sprint

Filed under
KDE
  • Hey Mycroft, Drive Me to our Goals!

    Almost three months after Akademy 2017, I finally found the time to write a blog post about how I experienced it.

    Akademy is where I learn again about all the amazing things happening in our community, where I connect the dots and see the big picture of where all the effort in the various projects together can lead. And of course, I meet all the wonderful people, all the individual reasons why being in KDE is so amazing. This year was no different.

    Some people voiced their concern during the event that those who are not at Akademy and see only pictures of it on social media might get the feeling that it is mostly about hanging out on the beach and drinking beer, instead of actually being productive. Everyone who was ever at Akademy of course knows this impression couldn’t be further from the truth, but I’ll still take it as a reason to not talk about any of the things that were “just” fun, and focus instead on those that were both fun and productive.

  •  

  • KDE Edu sprint 2017 in Berlin

    I had the privilege to attend the KDE Edu sprint in Berlin that happened from the 6th to the 9th of October.

Software: Narabu, ucaresystem, Telegram Messenger

Filed under
Software
  • Introducing Narabu, part 2: Meet the GPU

    Narabu is a new intraframe video codec. You may or may not want to read part 1 first.

    The GPU, despite being extremely more flexible than it was fifteen years ago, is still a very different beast from your CPU, and not all problems map well to it performance-wise. Thus, before designing a codec, it's useful to know what our platform looks like.

  • ucaresystem Core v4.0 : Added option to upgrade Ubuntu to the next release

    Since Ubuntu 17.10 has just been released, I have added new feature to the ucaresystem Core that can be used by the user to upgrade his distribution to the next stable version or optionally to the next development version of Ubuntu.

    For those who are not familiar with the ucaresystem app it is an automation script that automatically and without asking for your intervention performs some crucial Ubuntu maintenance processes, which otherwise would be done one by one and pressing Y / N each time.

  • 10 Reasons Why I Switched To Telegram Messenger

    Whatsapp may be the best player in the game when it comes to instant messaging apps, but Telegram Messenger is the entire game itself.

    Because Telegram is not just an app, it is an entire communication platform. It is not bound by restrictions or limitations like other apps.

Graphics and Games: RandR and AMDGPU, Opus Magnum

Filed under
Graphics/Benchmarks
Gaming
  • "NonDesktop" Proposed For RandR: Useful For VR & Apple Touch Bar Like Devices

    Besides Keith Packard working on the concept of resource leasing for the X.Org Server and resource leasing support for RandR, he's also now proposing a "NonDesktop" property for the Resize and Rotate protocol.

    The resource leasing has already been worked out as a candidate for the next update, RandR 1.6, while now this veteran X11 developer is proposing a new "NonDesktop" property for identifying outputs that are not conventional displays.

  • More AMDGPU Changes Queue For Linux 4.15

    Adding to the excitement of Linux 4.15, AMD has queued some more changes that were sent in today for DRM-Next.

    Already for Linux 4.15, the AMDGPU Direct Rendering Manager driver should have the long-awaited "DC" display stack that brings Vega/Raven display support, HDMI/DP audio, atomic mode-setting and more. Other pull requests have also brought in a new ioctl, UVD video encode ring support on Polaris, transparent huge-pages DMA support, PowerPlay clean-ups, and many fixes, among other low-level improvements.

  • Opus Magnum, the latest puzzle game from Zachtronics, is released into Early Access

    The developers behind the challenging puzzle games TIS-100 and SHENZEN I/O are at it again and have released their latest title into Steam’s Early Access today.

  • Open your wallets, there's some great Linux games on sale right now

    It's time to throw your wallet at your screen, as we're going to take a look at some awesome Linux games on sale.

System 76 and Purism Laptops

Filed under
GNU
Linux
  • POP!_OS is a developer-focused minimalist Linux distro from System 76

    There aren’t that many Linux hardware manufacturers around. Of the few that exist, System 76 is amongst the most well-known. It offers a slew of laptops and desktops, all shipping with the popular Ubuntu distro pre-installed, saving customers hours of wasted time dealing with driver hell.

    But it recently announced it’s changing gears and creating its own Linux distro, which will replace Ubuntu on its systems, called POP!_OS.

