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Wednesday, 28 Jun 17 - Tux Machines is a community-driven public service/news site which has been around for over a decade and primarily focuses on GNU/LinuxSubscribe now Syndicate content

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Quick Roundup

Type Titlesort icon Author Replies Last Post
Story An open source tool for every classroom need Roy Schestowitz 18/12/2015 - 10:09am
Story An open vision: Strategic planning is transparent at Mozilla Roy Schestowitz 22/12/2015 - 12:22pm
Story antiX A Fast And Lightweight Linux Distribution Roy Schestowitz 17/03/2017 - 9:51am
Story Arno, the first open source platform for NFV Roy Schestowitz 24/06/2015 - 7:22pm
Story Avoiding quality assurance disasters with openQA Roy Schestowitz 04/10/2016 - 4:11pm
Story Awesome Lucid Mockup srlinuxx 12/02/2010 - 4:24pm
Story BackBox 4.1 Ubuntu Based Distro Released, Available To Download And Install Mohd Sohail 31/01/2015 - 8:37am
Story Best of open hardware in 2014 Roy Schestowitz 22/12/2014 - 8:43pm
Story Best open education tools and tales in 2014 Roy Schestowitz 30/12/2014 - 12:42pm
Story Best open source in government: policies, new tools, and case studies Roy Schestowitz 29/12/2014 - 5:18pm

Security: Linux/UNIX Updates, Ztorg malware, Let's Encrypt, CIA Windows Exploits, Windows Compromised and Source Code Leaked

Filed under
Security
  • Security updates for Thursday
  • Security updates for Friday
  • Stack Clash Bug Could Compromise Linux and Unix Defenses
  • Ztorg malware hid in Google Play to send premium-rate SMS texts, delete incoming SMS messages
  • The Stack Clash Vulnerabilities Mitigated in Container Linux

    Security researchers at Qualys recently disclosed new techniques to exploit stack allocations on several operating systems, even in the face of a number of security measures. Qualys was able to find numerous local-root exploits — exploits which allow local users of a system to gain root privileges — by applying stack allocation techniques against various pieces of userspace software.

  • Let's Encrypt ACME Certificate Protocol Set for Standardization

    The open-source Let's Encrypt project has been an innovating force on the security landscape over the last several years, providing millions of free SSL/TLS certificates to help secure web traffic. Aside from the disruptive model of providing certificates for free, Let's Encrypt has also helped to pioneer new technology to help manage and deliver certificates as well, including the Automated Certificate Management Environment (ACME).

  • How the CIA infects air-gapped networks

    Documents published Thursday purport to show how the Central Intelligence Agency has used USB drives to infiltrate computers so sensitive they are severed from the Internet to prevent them from being infected.

    More than 150 pages of materials published by WikiLeaks describe a platform code-named Brutal Kangaroo that includes a sprawling collection of components to target computers and networks that aren't connected to the Internet. Drifting Deadline was a tool that was installed on computers of interest. It, in turn, would infect any USB drive that was connected. When the drive was later plugged into air-gapped machines, the drive would infect them with one or more pieces of malware suited to the mission at hand. A Microsoft representative said none of the exploits described work on supported versions of Windows.

  • WikiLeaks Publishes CIA Documents Detailing “Brutal Kangaroo” Tool and LNK Exploits

    On June 22, 2017, WikiLeaks released a new cache of documents detailing four tools allegedly used by the CIA as part of its ongoing “Vault 7” campaign. The leaked tools are named “EzCheese,” “Brutal Kangaroo,” “Emotional Simian,” and “Shadow.” When used in combination, these tools can be used to attack systems that are air-gapped by using weaponized USB drives as an exfiltration channel. Per the documentation, deployment of the tool takes place by unwitting targets; however, the use of such tools could also easily be deployed purposefully by complicit insider actors.

    [...]

    This exploit works against Windows 7, 8, and 8.1; the current CVEs surrounding this technique are currently unknown.

  • Microsoft says 'no known ransomware' runs on Windows 10 S — so we tried to hack it
  • 32TB of Windows 10 internal builds, core source code leak online

    A massive trove of Microsoft's internal Windows operating system builds and chunks of its core source code have leaked online.

