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Sunday, 15 Jul 18 - Tux Machines is a community-driven public service/news site which has been around for over a decade and primarily focuses on GNU/LinuxSubscribe now Syndicate content

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Today in Techrights

today's leftovers

Linux Kernel/Foundation

  • Linux Foundation Brings Power of Open Source to Energy Sector
    The Linux Foundation launched on July 12 its latest effort—LF Energy, an open-source coalition for the energy and power management sector. The LF Energy coalition is being backed by French transmission system operation RTE, Vanderbilt University and the European Network of Transmission System Operators (ENTSO-E). With LF Energy, the Linux Foundation is aiming to replicate the success it has seen in other sectors, including networking, automotive, financial services and cloud computing.
  • Marek Squeezes More Performance Out Of RadeonSI In CPU-Bound Scenarios
    AMD's leading open-source RadeonSI Gallium3D developer, Marek Olšák, sent out a new patch series this week aiming to benefit this Radeon OpenGL driver's performance in CPU-bound scenarios. The patch series is a set of command submission optimizations aimed to help trivial CPU-bound benchmarks to varying extents. In the very trivial glxgears, the patch series is able to improve the maximum frame-rates by around 10%.
  • Intel Sends In A Final Batch Of DRM Feature Updates Targeting Linux 4.19
    After several big feature pull requests of new "i915" Intel DRM driver features landing in DRM-Next for Linux 4.19, the Intel open-source developers have sent in what they believe to be their last batch of feature changes for queuing this next kernel cycle.

OSS Leftovers

  • Open source governance accelerates innovation [Ed: Evolution of the tactics by which anti-FOSS proprietary software firms, Sonatype in this case, try to sell their 'wares']
  • GitHub Enterprise 2.14 brings unified search of cloud and local
  • GitHub Enterprise 2.14 is ‘open goodness’ behind an enterprise firewall
  • DragonFly BSD Lead Developer Preaches The Blessing Of SSDs
    DragonFlyBSD lead developer Matthew Dillon has provided an update on the open-source operating system project's infrastructure and acknowledging the SSD upgrades that are noticeably beneficial over HDDs. DragonFlyBSD has recently been replacing various HDDs with SSDs in their build machines and other systems having an important presence in their infrastructure. Following these storage upgrades, things have been running great and ultimately should deliver a snappier experience for users and developers.
  • Binutils 2.31 Offers Faster DLL Linking For Cygwin/Mingw, Freescale S12Z Support
    A new release of the Binutils collection of important tools is now available with a number of new features and improvements. Binutils 2.31 contains work like direct linking with DLLs for Cygwin/Mingw targets now being faster, AArch64 disassembler improvements, MIPS GINV and CRC extension support, Freescale S12Z architecture support, the x86 assembler now supports new command line options to enable alternative shorter instruction encodings, and the Gold linker now supports Intel Indirect Branch Tracking and Shadow Stack instructions.
  • GCC 8/9 Land Fix For "-march=native" Tuning On Modern Intel CPUs
    The other day we reported on a GCC 8 regression where Skylake and newer CPUs with "-march=native" haven't been performance as optimally as they should be. Fortunately, that patch was quickly landed into the GCC SVN/Git code for GCC 9 as well as back-ported to GCC 8. In the GCC 8.1 release and mainline code since April, as the previous article outlined, when using "-march=native" as part of the compiler flags with GCC the full capabilities of the CPU haven't been leveraged. This affects Intel Skylake CPUs and newer generations, including yet to be released hardware like Cannonlake and Icelake.
  • ARM Kills Its RISC-V FUD Website After Staff Revolt
    ARM is under fire for the way it attempted to kneecap a fledgling open-source hardware project, and has retreated from its own line of attack after several days. ARM had launched a website, riscv-basics.com, which purported to offer “real” information on the rival ISA. As one might expect, the “information” on display was a bit less neutral than a visitor might hope for. Taking this kind of shot against an open-source hardware project also struck many in the OSS community as being in exceptionally poor taste, given how critical open source software has been to ARM’s overall success and visibility. First, a bit of background: RISC-V is an open-source ISA based on RISC principles and is intended to eventually provide flexible CPU cores for a wide variety of use-cases. By using the BSD license, the RISC-V teams hope to allow for a greater range of projects that support both open and proprietary CPU designs. RISC-V CPUs are already available today in a range of roles and capabilities. Despite some modest initial success, RISC-V, today, isn’t even a rounding error in CPU marketshare measurements. It’s certainly no threat to ARM, which enjoys the mother of all vendor lock-ins measured in per-device terms.
  • Python boss Guido van Rossum steps down after 30 years
     

    He lays out a list of things that the users will need to consider going forwards like who has banning rights and who inducts noobs to the core developer team, but its laid out in a context of ‘do what you want but keep me out of it'.  