  • Purism’s Linux laptops now ship with Intel Management Engine disabled

    Most computers that ship with recent Intel processors include something called Intel Management Engine, which enables hardware-based security, power management, and remote configuration features that are not tied to the operating system running on your PC.

    For free software proponents, this has been a pain in the behind, because it’s a closed-source, proprietary feature designed to provide remote access to a computer even when it’s turned off. While it’s designed to provide security, it also poses a potential security and privacy threat, since it’s a proprietary system that can only be patched by Intel

  • Purism Now Shipping Their Laptops With Intel ME Disabled

    Purism has announced today all laptops to be shipping from their company will now have the Intel Management Engine (ME) disabled.

    Thanks to work done by security researches in recent years for finding ways to disable ME, especially in light of recent security vulnerabilities, Purism's Coreboot-equipped laptops are now shipping with ME disabled out-of-the-box. Those already with a Librem laptop are able to apply a firmware update to also disable it.

Ubuntu Leftovers: GNOME, Birthday and More

Filed under
Ubuntu

Flint OS, an operating system for a cloud-first world

Filed under
OS

Given the power of today's browser platform technology and web frontend performance, it's not surprising that most things we want to do with the internet can be accomplished through a single browser window. We are stepping into an era where installable apps will become history, where all our applications and services will live in the cloud.

The problem is that most operating systems weren't designed for an internet-first world. Flint OS (soon to be renamed FydeOS) is a secure, fast, and productive operating system that was built to fill that gap. It's based on the open source Chromium OS project that also powers Google Chromebooks. Chromium OS is based on the Linux kernel and uses Google's Chromium browser as its principal user interface, therefore it primarily supports web applications.

Read more

Ubuntu MATE 17.10 Welcomes Unity Fans with New Mutiny Layout, Ships with Snaps

Filed under
Ubuntu

Ubuntu MATE 17.10 was released today as part of today's Ubuntu 17.10 (Artful Aardvark) operating system, bringing six month's worth of improvements and new features for fans of the MATE desktop environment.

Read more

MongoDB's successful IPO reflects its differences with traditional open source

Filed under
OSS

MongoDB had a good first day of trading with share prices popping roughly 25% over their opening. As the latest big data platform company to IPO, Mongo's fortunes are being compared and equated to Cloudera and Hortonworks.

As upstarts, each is in a race to grow business while whittling down the red ink. Cloudera and Hortonworks are a bit further along this path as their operating losses have begun trending downward - but that happened only after those companies went public.

Read more

today's leftovers

Filed under
Misc

Devices: Beelink S1 Mini PC, Aaeon’s SBC, Kobo and LEDE

Filed under
GNU
Linux
Hardware
  • Beelink S1 Mini PC and Linux – Comedy Gold

    The Beelink S1 is a small, silent mini PC released in August 2017 retailing for around 300 dollars (250 euros). It’s produced by Shenzhen AZW Technology Co Ltd, a Chinese company that focuses on Android smart TV boxes, Intel mini PCs, and home cloud TV boxes.

    The S1 ships with an activated copy of Windows 10. But what makes this mini PC interesting? For starters, it purports to run Ubuntu. Combined with a quad core Celeron CPU, dual monitor support (HDMI and VGA), 4K video, expansion options, together with a raft of other features, the machine looks a mouthwatering prospect compared to many other mini PCs.

  • Kaby Lake Pico-ITX SBC features dual M.2 slots

    Aaeon’s “PICO-KBU1” SBC is built on Intel 7th Gen U-series CPUs with up to 16GB DDR4, dual GbE ports, and M.2 B-key and E-Key expansion.

    The PICO-KBU1 SBC is equipped with Intel’s dual-core, 15W TDP 7th Gen U-series CPUs from the latest Kaby Lake generation. Other 100 x 72mm Pico-ITX boards that run Kaby Lake U-Series processors include Axiomtek’s PICO512. As usual with Aaeon, no OS support is listed.

  • Kobo firmware 4.6.9995 mega update (KSM, nickel patch, ssh, fonts)

    It has been ages that I haven’t updated the MegaUpdate package for Kobo. Now that a new and seemingly rather bug-free and quick firmware release (4.6.9995) has been released, I finally took the time to update the whole package to the latest releases of all the included items. The update includes all my favorite patches and features: Kobo Start Menu, koreader, coolreader, pbchess, ssh access, custom dictionaries, and some side-loaded fonts.