    The data – some 32TB of installation images and software blueprints that compress down to 8TB – were uploaded to betaarchive.com, the latest load of files provided just earlier this week. It is believed the data has been exfiltrated from Microsoft's in-house systems since around March.

    The leaked code is Microsoft's Shared Source Kit: according to people who have seen its contents, it includes the source to the base Windows 10 hardware drivers plus Redmond's PnP code, its USB and Wi-Fi stacks, its storage drivers, and ARM-specific OneCore kernel code.

    Anyone who has this information can scour it for security vulnerabilities, which could be exploited to hack Windows systems worldwide. The code runs at the heart of the operating system, at some of its most trusted levels.

  • If these universities had run an ad blocker they might have been saved from ransomware attack

    Earlier this month a number of British universities, including University College London and Ulster University reported that their systems had been hit hard by a ransomware attack.

    Although initially it was thought likely that the attacks had entered the universities' servers via poisoned emails (it's very normal to see ransomware being spread via malicious email attachments), it transpires that the actual vector for infection was malvertising instead.

    More details can be found in this technical article by researchers at Proofpoint, who believe that an AdGholas drive-by malvertising campaign helped infect the universities with the Mole ransomware, taking advantage of an exploit kit.

Linux owns supercomputing

Filed under
GNU
Linux
Server

The US is falling behind in the supercomputer race, but no matter where a supercomputer is running, one thing remains true: It's running Linux.

In the latest Top500 Supercomputer competition, which was revealed in June 2017, 498 out of 500 supercomputers were running Linux. Of the remaining two, both ran Unix.

These were a pair of Chinese IBM POWER computers running AIX near the bottom of the list. These machines came in at 493 and 494. Since the November 2016 Top500, these supercomputers have dropped by over 100 places. At this rate, Linux will score a clean sweep in the next biannual Top500 competition.

When the first Top500 supercomputer list was compiled in June 1993, Linux was barely more than a toy and hadn't adopted Tux as its mascot yet. Starting in 1998, when it first appeared on the Top500, Linux quickly dominated supercomputing.

Read more

Wine 2.11 is Released

Filed under
Software
  • Wine Announcement

    The Wine development release 2.11 is now available.

  • Wine 2.11 Arrives, Adds OpenGL Support In The Android Driver

    Wine 2.11 has arrived as the latest bi-weekly development release for this program to handle Windows games/applications on Linux and other operating systems.

    Building off Wine 2.10 with its initial Android graphics driver support is now support for OpenGL within Wine's Android driver.

  • Wine 2.11 released

    The Wine 2.11 development release is now officially available with more Android work and other fixes.

Jonathan Riddell Releases ISO Image Writer

Filed under
KDE
Software
  • ISO Image Writer

    It’s based on ROSA Image Writer which has served KDE neon and other projects well for some time. This adds ISO verification to automatically check the digital signatures or checksums, currently supported is KDE neon, Kubuntu and Netrunner. It also uses KAuth so it doesn’t run the UI as root, only a simple helper binary to do the writing. And it uses KDE Frameworks goodness so the UI feels nice.

  • ISO Image Writer is a new Qt-based Bootable USB Creator

    Linux enthusiasts on the hunt for a reliable USB image writer will be pleased to hear that a new app is in development.

    The plainly named ‘ISO Image Writer‘ is a new app by Jonathan Riddell, a prominent KDE developer and project lead of the KDE Neon software stack.

    The new app, Riddell says, is based on the Qt5 ROSA Image Writer, a cross-platform USB image writer that is recommended by KDE Neon, among other Linux distributions.

Rockstor: A Solid Cloud Storage Solution for Small or Home Office

Filed under
Reviews

The Linux platform can do quite a lot of things; it can be just about anything need it to be and function in nearly any form. One of the many areas in which Linux excels is that of storage. With the help of a few constituent pieces, you can have a powerful NAS or cloud storage solution up and running.

But, what if you don’t want to take the time to piece these together for yourself? Or, what if you’d rather have a user-friendly, web-based GUI to make this process a bit easier. For that, there are a few distributions available to meet your needs. Once such platform is Rockstor. Rockstor is a Network Attached Storage (NAS) and cloud solution that can serve either your personal or small business needs with ease.

