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About Tux Machines

Tuesday, 20 Mar 18 - Tux Machines is a community-driven public service/news site which has been around for over a decade and primarily focuses on GNU/LinuxSubscribe now Syndicate content

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Quick Roundup

Type Titlesort icon Author Replies Last Post
Story Linux going big time and prime time against Windows, UNIX (WSJ) srlinuxx 20/06/2007 - 9:35pm
Story Linux golden age threatened by bug army Rianne Schestowitz 12/10/2015 - 10:09am
Story Linux Good for Environment and Bottom Line srlinuxx 2 12/03/2007 - 3:44am
Story Linux Google Chrome Shines srlinuxx 05/10/2009 - 5:57pm
Story Linux gOS Space 2.9: A personal review srlinuxx 04/06/2008 - 8:04pm
Story Linux Got Game! srlinuxx 5 24/08/2009 - 2:46pm
Story Linux Got Game: Alien Arena 2007 Review srlinuxx 12/02/2008 - 11:09am
Story Linux Got Game: Blob Wars ( Blob And Conquer) srlinuxx 24/11/2009 - 5:05pm
Story Linux Got Game: Nexuiz 2.4 Review srlinuxx 05/04/2008 - 5:19pm
Story Linux Got Game: TORCS Review srlinuxx 22/02/2008 - 7:19pm

War Installing GNU/Linux

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While we're waiting for tier one vendors to become inclined to face down Microsoft, perhaps the GNU/Linux community's appropriate course of action should be to do what we should have done long ago. That is, to create a Linux-specific hardware vendor (or vendors) of our own.

California to Hold Hearing Tomorrow on Open Source Software in Election Systems

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Senator Debra Bowen, chairwoman of the Senate Elections, Reapportionment & Constitutional Amendments Committee today announced a hearing by the committee to look at how private companies, as well as state and federal agencies, have begun using "open source software" and where it can or should be used in California's electoral system.

Richard Stallman on P2P

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Richard Stallman is the creator of the Free Software movement, the founder of the GNU project and the Free Software Foundation. He has written several programs used in almost all GNU/Linux distributions, such as the GNU C Compiler, the GNU Emacs editor and the GNU Debugger, amongst others. He wrote the GNU GPL, and is also currently co-authoring version 3 of the GPL. He also gave POSIX it's name, the term used to mean most UNIX-like operating systems today. We asked him for his opinions on File Sharing, DRM and some other subjects.

Will public schools use Microsoft or open source?

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THERE is now a brewing issue on whether government should use Microsoft or open source-based software in the second phase of the "PCs for Public Schools Project" of the Department of Trade and Industry (DTI), says a government source privy to the bidding.

Upgrading to Firefox 1.5 in Ubuntu Linux

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I have a few OSes installed on my machine. But Ubuntu is the main distribution I use to do most of my work and Ubuntu breezy has included the web browser firefox 1.0.7 with it. One grouse I have about Ubuntu is the quality of the Firefox web browser bundled with it. So I decided to find ways to upgrade the web browser.

Lighttpd can lighten Apache's load

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Is your Apache Web server slowing down under the weight of streaming media content or database-driven applications? Lighttpd, sometimes pronounced "Lighty," is a lightweight HTTP server that can help alleviate Apache's load by serving static content or CGI scripts. Since Lighttpd uses fewer resources per request than Apache alone, it can generally serve most static content faster than Apache.

Novell's biggest open source competitor: Apple

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A report by Gartner claims that Novell's stiffest competition for the small and medium business server space will come not from Microsoft, but Apple.

GoblinX goes gold with Premium 2006.1 LiveCD

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The Brazil-based GoblinX Linux Project Monday announced a LiveCD version of GoblinX Premium 2006.1 edition. Based on Slackware, GoblinX aims to offer a pleasant and functional desktop with standardized icons and themes that make it easy for novice users to learn about available applications, the project said.


Opera 9p2 Mini Tour

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Today we were treated to the Opera 9 Technological Preview 2. Featuring some terrific new options, I'm sure we'll start seeing bits and pieces in user's screenshots all over the web. The big new additions are bittorrent support and what they call widgets. I think of them more as applets.