  • LEDE v17.01.4 service release

    Version 17.01.4 of the LEDE router distribution is available with a number of important fixes. "While this release includes fixes for the bugs in the WPA Protocol disclosed earlier this week, these fixes do not fix the problem on the client-side. You still need to update all your client devices. As some client devices might never receive an update, an optional AP-side workaround was introduced in hostapd to complicate these attacks, slowing them down."

Samsung Leftovers

Filed under
Linux

OSS Leftovers

Filed under
OSS
  • FOSDEM 2018 Real-Time Communications Call for Participation
  • Top Bank, Legal and Software Industry Executives to Keynote at the Open Source Strategy Forum
  • Copyleft is Dead. Long live Copyleft!

    As you may have noticed, we recently re-licensed mgmt from the AGPL (Affero General Public License) to the regular GPL. This is a post explaining the decision and which hopefully includes some insights at the intersection of technology and legal issues.

  • Crowdsourcing the way to a more flexible strategic plan

    Trust the community. Opening a feedback platform to anyone on campus seems risky, but in hindsight I'd do it again in a heartbeat. The responses we received were very constructive; in fact, I rarely received negative and unproductive remarks. When people learned about our honest efforts at improving the community, they responded with kindness and support. By giving the community a voice—by really democratizing the effort—we achieved a surprising amount of campus-wide buy-in in a short period of time.

    Transparency is best. By keeping as many of our efforts as public as possible, we demonstrated that we were truly listening to our customers and understanding the effects of the outdated technology policies and decisions that were keeping them from doing their best work. I've always been a proponent of the idea that everyone is an agent of innovation; we just needed a tool that allowed everyone to make suggestions.

    Iterate, iterate, iterate. Crowdsourcing our first-year IT initiatives helped us create the most flexible and customer-centric plan we possibly could. The pressure to move quickly and lay down a comprehensive strategic plan is very real; however, by delaying that work and focusing on the evolving set of data flowing from our community, we were actually able to better demonstrate our commitment to our customers. That helped us build critical reputational capital, which paid off when we did eventually present a long-term strategic plan—because people already knew we could achieve results. It also helped us recruit strong allies and learn who we could trust to advance more complicated initiatives.

  • Reform is a DIY, modular, portable computer (work in progress)

    Want a fully functional laptop that works out of the box? There are plenty to choose from. Want a model that you can upgrade? That’s a bit tougher to find: some modern laptops don’t even let you replace the RAM.

    Then there’s the Reform. It’s a new DIY, modular laptop that’s designed to be easy to upgrade and modify. The CAD designs will even be available if you want to 3D print your own parts rather than buying a kit.

    You can’t buy a Reform computer yet. But developer Lukas Hartmann and designer Ana Dantes have developed a prototype and are soliciting feedback on the concept.

  • New neural network teaches itself Go, spanks the pros

    While artificial intelligence software has made huge strides recently, in many cases, it has only been automating things that humans already do well. If you want an AI to identify the Higgs boson in a spray of particles, for example, you have to train it on collisions that humans have already identified as containing a Higgs. If you want it to identify pictures of cats, you have to train it on a database of photos in which the cats have already been identified.

Ubuntu Leftovers

Filed under
Ubuntu

Server: MAAS, OPNFV, 'DevOps', and Docker

Filed under
Server
  • MAAS KVM Pods

    OpenStack is the dominant solution in the IaaS space, fueled by the need for reliable, scalable and interoperable private cloud infrastructure to accommodate cloud native applications. Through OpenStack’s open APIs, tenants can easily deploy elaborate virtual (overlay) networks, integrate with a variety of storage backends, even leverage modern hypervisor-like machine containers (LXD) for bare metal performance. Although the tooling allows a full fledged OpenStack deployment on just a single machine, the intrinsic efficiencies that OpenStack’s design promises, materialize at a certain scale — typically at least 12 servers.

  • DevOps for NFV: OPNFV Infrastructure and Continuous Integration

    In this article series, we have been discussing the Understanding OPNFV book. Previously, we provided an introduction to network functions virtualization (NFV), discussed the role of OPNFV in network transformation, and looked at how OPNFV integrates and enhances upstream projects. We continue our series with in-depth insight into the OPNFV DevOps toolchain, hardware labs, continuous integration (CI) pipeline, and deployment tools (installers) from chapters 6 and 7 of the book.  

