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Saturday, 25 Feb 17 - Tux Machines is a community-driven public service/news site which has been around for over a decade and primarily focuses on GNU/LinuxSubscribe now Syndicate content

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Quick Roundup

Type Titlesort icon Author Replies Last Post
Story Bringing new security features to Docker Roy Schestowitz 03/09/2014 - 12:39pm
Story Bringing Raspberry Pi to schools in Tanzania Roy Schestowitz 16/06/2016 - 9:03am
Story Can India break the pattern and do open source right? Roy Schestowitz 18/11/2014 - 4:58pm
Story Can this free software company secure the future of Linux for the city of Munich? Roy Schestowitz 04/09/2014 - 4:29pm
Story Change is brutal, even in an open organization Roy Schestowitz 11/06/2015 - 11:12pm
Story Charting new licensing territories with the Open Definition standard Roy Schestowitz 24/10/2014 - 11:30am
Story Chief Architect of Cloudera on growth of Hadoop Roy Schestowitz 20/10/2014 - 7:12pm
Story City of Vienna increasingly turns to open source Roy Schestowitz 26/05/2014 - 2:13pm
Story Collaborative robotics software development Roy Schestowitz 16/04/2015 - 9:49am
Story Confessions of a systems librarian Roy Schestowitz 28/01/2015 - 5:53pm

Development News/Tools

Filed under
Development
  • NVIDIA Makes Huge Code Contribution To Qt, New Qt 3D Studio

    The Qt Company today announced Qt 3D Studio, a new 3D UI authoring system, thanks to NVIDIA providing Qt with hundreds of thousands of lines of source code making up this application.

  • Cavium ThunderX Support Added To LLVM

    Cavium's ThunderX ARM 64-bit processors are now formally supported by the LLVM compiler stack.

  • How copying an int made my code 11 times faster

    Recently, after refactoring some Rust code, I noticed that it had suddenly become four times slower. However, the strange part is that I didn’t even touch the part of the code that became slower. Furthermore, it was still slower after commenting out the changes. Curious, I decided to investigate further.

    The first step was to use git diff to display all changes since the previous commit, which was normal speed. Then I started removing them one by one, no matter how inconsequential, and testing to see if it was still slow after the change.

    [...]

    Adding the print statement causes the code to go from 0.16 seconds to 1.7 seconds, an 11x slowdown (in release mode). Then, I posted it in the rustc IRC channel, where eddyb and bluss suggested a workaround and explained what was going on.

    The fix was to the change the print line to the following, which does indeed fix the slowdown.

Linux Kernel News

Filed under
Linux

GNOME News: GNOME 3.24, Vala, and GNOME Shell Extensions

Filed under
GNOME
  • Ubuntu 17.04 Will Ship with GNOME 3.24

    For first time in a long time, Ubuntu will ship with the latest GNOME release.

  • Who Maintains That Stuff?

    If you use GNOME or Ubuntu, then GNOME Disks is probably what you rely on if you ever need to do any disk management operations, so it’s a relatively important piece of software for GNOME and Ubuntu users. Now if you’re a command line geek, you might handle disk management via command line, and that’s fine, but most users don’t know how to do that. Or if you’re living in the past like Ubuntu and not yet using Wayland, you might prefer GParted (which does not work under Wayland because it requires root permissions, while we intentionally will not allow applications to run as root in Wayland ). But for anyone else, you’re probably using GNOME Disks. So it would be good for it to work reliably, and for it to be relatively free of bugs.

  • On Problems with Vala

    If you’re going to be writing a new application based on GNOME technologies and targeting the GNOME ecosystem, then you should seriously consider writing it in the Vala programming language.

  • 10 Awesome Gnome Shell Extensions to Improve GNOME 3

    The GNOME desktop environment is loved by many, but it allows for very little out-of-the-box customisation. However, you can extend the features of the desktop by installing third-party extensions which help to fix any weird quirks you might have observed or change the behaviour of your desktop outright.

Android Leftovers

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Android

New/Imminent Releases: Black Lab Linux, Exton|Defender, Mageia

Filed under
GNU
Linux
  • Black Lab Linux 8.1 Released

    Today we are pleased to announce the release of Black Lab Linux 8.1. Our first incremental release to the 8.0 series. In this release we have brought all security updates up to Feb 15, 2017 as well as application updates.