European Linux Integrator Collax Receives Investment from Intel Capital

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Collax, a European vendor of Linux-based server technology, announced today that Intel Capital has invested as part of the company’s Series A investment round, bringing the total investment to $8.4 million. Previous investors in the round include Atlas Venture Partners and Wellington Partners.
Collax will use the funds to expand its rollout in Europe and enter the U.S. market in Q3 2006 -- capitalizing on the increasing customer demand for low cost, easy-to-use open source-based server solutions.

Opera 9 Pre-2 Released, Opens New Portal

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The latest technology preview of Opera 9 is available today. We've added several big features – including BitTorrent support and Widgets. Give it a shot and let us know what you think.

CLI Magic: ifup, ifdown, ifstatus

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I've always assumed that ifup and ifdown were conditional commands that performed their assigned duties only if the interface device in question was up or down, as the command might be. I was dead wrong. I blame my mistake on being a programmer, rather than being stupid, but it's simply too close to call.

Linux Desktops Get a Graphics Boost

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The Linux desktop is about to get a 3-D makeover courtesy of Novell.

Novell is contributing a new graphics subsystem called "Xgl" and the associated "Compiz" compositing manager to the granddaddy of all Linux and UNIX windowing infrastructures,

How to avoid open source licensing pitfalls

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Open source software can offer users great commercial advantages when care is taken to address intellectual property issues and minimise contractual risks.

Programmers get their own search engine

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Developers can use Google and other search engines to find source code, but it's not easy. A Silicon Valley startup claims to have come up with a better alternative -- a search engine for source code and code-related information.

At the Sounding Edge: Article 24

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In this month's installment, I look at a few notable developments going on in that scene today. Then, I present some specific news about how I'm getting along with LilyPond these days.

AMD Cool n Quiet

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Introduced way back with the launch of Advanced Micro Devices Athlon 64 processors was Cool 'n' Quiet Technology, as the successor to PowerNow! Today at Phoronix we are looking at the performance of AMD's Cool 'n' Quiet under Linux when it comes to the CPU temperature, power consumption, and overall desktop performance and usage.

Setting up international character support

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Like other operating systems, GNU/Linux is starting to add increased support for international characters. The support is spotty in places, and varies between systems because of differences in keyboards, distributions, fonts, and program support. Even so, if you make a few configuration changes, you can use the keyboard to enter the characters for dozens of languages with only a few problems.

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Android Leftovers

today's leftovers

  • Purchased a PlayStation 3 Between 2006 and 2010? You May Be Entitled to $65
    PS3 owners first qualified to receive compensation from Sony following the settlement of a lawsuit in 2016. That case dealt with the "OtherOS" feature that came with the console when it debuted. With OtherOS, Sony promised a new PlayStation that would operate like a computer, allowing users to partition their hard drive and install third-party operating systems like the open-source Linux software.
  • Moro – A Command Line Productivity Tool For Tracking Work Hours
    Keeping track of your work hours will give you an insight about the amount of work you get done in a specific time frame. There are plenty of GUI-based productivity tools available on the Internet for tracking work hours. However, I couldn’t find a good CLI-based tool. Today, I stumbled upon a a simple, yet useful tool named “Moro” for tracking work hours. Moro is a Finnish word which means “Hello”. Using Moro, you can find how much time you take to complete a specific task. It is free, open source and written using NodeJS.
  • Twenty years, 1998 – 2018
    curl 4.0 was just a little more than 2000 lines of C code. It featured 23 command line options. curl 4.0 introduced support for the FTP PORT command and now it could do ftp uploads that append to the remote file. The version number was bumped up from the 3.12 which was the last version number used by the tool under the old name, urlget.
  • What’s New in ArchLabs 2018.03
    ArchLabs 2018.03 is the latest release of Linux distribution based on Arch Linux featuring the Openbox window manager as the primary desktop interface. The project’s latest release ArchLabs 2018.03 brings a few fixes and improvements and improve the user. Powered by Linux kernel 4.15 series and based-on latest version of Arch Linux. LUKS and encryption is now working, for those security concious users out there you should be all go on the encryption side. There have been a few installer updates, base-devel is included at install time. Also the mirrorlist is optimised at the same time.
  • [Older] openSUSE.Asia Summit 2018: Call for Host
    The openSUSE.Asia organization committee is accepting proposals to host the openSUSE.Asia Summit during the second half of 2018. The openSUSE.Asia Summit is the largest annual openSUSE conference in Asia, attended by contributors and enthusiasts from all over Asia.
  • TidalScale Software-Defined Servers Now Support SUSE Linux Enterprise Server
    TidalScale, the leader in Software-Defined Servers, announced today that working in partnership with SUSE, the world’s first provider of Enterprise Linux, TidalScale has achieved SUSE Ready certification to ensure full compatibility with SUSE Linux Enterprise Server. TidalScale’s breakthrough scaling platform allows multiple industry standard servers to be combined into a single Software-Defined Server running a single instance of SUSE Linux Enterprise Server.
  • 8 Best Radio Apps For Android To Stream Online Music In 2018

