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Sunday, 26 Jun 16 - Tux Machines is a community-driven public service/news site which has been around for over a decade and primarily focuses on GNU/LinuxSubscribe now Syndicate content

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GNU/Linux Leftovers

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Android
GNU
Linux

Security Leftovers

Filed under
Security
  • New RAA ransomware written in JavaScript discovered

    A new variety of ransomware called RAA has been discovered that has the somewhat unusual attribution of being coded in JavaScript instead of one of the more standard programming languages making it more effective in certain situations.

  • Want To Be A Cool Security Guru?

    Well it will take some work, security is not like what they show on TV. You don’t need green on black text, special goggles or an unlimited enhance function. Instead, it requires sitting down and understanding the history of the field, what it means to be “secure” and what limitations or assumptions you can work under. This summer I have decided to start my journey on the vast field of cryptography and am doing an online course at Stanford University that provides an introduction to cryptography. It is appropriately named “Cryptography I” and is the first part of a two part course, the second part being offered later in the Fall. Both are taught by a really awesome professor Dan Boneh who I find explains the material very well. I decided I would like to make some posts about what I have learned in this course as I go through the material so that I can share my knowledge and get a chance to write it down somewhere for later reference.

  • WordPress 4.5.3 Maintenance and Security Release

    WordPress 4.5.3 is now available. This is a security release for all previous versions and we strongly encourage you to update your sites immediately.

Raspberry Pi Zero IoT adapter adds Grove modules and more

Filed under
Linux

Dexter’s $17 “GrovePi-Zero” IoT expansion board for the Raspberry Pi Zero features analog, digital, and serial ports that support Grove modules.

Back in 2014, robotics specialist Dexter Industries released a GrovePi expansion kit for the Raspberry Pi equipped with ports that support SeeedStudio’s catalog of hundreds of Arduino-compatible Grove sensors and I/O modules. This was followed up with a $30 GrovePi+ board. The company has now spun a smaller, simpler GrovePi-Zero I/O kit specifically for the miniscule Raspberry Pi Zero.

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Sony agrees to pay millions to gamers to settle PS3 Linux debacle

Filed under
GNU
Linux
Gaming

After six years of litigation, Sony is now agreeing to pay the price for its 2010 firmware update that removed support for the Linux operating system in the PlayStation 3.

Sony and lawyers representing as many as 10 million console owners reached the deal on Friday. Under the terms of the accord, (PDF) which has not been approved by a California federal judge yet, gamers are eligible to receive $55 if they used Linux on the console. The proposed settlement, which will be vetted by a judge next month, also provides $9 to each console owner that bought a PS3 based on Sony's claims about "Other OS" functionality.

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Fedora: The Latest Release and More

Filed under
Red Hat

Leftovers: OSS

Filed under
OSS
  • Elon Musk's open source OpenAI: We're working on a robot for your household chores

    OpenAI, the artificial-intelligence non-profit backed by Elon Musk, Amazon Web Services, and others to the tune of $1bn, is working on a physical robot that does household chores.

    The robot OpenAI is targeting would be as reliable, flexible, and intelligent as Rosie the maid from TV cartoon comedy The Jetsons.

    OpenAI leaders Musk, Sam Altman, Ilya Sutskever, and Greg Brockton explain in a blogpost that they don't want to manufacture the robot itself, but "enable a physical robot ... to perform basic housework".

  • Is Open Source Right for You? Maybe, But Cost Should Be the Last Consideration

    Without a doubt, open source is making the software business better. But, if you’re considering going the open source route for software that’s critical to your company, keep in mind that “open” doesn’t mean “free.” It’s understandable that cost would be a major factor in the decision to go open source, as it’s free to license and allows you to spin up unlimited instances. However, there are a number of hidden expenses associated with using open source software that in many cases can drive up the price tag way past commercial software. The real differentiating factors in open source have less to do with cost than they do with your objectives, and the capabilities of your team.

  • Community-powered marketing succeeds where traditional marketing fails

    It's time for us B2B marketers to stop being so transactional and impersonal—to stop believing that buyers' purchase decisions are completely rational. Buyers, after all, are people, not cogs in a wheel spinning inside their companies.

    Traditional B2B marketing tactics are expensive and increasingly ineffective. You know them well: online banners, emails from random salespeople, sponsored golf outings, airport advertising, billboards, radio ads. Our customers are swimming in messages about why our product is better than the next guy's. They're messages designed to promote, persuade, and convince, and they speak to the part of us hungry for just one more tiny bit of data that might help with an important decision.