Rockstor got its start in 2014 and has quickly become a solid tool in the storage space. I was able to quickly get Rockstor up and running (after overcoming only one minor hurdle) and had SMB shares and users/groups created with just a few quick clicks. And, with the inclusion of add-ons (called Rockons), you can extend the feature set of your Rockstor to include new apps, servers, and services.

Read more

Graphics in Linux: Mesa, GPUOpen, RadeonSI, Vulkan and OpenGL

Filed under
Graphics/Benchmarks
  • Some Fresh Tests With Mesa's Continuing KHR_no_error Work

    Given the continued flow of KHR_no_error patches hitting Mesa 17.2 Git by Valve developers, here is a fresh comparison using the just-updated Padoka PPA with comparing the impact of using this support via the MESA_NO_ERROR=1 switch.

  • AMD's GPUOpen Releases Baikal Renderer

    The Baikal renderer is a newly-released, open-source implementation of the AMD Radeon ProRender API. Baikal has evolved into a fully-functional rendering engine and its only hardware requirement is on OpenCL 1.2.

  • Marek Takes To RadeonSI Tweaking For Unigine Superposition
  • Vulkan vs. OpenGL On Linux With Core i5, Core i7, Ryzen 7

    For those curious about the state of the Radeon Vulkan (RADV) vs. OpenGL (RadeonSI) performance with different Intel and AMD CPUs, here are some fresh benchmark results with the current Vulkan-supported prominent Linux game titles of Dota 2, Mad Max, Talos Principle, and Dawn of War III. During this opportunity for the tests across Core i5 / Core i7 / Ryzen 7 hardware were also CPU usage analytics.

Games: Machinarium, Serious Sam 3 and More

Filed under
Gaming

Tizen (Linux) and Samsung

Filed under
Linux

Linux 4.12 Ubuntu Benchmarks With AMD Ryzen, Intel Kabylake - 12 Systems

Filed under
Graphics/Benchmarks

While waiting for my motherboards to arrive for the new Core i7 7740X and Core i9 7900X, I've been re-testing many of my AMD/Intel boxes with Ubuntu 17.04 on the latest Linux 4.12 kernel for comparison to Intel's new high-end processors. Here is a look at 12 of the existing systems when running on the Linux 4.12 kernel as well as all of the systems have the latest BIOSes, etc.

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The role of open source software in telecommunications

Filed under
OSS

The telecommunications space has conventionally used proprietary hardware and software to deploy solutions from various vendors. Using multiple vendors enabled telecom operators to open source some network functions, but not to the extent usually fastened to open source software.

Proprietary and open source programs are made of codes written by programmers. A proprietary program is a closed source, meaning it is owned by a developer, restricted to a licensing agreement and cannot be copied. An open source program, as the name suggests, is an open source, meaning it can be copied and modified under the developer’s license.

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Vulkan vs. OpenGL With The Radeon RX 470 On An Intel Xeon

Filed under
Graphics/Benchmarks

Here is some more complementary data to this week's Vulkan vs. OpenGL On Linux With Core i5, Core i7, Ryzen 7.

With having the Intel Xeon Skylake + Radeon RX 470 box powered up yesterday/today with the latest Linux 4.12 + Mesa 17.2-dev stack for the new Mesa KHR_no_error testing, afterwards I kicked off some fresh benchmarks with that system for OpenGL vs. Vulkan using the Phoronix Test Suite.

Read more

That OpenSUSE Tablet So Far Is A Dud

Filed under
SUSE

Remember that "openSUSE Tablet" last year that was seeking crowd-funding and even advertised by the openSUSE crew for being a Linux tablet as cheap as $200 USD? Sadly, it's not a reality while the company still appears to be formulating something.

Read more

No-frills networking appliance runs Linux on Apollo Lake

Filed under
Linux
Red Hat

Win Enterprises unveiled a “PL-81210” networking appliance that runs Linux on a dual-core Atom x5-E3930, and offers mini-PCIe, mSATA, and up to 4x GbE.

Win Enterprises has launched a low-end networking appliance with three or four Gigabit Ethernet ports, a WAN port, and mini-PCIe expansion. The fanless, PL-81210 runs Red Hat Enterprise Linux (RHEL) 6.4 on a dual-core Intel Atom x5-E3930 from the most recent Apollo Lake generation.

