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Friday, 22 Sep 17 - Tux Machines is a community-driven public service/news site which has been around for over a decade and primarily focuses on GNU/LinuxSubscribe now Syndicate content

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Quick Roundup

Type Titlesort icon Author Replies Last Post
Story An open source mantra: Avoid "no derivatives" Roy Schestowitz 06/01/2015 - 9:52pm
Story An open source tool for every classroom need Roy Schestowitz 18/12/2015 - 10:09am
Story An open vision: Strategic planning is transparent at Mozilla Roy Schestowitz 22/12/2015 - 12:22pm
Story antiX A Fast And Lightweight Linux Distribution Roy Schestowitz 17/03/2017 - 9:51am
Story Arno, the first open source platform for NFV Roy Schestowitz 24/06/2015 - 7:22pm
Story Avoiding quality assurance disasters with openQA Roy Schestowitz 04/10/2016 - 4:11pm
Story Awesome Lucid Mockup srlinuxx 12/02/2010 - 4:24pm
Story BackBox 4.1 Ubuntu Based Distro Released, Available To Download And Install Mohd Sohail 31/01/2015 - 8:37am
Story Best of open hardware in 2014 Roy Schestowitz 22/12/2014 - 8:43pm
Story Best open education tools and tales in 2014 Roy Schestowitz 30/12/2014 - 12:42pm

Jim Zemlin and Linus Torvalds

Filed under
Linux
  • Linux Foundation President uses Apple OS

    Jim Zemlin, President of the Linux Foundation, appears to have hit levels of fail unprecedented in the open saucy world.

    At the Open Source Summit 2017 not only did Zemlin do the usual comedy “this is the year of the Linux desktop” speech he did it using a comedy laptop with a joke operating system designed for those who know nothing about computers.

  • Linux 4.14 'getting very core new functionality' says Linus Torvalds

    Linus Torvalds has unsentimentally loosed release candidate one of Linux 4.14 a day before the 26th anniversary of the Linux-0.01 release, and told penguinistas to expect a few big changes this time around.

    “This has been an 'interesting' merge window,” Torvalds wrote on the Linux Kernel Mailing List. “It's not actually all that unusual in size - I think it's shaping to be a pretty regular release after 4.13 that was smallish. But unlike 4.13 it also wasn't a completely smooth merge window, and honestly, I _really_ didn't want to wait for any possible straggling pull requests.”

    Hence the Saturday release, instead of his usual Sunday.

    Torvalds also says this merge window included “some unusual activity.”

  • First Linux 4.14 release adds "very core" features, arrives in time for kernel's 26th birthday

    Linus Torvalds has announced the first release candidate (rc) for Linux 4.14, the next long term stable release of the Linux kernel.

    This release introduces several new core memory management features, a host of device driver updates, and changes to documentation, architecture, filesystems, networking and tooling.

    It's the first of a likely seven release candidates before the new kernel reaches stable release around November.

Red Hat, Fedora/Flock, and Financial News

Filed under
Red Hat

Security: Updates, CCleaner, and Equifax Blame

Filed under
Security
  • Security updates for Monday
  • Here’s an Open Source Alternative to CCleaner
  • Software Has a Serious Supply-Chain Security Problem

    The warnings consumers hear from information security pros tend to focus on trust: Don't click web links or attachments from an untrusted sender. Only install applications from a trusted source or from a trusted app store. But lately, devious hackers have been targeting their attacks further up the software supply chain, sneaking malware into downloads from even trusted vendors, long before you ever click to install.

    On Monday, Cisco's Talos security research division revealed that hackers sabotaged the ultra-popular, free computer-cleanup tool CCleaner for at least the last month, inserting a backdoor into updates to the application that landed in millions of personal computers. That attack betrayed basic consumer trust in CCleaner-developer Avast, and software firms more broadly, by lacing a legitimate program with malware—one distributed by a security company, no less.

  • CCleaner Compromised to Distribute Malware for Almost a Month

    Version 5.33 of the CCleaner app offered for download between August 15 and September 12 was modified to include the Floxif malware, according to a report published by Cisco Talos a few minutes ago.

    Floxif is a malware downloader that gathers information about infected systems and sends it back to its C&C server. The malware also had the ability to download and run other binaries, but at the time of writing, there is no evidence that Floxif downloaded additional second-stage payloads on infected hosts.

  • From equanimity to Equifax [Ed: It's NOT "about open-source software quality" but about Equifax not patching its software for >2 months]

Games: Burst The Game, Observer and More

Filed under
Gaming

Seven things about Linux you may not have known so far

Filed under
Linux

One of the coolest parts about using Linux is the knowledge you gain over time. Each day, you’re likely to come across a new utility or maybe just an unfamiliar flag that does something helpful. These bits and pieces aren’t always life-changing, but they are the building blocks for expertise.

