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Wednesday, 20 Jun 18 - Tux Machines is a community-driven public service/news site which has been around for over a decade and primarily focuses on GNU/LinuxSubscribe now Syndicate content

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OSS Leftovers

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OSS
  • Luke Klinker’s Talon for Twitter goes open source

    Knowing how successful the original version of Talon for Twitter was, it might not be a surprise that its revamped Material Design version is currently the top paid social app. There is clearly a demand for third-party Twitter apps that look good, a demand that developer Luke Klinker knows extends to other developers and tinkerers.

    That might be why Klinker announced that the current version of Talon will be open source from now on.

  • Google releases open source 'GIF for CLI' terminal tool on GitHub

    Tomorrow is the GIF's 31st anniversary -- exciting, right? Those animated images have truly changed the world. All kidding aside, it is pretty amazing that the file format came to be way back in 1987!

    To celebrate tomorrow's milestone, Google releases a new open source tool today. Called "GIF for CLI," it can convert a Graphics Interchange Format image into ASCII art for terminal. You can see such an example in the image above.

  • Is Open Source Software the Best Choice for IoT Development?

    For IoT development, new survey data shows enterprise IT teams are getting more comfortable with open source software.

  • The ‘problems’ with machine learning, Databricks MLflow to the rescue?

    Databricks announced a new open source project called MLflow for open source machine learning at the Spark Summit this month.

    The company exists to focus on cloud-based big data processing using the open source Apache Spark cluster computing framework.

    The company’s chief technologist Matei Zaharia says that the team built its machine learning (ML) approach to address the problems that people typically voice when it comes to ML.

  • The Open Revolution: the vital struggle of open vs closed, free vs unfree

    Rufus Pollock’s new book The Open Revolution: rewriting the rules of the information age, reimagines ownership in a digital age and its implications from the power of tech monopolies to control how we think and vote , to unaffordable medicines, to growing inequality. Get the book and find out more at openrevolution.net. - Cory

  • Dremio Announces the Gandiva Initiative for Apache Arrow
  • Open source "Gandiva" project wants to unblock analytics

    The key to efficient data processing is handling rows of data in batches, rather than one row at a time. Older, file-oriented databases utilized the latter method, to their detriment. When SQL relational databases came on the scene, they provided a query grammar that was set-based, declarative and much more efficient. That was an improvement that's stuck with us.

  • Bitfi launching open source crypto wallet and 1st hardware wallet for Monero

    Bitfi, a global payments technology company working to enable businesses and consumers to participate in the digital currency economy, today announced Bitfi Knox Wallet – the first unhackable, open source hardware wallet with an accompanying dashboard that features wireless setup and support for many popular cryptocurrencies and crypto assets, including Monero, a fully decentralized private cryptocurrency that has previously never had a hardware wallet solution.

  • Sculpt OS available as live system

    Sculpt for The Curious (TC) is the second incarnation of the general-purpose operating system pursued by the developers of the Genode OS Framework. It comes in the form of a ready-to-use system image that can be booted directly from a USB thumb drive. In contrast to earlier versions, Sculpt TC features a graphical user interface for the interactive management of storage devices and networking. The main administrative interface remains text-based. It allows the user to "sculpt" the system live into shape, and introspect the system's state at any time.

  • Mozilla To Create A Voice-Controlled Web Browser Called ‘Scout’

    Mozilla is reported to be working on a browser that works on voice commands instead of standard inputs obtained from mouse and keyboard.

    The project has been named ‘Scout’; the voice-controlled web browser would focus on accessibility and would allow users to surf the web without using a touchscreen and other conventionally used input systems.

  • GNU Scientific Library 2.5 released

    Version 2.5 of the GNU Scientific Library (GSL) is now available. GSL provides a large collection of routines for numerical computing in C.

    This release introduces some new features and fixes several bugs. The full NEWS file entry is appended below.

