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Wednesday, 01 Oct 14 - Tux Machines is a community-driven public service/news site which has been around for over a decade and primarily focuses on GNU/LinuxSubscribe now Syndicate content

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Quick Roundup

Type Titlesort icon Author Replies Last Post
Story Shortlist of open source software used at NASA lab Roy Schestowitz 27/08/2014 - 12:22pm
Story Smaller businesses take another look at open source apps srlinuxx 24/05/2006 - 6:29pm
Story The Linux terminal - Outliving its relevancy? srlinuxx 30/09/2009 - 9:34pm
Story The OpenStack and Linux developer communities compared Rianne Schestowitz 25/06/2014 - 8:33pm
Story The personality of a Linux-loving teen Roy Schestowitz 09/09/2014 - 8:16am
Story The sought after Linux professional Roy Schestowitz 05/06/2014 - 11:36am
Story The story of Aaron Swartz and his fight for open Roy Schestowitz 25/09/2014 - 3:54pm
Story Top 4 open source alternatives to LDAP Roy Schestowitz 28/05/2014 - 12:41pm
Story Upgrading libraries to open source Koha system Roy Schestowitz 14/08/2014 - 8:31am
Story Using open-source data backup software srlinuxx 20/07/2009 - 6:18pm

Overview of features in new GNOME release

Filed under
GNOME
Reviews

Salix Live Xfce 14.1 Beta 1 Is a Simple and Easy to Use Stackware-Based OS

Filed under
GNU
Linux
Slack

The Live version of Salix, a GNU/Linux distribution based on Slackware that is simple, fast, easy to use, and based on the Xfce desktop environment, has finally reached version 14.1 Beta 1.

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Calligra 2.8.6 Released

Filed under
KDE

Calligra Suite, and Calligra Active 2.8.6 have just been released. This is last recommended update brings over 60 improvements to the 2.8 series of the applications and underlying development frameworks.

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Cinnamon 2.4 Has Received A “Background Slideshows” Feature

Filed under
GNOME

Cinnamon 2.4, which is still under works and will be most likely used by default on Linux Mint 17.1, has been updated yet again, receiving a “Background slideshows” feature, a feature that is not present on many desktop environments so far.

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What Linux Users Should Know About Open Hardware

Filed under
GNU
Linux
Hardware

Business and free software have been intertwined for years, but the two often misunderstand one another. That's not surprising -- what is just a business to one is way of life for the other. But the misunderstanding can be painful, which is why debunking it is a worth the effort.

An increasingly common case in point: the growing attempts at open hardware, whether from Canonical, Jolla, MakePlayLive, or any of half a dozen others. Whether pundit or end-user, the average free software user reacts with exaggerated enthusiasm when a new piece of hardware is announced, then retreats into disillusionment as delay follows delay, often ending in the cancellation of the entire product.

It's a cycle that does no one any good, and often breeds distrust – and all because the average Linux user has no idea what's happening behind the news.

My own experience with bringing products to market is long behind me. However, nothing I have heard suggests that anything has changed. Bringing open hardware or any other product to market remains not just a brutal business, but one heavily stacked against newcomers.

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Mesa 10.3 Landing For Ubuntu 14.10 "Utopic Unicorn"

Filed under
Ubuntu

Mesa 10.3 is in the process of making its way to Ubuntu 14.10.

Maarten Lankhorst of Canonical has pushed Mesa 10.3.0 into the utopic-proposed archive after merging the updated Mesa packages from debian-experimental. Confirmation of Mesa 10.3 coming for Ubuntu 14.10 can be found via this change message.

Mesa 10.3 was officially released last week and features many improvements and new capabilities. On the graphics front, earlier this month was when X.Org Server 1.16 finally landed for Ubuntu 14.10.

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Bash specially-crafted environment variables code injection attack

Filed under
Security

Bash or the Bourne again shell, is a UNIX like shell, which is perhaps one of the most installed utilities on any Linux system. From its creation in 1980, bash has evolved from a simple terminal based command interpreter to many other fancy uses.

In Linux, environment variables provide a way to influence the behavior of software on the system. They typically consists of a name which has a value assigned to it. The same is true of the bash shell. It is common for a lot of programs to run bash shell in the background. It is often used to provide a shell to a remote user (via ssh, telnet, for example), provide a parser for CGI scripts (Apache, etc) or even provide limited command execution support (git, etc)

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DNF Seems To Be Working Well As Yum's Future Replacement

Filed under
Red Hat

Since yesterday I've been testing the Fedora 21 alpha release and it's running quite nicely. I've also been trying out the latest release of DNF on Fedora 21 and it's been working out well as a drop-in replacement to Yum.

The DNF next-generation package manager is installed by default on Fedora 21 but it doesn't yet replace Yum. Yum is still present on the system and used as the default package manager. However, with the upcoming Fedora 22 release is where DNF is set to replace Yum. The version found right now on Fedora 21 is DNF 0.6.1 with RPM 4.12.

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Chrome OS gets Android apps: Merging Chrome OS and Android gets closer

Filed under
Android
Google

Bringing Android apps to Chrome OS pushes the two platforms closer together. This sets the stage for Google to merge them completely down the road to have one OS for both mobile and desktop. This is similar to what Microsoft has done with Windows 8, but Google has the advantage of doing it with two existing solid bases that already run well on mobile devices.

