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Monday, 23 Apr 18 - Tux Machines is a community-driven public service/news site which has been around for over a decade and primarily focuses on GNU/LinuxSubscribe now Syndicate content

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Quick Roundup

Type Titlesort icon Author Replies Last Post
Story 3 open source genealogy tools for mapping your family tree Roy Schestowitz 17/12/2015 - 1:15pm
Story 3 open source personal finance tools for Linux Roy Schestowitz 07/01/2016 - 10:45am
Story 3 tools that make scanning on the Linux desktop quick and easy Roy Schestowitz 23/09/2014 - 8:05pm
Story 4 open source alternatives to Dreamweaver Roy Schestowitz 24/03/2016 - 10:40am
Story 4 open source tools I used to write a Linux book Roy Schestowitz 06/07/2016 - 8:10am
Story 4 steps to creating a thriving open source project Roy Schestowitz 26/05/2015 - 3:48pm
Story 4 tips for how to migrate to Drupal Roy Schestowitz 20/02/2015 - 12:49pm
Story 4 versatile boards for fast, inexpensive IoT development Roy Schestowitz 10/10/2016 - 8:44am
Story 5 open access journals for open source enthusiasts Roy Schestowitz 21/10/2014 - 8:04am
Story 5 open source projects to join in 2015 Roy Schestowitz 05/01/2015 - 6:23pm

today's howtos

Filed under
HowTos

Debian Milestones and Diversity Update

Filed under
Debian
  • 15.010958904109589041

    And yes! On April 15, I passed the 15-year-mark as a Debian Developer.

  • 10 years + 1 day

    yesterday 10 years ago I became a Debian Developer.

  • Diversity Update

    Which brings us to a panel for the upcoming Debconf in Taiwan. There is a suggestion to have a Gender Forum at the Openday. I'm still not completely sure what it should cover or what is expected for it and I guess it's still open for suggestions. There will be a plan, let's see to make it diverse and great!

    I won't promise to send the next update sooner, but I'll try to get back into it. Right now I'm also working on a (German language) submission for a non-binary YouTube project and it would be great to see that thing lift off. I'll be more verbose on that front.

Ubuntu Budgie 18.04 Beta 2, Replacement for gksu

Filed under
Ubuntu
  • The Unique Ubuntu Budgie 18.04 Beta 2

    It is the most unique among the Official Flavors in the 18.04. It's the only to bring Chromium browser, and it gives you the unique Budgie Desktop experiences. It is really a good place for everyone who wants new, distinct desktop experience with modern version of software and broad space to explore. And ultimately it is still available for 32 bit, which has been abandoned by Ubuntu original. We will wait until the planned release on April 26.

  • Welcome To The (Ubuntu) Bionic Age: Behind communitheme: interviewing Frederik

    My name is Frederik, I live in Germany and I am working as a java software developer in my daily job.

    I am using Ubuntu since 5 years and quickly started to report bugs and issues when they jumped into my face. Apart from that, I like good music, and beautiful software. I also make my own music in my free time.

  • gksu Removed From Ubuntu, Here's The Recommended Replacement

    gksu is used to allow elevating your permissions when running graphical applications, for example in case you want to run a graphical text editor as root to edit a system file, or to be able to remove or add a file to a system folder.

  •  

Devices: Aaeon, Tizen and Android

Filed under
Android
Linux

OSS Leftovers

Filed under
OSS
  • Open source crucial to Orange as it prepares for ONAP deployment

    Orange has long played a key part in the testing and adoption of ONAP, dating back to when its ECOMP predecessor was created by AT&T as a platform for managing a software-defined network. The move to open source and its development as the ONAP project has made the platform a key component of the new telco open networking movement. But why should other telcos look to ONAP as they embark on their network transformation strategies, and how does it help enable the automated network that will lead to new business opportunities?

  • Lessons from OpenStack Telemetry: Deflation

    At some point, the rules relaxed on new projects addition with the Big Tent initiative, allowing us to rename ourselves to the OpenStack Telemetry team and splitting Ceilometer into several subprojects: Aodh (alarm evaluation functionality) and Panko (events storage). Gnocchi was able to join the OpenStack Telemetry party for its first anniversary.

  • Dev-tools in 2018

    This is a bit late (how is it the middle of April already?!), but the dev-tools team has lots of exciting plans for 2018 and I want to talk about them!

    [...]