  • Exton|Defender Super Rescue System Is Now Based on Fedora 25 and Cinnamon 3.2.8

    GNU/Linux developer Arne Exton is announcing the availability of a new build of his Exton|Defender SRS (Super Rescue System) Live DVD/USB designed for those who want to do various administrative tasks on their PCs.

    Based on the 64-bit version of the Fedora 25 operating system, Exton|Defender SRS Build 170218 comes with up-to-date tools that let you administrate and repair your operating system after a disaster. It's now powered by the Linux 4.9.9 kernel and uses the gorgeous Cinnamon 3.2.8 desktop environment by default.

  • Mageia 6 Has Been Running Months Behind Schedule, But It's Still Coming

    Samuel Verschelde of the Mandrake/Mandriva-forked Mageia Linux distribution has put out a blog post concerning the state of Mageia 6.

    The last Mageia 6 test release was in June of last year and their next Mageia 6 "stabilization snapshot" has been repeatedly delayed for months.

  • So where is Mageia 6?

    There is no mystery about it, we are totally off schedule. The last preview we published for Mageia 6 was Stabilization Snapshot 1 in June 2016, and Stabilization Snapshot 2 still hasn’t been published, although we have been saying “soon” for weeks, or even months! So what’s going on? Is Mageia dead? Fortunately not. But it’s good that you worry about it because it shows you like your Linux distribution. We need to communicate about the state of things so that you can stop worrying, so here we are.

5 Signs That Show You’re a Linux Geek

Filed under
GNU
Linux

While Linux is certainly very easy to use, there are some activities surrounding it that are seen as more complex than others. While they can be all be avoided easily enough, they do have a certain, geeky appeal. How many of them do you follow?

Read more

Top 5 best rising Linux distros in 2017

Filed under
GNU
Linux

Linux is built for tinkering and experimentation, which means it’s always morphing and changing. New distros are popping up all the time, because all it takes is a little bit of determination, time and effort to create a custom operating system.

Not all of them hit the mark – there are stacks of Linux distros that have seen little to no action, and we’re almost certain that some have been released and never installed by anyone other than their creator.

Other alternative distros, though, fare rather better. Look at the success of Linux Mint, which spun off from Ubuntu to become (at times) arguably more popular than its own parent. Indeed, Ubuntu itself grew from Debian, and its niche offshoots (distros like Ubuntu Studio) have seen good movement. If there’s a market out there for your distro, there’s traction to be had.

So let’s look at our pick of the five distros moving up swiftly through the ranks as of early 2017. Some of these might become the best Linux distros out there, some might turn out to be awful – but it won’t cost you a penny to try them out.

Read more

Games for GNU/Linux

Filed under
Gaming

Hands-on: New PCLinuxOS installation images

Filed under
PCLOS

PCLinuxOS is an independent distribution, it is not derived from or dependent upon any other current distribution. It is a rolling-release distribution, so it gets a steady flow of updates rather than having periodic point-releases. There was a time when the intention was to update the PCLinuxOS distribution images quarterly, but it seems that turned out to be too much work for too little return.

Read more

Linux Kernel News

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Linux

budgie-remix 16.04.2 Comes Equipped with the HWE Kernel from Ubuntu 16.04.2 LTS

Filed under
GNU
Linux
Ubuntu

The great folks from the Ubuntu Budgie (formerly budgie-remix) GNU/Linux distribution had the pleasure of announcing the general availability of budgie-remix 16.04.2.

What's budgie-remix 16.04.2, you may wonder? Well, as Ubuntu Budgie did not yet have a stable release, and because many people are still using the distro on their PCs with its previous name (budgie-remix), the developers updated it to be based on the recently released Ubuntu 16.04.2 LTS (Xenial Xerus) operating system.

Being based on Ubuntu 16.04.2 LTS, which inherits the newer Linux 4.8 kernel and an updated graphics stack based on Mesa 12.0 3D Graphics Library from Ubuntu 16.10 (Yakkety Yak), budgie-remix 16.04.2 comes equipped with its HWE kernel and graphics stack, as well as the latest Budgie 10.2.9 desktop environment.