    "I'll still be here, but I'm trying to let you all figure something out for yourselves. I'm tired, and need a very long break."

TxFS Linux File-System Supports ACID Transactions, Simple API

Filed under
Linux

Presented at this past week's 2018 USENIX Annual Technical Conference (ATC18) was TxFS, the Texas Transactional File System for Linux.

Texas Transactional File System (TxFS) has been in the works for a number of years and is a transactional file-system that offers a simple API, wide range of hardware support, high performance while supporting ACID transactions, and relatively low complexity.

TxFS has been worked on by the University of Texas at Austin as well as VMware Research. Papers on TxFS have been published before but their ATC18 paper can be found here (PDF).

One of the professors involved in this work has also tweeted some different remarks including the file-system is down to just five thousand lines of code by utilizing the file-system journal, how they provided isolation for TxFS transactions, and its very simple API of just three system calls.

Read more

Red Hat Enterprise Linux 6 & CentOS 6 Patched Against Spectre V4, Lazy FPU Flaws

Filed under
Red Hat
Security

Users of the Red Hat Enterprise Linux 6 and CentOS Linux 6 operating system series received important kernel security updates that patch some recently discovered vulnerabilities.

Now that Red Hat Enterprise Linux 7 and CentOS Linux 7 operating system series were patched against the Spectre Variant 4 (CVE-2018-3639) security vulnerability, as well as the Lazy FPU State Save/Restore CPU flaw, it's time for Red Hat Enterprise Linux 6 and CentOS Linux 6 to receive these important security updates, which users can now install them on their computers.

Read more

openSUSE Tumbleweed Users Get LibreOffice 6.1, Mozilla Firefox 61, and FFmpeg 4

Filed under
SUSE

The month of July 2018 was pretty busy for the openSUSE Tumbleweed development team, and the first two weeks of the month already delivered dozens of updates and security fixes.

openSUSE developer Dominique Leuenberger reports that a total of nine snapshots have been released in July 2018 for the openSUSE Tumbleweed Linux operating system series, which follows a rolling release model where users install once and receive updates forever. As expected, these 9 snapshots bring numerous updates and bugfixes.

Read more

today's leftovers

Filed under
Misc

Linux Kernel/Foundation

Filed under
Linux
  • Linux Foundation Brings Power of Open Source to Energy Sector

    The Linux Foundation launched on July 12 its latest effort—LF Energy, an open-source coalition for the energy and power management sector.

    The LF Energy coalition is being backed by French transmission system operation RTE, Vanderbilt University and the European Network of Transmission System Operators (ENTSO-E). With LF Energy, the Linux Foundation is aiming to replicate the success it has seen in other sectors, including networking, automotive, financial services and cloud computing.

  • Marek Squeezes More Performance Out Of RadeonSI In CPU-Bound Scenarios

    AMD's leading open-source RadeonSI Gallium3D developer, Marek Olšák, sent out a new patch series this week aiming to benefit this Radeon OpenGL driver's performance in CPU-bound scenarios.

    The patch series is a set of command submission optimizations aimed to help trivial CPU-bound benchmarks to varying extents. In the very trivial glxgears, the patch series is able to improve the maximum frame-rates by around 10%.

  • Intel Sends In A Final Batch Of DRM Feature Updates Targeting Linux 4.19

    After several big feature pull requests of new "i915" Intel DRM driver features landing in DRM-Next for Linux 4.19, the Intel open-source developers have sent in what they believe to be their last batch of feature changes for queuing this next kernel cycle.

OSS Leftovers

Filed under
OSS
  • Open source governance accelerates innovation [Ed: Evolution of the tactics by which anti-FOSS proprietary software firms, Sonatype in this case, try to sell their 'wares']
  • GitHub Enterprise 2.14 brings unified search of cloud and local
  • GitHub Enterprise 2.14 is ‘open goodness’ behind an enterprise firewall
  • DragonFly BSD Lead Developer Preaches The Blessing Of SSDs

    DragonFlyBSD lead developer Matthew Dillon has provided an update on the open-source operating system project's infrastructure and acknowledging the SSD upgrades that are noticeably beneficial over HDDs.