    We're creating two new teams - Rustdoc, and IDEs and editors - and going to work more closely with the Cargo team. We're also spinning up a bunch of working groups. These are more focused, less formal teams, they are dedicated to a single tool or task, rather than to strategy and decision making. Primarily they are a way to let people working on a tool work more effectively. The dev-tools team will continue to coordinate work and keep track of the big picture.

  • Nonny de la Peña & the Power of Immersive Storytelling

    This week, we’re highlighting VR’s groundbreaking potential to take audiences inside stories with a four part video series. There aren’t many examples of creators doing that more effectively and powerfully than Nonny de la Peña.

    Nonny de la Peña is a former correspondent for Newsweek, the New York Times and other major outlets. For more than a decade now, de la Peña has been focused on merging her passion for documentary filmmaking with a deep-seeded expertise in VR. She essentially invented the field of “immersive journalism” through her company, Emblematic Group.

  • Collabora Online 3.2 Brings More Powerful Features to LibreOffice in the Cloud

    Michael Meeks of the Collabora Productivity has the pleasure of informing Softpedia today on the availability of Collabora Online 3.2, the second point release of the Collabora Online 3 series that promises yet another layer of new features and improvements to the enterprise-ready, cloud-based office suite.

    Based on the LibreOffice 6.1 open-source office suite, Collabora Online 3.2 introduces support for creating and inserting charts into Writer and Impress documents, and the ability to validate data in Calc, which might come in handy for engineers who want to do a final assembly inspection on their tablets, as well as to collaborate with their colleagues to ensure all tests are passed by a complete product.

  • Oracle demands dev tear down iOS app that has 'JavaScript' in its name

    Oracle, claims developer Zhongmin Steven Guo, has demanded that Apple remove an app he created because it contains the trademarked term "JavaScript."

    The app in question, published by Guo's Tyanya Software LLC – which appears to be more a liability shield than a thriving software business – is titled "HTML5, CSS, JavaScript, HTML, Snippet Editor."

    The name, Guo explains in a Hacker News comment, was chosen in an effort to "game the App Store ranking by adding all the keywords to the app name."

  • FoundationDB is Open Source

    Starting today, FoundationDB starts its next chapter as an open source project!

    FoundationDB is a distributed datastore, designed from the ground up to be deployed on clusters of commodity hardware. These clusters scale well as you add machines, automatically heal from hardware failures, and have a simple API. The key-value store supports fully global, cross-row ACID transactions. That's the highest level of data consistency possible. What does this mean for you? Strong consistency makes your application code simpler, your data models more efficient, and your failure modes less surprising.

    The great thing is that FoundationDB is already well-established — it's actively developed and has years of production use. We intend to drive FoundationDB forward as a community project and we welcome your participation.

  • Apple Open Sources FoundationDB, Releases Code On GitHub

    Back in 2015, Apple bought FoundationDB, a NoSQL database company. It created a distributed database of the same name designed to deal with large masses of structured data across clusters of servers. In a recent development, Apple has shared the FoundationDB core and turned it into an open source project.

  • Microsoft offers limited-time 30 percent discount on SQL Server on Linux [Ed: Microsoft is googlebombing Linux again and as I predicted it would be done only to help Microsoft sell malicious proprietary software. Mary Jo Foley is like Microsoft marketing at CBS. In this case she promotes proprietary software.
    She also says "SQL Server on Linux" (no such thing exists, it's an illusion).]
  • Friday Free Software Directory IRC meetup time: April 20th starting at 12:00 p.m. EDT/16:00 UTC

    Help improve the Free Software Directory by adding new entries and updating existing ones. Every Friday we meet on IRC in the #fsf channel on irc.freenode.org.

    Tens of thousands of people visit directory.fsf.org each month to discover free software. Each entry in the Directory contains a wealth of useful information, from basic category and descriptions, to providing detailed info about version control, IRC channels, documentation, and licensing info that has been carefully checked by FSF staff and trained volunteers.

  • Researchers deliver open-source simulator for cyber physical systems

    Cyber physical systems (CPS) are attracting more attention than ever thanks to the rapid development of the Internet of Things (IoT) and its combination with artificial intelligence (AI), machine learning and the cloud. These interacting networks of physical and computational components will provide the foundation of critical infrastructure, form the basis of ‘smart’ services, and improve the quality of life in areas ranging from energy and environment to transportation and healthcare.