Read more

Linux Mint 18.2 to Come with a Revamped Bluetooth Panel, Updated Xplayer and Xed

Filed under
Linux

Clement Lefebvre, the founder and lead developer of the popular Linux Mint operating system, published the project's monthly newsletter for the month of February 2017 to keep the community up-to-date with the latest developments.

Read more

Debian-Based GParted Live 0.28.1-1 Released with Linux 4.9.6 and GParted 0.28.1

Filed under
OS
Debian

A day after announcing the release of GParted 0.28.1, which re-enabled the ability for users to resize or move primary disk partitions, Curtis Gedak is today releasing the GParted Live 0.28.1-1 distro.

Read more

Also: GParted 0.28.1 Restores Ability to Resize or Move Primary Partitions, Fixes Bugs

Linux 4.10

Filed under
Linux
  • Linux 4.10
  • Linux Kernel 4.10 Officially Released with Virtual GPU Support, Many Features

    As expected, Linus Torvalds announced today the general availability of the Linux 4.10 kernel series, which add a great number of improvements, new security features, and support for the newest hardware components.

    Linux kernel 4.10 has been in development for the past seven weeks, during which it received a total of eight RC (Release Candidate) snapshots that implemented all the changes that you'll soon be able to enjoy on your favorite Linux-based operating system.

  • Linux 4.10 Kernel Released

    Linus Torvalds has released the Linux 4.10 kernel.

    As of writing this article, Torvalds hasn't put out anything on the mailing list but Linux 4.10 is out.

Desktop GNU/Linux/Chromebook

Filed under
GNU
Linux
  • A Minimal Chrome OS Theme for Tint2

    I used to (and sort-of-still-do, I guess) run a sister site focused on Google Chrome, Chromecast and Chromebooks, i.e. the Chrome ecosystem.

    As such I am a fan of Chromebooks and Chrome OS, a Linux-based distribution based on Gentoo. The appearance of Chrome OS has waxed and waned in sync with Google’s ambitions and positioning for the OS, going form hyper-minimal to a full desktop clone (with the desktop-y Chrome Apps platform) through to a Material Design inspired Android + Chrome hybrid today.

  • Off-The-Shelf Hacker: Linux for Cheap Hardware, Then and Now

    Most people, don’t realize how prolific Linux has become. With the Embedded Linux Conference just a week away, I’ve been reflecting on how Linux has provided a sort of computing “circle of life” experience for me. It’s powered my computational hardware 20 years ago and continues to do so today.

  • [Video] XPS 13 Review | Linux Action Show 457
  • GParted 0.28.1

    This release of GParted restores the ability to move/resize primary partitions when an extended partition exists. The move/resize regression was introduced in version 0.28.0. This release also includes some minor bug fixes.

  • Antergos Linux : The beauty built on Arch

    Hi guys, welcome to the 16th segment of "Introduction with Linux Distro". Most of us know or heard about Arch Linux, which is one of the most widely used Linux distribution. For some reason, few users find it hard to install and use Arch. But in Linux world, there is almost always some alternative to your desired distribution. In today's segment, we will be introducing an Arch-based distribution which turned it completely on user-friendly side. So, let's get to know about Antergos Linux.

Kernel Space/Linux

Filed under
Linux

Leftovers: Software

Filed under
Software
  • Picard 1.4 released

    The last time we put out a stable release was more than 2 years ago, so a lot of changes have made it into this new release. If you’re in a hurry and just want to try it out, the downloads are available from the Picard website.

  • Linux Digital Audio Workstations: Open Source Music Production

    Linux Digital Audio Workstations
    When most people think of music programs, they’ll usually think Mac OS or Windows. However, there are also a few Linux digital audio workstations. The support and features of these programs can vary, but they’re a good choice to setup a cheap recording studio. Some of them are even good competitors for paid programs, offering features such as multitrack recording, MIDI, and virtual instruments.

    Keep in mind that many audio editing programs for Linux rely on the Jack backend. You’ll need a dedicated system to install these programs on, since it doesn’t work properly in a virtual machine.

    In the following article, we’ll cover audio editing programs that are available for Linux. We’ll talk about the available features, as well as help you decide which program to use for your needs.

  • i2pd 2.12 released

    i2pd (I2P Daemon) is a full-featured C++ implementation of I2P client.

    I2P (Invisible Internet Protocol) is a universal anonymous network layer. All communications over I2P are anonymous and end-to-end encrypted, participants don't reveal their real IP addresses.