    DragonFlyBSD has recently been replacing various HDDs with SSDs in their build machines and other systems having an important presence in their infrastructure. Following these storage upgrades, things have been running great and ultimately should deliver a snappier experience for users and developers.

  • Binutils 2.31 Offers Faster DLL Linking For Cygwin/Mingw, Freescale S12Z Support

    A new release of the Binutils collection of important tools is now available with a number of new features and improvements.

    Binutils 2.31 contains work like direct linking with DLLs for Cygwin/Mingw targets now being faster, AArch64 disassembler improvements, MIPS GINV and CRC extension support, Freescale S12Z architecture support, the x86 assembler now supports new command line options to enable alternative shorter instruction encodings, and the Gold linker now supports Intel Indirect Branch Tracking and Shadow Stack instructions.

  • GCC 8/9 Land Fix For "-march=native" Tuning On Modern Intel CPUs

    The other day we reported on a GCC 8 regression where Skylake and newer CPUs with "-march=native" haven't been performance as optimally as they should be. Fortunately, that patch was quickly landed into the GCC SVN/Git code for GCC 9 as well as back-ported to GCC 8.

    In the GCC 8.1 release and mainline code since April, as the previous article outlined, when using "-march=native" as part of the compiler flags with GCC the full capabilities of the CPU haven't been leveraged. This affects Intel Skylake CPUs and newer generations, including yet to be released hardware like Cannonlake and Icelake.

  • ARM Kills Its RISC-V FUD Website After Staff Revolt

    ARM is under fire for the way it attempted to kneecap a fledgling open-source hardware project, and has retreated from its own line of attack after several days. ARM had launched a website, riscv-basics.com, which purported to offer “real” information on the rival ISA. As one might expect, the “information” on display was a bit less neutral than a visitor might hope for. Taking this kind of shot against an open-source hardware project also struck many in the OSS community as being in exceptionally poor taste, given how critical open source software has been to ARM’s overall success and visibility.

    First, a bit of background: RISC-V is an open-source ISA based on RISC principles and is intended to eventually provide flexible CPU cores for a wide variety of use-cases. By using the BSD license, the RISC-V teams hope to allow for a greater range of projects that support both open and proprietary CPU designs. RISC-V CPUs are already available today in a range of roles and capabilities. Despite some modest initial success, RISC-V, today, isn’t even a rounding error in CPU marketshare measurements. It’s certainly no threat to ARM, which enjoys the mother of all vendor lock-ins measured in per-device terms.

  • Python boss Guido van Rossum steps down after 30 years

     

    He lays out a list of things that the users will need to consider going forwards like who has banning rights and who inducts noobs to the core developer team, but its laid out in a context of ‘do what you want but keep me out of it'.
     

    "I'll still be here, but I'm trying to let you all figure something out for yourselves. I'm tired, and need a very long break."

Nintendo Found a Way to Patch an Unpatchable Coldboot Exploit in Nintendo Switch

Filed under
Security
Gadgets

If you plan on buying a Nintendo Switch gaming console to run Linux on it using the "unpatchable" exploit publicly disclosed a few months ago, think again because Nintendo reportedly fixed the security hole.

Not long ago, a team of hackers calling themselves ReSwitched publicly disclosed a security vulnerability in the Nvidia Tegra X1 chip, which they called Fusée Gelée and could allow anyone to hack a Nintendo Switch gaming console to install a Linux-based operating system and run homebrew code and apps using a simple trick.

Read more

Winds – RSS and Podcast software created using React / Redux / Node

Filed under
Software
Reviews

Winds is billed as a beautiful, modern, open-source RSS Reader and Podcast app. It’s certainly garnishing attention among open source enthusiasts. It’s picked up over 5,000 stars on GitHub, so I’ve been putting this JavaScript software through its paces.

Winds is cross-platform software. There are desktop apps available for Linux, macOS and Windows. There’s also a web version. The software is released under an open source license (BSD-3-Clause). It’s developed by GetStream.io (Stream), a Venture Capital backed company based in the US and the Netherlands.