  • A Chat with Chef about the DevOps Movement and Habitat Builder

    Last week at our annual user conference, Node.js Interactive, we announced several new members to the Node.js Foundation. One of the members that joined is Chef. Chef works with more than a thousand companies around the world to deliver their vision of digital transformation.

    We sat down with the team at Chef to talk about how Node.js fits within the DevOps movement, why they joined the Node.js Foundation, and also about a new offering from the group called Habitat Builder.

  • Why Use Docker with R? A DevOps Perspective

    There have been several blog posts going around about why one would use Docker with R.
    In this post I’ll try to add a DevOps point of view and explain how containerizing
    R is used in the context of the OpenCPU system for building and deploying R servers.

  • Docker on Docker at DockerCon EU 17

    Docker Inc. the company behind the open-source Docker container technology doesn't just build docker, it also used the same technology to power its own services.

Software: Narabu, Network Monitors, Mailutils, Rubik’s Cube, VirtualBox

Filed under
Software
  • Introducing Narabu, part 1: Introduction

    Narabu is a new intraframe video codec, from the Japanese verb narabu, which means to line up or be parallel.

    Let me first state straight up that Narabu isn't where I hoped it would be at this stage; the encoder isn't fast enough, and I have to turn my attention to other projects for a while. Nevertheless, I think it is interesting as a research project in its own right, and I don't think it should stop me from trying to write up a small series. Smile

  • 3 Simple, Excellent Linux Network Monitors
  • Mailutils Version 3.3 available

    Mailutils version 3.3 is available for download. See the NEWS file, for information about changes in this version.

  • Now You Can Play Rubik’s Cube Puzzle In Terminal

    Rubik’s Cube game needs no introduction, right? It is a 3-D combination puzzle game invented by Ernő Rubik, a Hungarian sculptor and professor of architecture, in 1974. It is one of the best puzzle game invented so far to enhance the problem-solving skills of the kids and adults. If you’re one Rubik’s Cube lover, you don’t need to buy it online or from a shop. You can play it right from the Terminal. A fellow Developer has created an utility called “NRubik”. It is an N-Curses based, virtual Rubik’s Cube written in Python. If you’re a hardcore CLI user who lives on Terminal all day, NRubik will certainly make your time useful.

  • VirtualBox 5.2 Debuts Officially with Support for Exporting VMs to Oracle Cloud

    To everyone's surprise, Oracle announced today the final release of the VirtualBox 5.2 open-source and cross-platform virtualization software for all supported platforms, including GNU/Linux, macOS, Windows, and Solaris.

    VirtualBox 5.2 is a massive update bringing a revamped and more modern graphical user interface (GUI) based on recent Qt5 technologies, as well as powerful new features that will help you with all of your virtualization tasks. One of these new features is the ability to finally export and store virtual machines into the cloud.

    Oracle has made it possible to export VMs to its Oracle Cloud (OPC) public cloud service, allowing users to easily deploy virtual machines across multiple VirtualBox installations. Imagine you no longer have to export a VM to an external drive to import it on another computer, just download it from the Oracle Cloud.

Graphics: Mesa 17.2.3, Libinput 1.9 and More

Filed under
Graphics/Benchmarks
  • mesa 17.2.3

    Mesa 17.2.3 is now available.

    In this release we have:

    The Vulkan drivers ANV and RADV have multiple small fixes.

    The EGL code has improved handling of the new wl_dmabuf codepath.

    SWR no longer crashes when checking environment variables.

    Other gallium drivers have also seen updates - freedreno, nouveau and radeonsi. The gallivm module, used by llvmpipe et al. has gained little endian PPC64 fixes.

  • Mesa 17.2.3 Offers Vulkan Fixes, Gallium3D Updates

    Mesa 17.2.3 is now available as the latest bi-weekly update for this current stable driver series.

  • [ANNOUNCE] libinput 1.9.0

    libinput 1.9 is now available. As expected, not a lot of changes since the
    rc2: a few test fixes, a fix to stop excessive logging and an extra
    assert so we fail early in case of a bug.