FUD and Entryism

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OSS

Security: Cortana Hole, Docker Hub Woes, and Intel FPU Speculation Vulnerability

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Security

Kernel: Security, ARM and Whiskey Lake/Amber Lake

Filed under
Linux

Fedora: Fedora 29, Linux 4.17 (Soon), Fedora vs Ubuntu

Filed under
Red Hat
  • Binutils 2.31 Slated For Fedora 29

    To little surprise given that Fedora Linux always strives to ship with a bleeding-edge GNU toolchain, for the Fedora 29 release this fall they are planning to make use of the yet-to-be-released Binutils 2.31.

  • Linux 4.17 Stable Has Been Settling Well, Coming Soon To Fedora

    Since the release of Linux 4.17 almost two weeks ago, I haven't heard of any horror stories, Linux 4.17 continues running excellent on all of my test systems, the 4.17.1 point release was quite small, and more distributions are gearing up to ship this latest kernel release.

  • [Older] Fedora vs Ubuntu

Wine and Games: Better Wine Benchmarking, Bundles and More

15.6-inch Apollo Lake panel PC supports Fedora, Ubuntu, and Yocto Linux

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GNU
Linux
Hardware

DFI’s “KS-156AL” industrial touch-panel PC runs Linux or Windows on Apollo Lake and features a 15.6-inch, 1366 x 768 touchscreen with IP65 protection and shock and vibration resistance.

DFI’s Linux-friendly, 15.6-inch KS-156AL panel PC is based on its AL171 mini-ITX board, which was announced a year ago along with the similar AL173 which is otherwise identical except for the addition of wide-range power. The KS-156AL was recently announced along with a similarly Intel Apollo Lake based, 7-inch KS070-AL panel PC. The 7-inch KS070-AL is supported only with Windows, although it’s based on a 3.5-inch, “coming soon” AL551 SBC that also supports Ubuntu. The two systems are designed for factory automation, transportation, and other embedded applications.

Read more

Also: Compact Kaby Lake embedded PC has SATA, M.2, and mSATA

Security: Intel, Updates and More

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Security
  • New Lazy FP State Restore Vulnerability Affects All Intel Core CPUs
  • CVE-2018-3665: Floating Point Lazy State Save/Restore vulnerability affects Intel chips
  • New flaw in Intel processors can be exploited in a similar way to Spectre

    A new security vulnerability has been found in Intel’s family of Core processors, along similar lines of the major Spectre bug that has been making headlines all year. Thankfully, this one appears to be less severe – and is already patched in modern versions of Windows and Linux.

    The freshly-discovered hole is known as the ‘Lazy FP state restore’ bug, and like Spectre, it is a speculative execution side channel attack. Just a few weeks back, we were told to expect further spins on speculative execution attack vectors, and it seems this is one.

    Intel explains: “Systems using Intel Core-based microprocessors may potentially allow a local process to infer data utilizing Lazy FP state restore from another process through a speculative execution side channel.”

  • openSUSE Leap 15 Now Offering Images for RPis, Another Security Vulnerability for Intel, Trusted News Chrome Extension and More

    Intel yesterday announced yet another security vulnerability with its Core-based microprocessors. According to ZDNet, Lazy FP state restore "can theoretically pull data from your programs, including encryption software, from your computer regardless of your operating system." Note that Lazy State does not affect AMD processors.

  • Security updates for Thursday
  • FBI: Smart Meter [Cracks] Likely to Spread

    A series of [cracks] perpetrated against so-called “smart meter” installations over the past several years may have cost a single U.S. electric utility hundreds of millions of dollars annually, the FBI said in a cyber intelligence bulletin obtained by KrebsOnSecurity. The law enforcement agency said this is the first known report of criminals compromising the hi-tech meters, and that it expects this type of fraud to spread across the country as more utilities deploy smart grid technology.