    CPS technologies are already transforming the way people interact with engineered systems in the ‘real’ or ‘physical’ world, just as the internet has transformed the way people interact with information. Yet, due to their complexity, the developers of CPS face a major problem: the lack of simulation tools and models for their design and analysis.

  • Creators face an evolving challenge protecting IP

    The GNU General Public License, under which the operating system Linux and much open-source software is shared, is another example of copyleft.

    Open-source software, where programs are worked on together by loosely connected developer communities rather than traditional software houses, show one way IP can be shared without stifling innovation. Linux, the mobile operating system Android and the database system MySQL have all achieved widespread adoption, and are continually innovating despite, or perhaps because of, being open source.

  • Emerging Tech Speaker Series Talk with Rian Wanstreet

    This is an opportunity for the open source community, as alternative technologies and platforms are being developed which provide farmers the ability to farm outside of walled gardens. From open source seed initiatives, to open farm technologies, to data platform cooperatives, there is a small, but growing, collaborative movement that recognizes that farmers are at a critical moment: they can help to establish tools that advance freedom, or accept machines that foster dependencies.

  • Williamson Schools to develop open source social studies curriculum

    The open source science curriculum saved the district about $3.3 million. An open source social studies curriculum may post similar savings, with estimates at about $3.5-4 million, Gaddis said.

  • Large Open-Source Data Set Released to Help Train Algorithms Spot Malware

    For the first time, a large dataset has been released by a security firm to help AI research and training of machine learning models that statically detect malware. The data set released by cybersecurity firm Endgame is called EMBER is a collection of more than a million representations of benign and malicious Windows-portable executable files. Hyrum Anderson, Endgame's technical director of data science who worked on EMBER, says: "This dataset fills a void in the information security machine learning community: a benign/malicious dataset that is large, open and general enough to cover several interesting use cases. ... [We] hope that the dataset, code and baseline model provided by EMBER will help invigorate machine learning research for malware detection, in much the same way that benchmark datasets have advanced computer vision research."

3-D Printing and Open Hardware

Filed under
Hardware
OSS
  • Open Source Innovation Could Put a 3D Bioprinter in Your Living Room

    3D bioprinting traditionally requires high-level expertise, proprietary technology and a five-figure investment. A team of researchers from Carnegie Mellon University setout to change all that. In a paper published earlier this month in HardwareX, the group released the design of a fully functional 3D bioprinter it built by altering a widely available desktop 3D machine. The team’s innovation could be a game changer in terms of the overall accessibility of bioprinting.

  • 3D Printing the SynDaver Open-Source Healthcare Mannequin

    As desktop 3D printers become more robust, reliable, and feature-rich, we are seeing a definite shift in professional use-cases from prototyping to producing final products.

  • Unlock & Talk: Open Source Bootloader & Modem

    Since [Tom Nardi] introduced Hackaday readers to postmarketOS, the team has made progress on compiling a standard bootloader for MediaTek System-on-Chip (SoC) processors. Many Android phones use the MIT-licensed Little Kernel as the base of their bootloader and then apply custom closed-source modifications. [McBitter] has worked to eliminate this closed-source code by porting Little Kernel to the MT6735P used in the Coolpad Modena 2. By understanding the modifications MediaTek used for this particular SoC, the postmarketOS team hopes to use their modified, open-source Little Kernel bootloader with other MediaTek-based devices. While progress has been difficult and attempts at using emulators to probe bootloader memory have failed, [McBitter] was able to decode the DRAM configuration settings by searching for a leaked portion of the configuration strings. Now that he can set up the DRAM, there should be few barriers to running Little Kernel.

Mozilla's large repository of voice data will shape the future of machine learning

Filed under
Moz/FF

Mozilla's open source project, Common Voice, is well on its way to becoming the world’s largest repository of human voice data to be used for machine learning. Common Voice recently made its way into Black Duck's annual Open Source Rookies of the Year list.

What’s special about Common Voice is in the details. Every language is spoken differently—with a wide variation of speech patterns, accents, and intonations—throughout the world. A smart speech recognition engine—that has applications over many Internet of Things (IoT) devices and digital accessibility—can recognize speech samples from a diverse group of people only when it learns from a large number of samples. A speech database of recorded speech from people across geographies helps make this ambitious machine learning possible.

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Red Hat News

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Red Hat

Security Leftovers

Filed under
Security
  • Hackers once stole a casino's high-roller database through a thermometer in the lobby fish tank

    Hackers are increasingly targeting "internet of things" devices to access corporate systems, using things like CCTV cameras or air-conditioning units, according to the CEO of a cybersecurity firm.