  • Understanding Ceph and Its Place in the Market

    I see a strong and promising future for Ceph. Sure, like any other data storage solution it doesn't address all data storage needs, but it's here, and it's yet another contender in the software-defined storage arena.

  • twenty years of free software

    I'm forty years old. I've been developing free software for twenty years.

    A decade ago, I wrote a series of posts about my first ten years of free software, looking back over projects I'd developed. These retrospectives seem even more valuable in retrospect; there are things in the old posts that jog my memory, and other details I've forgotten by now.

  • OpenStack Summit Barcelona: Call for Speakers
  • Platform9’s Managed Kubernetes Available in Beta

    Platform9 uses a fork of the OpenStack cloud platform. The startup’s product allows companies to turn private servers into in-house versions of public cloud services like Amazon‘s. Last year the company debuted a virtual appliance that integrates its OpenStack controller service with VMware vSphere services.

  • OpenStack And Storage -- Flowing Downstream With Openness

    Nobody likes being locked out. Locked out of their home, locked out of their car, locked out of their corporate network. It feels helpless.

    Nobody likes being locked in either. Locked into a contract, locked into a relationship, locked in by a proprietary network operating system or a particular platform. Can’t take advantage of great new developments from other platform companies. It feels helpless.

  • Crash reporting for LibreOffice

    Starting with LibreOffice 5.2 the LibreOffice project will have an automated crash reporting tool with server side analysis of the reports. This has been active in the builds since 5.0.0.0.beta1 and was really working since beta 2.

  • The State of Open Source Security in Commercial Applications [Ed: The mouthpieces from Black Duck with more marketing placements/spam as ‘article’]
  • FreeBSD Is Trying To Figure Out If Anyone Uses Its VGL Graphics Library

    FreeBSD VGL provides a library for accessing graphics modes and carrying out basic drawing operations atop its syscons console driver. Not only is basic graphics output on a virtual console supported by libvgl, but mouse input is too handled. However, not many people seem to be using this library.

  • EU Rejection of Secret Service and EU Partial Adoption of Open Source: Two "Op Eds"

    I respectfully draw the community's attention to two "Op Eds" that explore missed opportunities for the EU in relation to open source everything.

  • Selecting an Open Source License for Your Project

    Selecting an open source license is not actually as easy as you might think. This article provides links to some valuable resources for anyone faced with choosing from the sea of open source licenses currently available.

  • OStatic's Guide to Open Source Licensing and the Law

Leftovers: Ubuntu

Filed under
Ubuntu
  • The press will believe anything about open source

    Take the case of Canonical's recent pronouncement that it has ended decades of dissonance between competing Linux package management solutions. The lack of thoughtful scrutiny of the claims by the tech press beggars belief. Fortunately, a swelling chorus of critics is rising to put the claims in context, separating the wheat from the chaff in Canonical's attempts to unify Linux distributions.

  • Keynote: More Fun, Less Friction: How Open Source Operations Will Take Big Data to the Next Level

    Solving operational difficulties with a modular, easy-to-use system was the solution Mark Shuttleworth laid out in his keynote entitled “More Fun, Less Friction” at Apache Big Data in Vancouver in May.

  • Removing Operational Friction Will Free Big Data To Do Big Things, Says Mark Shuttleworth

    Good code is cheap; it’s operational knowledge that’s holding back big data from solving the great problems of our time.

    Solving those operational difficulties with a modular, easy-to-use system was the solution Mark Shuttleworth laid out in his keynote entitled “More Fun, Less Friction” at Apache Big Data in Vancouver in May.

  • Announcing Jono Bacon Consulting

    I am really excited about this new chapter. While I feel I have a lot I can offer my clients today, I am looking forward to continuing to broaden my knowledge, expertise, and diversity of community strategy and leadership. I am also excited to share these learnings with you all in my writing, presentations, and elsewhere. This has always been a journey, and each new road opens up interesting new questions and potential, and I am thirsty to discover and explore more.

Leftovers: Software

Filed under
Software
  • 5 Sparkling CLI Linux Time Trackers

    Time tracking software is a type of computer software that records time spent on tasks. This category of software can enable users to run billing reports, and prepare invoices for clients.

    The deployment of this software offers a new level of productivity to organisations, as it provides management with information on what time is spent by employees on different activities such as projects and tasks. This can help to measure productivity over time. This software is commonly used by professionals that charge clients by the hour such as accountants, solicitors, and freelancers. The generation of automatic invoices with minimal or no data entry removes the inconvenience of billing and invoicing clients, and improves efficiency.