  • Introducing Graphene-ng: running arbitrary payloads in SGX enclaves

    A few months ago, during my keynote at Black Hat Europe, I was discussing how we should be limiting the amount of trust when building computer systems. Recently, a new technology from Intel has been gaining popularity among both developers and researchers, a technology which promises a big step towards such trust-minimizing systems. I’m talking about Intel SGX, of course.

KDE: Plasma 5.13, GSoC and Qt 3D

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KDE
  • KDE Plasma 5.13 Is Here – And It Looks Incredible

    Back in May we said that KDE Plasma 5.13 was shaping up to be one heck of a release — now that it’s out, I think I can say we were right.

    And to demo the key changes arriving in this update of the popular, resource-efficient desktop environment is a spiffy official release video.

    At a speedy 2 minutes 22 seconds long, the official clip offers a concise overview of the what’s new in Plasma 5.13, from its new-look system settings and nifty browser integration, to the redesigned lock and login screens and improved ‘Discover’ software tool.

  • GSoC 2018: First period summary

    Hi everybody, it has been a month since I started working on WikiToLearn PWA for Google Summer of Code program and many things happened!
    WTL frontend needed some improvements in terms of usability and functionalities. Course needed a way to update their metadata: title and chapters order for example
    So I implemented a work-in-progress EDIT MODE, as you can see below. You can drag chapters, insert new ones and/or modify course title.

  • Qt 3D Studio RC2 is available

    We have released Qt 3D Studio 2.0 RC2 today. It is available as both commercial and open source versions from online and offline installers.

    Qt 3D Studio 2.0 has a whole new 3D engine built on top of Qt 3D, a new timeline built from ground up with Qt based on the new timeline code in upcoming Qt Design Studio. Also there are a lot of improvements to the designer user experience, interactions in the 3D edit view and visualisation of lights and cameras being most notable ones. And of course we have numerous bug fixes.

  • Qt 3D Studio 2.0 RC2 Released For This 2D/3D UI Designer

    The second release candidate of the revamped Qt 3D Studio 2.0 is now available for testing.

    Qt developers have had a very busy week with the Qt Contributors' Summit where they talked of early Qt 6.0 plans, releasing the inaugural Qt for Python, and also updating Qt 5.9 and Qt Creator 4.6. The latest is now their second test release of the upcoming Qt 3D Studio 2.0.

Software: Corgi, Editors. PulseEffects, Short Message Service, Kubernetes and Docker

Filed under
Software
  • Corgi, the CLI workflow manager: Cute *and* useful

    Corgi is a command-line tool that helps with your repetitive command usages by organizing them into reusable snippet. It was inspired by Pet and aims to advance Pet’s command-level usage to a workflow level.

    The current version of v0.2.2 features a number of useful snippet tools. Let’s have a look:

    Create a snippet – Corgi provides an interactive CLI interface to create snippets, and you can start by running corgi new. You can also create snippets from command history and define template fields in snippet

  • Emacs, Vim, or something else?
  • System-Wide PulseAudio Effects Software PulseEffects Update Includes Configurable Number Of Equalizer Bands

    PulseEffects, the audio effects tool for PulseAudio, was updated to version 4.0 recently, with subsequent bug-fix releases to version 4.0.4, introducing new features like an option to change the number of its PulseAudio equalizer bands, or use a custom color for the spectrum, among others.

    PulseEffects allows using multiple audio input and output effects on your system (which needs to use PulseAudio), including reverberation, stereo enhancer, limiter, auto volume, as well as a 30-band system-wide equalizer.

    The application was updated to version 4.0.0 about 10 days ago, and since then there were 4 bug-fix releases, but the 4.x versions weren't available on FlatHub until recently (the current version on Flathub is 4.0.2 so it's 2 bug-fix versions behind).

  • 4 Best Open Source Bulk SMS Gateway Software

    Today, SMS (Short Message Service) has become more popular, it widely used all over the world in huge amounts for various business processes such as SMS Marketing, apart from the conventional communication platform. An SMS gateway allows a computer system to send or receive SMS to or from a telecommunications network, thus to or from mobile phones of clients.