Kernel and Graphics: Torvalds, Linux Foundation, Nouveau and libinput

  • Which Linux Distribution Does Linus Torvalds Use in 2018?
    We know a sizeable amount of his views on Linux distros, thanks to an interview he took long ago in 2007, but who knows – could he have changed his mind? In a 2007 interview, Linus professed that he didn’t use Debian because he found it hard to install, a statement I find interesting because he’s the guy who wrote GIT in C. Anyway, he buttressed his reason for not using Debian in a later interview from 2014, when he explained that because he is responsible for maintaining his computer and all the computers used by his household, he likes to use an OS with virtually no installation hassle. [...] As far as I know, he uses Fedora on most of his computers because of its fairly good support for PowerPC. He mentioned that he used OpenSuse at one point in time and complimented Ubuntu for making Debian accessible to the mass. So most of the flak on the internet about Linus disliking Ubuntu isn’t factual.
  • Linux Foundation, Intel launch open source IoT hypervisor
    The Linux Foundation has unveiled plans for a new open source project to provide streamlined embedded hypervisors for IoT devices. Called Acrn, the project has been assisted by Intel, which contributed code and engineering. The main thrust of the project is to create small, flexible virtual machines. ACRN comprises two main components: the hypervisor and its device model, complete with I/O mediators. The Linux-based hypervisor can run many ‘guest’ operating systems at the same time.
  • Nouveau NIR Support Appears Almost Baked, NV50 Support Added
    Karol Herbst at Red Hat started off this week by publishing his latest patches around Nouveau NIR support as part of the company's effort for getting SPIR-V/compute support up and running on this open-source NVIDIA driver. Red Hat's grand vision around open-source GPGPU compute still isn't entirely clear especially with Nouveau re-clocking not being suitable for delivering high performance at this point, but it must be grand given the number of developers they have working on improving the Linux GPU compute stack at the moment.
  • xf86-input-libinput 0.27.0 Released
    Aside from a few touchpad issues and other minor random issues with select hardware, libinput these days is mostly in great shape for being a generic input handling library that is working out well for both X.Org and Wayland users.

KDE: KDE Applications 18.04, KDE Connect, KMyMoney 5.0.1 and Qt Quick

  • KDE Applications 18.04 branches created
    Make sure you commit anything you want to end up in the KDE Applications 18.04 release to them :)
  • KDE Connect – State of the union
    We haven’t blogged about KDE Connect in a long time, but that doesn’t mean that we’ve been lazy. Some new people have joined the project and together we have implemented some exciting features. Our last post was about version 1.0, but recently we released version 1.8 of the Android app and 1.2.1 of the desktop component some time ago, which we did not blog about yet. Until now!
  • KMyMoney 5.0.1 released
    The KMyMoney development team is proud to present the first maintenance version 5.0.1 of its open source Personal Finance Manager. Although several members of the development team had been using the new version 5.0.0 in production for some time, a number of bugs and regressions slipped through testing, mainly in areas and features not used by them.
  • Qt Quick without a GPU: i.MX6 ULL
    With the introduction of the Qt Quick software renderer it became possible to use Qt Quick on devices without a GPU. We investigated how viable this option is on a lower end device, particularly the NXP i.MX6 ULL. It turns out that with some (partially not yet integrated) patches developed by KDAB and The Qt Company, the performance is very competitive. Even smooth video playback (with at least half-size VGA resolution) can be done by using the PXP engine on the i.MX6 ULL.