    The internet of things refers to devices hooked up to the internet, and it has expanded to include everything from household appliances to widgets in power plants.

    Nicole Eagan, the CEO of Darktrace, told the WSJ CEO Council Conference in London on Thursday: "There's a lot of internet-of-things devices, everything from thermostats, refrigeration systems, HVAC systems, to people who bring in their Alexa devices into the offices. There's just a lot of IoT. It expands the attack surface, and most of this isn't covered by traditional defenses."

  • Certificate Transparency and HTTPS

    CT stands for “Certificate Transparency” and, in simple terms, means that all certificates for websites will need to be registered by the issuing Certificate Authority (CA) in at least two public Certificate Logs.

  • Security updates for Thursday
  • IBM introduces open-source library for protecting AI systems
  • How to combine SSH key authentication and two-factor authentication on Linux
  • openSUSE Heroes loves Let’s Encrypt™ – Expect certificate exchange

    openSUSE loves Let's Encrypt™

    Maybe some of you noticed, that our certificate *.opensuse.org on many of services will expire soon (on 2018-04-23).

    As we noticed that – as well – we decided to put a bit of work into this topic and we will use Let’s Encrypt certificates for the encrypted services of the openSUSE community.

    This is just a short notice / announcement for all of you, that we are working on this topic at the moment. We will announce, together with the deployment of the new certificate, the regarding hashes and maybe some further information on our way of implementing things.

Single-unit version of Odroid-MC1 cluster computer adds flexibility

Filed under
Android
Linux
Hardware

Hardkernel has launched a stackable single-unit Solo version of its 4-board Odroid-MC1 cluster computer. The system runs Linux on a octa-core Samsung Exynos5422 based Odroid-XU4S SBC.

Hardkernel has spun a single-unit version of its four-unit, 32-core Odroid-MC1 cluster computer for running Docker Swarm, Build Farm, and other parallel computing applications. The octa-core Odroid-MC1 Solo costs $48 instead of $220 for the original. The design offers greater flexibility, enabling users to combine Odroid-MC1 Solo units for a “single unit, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, or n stackable cluster” or combine one or more Solo units with the original 4-unit MC1 to act as a single cluster,” says Hardkernel.

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FoundationDB Source Code Shared

Filed under
OSS

​Learn to use GitHub, ​GitHub Releases Atom 1.26

Filed under
Development
  • ​Learn to use GitHub with GitHub Learning Lab

    The most popular open-source development site in the world is GitHub. It's used by tens of millions of developers to work on over 80 million projects.

    It's not just a site where people use Linus Torvalds' Git open-source distributed version control system. It's also an online home for collaboration, a sandbox for testing, a launchpad for deployment, and a platform for learning new skills. The GitHub Training Team has now released an app, GitHub Learning Lab, so you can join the programming party.

    GitHub Learning Lab is not a tutorial or webcast. It's an app that gives you a hands-on learning experience within GitHub. According to GitHub, "Our friendly bot will take you through a series of practical, fun labs that will give you the skills you need in no time--and share helpful feedback along the way."

  • Atom 1.26

    Atom 1.26 has been released on our stable channel and includes GitHub package improvements, fuzzy-finder support for Teletype and file system watcher improvements.

  • Atom Hackable Text Editor Gets GitHub Package, Filesystem Watcher Improvements

    GitHub announced the release of the Atom 1.26 open-source and cross-platform hackable text editor for Linux, macOS, and Windows platforms with more improvements and bug fixes.

    In Atom 1.26, the GitHub package received various improvements and new features, among which we can mention the ability of the ’s Git pane to display a read-only list of recent commits for quick reference, and support for storing your GitHub username and password credentials in the Git authentication dialog.

Games Leftovers

Filed under
Gaming

Linux and Linux Foundation

Filed under
Linux
  • V3D DRM Driver Steps Towards Mainline Kernel, Renamed From VC5

    The Broadcom VC5 driver stack is being renamed to V3D and developer Eric Anholt is looking at merging it into the mainline Linux kernel.

    The VC5 DRM/KMS and Mesa code has been for supporting the next-generation Broadcom VideoCore 5 graphics hardware that's only now beginning to appear in some devices, well, it seems one device so far. Though as I pointed out a few months back, there's already "VC6" activity going on too as the apparent successor to VC5 already being in development.