  • Going Global with Kubernetes

    Kubernetes is often touted as the Linux of the cloud world, and that comparison is fair when you consider its widespread adoption. But, with great power comes great responsibility and, as the home of Kubernetes, the Cloud Native Computing Foundation (CNCF) shoulders many responsibilities, including learning from the mistakes of other open source projects while not losing sight of the main goal. The rapid global growth of CNCF also means increased responsibility in terms of cultural diversity and creating a welcoming environment.

  • Docker Enterprise Edition Offers Multicloud App Management

    Docker has expanded its commercial container platform software, Docker Enterprise Edition (EE) to manage containerized applications across multiple cloud services.

    The idea with this release is to better help enterprise customers manage their applications across the entire development and deployment lifecycle, said Jenny Fong, Docker director of product marketing. “While containers help make applications more portable, the management of the containers is not the same,” Fong said.

    Docker EE provides a management layer for containers, addressing needs around security and governance, and the company is now extending this management into the cloud.

Events/Audiocasts/Shows: OpenBSD, Fynd, PostgresConf, Ubuntu Podcast, EzeeLinux Show

Filed under
OSS
  • Can you hack it? The importance of hackathons

    Back in the summer of 1999, 10 programmers from around the globe congregated in a room in Calgary, Alberta, to work on the obscure open source operating system known as OpenBSD. This was, in fact, the first ever recorded hackathon – a portmanteau of the words ‘hack’ and ‘marathon’ – anywhere in the world. Since…

  • Fynd Organizes Hackxagon, an Open Source Challenge for Its Engineers

    As an initiative to give back to the open source community, Fynd, the unique fashion e-commerce portal had launched gofynd.io, a few months ago. This project enabled the engineers of the fashion e-commerce portal to learn new technologies, improve the core infrastructure and enhance the Fynd platform. However, Fynd wanted to streamline the open sourcing process for which, the fashion e-commerce portal introduced Fynd Hackxagon—Open Source Challenge. The tech team open-sourced 13 projects in a day that were later made available in the Fynd GitHub public account.

  • South African Linux and Postgres conferences planned for October

    The South African open source, Linux, and Postgres community will be treated to two conferences in October – LinuxConf on 8 October and PostgresConf on 9 October.

    LinuxConf is a one-day conference in Johannesburg aimed at the Linux and open source community.

    Topics covered at LinuxConf will include Linux Kernel and OS, Linux distributions, virtualisation, system administration, open source applications, networking, and development environments.

    PostgresConf is aimed at the database administration and developer community, where they will exchange ideas and learn about the features and upcoming trends within PostgreSQL.

  • Ubuntu Podcast from the UK LoCo: S11E14.5 – Fourteen and a Half Pound Budgie - Ubuntu Podcast

    This show was recorded in front of a live studio audience at FOSS Talk Live on Saturday 9th June 2018! We take you on a 40 year journey through our time trumpet and contribute to some open source projects for the first time and discuss the outcomes.

  • EzeeLinux Show 18.23 | Ubuntu is NOT Spying on You!

    We take a look at Ubuntu’s data collection and talk about how it effects you. I also comment on some goings on in the Linux YouTube community and look at the new EzeeLinux web server.

Graphics: Nouveau Benchmarks, H.264, Mesa and Libinput

Filed under
Graphics/Benchmarks
  • The NVIDIA vs. Open-Source Nouveau Linux Driver Benchmarks For Summer 2018

    It has been some months since last delivering any benchmarks of Nouveau, the open-source, community-driven for NVIDIA GPUs. The reason for not having any Nouveau benchmarks recently has largely been due to lack of major progress, at least on the GeForce desktop GPU side, while NVIDIA has continued to contribute on the Tegra side. For those wondering how the current performance is of this driver that started out more than a decade ago via reverse-engineering, here are some benchmarks of the latest open-source Nouveau and NVIDIA Linux graphics drivers on Ubuntu.