  • Libinput 1.9 Released With Input Improvements, Requires Meson

    Peter Hutterer has today released libinput 1.9.0 as the latest version of this library used by both Wayland and X11 systems for unified input handling.

  • DRM Leasing Support To Land For Linux 4.15
  • Intel OpenGL Shader Cache Revised Once More

    The long ongoing work to implement an OpenGL/GLSL shader cache for the Intel Mesa driver has been revised once more with 32 new patches hitting the mailing list today.

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More in Tux Machines

today's leftovers

  • Linux Users Discuss DRM 1 on 1 – Unleaded Hangout
    Linux Users Discuss DRM. Today my Brandon and I discuss encrypted media extensions, digital rights management and our freedom on the Linux desktop. So join Brandon and I as we as Linux Users Discuss DRM.
  • i965 Shader Cache Revised As It Still Might Squeeze Into Mesa 17.3
    Intel's Jordan Justen has sent out his third revision to the recently renewed patches for allowing an OpenGL on-disk shader cache for the "i965" Mesa driver. Just a few days back Jordan sent out a revised Intel shader cache implementation for this code that's long been baking on the Intel side but yet to be merged for mainline Mesa while the RadeonSI shader cache and co has been present now for many months.
  • Sunday Linux Gaming Wrap-up
  • retro-gtk: The Future, Marty!
    Let's come back to retro-gtk. In the previous articles I explained how bad retro-gtk was, what I did to start improving it and more importantly what I did to prepare the terrain for further development. This article will detail the aforementioned planed improvements!
  • Ikea’s Open-Source Showrooms
    Ikea Group will also roll out a new digital platform called 'Co-Create Ikea' which mimics its IT division's open-source software development, where customers have the chance help develop and test new products.
  • Glibc Picks Up Some More FMA Performance Optimizations
    The GNU C Library, glibc, has picked up support for some additional functions as FMA-optimized versions. The newest functions now getting the fused multiply-add (FMA) support are powf(), logf(), exp2f(), and log2f(). The FMA instruction set is present since Intel Haswell and AMD Piledriver generations and like past FMA optimizations, the benefits can be quite noticeable.
  • Landmark release of Termination of Transfer tool from Creative Commons and Authors Alliance
    For more than a decade, Creative Commons has developed and stewarded legal tools that give creators the opportunity to share their work on open terms. We have focused on tools that empower sharing at the moment of publication, leaving out an important group of creators: what about those who previously signed away their rights to their works long ago, but who now want to share on open terms under a CC license or renegotiate unfavorable publishing terms?
  • The recent catastrophic Wi-Fi vulnerability was in plain sight for 13 years behind a corporate paywall
    The recent Wi-Fi “KRACK” vulnerability, which allowed anyone to get onto a secure network (and which was quickly patched by reputable vendors), had been in plain sight behind a corporate-level paywall for 13 years. This raises a number of relevant, interesting, and uncomfortable questions.

Events: openSUSE.Asia Summit 2017, GStreamer Conference 2017, FSFE Assembly During 34C3

  • openSUSE.Asia Summit 2017 in Tokyo
  • GStreamer Conference 2017 Videos
    Taking place this weekend in Prague has been the 8th annual GStreamer Conference, which is preceding next week's Linux Foundation Embedded Linux Conference Europe.
  • Call for sessions at the FSFE assembly during 34C3
    With the CCC moving from Hamburg to Leipzig, there are not only logistic changes to be done but also some organisational changes. We are still figuring out the details, but in the context of this call, one of the major changes will be the loss of free available rooms to book for self-organised sessions. Instead, assemblies that match with each other are asked to cluster around 1 of several stages and use that as a common stage for self-organized sessions together. To make the most of this situation, the FSFE will for the first time not join the Noisy Square this year but form a new neighbourhood with other freedom fighting NGOs – in particular with our friends from European Digital Rights. However, at this point of time, we do not yet have more information about the concrete or final arrangements.

Android Leftovers

GNOME 3.28 Linux Desktop Environment Development Kicks Off with First Snapshot

GNOME developer Javier Jardón is kicking off the development of the GNOME 3.28 desktop environment with the first snapshot, GNOME 3.27.1, which is now available for public testing. Read more