Google may not intend to merge the two OSes into one, but they've set the stage to make it easier. They will likely keep sharing features between the two in any event, making both OSes more appealing.

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5 New Enterprise Open Source Projects to Watch

Filed under
OSS

The open source software community is nothing if not prolific, and exciting new projects arrive on the scene practically every day. Keeping up with it all can be a formidable challenge; on the other hand, failing to do so could mean you miss out on something great.

Nowhere is that more true than in enterprises, where upstart new contenders can change the way business is done almost overnight. Take Docker, for example. Though it only just launched last year, the container technology tool has taken the enterprise world by storm, becoming a fundamental part of the way many businesses work.

With that in mind, we recently took a stroll through Open Hub and reached out to several open source watchers in the hopes of highlighting a few of the latest up-and-comers in this space. What, we asked, are the most exciting open source projects to launch recently with a focus on enterprises?

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Red Hat Linux powering Indian mission to Mars!

Filed under
GNU
Linux
Red Hat

India has made history today by being the first and only country in the world to send a space craft to Mars in first attempt. The country also made history as it achieved it in a budget lesser than the un-scientific Hollywood block buster Gravity; India spent only $71 million on the mission.

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Libinput Is Great & Improves Linux Input Handling

Filed under
Linux

With Weston 1.6 release the libinput library is now used by default for handling input. Linux input expert Peter Hutterer at Red Hat has written a lengthy blog post to explain the need for libinput and how it's improving device input on Linux.

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Open source frameworks for digital self-service: Savings, flexibility and innovation

Filed under
OSS

The UK public sector today faces its greatest challenges for a generation. A unique combination of severe budget constraint, growing demand, innovation in technology and the mainstream adoption of online channels is speeding up an urgent drive for channel shift.

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Nexus 6 on Ubuntu rather than Android L

Filed under
Android
Ubuntu

The Google Nexus 6, aka Nexus X, is heading for an official launch soon and one of its highlights that it will release running Android L, the new version of the mobile operating system. Being able to use a smartphone running pure vanilla Android is really appealing to many people, but some may prefer the Nexus 6 on Ubuntu rather than Android L.

There has been plenty of speculation over the last few months about the Nexus 6. So far even the name hasn’t been confirmed, and there have been recent rumors that it may be titled the Nexus X. One thing that’s a given though is that it will run the Android L update, which is currently with developers and also hasn’t had its final name confirmed.

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Pico-ITX SBC runs Android 4.4 on Snapdragon 805

Filed under
Android

Inforce Computing unveiled an Android-ready Pico-ITX “IFC6540″ SBC that extends Qualcomm’s quad-core 2.5GHz Snapdragon 805 SoC with wireless, GPS, and more.

Like the Qualcomm Snapdragon 600 (S4 Pro) based, Android-ready IFC6410 SBC that Inforce Computing announced last year, the new IPC6540 uses the 100 x 70mm Pico-ITX form factor. (This week Inforce added a Linaro/Ubuntu Linux build pre-loaded on the IFC6410, sold at a discounted rate of $75, down from $149.)

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Why Python 4.0 won't be like Python 3.0

Filed under
Development
OSS

Newcomers to python-ideas occasionally make reference to the idea of "Python 4000" when proposing backwards incompatible changes that don't offer a clear migration path from currently legal Python 3 code. After all, we allowed that kind of change for Python 3.0, so why wouldn't we allow it for Python 4.0?

I've heard that question enough times now (including the more concerned phrasing "You made a big backwards compatibility break once, how do I know you won't do it again?"), that I figured I'd record my answer here, so I'd be able to refer people back to it in the future.

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EXT4/Btrfs/XFS/F2FS Benchmarks On Linux 3.17

Filed under
Graphics/Benchmarks

With the Linux 3.17 kernel due out soon, here's our routine file-system benchmarks we do each kernel cycle to see how the popular Linux file-systems have evolved between kernel releases.

Earlier this month I did a 9-way file-system comparison on Linux 3.17 while in this article are the four most common Linux file-systems as we see how the performance evolved compared to Linux 3.16 stable. With Linux 3.17 there were notable changes to XFS and new F2FS features while the Btrfs changes were largely rejected.

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Samsung Gear S smartwatch coming to four American carriers this fall

Filed under
Linux
Gadgets

Samsung's Gear S smartwatch will hit US shores sometime this fall. According to a succinct press release, the device will be available through AT&T, Sprint, T-Mobile, and Verizon Wireless. Android Central reports receiving an email from T-Mobile that states the Gear S will be available through the company's Equipment Installment Plan, with more details to follow in October.

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Fedora 21 Workstation: GNOME 3. KDE and Anaconda screenshots

Filed under
KDE
GNOME

The alpha version of what will become Fedora 21 Workstation, which is scheduled for release before the end of this year (tentatively December 2 2014), was made available for download and testing yesterday.

Fedora Workstation is the branch of the distribution that’s designed primarily for use on the desktop. The other branches are Fedora Server and Fedora Cloud.

Separate ISO installation images for the GNOME 3 desktop, the main edition, and the KDE, LXDE. SoaS and Xfce desktops were released.

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Manjaro Linux 0.8.10 Ascella OpenBox Edition : Video Review and Screenshots

Filed under
Reviews

Manjaro Linux 0.8.10 Ascella Openbox Edition is the latest version of manjaro linux distribution with OpenBox desktop environment. Manjaro Linux is a fast, user-friendly, desktop-oriented operating system based on Arch Linux.

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