Even experts don’t know that all, though. No matter how much experience you might have, there is always more to learn, so we’ve put together this list of seven things about Linux you may not have known.

Read more

Linux Mint 18.3 to Be Dubbed "Sylvia," Enables HiDPI by Default in Cinnamon 3.6

Filed under
Linux

Linux Mint project leader and creator Clement Lefebvre published today a new monthly newsletter to inform us all about some of the upcoming features coming to the Linux Mint 18.3 operating system later this fall.

Read more

Also: Monthly News – September 2017

Linux Mint 18.3 Ubuntu-based operating system is named 'Sylvia'

Linux Mint Continues Working On HiDPI Improvements

LinuxKit Helps Extend Linux Container Functionality Beyond Linux

Filed under
Linux

It's often been mentioned in this column that containers are — or at least are perceived to be — less secure than virtual machines. Why? Because they offer less isolation from the underlying host operating system. But LinuxKit changes the calculus significantly. Here's why.

But first, a quick detour: what is LinuxKit? Well, it was something that was announced by Docker back in April, and its purpose is to allow platforms such as Windows to run Linux containers. Essentially, it is a "lean and portable Linux subsystem that can provide Linux container functionality as a component of a container platform," as Docker describes it, and it was developed by a group of companies that includes HPE, Intel, Microsoft and IBM, along with the Linux Foundation.

Read more

today's leftovers

Filed under
Misc

UNIX: Nintendo Switch, iPhone Debacle, SPARC/Solaris, Screencasting with OpenBSD and What’s So Bad About POSIX I/O

Filed under
OS
  • Every Nintendo Switch appears to contain a hidden copy of NES Golf [Ed: The Switch, some claim, runs FreeBSD]

    Turns out, this is somehow weirder. Your Nintendo Switch may already have a fully playable NES game just sitting inside of it.

  • How long should a $999 iPhone last?
  • [Older] R.I.P. SPARC and Solaris [iophk: "Larry doing favors for Bill at his own expense"]

    According to comments on thelayoff.com, “SPARC people are out.” “The entire SPARC core team has been let go as of Friday. It’s gone. No more SPARC. You can’t have a SPARC w/o a team to develop the core.”

  • [Old] Screencasting with OpenBSD
  • What’s So Bad About POSIX I/O?

    However, it is much less common to hear exactly why POSIX I/O is so detrimental to scalability and performance, and what needs to change to have a suitably high-performance, next-generation I/O model. To answer the question of why POSIX I/O is holding back I/O performance today and shed light on the design space for tomorrow’s extreme-scale I/O systems, it is best to take a critical look at what POSIX I/O really means.

Free Software Development

Filed under
Development
OSS

Games and Graphics: Chopper: Lethal darkness, Banshee, RadeonSI and Mir

Filed under
Graphics/Benchmarks
Gaming
  • Take out enemies from an attack helicopter using an FLIR camera in Chopper: Lethal darkness
  • Banshee Engine Planning For Linux Support In Q4

    Banshee has been a promising C++14-written, multi-threaded open-source game engine featuring Vulkan support. When the Vulkan support was added at the start of the year the plan was to see the Linux support added to the game engine in Q2. Well, it looks like in Q4 we could see the Linux client finally materialize.

    For those that have been wondering about the Linux support for Banshee, the engine's roadmap now reflects a plan to add Linux support in Q4. Meanwhile, the engine's 1.0 beta release is planned for early 2018.

  • RadeonSI OoO Rasterization Lands In Mesa 17.3 For RX Vega & VI GPUs

    The RadeonSI out-of-order rasterization support for RX Vega "GFX9" and Volcanic Islands GPUs has now landed in Mesa 17.3-devel Git.

    The out-of-order rasterization support should be able to boost the performance of these newer graphics cards in some Linux games. The support is enabled by default for now on Vega/VI GPUs while can be disabled with R600_DEBUG=nooutoforder.

  • Mir Now Has Initial Support For Wayland Clients

    Quietly being added to the Mir display stack a week ago was initial support for Wayland clients.

    Natively supporting Wayland clients within Mir has been a new goal for the remaining Mir developers at Canonical now that the original Mir plans were abandoned when Canonical did away with their grand vision for Unity 8. Mir is still being maintained at Canonical for some IoT use-cases while they hope some open-source projects will still decide to make use of their technology. With now at least having native Wayland client support, they stand some chance of Mir being useful to other groups.

Software: Alternatives to Emacs and Vim, Alduin RSS Reader, SelekTOR

Filed under
Software
  • 3 text editor alternatives to Emacs and Vim

    Before you start reaching for those implements of mayhem, Emacs and Vim fans, understand that this article isn't about putting the boot to your favorite editor. I'm a professed Emacs guy, but one who also likes Vim. A lot.