  • 4 Command-Line Graphics Tools for Linux

    For the most part, they’re wrong. Command-line image tools do much of what their GUI counterparts can, and they can do it just as well. Sometimes, especially when dealing with multiple image files or working on an older computer, command-line tools can do a better job.

    Let’s take a look at four command-line tools that can ably handle many of your basic (and not-so-basic) image manipulation tasks.

  • CloudStats - Best Server Monitoring Tool for Linux Servers

    CloudStats is an effective tool for Linux server monitoring and network monitoring. With CloudStats you get whole visibility into key performance criteria of your Linux Server. You can proactively track different server metrics like CPU, disk and memory usage, services, apps, processes and more. The best thing is that you don’t need to have any special technical skills – this tool for server monitoring is very easy to install and run from any device.

  • New Inkscape 0.92.1 fixes your previous works done with Inkscape

    This blog-post is about a happy-end after a previously published blog-post named New Inkscape 0.92 breaks your previous works done with Inkscape published on 20 January. A lot of reactions did happen about this previous blog-post and the news get quickly viral. That's why I thought it was nice to make another blog post to "close this case".

  • Qt 5.10 To Have Built-In Vulkan Support

    With Qt 5.8 there was experimental Direct3D 12 support that left some disappointed the toolkit didn't opt for supporting Vulkan first as a cross-platform, high-performance graphics API. Fortunately, with Qt 5.10, there will be built-in Vulkan support.

    Going back nearly one year there has been Vulkan work around Qt while with Qt 5.10 it's becoming a reality. However, with Qt 5.9 not even being released until the end of May, Qt 5.10 isn't going to officially debut until either the very end of 2017 or early 2018.

  • Rusty Builder

    Thanks to Georg Vienna, Builder can now manage your Rust installations using RustUp!

  • GNOME MPlayer knows how to grow your playlist size

today's howtos

Filed under
HowTos
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More in Tux Machines

3 little things in Linux 4.10 that will make a big difference

Linux never sleeps. Linus Torvalds is already hard at work pulling together changes for the next version of the kernel (4.11). But with Linux 4.10 now out, three groups of changes are worth paying close attention to because they improve performance and enable feature sets that weren’t possible before on Linux. Here’s a rundown of those changes to 4.10 and what they likely will mean for you, your cloud providers, and your Linux applications. Read more

SODIMM-style module runs Linux on VIA’s 1GHz Cortex-A9 SoC

VIA unveiled an SODIMM-style COM based on its Cortex-A9 WM8850 SoC, with 512MB RAM and 8GB eMMC, plus Ethernet, CSI, graphics, USB, and serial ports. The 68.6 x 43mm “SOM-6X50” computer-on-module appears to be VIA’s second-ever ARM COM. Back in Sept. 2015, the company released a 70 x 70mm Qseven form factor QSM-8Q60 COM, based on a 1GHz NXP DualLite SoC. Read more

Today in Techrights

today's leftovers

  • LinuXatUSIL – Previas 2 for #LinuxPlaya
    Damian from GNOME Argentina explained us some code based on this tutorial and the widgets in Glade were presented.
  • RancherOS v0.8.0 released! [Ed: and a bugfix release, 0.8.1, out today]
    RancherOS v0.8.0 is now available! This release has taken a bit more time than prior versions, as we’ve been laying more groundwork to allow us to do much faster updates, and to release more often.
  • The Technicals For Red Hat, Inc. (RHT) Tell An Interesting Tale
  • Ubuntu 17.04 Beta 1 Released | New Features And Download
    Ubuntu 17.04 Zesty Zapus Beta 1 release is finally here. If you’re interested, you can go ahead and download the ISO images of the participating flavors, which are, Lubuntu, Kubuntu, Xubuntu, Ubuntu Budgie, Ubuntu GNOME, Ubuntu Kylin, and Ubuntu Studio. Powered by Linux kernel 4.10, these releases feature the latest stable versions of their respective desktop environments. This release will be followed by the Final Beta release on March 23 and final release on April 13.
  • Ubuntu 17.04 Beta 1 Now Available to Download
    The first beta releases in the Ubuntu 17.04 development cycle are ready for testing, with Xubuntu, Ubuntu GNOME and Ubuntu Budgie among the flavors taking part.