  • Epiphany Web Browser to Let Users Run System Web Apps Outside the GNOME Desktop

    As mentioned earlier in our news story about the features coming to the Orca 3.22 open-source screen reader and magnifier, the GNOME developers are currently working hard on releasing the third snapshot towards GNOME 3.22.

  • Orca Screen Reader and Magnifier to Better Support LibreOffice in GNOME 3.22

    The GNOME developers announced this past weekend that they were working hard on releasing the third snapshot towards the GNOME 3.22 desktop environment.

  • Shotwell 0.23.2 Free Image Editor Improves Facebook Support, Fixes Many Issues

    The new development team behind Shotwell, the open-source image editor used in numerous GNU/Linux operating systems, has announced the availability of a new maintenance build in the Shotwell 0.23.x series.

    Shotwell 0.23.2 is now the latest and most advanced stable version of the project, bringing better support for the Facebook integration by adding a pop-up login and updating the documentation in regards with the Facebook publishing permissions.

Server Administration

Filed under
Server
  • With Cloud Foundry, Cloud.gov Provides a Federally-Compliant Cloud for Government Work

    Ensuring U.S. government agencies have a compliant cloud-based infrastructure is the task of the General Services Administration’s 18F digital services, which created cloud.gov, a Cloud Foundry-based hosted cloud service specifically for federal agencies.

  • Weave Cloud Integrates Docker Containers with AWS

    Weaveworks announced the public beta of its Weave Cloud hosted cloud product. It combines versions of Weaveworks’ container networking and management software.

    Of particular interest: Weave Cloud offers native Docker container integration with Amazon Web Services (AWS) Virtual Private Cloud (VPC), so that Docker containers can run directly on AWS VPC.

  • Serverless Microservices (and Minimal Ops): Current Limitations of AWS Lambda

    A “serverless” approach to API deployment involves containerization, webhooks, virtualization and reciprocity, with no infrastructure (servers, deployments or installed software) required. Microservices can be used as an abstracted resource that allows developers to work more effectively, and focus more on development and less on operations.

  • Microservices: What They Mean and How They Impact the Channel

    "Microservices" is fast becoming one of the newest buzzwords that IT decision makers need to know as DevOps redefines modern software application delivery. Here's a primer on what microservices mean and how the concept is affecting the channel.

  • Field notes - ElasticSearch at petabyte scale on AWS
  • What is DevOps? Patrick Debois Explains

    Patrick Debois is best known as the founder of DevOpsDays and as a creator of the DevOps movement, which explains why some refer to him as the “Godfather of DevOps”. As CTO of Small Town Heroes, an interactive video company, he puts these DevOps practices to the test on a daily basis to deliver mobile applications, and he recently organized a new event, Mobile Delivery Days.

Android apps on Chromebook

Filed under
Android
Gentoo
Google
  • How to install Android apps on Chromebook

    A nice surprise landed on my Chromebook Flip when I checked for updates late last week. The dev channel running on Chromebook was ready with the much awaited 53.0.x update that brings the Google Play Store to Chrome OS devices. I updated it and I have been running Android apps on my Chromebook Flip since Friday.

  • How to run Android Apps on your Chromebook

    For now, there's only one Chromebook that will do it, the ASUS Chromebook Flip, but soon most newer models Chromebooks will be able to run most of the 1.5 million Android apps.

Sean Michael Kerner at Dockercon 16

Filed under
GNU
Linux
Server
OSS
  • Praise Be to the Dockercon 16 Demo Gods : Drink Espresso #dockercon

    Dockercon the primary conference for Docker container has a three year old tradition of appeasing the demo gods prior to any live demo - and Dockercon has lots of live demos.

  • Docker Container Usage Growing

    A trio of new reports show positive trends for Docker container adoption, although there is a concern that Docker is too complex to integrate into organizations' environments.
    As the DockerCon 16 conference gets underway June 20 in Seattle, users and advocates of the open-source container technology are being bolstered by multiple reports that imply adoption is growing, although there are some challenges to adoption.

  • Docker on a Mission to Reduce Developer Deployment Friction

    During the opening keynote for the Dockercon 16 conference, a primary message that was repeated time and again was that that Docker is all about building tools that help developers and operators do their jobs, faster and easier.

  • Docker 1.12 Integrates Orchestration Directly Into Container Engine

    Docker today at DockerCon 2016 here officially announced Docker Engine 1.12, which directly integrates container orchestration technology that previously had required separate technology to implement. Docker first announced the Swarm orchestration technology back in February 2015 as a stand-alone project, requiring separate installation.