  • Azure Sphere Makes Microsoft an Arm Linux Player for IoT [Ed: Microsoft marketing at LF (only runs on/with Windows and Visual Studio etc.)]
  • Keynotes Announced for Automotive Linux Summit & OS Summit Japan [Ed: "Senior Software Engineer, Microsoft" in there; LF has once again let Microsoft infiltrate Linux events; in the words of Microsoft’s chief evangelist, “I’ve killed at least two Mac conferences. […] by injecting Microsoft content into the conference, the conference got shut down. The guy who ran it said, why am I doing this?”]

    Automotive Linux Summit connects those driving innovation in automotive Linux from the developer community with the vendors and users providing and using the code, in order to propel the future of embedded devices in the automotive arena.

ExTiX, the Ultimate Linux Operating System, Is Now Based on Ubuntu 18.04 LTS

Filed under
OS
Linux
Ubuntu

ExTiX is dubbed the "Ultimate Linux System," and it's been updated earlier today by developer Arne Exton to version 18.4, based on Canonical's upcoming Ubuntu 18.04 LTS operating system. However, ExTiX is using the lightweight and modern LXQt 0.12.0 as default desktop environment instead of GNOME, and it's powered by the latest Linux 4.16.2 kernel.

"After removing GNOME I have installed LXQt 0.12.0," said Arne Exton in today's announcement. "Programs won’t crash or anything like that. And I haven’t discovered any bugs to report. While running ExTiX LXQt 18.4 live or from the hard drive you can use Refracta tools (pre-installed) to create your own live installable Ubuntu system. A ten-year child can do it."

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20-Way NVIDIA GeForce / AMD Radeon GPU Comparison For Rise of The Tomb Raider On Vulkan/Linux

Filed under
Graphics/Benchmarks
Gaming

Today Feral Interactive released their much anticipated Linux port of Rise of the Tomb Raider, the game that was released for Windows in January of 2016 and then released for macOS last week. Feral's Mac port was relying upon the Apple Metal API while the Linux port is now their second game (after F1 2017) exclusively relying upon the Vulkan graphics/compute API rather than OpenGL. This morning I posted the initial Radeon results using the RADV driver while here is the NVIDIA GeForce vs. AMD Radeon graphics card comparison on Ubuntu Linux using twenty different graphics cards.

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Nix This Innovative OS for Its Uninviting Complexity

Filed under
OS
Reviews

I had to keep reminding myself that I was not dealing with an extreme case of Arch Linux instead of GNU/Linux. NixOS is more demanding and definitely not a distro for users with anything less than advanced skills.

To say NixOS comes with a steep learning curve and lots of hands-on overhead is putting it mildly. If you are a typical Linux user who lacks sysadmin training, avoid NixOS like a malware attack hiding in plain sight.

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Riot: A Distributed Way of Having IRC and VOIP Client and Home Server

Filed under
Software

Riot is a free and open source decentralized instant messaging application that can be considered an alternative to Slack. Take a look at features of Riot, installation procedure and usage.
Read more

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More in Tux Machines

Thunderbolt 3 in Fedora 28

  • The state of Thunderbolt 3 in Fedora 28
    Fedora 28 is around the corner and I wanted to highlight what we did to make the Thunderbolt 3 experience as smooth as possible. Although this post focuses on Fedora 28 for what is currently packaged and shipping, all changes are of course available upstream and should hit other distributions in the future.
  • Thunderbolt 3 Support Is In Great Shape For Fedora 28
    Red Hat developers have managed to deliver on their goals around improving Thunderbolt support on the Linux desktop with the upcoming Fedora 28 distribution update. This has been part of their goal of having secure Thunderbolt support where users can authorize devices and/or restrict access to certain capabilities on a per-device basis, which is part of Red Hat's Bolt project and currently has UI elements for the GNOME desktop.

New Heptio Announcements

Android Leftovers

New Terminal App in Chome OS Hints at Upcoming Support for Linux Applications

According to a Reddit thread, a Chromebook user recently spotted a new Terminal app added to the app drawer when running on the latest Chrome OS Dev channel. Clicking the icon would apparently prompt the user to install the Terminal app, which requires about 200 MB of disk space. The installation prompt notes the fact that the Terminal app can be used to develop on your Chromebook. It also suggests that users will be able to run native apps and command-line tools seamlessly and securely. Considering the fact that Chrome OS is powered by the Linux kernel, this can only mean one thing. Read more