  • H.264 Decoding Tackled For Reverse-Engineered "Cedrus" Allwinner Video Decode Driver

    The Bootlin (formerly Free Electrons) developers working on the Cedrus open-source, reverse-engineered Allwinner video decode driver have posted their patches for enabling H.264 video decoding.

    Earlier versions of their Sunxi-Cedrus driver patches had just supported MPEG-2 with other codecs to be tackled, but hitting the kernel mailing list this week were their patches for enabling H.264 decoding on Allwinner hardware.

  • More Vega M Performance Numbers Surfacing, Linux State Looking Good

    The performance of the Intel Core i7-8809G "Kabylake G" processor with onboard Radeon "Vega M" graphics are looking quite good under Linux now that the support has been squared away.

  • Mesa RadeonSI Lands Possible Vega/Raven Performance Improvement

    Earlier this month AMD's Marek Olšák posted RadeonSI patches for a scissor workaround affecting GFX9/Vega GPUs including Raven Ridge, which were based upon a RADV driver workaround already merged that helped affected games by up to ~11%. A revised version of that patch is now in Mesa 18.2 Git.

  • libinput and its device quirks files

    This post does not describe a configuration system. If that's all you care about, read this post here and go be angry at someone else. Anyway, with that out of the way let's get started.

    For a long time, libinput has supported model quirks (first added in Apr 2015). These model quirks are bitflags applied to some devices so we can enable special behaviours in the code. Model flags can be very specific ("this is a Lenovo x230 Touchpad") or generic ("This is a trackball") and it just depends on what the specific behaviour is that we need. The x230 touchpad for example has a custom pointer acceleration but trackballs are marked so they get some config options mice don't have/need.

Games Leftovers: OneShot, War Thunder, Hand of Fate 2, Surviving Mars & Iconoclasts

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Gaming

openSUSE Leap 15 Linux OS Is Now Available for Raspberry Pi, Other ARM Devices

Filed under
SUSE

Released last month, openSUSE Leap 15 is based on the SUSE Linux Enterprise 15 operating system series and introduces numerous new features and improvements over the previous versions. These include a new disk partitioner in the installer, the ability to migrate OpenSuSE Leap 15 installations to SUSE Linux Enterprise (SLE) 15, and integration with the Kopano open-source groupware application suite.

openSUSE Leap 15 also ships with a Firewalld as the default firewall management tool, a brand-new look that's closely aligned with SUSE Linux Enterprise, new classic "transactional server" and "server" system roles providing read-only root filesystem and transactional updates, and much more. Now, openSUSE Leap 15 was launched officially for ARM64 (AArch64) and ARMv7 devices, such as Raspberry Pi, BeagleBoard, Arndale Board, CuBox-i, and OLinuXino.

Read more

Piventory: LJ Tech Editor's Personal Stash of Raspberry Pis and Other Single-Board Computers

Filed under
Linux

I'm a big fan of DIY projects and think that there is a lot of value in doing something yourself instead of relying on some third party. I mow my own lawn, change my own oil and do most of my own home repairs, and because of my background in system administration, you'll find all sorts of DIY servers at my house too. In the old days, geeks like me would have stacks of loud power-hungry desktop computers around and use them to learn about Linux and networking, but these days, VMs and cloud services have taken their place for most people. I still like running my own servers though, and thanks to the advent of these tiny, cheap computers like the Raspberry Pi series, I've been able to replace all of my home services with a lot of different small, cheap, low-power computers.

Read more

Server: Containers and 'Enterprise' GNU/Linux

Filed under
Red Hat
Server
  • Container and Kubernetes Security: It's Complicated

    Container technology is being increasingly used by organizations as a way to deploy applications and micro-services. The promise of containers is improved agility and portability, while potentially also reducing the attack surface. Though container technology can be helpful for security, it can also have its own set of risks.