As Red Hat aims for $5 billion in revenue, Linux won’t be only driver

Filed under
Linux
Red Hat

Last year Red Hat, which has been mostly known for selling Linux in the enterprise became the first $2 billion open source company. Now it wants to be the first to $5 billion, but it might not be just Linux that gets it there.

A couple of years ago Red Hat CEO Jim Whitehurst recognized, even in the face of rising revenue, that the company couldn’t continue growing forever featuring Red Hat Enterprise Linux (RHEL) alone. As successful as RHEL had been, the world was changing and his company like so many enterprise-focused companies had to change too or risk being left behind.

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Anecdotal Comparison of Steam on Linux Vs Windows

Filed under
Linux
Microsoft
Gaming

After seeing how smoothly Steam ran on the Cinnamon Linux box, we sat together at my house the next day and put Linux Mint Cinnamon 17.3 LTS on her Dell, installed I might add, without hardly any drama over EUFI. Mint has that handled nicely. I explained to her that while Steam has almost 2,000 games running on Linux, some of the larger game houses haven’t boarded the Linux Steam ship. For her, that was fine. What she plays runs just fine on Linux…at least for now.

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Phoronix on Graphics

Filed under
Graphics/Benchmarks
Linux

Point Linux MATE 3.2 Release Notes

Filed under
GNU
Linux

These release notes for Point Linux MATE 3.2 (agni) provide an overview of the release and document the known issues with Point Linux MATE 3.2.

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Fedora 24 is Released

Filed under
Red Hat
  • Fedora 24 Linux Distribution Officially Released, Available for Download Now

    Today, June 21, 2016, Fedora Project has announced the general availability of the final release of the Fedora 24 Linux operating system for desktops, servers, cloud, and embedded devices.

    Delayed four times during its development cycle, the Fedora 24 distribution is finally available to download today. It looks like it ships with the usual Fedora Workstation, Fedora Server, and Fedora Cloud variants, as well as the official Fedora Spins with the Xfce, LXDE, KDE, MATE/Compiz, Cinnamon, and Sugar desktops.

  • Fedora 24 released!

    The Fedora Project has embarked on a great journey… redefining what an operating system should be for users and developers. Such innovation does not come overnight, and Fedora 24 is one big step on the road to the next generation of Linux distributions. But that does not mean that Fedora 24 is some “interim” release; there are great new features for Fedora users to deploy in their production environments right now!

  • Fedora 24 Officially Released: Powered By Linux 4.5 & GNOME 3.20

    There's a lot of good stuff in Fedora 24 across their Server, Workstation, Cloud, and other products.

  • I Am Super Excited About Fedora 24

    Long story short, this latest Red Hat sponsored Linux distribution release has shaped up to be another splendid release. Fedora 24 features the GNOME 3.20 desktop and all of its latest innovations on the desktop side, GCC 6 is the default compiler, many other package updates like glibc 2.23 / Mono 4.2 / Golang 1.6 / Python 3.5, and many other improvements. You can see a complete list of Fedora 24 changes via FedoraProject.org.

GNU/Linux on Servers

Filed under
GNU
Linux
Server

Leftovers: Gaming

Filed under
Gaming

SUSE, Intel collaborate on HPC stack

Filed under
SUSE

The Germany-based GNU/Linux company SUSE has teamed up with Intel with the latter to offer its server distribution, which is optimised for high-performance computing (HPC), as an option on the Intel HPC Orchestrator, an HPC system software stack.

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More in Tux Machines

OSS Leftovers

  • DataBasin - object inspector and updates
    First, the underlying DataBasinKit framework got an important update.
  • In-demand dev skills, understanding licensing, and more open source news
  • Higher ed systems expanding access to open-source materials
    Open-source learning technology is at the core of higher education for institutions that want to reach broader audiences with very strict ideas about how convenient learning should be. But developing these initiatives does not happen quickly or easily. It requires strong leadership in information technology, expertise to determine which solutions work best for a campus, and a financial commitment to making sure the technology is sustainable.
  • Proxmark Pro Proxmark3 Standalone Open Source RFID Tester (video)
    Rysc Corp has unveiled a new open source board in the form of the Proxmark Pro which now offers a true standalone client and RFID test instrument, check out the video below to learn more. The Proxmark Pro will feature an FPGA with 5 times the logic cells of the Proxmark3 and will remove the need to switch between HF and LF bit streams during operation, to use developers.
  • ErupteD Brings Vulkan To The D Programming Language
    The D programming language is just the latest to have support for Vulkan alongside C++, Rust (via Vulkano, if you missed that project), Go, and many other modern languages getting bindings for this Khronos Group high performance graphics API. Should you not be familiar with the D language, see Wikipedia.

Leftovers: Security