    That said, I realize that Emacs and Vim aren't for everyone. It might be that the silliness of the so-called Editor war has turned some people off. Or maybe they just want an editor that is less demanding and has a more modern sheen.

  • Open-Source Alduin RSS Reader for Linux

    RSS readers are useful if you want to get latest updates from website(s). Alduin is a free and open-source RSS feed reader available for Linux and Windows, built using modern technologies like: Electron, React, TypeScript and Less, it has easy to use user-interface and suitable for all types of users. It has native system notification support, and additionally it supports podcast feeds too.
    Using the Alduin RSS interface is fairly simple, just click on the plus shaped button, and it will pull new articles from that given feed url, you can delete already added feed sources, lock the side menu in place.

  • SelekTOR: A Frontend GUI For Tor Browser (Bypass Country Restriction)

    Tor is a free software designed to make communication anonymous. Tor directs Internet traffic through a free, worldwide, volunteer overlay network consisting of more than seven thousand relays to conceal a user's location and usage from anyone conducting network surveillance or traffic analysis. Tor makes it more difficult for Internet activity to be traced back (Warning: still possible). Tor's use is intended to protect the personal privacy of users, as well as their freedom and ability to conduct confidential communication by keeping their Internet activities from being monitored.

    SelecTOR is a frontend GUI for the Tor application. It is free for Linux and open-source based on Java released under license GNU GPL-2, it acts as a Tor launcher and exit node chooser for browsers that support system proxying using PAC files. It can be used for security and anonymization purposes or to bypass some firewall. Simplifies the process of selecting Tor exit nodes and manages selective URL pattern based on routing via system proxying.

The Demand for Open-Source Professionals Soars

Filed under
OSS

While the majority of organizations anticipate hiring more open-source professionals over the next six months, an even greater number are struggling to recruit qualified candidates for their open positions, according to a recent survey from the Linux Foundation and Dice. The accompanying report, "Open-Source Jobs Report: Employers Prioritize Hiring Open-Source Professionals With Latest Skills," paints an optimistic picture for open source as a career pursuit: Employers are scrambling to fill open positions to enhance the DevOps and app development capabilities in their company. They're especially eager to hire a candidate who has certifications, and, if not, they're often willing to help pay for the cost of getting certifications. Meanwhile, open-source pros are constantly getting recruiting calls, leading most of them to believe that it would be easy to find another job. "As open source becomes increasingly relevant and more companies globally leverage the technology in their stacks, demand for professionals with open-source experience will only intensify," said Michael Durney, president and CEO of DHI Group, which owns Dice. "Successful employers recognize that open-source professionals will look at things beyond just the compensation, and will, for instance, express the opportunity to work on challenging projects during the recruiting process. Those firms [that] foster a spirit of teamwork and promote paths for professionals to advance their careers within the organization will attract highly skilled, passionate tech talent and, in turn, propel innovation forward for the future." More than 280 global hiring managers and 1,800 open-source professionals took part in the research.

Read more

We're giving away a Linux-ready laptop from ZaReason

Filed under
Linux

For the first time ever, Opensource.com is partnering with ZaReason to give away an UltraLap 5330 laptop with Linux pre-installed!

Since 2007, ZaReason has assembled, shipped, and supported hardware specifically designed for Linux, and the UltraLap 5330 is no exception—the 3.6-lb laptop ships with the Linux distribution of your choice and boasts the following hardware specs:

Read more

7 tips for Linux cluster admins to help keep auditors happy

Filed under
Linux

The beauty of building extra-large Linux clusters is it's easy. Hadoop, OpenStack, hypervisor, and high-performance computing (HPC) installers enable you to build on commodity hardware and deal with node failure reasonably simply. Learning and managing Linux administration on a small scale involves basic day-to-day tasks; however, when planning and scaling production to several thousand node clusters, it can take over your life, including your weekends and holidays.

Read more

ArchLabs Linux “Mínimo” 2017.09 Released — Get A Fresh And Lightweight Linux Experience

Filed under
Linux

ArchLabs is a comparatively newer and lesser popular Linux distro as compared to other Arch Linux derivatives like Manjaro or Antergos. It came into existence when Crunchbang’s development was ceased and some fans decided to take inspiration from Bunsenlabs, which was itself a community-organized successor to Crunchbang, and create an Arch Linux based distribution named ArchLabs.

ArchLabs, in early September 2017, decided to shift their focus of ArchLabs Mínimo, aka MSE-6, as their main release. It’s a stripped down, Openbox-based version of ArchLabs R2D2. For those who don’t know, MSE-6 are tiny repair droids seen in Star Wars.

Read more

Security: Failure to Patch, Failure to Set up Database Correctly, Failure to Check 'Apps'

Filed under
Security
  • Don't blame open-source software for poor security practices

    The Equifax breach is a good reminder of why organizations need to remain vigilant about properly maintaining and updating their software, especially when security vulnerabilities have been disclosed. In an ideal world, software would update itself the moment a security patch is released. WordPress, for example, offers automatic updates in an effort to promote better security, and to streamline the update experience overall. It would be interesting to consider automatic security updates for Drupal (just for patch releases, not for minor or major releases).