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Manjaro 17.0.1 Gellivara (Che Guevara) - Pretty decent

Filed under
Linux
Reviews

It is time to arch our backs and explore the distroverse some more. That's a horrible pun, I admit, so I'll chase to the cut. Manjaro. It's a nerdy operating system, powered by sacrificial goats, curdled blood, enthusiasm, and heaploads of nerdiness. But then, over the years, it has slowly grown on me, becoming almost usable on a daily basis.

A new version is out, carrying the numerical identifier 17.0.1, and there are several desktop flavors available. In order to test the progress and change in Manjaro, I decided to continue with the Xfce version, and so we can compare to previous editions. Now, the system has a rolling update nature, so I could have just upgraded the installed instance on my Lenovo G50 box, but I decided to go for a full, fresh experience. We commence.

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gThumb: View and manage your photos in Fedora

Filed under
Red Hat

Fedora uses Eye of GNOME to display images, but it’s a very basic program. Out of the box, Fedora doesn’t have a great tool for managing photos. If you’re familiar with the Fedora Workstation’s desktop environment, GNOME, then you may be familiar with GNOME Photos. This is a young app available in GNOME Software that seeks to make managing photos a painless task. You may not know that there’s a more robust tool out there that packs more features and looks just as at home on Fedora. It’s called gThumb.

Read more

Ubuntu Development Updates: GDM, Kernel, and Ubuntu Phone

Filed under
Development
Ubuntu
  • Ubuntu 17.10 Proceeding With Transition From LightDM To GDM

    As part of the switch over to the GNOME Shell desktop environment by default for Ubuntu 17.10, they are also abandoning the LightDM display/log-in manager in favor of GNOME's GDM.

  • [Ubuntu] Kernel Team Summary: June 22, 2017

    We intend to target a 4.13 kernel for the Ubuntu 17.10 release. The Ubuntu 17.10 Kernel Freeze is Thurs Oct 5, 2017.

  • Ubuntu Phone project failed because it was a mess: claim

    A developer who worked with the Ubuntu Phone project has outlined the reasons for its failure, painting a picture of confusion, poor communication and lack of technical and marketing foresight.

    Simon Raffeiner stopped working with the project in mid-2016, about 10 months before Canonical owner Mark Shuttleworth announced that development of the phone and the tablet were being stopped.

Tumbleweed Development and Laptop Experience

Filed under
SUSE
  • openSUSE Tumbleweed Gets Qt 5.9, Linux Kernel 4.11.6, and MP3 Out-Of-The-Box

    Users of the openSUSE Tumbleweed operating system are getting a lot of the latest GNU/Linux technologies and Open Source software applications lately as a total of seven snapshots were released this week.

    openSUSE Project's Douglas DeMaio is back to report that openSUSE Tumbleweed is now powered by the latest Linux 4.11.6 kernel, and the GStreamer multimedia framework was updated to the major 1.12 series, adding out-of-the-box MP3 decoding support in the distribution.

  • Tumbleweed Gets Qt 5.9, mp3 Out-Of-The Box

    A total of seven openSUSE Tumbleweed snapshots featuring new software were released this week along with an upgrade to GStreamer that allows for mp3 decoding to work out-of-the box.

    The newest stable Linux Kernel 4.11.6 is also available in the latest Tumbleweed snapshot 20170620.

    Updates in the repositories from the 20170620 snapshot brought both the 52.2 versions of Mozilla Firefox and Thunderbird, which fixed some critical vulnerabilities. Systemd 233 provided a package for a new systemd-umount binary and, with the update of dracut 044.1, supports the new compatibility rule. Fontconfig’s 2.12.3 version fixed the build issues with gperf 3.1 and on GNU Hurd. The Beta 2 version of LibreOffice 5.4 cleaned up the license string and got rid of the Oxygen theme. A removal of support for old, non-systemd distros was made available in the snapshot with libvirt 3.4.0.

  • Dell Latitude D630 Tumbleweed Refresh

    I am not quick to buy new things, though I did replace my Dell Latitude D630 about three months ago with a newer Dell latitude E6440. My plan was to deprecate the machine and put it on a "reserve only" status. In my process of setting up the E6440, I found that I used my D630 still but quite differently, it became my home station machine and my E6440 would be my mobile machine that would return back to "base" where I would have it connect as a client to the D630 for keyboard and mouse. It was a rather nice arrangement.