    In a panel session at the recent Kubecon + CloudNativeCon EU event titled "Modern App Security Requires Containers" -- moderated by eSecurity Planet -- security experts from Cloud Native Computing Foundation (CNCF) project and Google debated what's wrong and what's right with container security.

  • Docker Defines Itself as the Open Choice for Containers at DockerCon 18

    Docker CEO Steve Singh kicked off his company's DockerCon 18 conference here today, offering the assembled crowd of container enthusiasts a clear vision of where Docker is going.

    For Docker Inc, the company behind the eponymous container system, a lot is at stake. This is the first DockerCon where the founder of the company, Solomon Hykes is not present. Hykes left Docker in March, as the company direction has increasingly focused on enterprise adoption and commercial market growth.

  • How to select the right enterprise Linux

    The decision to use any modern edition of that operating system, generally spoken as RHEL with a silent H, is usually based on a need for component stability, paid technical support, and long-term version support, said Red Hat's Ron Pacheco, director of global product management.

  • CentOS 7.4 & kernel 4.x - Worth the risk?

    The reasons why we have gathered here are many. A few weeks ago, my CentOS distro went dead. With the new kernel containing Spectre patches, it refused to load the Realtek Wireless drivers into memory. Moreover, patches also prevent manual compilation. This makes the distro useless, as it has no network connection. Then, in my CentOS 7.4 upgrade article - which was flawless, including the network piece, go figure - I wondered about the use of new, modern 4.x kernels in CentOS. Sounds like we have a real incentive here.

    In this tutorial, I will attempt to install and use the latest mainline kernel (4.16 when I typed this). The benefits should be many. I've seen improved performance, responsiveness and battery life in newer kernels compared to the 3.x branch. The Realtek Wireless woes of the disconnect kind (like a Spielberg movie) were also fixed in kernel 4.8.7 onwards, so that's another thing. Lastly, this would make CentOS a lean, mean and modern beast. Bravely onwards!

    [...]

    Now, I can breathe with relief, as I've delivered on my promise, and I gave you a full solution to the CentOS 7.4 Realtek issues post upgrade. I do not like to end articles on a cliffhanger, and definitely not carry the solution over to a follow-up article, but in this rare case, it was necessary. The mainline kernel upgrade is a topic of its own.

    The kernel installation worked fine, and thereafter, we seem to have gained on many fronts. The network issues are fully resolved, we can compile again, the performance seems improved despite worse figures in the system monitor, battery life and stability are not impaired in any way, and the CentOS box has fresh new life, wrapped in modern features and latest software. And none of this was meant to be in the first place, because CentOS is a server distro. Well, I hope you are happy. The one outstanding mission - Plasma 5. Once we have that, we can proudly claim to have created the ultimate Linux distro hybrid monster. Take care.

HP Chromebook X2 is the first Detachable Chromebook with Linux app support

Filed under
GNU
Linux
Google
  • HP Chromebook X2 is the first Detachable Chromebook with Linux app support

    We first heard of Chrome OS gaining Linux app support back in February. Google officially confirmed during Google I/O 2018 that the Pixelbook would be the first Chromebook with Linux app support, but since then the Samsung Chromebook Plus has joined in on the fun. Tonight, a device that we expected to eventually gain Linux app support finally got support for it: the HP Chromebook X2.

  • HP Chromebook X2 Receives Linux App Support In Canary

    Following Google’s addition of Linux app support for Chrome OS and its own Pixelbook shortly after this year’s Google I/O conference which took place last month, the same Linux treatment has now been given to the new HP Chromebook X2. The aforementioned device was released in April as the first Chrome OS notebook to be wrapped in a 2-in-1 format, boasting stylus support and a metal unibody design. The recent implementation of Linux apps is primarily aimed at developers and presently it can only be acquired by switching to the Canary channel.