    In absence of automatic updates, I would encourage users to work with PaaS companies that keep not only your infrastructure secure, but also your Drupal application code. Too many organizations underestimate the effort and expertise it takes to do it themselves.

    At Acquia, we provide customers with automatic security patching of both the infrastructure and Drupal code. We monitor our customers' sites for intrusion attempts, DDoS attacks, and other suspicious activity. If you prefer to do the security patching yourself, we offer continuous integration or continuous delivery tools that enable you to get security patches into production in minutes rather than weeks or months. We take pride in assisting our customers to keep their sites current with the latest patches and upgrades; it's good for our customers and helps dispel the myth that open-source software is more susceptible to security breaches.

  • Northern Exposure: Data on 600K Alaskan Voters is Leaked

    Researchers have discovered the personal details of over half a million US voters exposed to the public internet, once again thanks to a misconfigured database.

  • Google purges malicious Android apps with millions of downloads

Jumpstarting the Raspberry Pi Zero W: Now Available via Humble Bundle!

Filed under
GNU
Linux
Hardware

My new book is now shipping! And it's being launched via a terrific Humble Bundle of books on electronics, making, Raspberry Pi and Arduino.

Humble Bundles, if you haven't encountered them before, let you pay what you want for a bundle of books on related subjects. The books are available in ePub, Mobi, and PDF formats, without DRM, so you can read them on your choice of device. If you pay above a certain amount, they add additional books. My book is available if you pay $15 or more.

You can also designate some of the money you pay for charity. In this case the charity is Maker Ed, a crowdfunding initiative that supports Maker programs primarily targeted toward kids in schools. (I don't know any more about them than that; check out their website for more information.)

Read more

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More in Tux Machines

Red Hat: Ansible Tower, Patent Promise, and Shares Declining

  • Red Hat’s automation solution spreading among APAC enterprises
    Red Hat recently shared revealed its agentless automation platform is spreading among enterprises in APAC countries like Australia, China, India and Singapore. The company asserts its Ansible Tower helps enterprises cut through the complexities of modern IT environments with powerful automation capabilities that improve productivity and reduce downtime. “Today’s business demands can mean even greater complexity for many organisations. Such dynamic environments can necessitate a new approach to automation that can improve speed, scale and stability across IT environments,” says head of APAC office of technology at Red Hat, Frank Feldmann.
  • Red Hat broadens patent pledge to most open-source software
    Red Hat, the world's biggest open source company, has expanded its commitment on patents, which had originally been not to enforce its patents against free and open source software.
  • Red Hat expands Patent Promise
    Open-source software provider Red Hat has revised its Patent Promise, which was initially intended to discourage patent aggression against free and open-source software. The expanded version of the defensive patent aggregation scheme extends the zone of non-enforcement to all of Red Hat’s patents and all software under “well-recognised” open-source licenses. In its original Patent Promise in 2002, Red Hat said software patents are “inconsistent with open-source and free software”.
  • Red Hat Inc (RHT) AO Seeing a Consistent Downtrend
  • Red Hat, Inc. (RHT) noted a price change of -0.14% and RingCentral, Inc. (RNG) closes with a move of -2.09%

Add-on board expands i.MX6 UL SBC

MYIR released an add-on board for its Linux-driven, i.MX6 UL-based MYS-6ULX SBC that adds a second LAN port, plus CAN, RS485, camera, audio, and RTC. In April, MYIR released a Linux-powered MYS-6ULX SBC, which was notable for being available in two different versions using NXP’s low power, Cortex-A7 i.MX6 UltraLite (UL) or the more affordable, and almost identical i.MX6 ULL SoC. Now, MYIR has released an “MYB-6ULX Expansion Board” designed to stack onto either model. The $21.20 accessory adds a second 10/100 Ethernet port to the MYS-6ULX, as well as new CAN, RS485, audio, micro-USB, RTC, and camera functions. Read more

Hardware: PocketBeagle, Purism Librem 5, Aaeon Embedded PCs

Finding the Mainframers of the Future Through Open Source Ecosystem Development

Speak the word “mainframe” to many millennial techies, and the first things that likely come to mind are in the form of grainy sepia photos of floor-to-ceiling, wall-to-wall computers with big spinning tapes. But that’s far from the reality of the modern mainframe. Imagine instead up to 240 10-core, 5.2ghz processors, 32TB of RAIM (redundant array of independent memory), hardware-based encryption, and fully hot-swappable hardware components. Those are the specs of the newly released IBM z14 – a single machine that could replace the computing resources of an average corporate data center with room to spare. Read more