    Unfortunately, the hard drive died on the D630 and I needed to install openSUSE once again on it in order to continue to use my workspace as I have been. What is $50 on a new hard drive to restore my SuperCubicle, right?

    [...]

    I run KDE Plasma for my desktop. I've tried others but the customization options in KDE Plasma just fits my personal tastes best. I have also been real happy with the speed improvements of KDE Plasma in the last couple years and especially those of KDE Plasma 5.10 on Tumbleweed as of late.

GNOME/GSOC Development and Cascade Windows in GNOME Shell

Filed under
GNOME
  • Code Search for GNOME Builder : GSOC 2017

    I am very happy to be part of GNOME and Google Summer of Code 2017. First of all, thank you for all GNOME members for giving me this opportunity and Christian Hergert for mentoring and helping me in this project. In this post I will introduce my project and approach for doing this project.

    Goal of the project is to enhance Go to Definition and Global Search in GNOME Builder for C/C++ projects. Currently in GNOME Builder, using Go to Definition one can go from reference of a symbol to its definition if definition is there in current file or included in current file. In this project, Go to Definition will be enhanced and using that one can go from reference of a symbol to its definition which can be present in any file in the project. Global Search will also be enhanced by allowing to search all symbols in the project fuzzily right from search bar.

  • [Older] GSOC 2017: And so it begins

    But let’s start from the beginning. Only 4 months ago, I was making my first steps as a contributor in the open-source world. One of the first things I discovered is how amazing and helpful the GNOME community is. I started by trying out a lot of GNOME apps and looking through the code behind them and that’s how I discovered Pitivi, a really great video editing solution. After my first patch on Pitivi got accepted, I was really hooked up. Fast forward a couple of patches and now I have the opportunity and great pleasure to work on my own project: UI for the Ken Burns effect, after being accepted for Google Summer of Code 2017. In this amazing journey, I’ve had some great mentoring: special thanks to Thibault Saunier (thiblahute), who is also my current mentor for GSOC 2017, and Alexandru Balut (aleb), who helped me along the way.

  • Pitivi: UI for the Ken-Burns effect

    It’s been three weeks since the coding period for GSOC 2017 started, so it’s time to show the world the progress I made. A short recap: I’ve been working on building a user interface which allows simulating the Ken-Burns effect and other similar effects in Pitivi. The idea is to allow adding keyframes on x, y, width, height properties of a clip, much like we are doing with other effects.

  • I Finally Found a Way to Cascade Windows in GNOME Shell [Ed: If your workflow involves "Cascade" like in Windows 3.1x, then you make poor use of virtual desktops, activities, etc.]
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More in Tux Machines

Why The Ubuntu Phone Failed

In April 2017, Canonical's Mark Shuttleworth announced that their support of the Ubuntu phone convergence was no longer something they were going to invest in. Looking back on this decision, I can understand where they were coming from. Let's face it, we live in an Android/iOS landscape and all other entries into this space are just spinning their wheels. Considering other projects that failed to garner needed traction such as WebOS, Firefox OS, among others, it's understandable why Canonical decided to refocus their efforts into other areas. Well, at least with cloud services. I differ with them on IoT and believe they're destined to repeat mistakes found with convergence. Read more

Intel Core i9 7900X Linux Benchmarks

Since the Intel Core-X Series were announced last month at Computex, I've been excited to see how well this high-end processor will perform under Linux... Linux enthusiasts have plenty of highly-threaded workloads such as compiling the Linux kernel, among other packages, and thus have been very excited by the potential of the Core i9 7900X with its ten cores plus Hyper Threading and sporting a 13.75MB cache. With finally having an X299 motherboard ready, here are my initial Ubuntu Linux benchmarks for the i9-7900X. Read more

KDE Plasma 5.10.3 Desktop Environment Improves Plasma Discover's Flatpak Backend

Today the KDE Project announced the release and general availability of the third stable update to the KDE Plasma 5.10 desktop environment, which was unveiled at the end of May 2017. Read more

Ubuntu 17.10 Finishes Its Transition to Python 3.6, Ubuntu 16.10 EOL Coming July

Canonical today published a new installation of the Ubuntu Foundations Team weekly newsletter to inform the Ubuntu Linux community on the progress made since last week's update. Read more