  • HP Chromebook X2 Gets Official Linux App Support

    Google recently announced that Chrome OS devices will soon get support for Linux apps starting with the company’s own Pixelbook, after which Chromebooks from other manufacturers will also get the same treatment. Samsung’s Chromebook Plus was the first device from another manufacturer to get support for Linux apps, and now, HP’s Chromebook X2 has joined the league.

Microsoft loves Linux so much its R Open install script rm'd /bin/sh

Filed under
Microsoft
Debian

Microsoft had to emit a hasty update for its R Open analysis tool after developers found the open-source package was not playing nice with some Linux systems.

The issue was brought to light earlier this week by developer Norbert Preining, who found that the Debian GNU/Linux version of Open R – Microsoft's open-source implementation of the R statistics and data science tool – was causing headaches when it was installed on some systems.

Read more

Also: Microsoft Fixes Faulty Debian Package That Messed With Users' Settings

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More in Tux Machines

GNOME Desktop: Flatpak and Random Wallpaper Gnome Extension

  • Flatpak in detail, part 2
    The first post in this series looked at runtimes and extensions. Here, we’ll look at how flatpak keeps the applications and runtimes on your system organized, with installations, repositories, branches, commits and deployments.
  • Flatpak – a history
    I’ve been working on Flatpak for almost 4 years now, and 1.0 is getting closer. I think it might be interesting at this point to take a retrospective look at the history of Flatpak.
  • Random Wallpaper Gnome Extension Changes Your Desktop Background With Images From Various Online Sources
    Random Wallpaper is an extension for Gnome Shell that can automatically fetch wallpapers from a multitude of online sources and set it as your desktop background. The automatic wallpaper changer comes with built-in support for downloading wallpapers from unsplash.com, desktopper.co, wallhaven.cc, as well as support for basic JSON APIs or files. The JSON support is in fact my favorite feature in Random Wallpaper. That's because thanks to it and the examples available on the Random Wallpaper GitHub Wiki, one can easily add Chromecast Images, NASA Picture of the day, Bing Picture of the day, and Google Earth View (Google Earth photos from a selection of around 1500 curated locations) as image sources.

today's howtos

KDE: QtPad, Celebrating 10 Years with KDE, GSoC 2018

  • QtPad - Modern Customizable Sticky Note App for Linux
    In this article, we'll focus on how to install and use QtPad on Ubuntu 18.04. Qtpad is a unique and highly customizable sticky note application written in Qt5 and Python3 tailored for Unix systems.
  • Celebrating 10 Years with KDE
    Of course I am using KDE software much longer. My first Linux distribution, SuSE 6.2 (the precursor to openSUSE), came with KDE 1.1.1 and was already released 19 years ago. But this post is not celebrating the years I am using KDE software. Exactly ten years ago, dear Albert committed my first contribution to KDE. A simple patch for a problem that looked obvious to fix, but waiting for someone to actually do the work. Not really understanding the consequences, it marks the start of my journey within the amazing KDE community.
  • GSoC 2018 – Coding Period (May 28th to June 18th): First Evaluation and Progress with LVM VG
    I got some problems during the last weeks of Google Summer of Code which made me deal with some challenges. One of these challenges was caused by a HD physical problem. I haven’t made a backup of some work and had to rework again in some parts of my code. As I already knew how to proceed, it was faster than the first time. I had to understand how the device loading process is made in Calamares to load a preview of the new LVM VG during its creation in Partition Page. I need to list it as a new storage device in this page and deal with the revert process. I’ve implemented some basic fixes and tried to improve it.

Open Hardware: Good for Your Brand, Good for Your Bottom Line

Chip makers are starting to catch on to the advantages of open, however. SiFive has released an entirely open RISC-V development board. Its campaign on the Crowd Supply crowd-funding website very quickly raised more than $140,000 USD. The board itself is hailed as a game-changer in the world of hardware. Developments like these will ensure that it won't be long before the hardware equivalent of LEGO's bricks will soon be as open as the designs built using them. Read more