Read more

Also: Alacritty – A Fastest Terminal Emulator for Linux

GNOME: Pitivi, Gitlab CI, Flatpak and Mutter

Filed under
GNOME
  • Harish Fulara: [GSoC 2018] Welcome Window Integration in Pitivi – Part 4

    The next and the last task under “Welcome Window Integration in Pitivi” as per my GSoC project is to integrate project thumbnails in recent projects list. I am currently working on this task and hope to finish it by next week.

  • Application screenshots with Gitlab CI

    The fresh new tooling used for development in the GNOME project (gitlab, meson, docker, flatpak) has a lots of potential

  • Matthias Clasen: The Flatpak BoF at Guadec

    Here is a quick summary of the Flatpak BoF that happened last week at Guadec.

  • Flatpak 1.0 Is En Route For Linux App Sandboxing & Easy Program Distribution

    At the recent GUADEC 2018 conference in Spain, GNOME developers plotted the imminent Flatpak 1.0 release as well as what's coming after the big 1.0 milestone.

  • More Mutter Performance Tuning Work Landing For GNOME 3.30

    GNOME 3.30 is looking like Mutter will be quite fit with the ability to remove its dependence on X11 code and various performance tuning optimizations. On top of already landed performance work in recent months, more optimizations have just landed and it looks like more could still be on the way.

    Most recently, as of this morning, this two month old GitLab request was merged about re-using paint volumes. From the last commit it explains, "Cuts down approximately all paint volume calculations when there's windows that redraw frequently, but don't move."

Release of KDE Frameworks 5.48.0

Filed under
KDE
  • Release of KDE Frameworks 5.48.0

    July 14, 2018. KDE today announces the release of KDE Frameworks 5.48.0.

    KDE Frameworks are 70 addon libraries to Qt which provide a wide variety of commonly needed functionality in mature, peer reviewed and well tested libraries with friendly licensing terms. For an introduction see the Frameworks 5.0 release announcement.

  • KDE Frameworks 5.48 Brings KWayland Fixes & Many Other Improvements

    KDE Frameworks 5.48 is now the latest monthly update to this collection of add-on libraries complementing Qt5.

Security Leftovers

Filed under
Security

A Second Preview to the Next elementary OS 5.0 (July 2018)

Filed under
Reviews

Here's a second short preview (after the March 2018 one) to the next 5.0 version of elementary OS from the development release. We're getting closer to final now as the Beta 1 has been released and the Beta 2 has been started but it's still not recommended to install or use the Betas. This means do not upgrade to Beta 1 or Beta 2 yet, nor install the Beta, but wait until the final version officially released. To sum it up, in 5.0, the user interface is getting more cool with tons of improvement; and the AppCenter is really amazing with payment system for both developers who deserve funds and users who want to contribute. I also mention how active the development progress is below and how we can help. This preview is very brief and cannot represent the final as the final could have more and more amazing additions. Anyway, wait for the final and enjoy reading!

Read more

Vulkan vs. OpenGL Performance For Linux Games

Filed under
Graphics/Benchmarks
Gaming

It has been a while since last publishing some Linux GPU driver benchmarks focused explicitly on the OpenGL vs. Vulkan performance, but that changed today with a fresh look at the performance between these two Khronos graphics APIs when tested with AMD and NVIDIA hardware on the latest RadeonSI/RADV and NVIDIA Linux graphics drivers.

Read more

Debian GNU/Linux 9.5 "Stretch" Is Now Available with 100 Security Updates

Filed under
Security
Debian

Coming four months after the previous point release, Debian GNU/Linux 9.5 "Stretch" includes a total of 100 security update and 91 miscellaneous bugfixes for various core components and applications. However, this remains a point release and doesn't represent a new version of the Debian GNU/Linux 9 "Stretch" operating system series, which continues to be updated every day.

"This point release mainly adds corrections for security issues, along with a few adjustments for serious problems. Security advisories have already been published separately and are referenced where available. Please note that the point release does not constitute a new version of Debian 9 but only updates some of the packages included," reads today's announcement.

Read more

Also: Debian 9.5 Released With Security Fixes, Updated Intel Microcode For Spectre V2

Updated Debian 9: 9.5 released

Games and Wine Leftover

Filed under
Gaming

Open Cars Kick-Off Conference

Filed under
OSS

Autonomous cars are coming. But how are we going to deal with keeping both the software and hardware up-to-date? Odds are, a three-year computer and software a few months old are going to be too old to drive autonomously, at least while the technology is in its infancy. And how do we train the guys in your local garage to maintain an AI?

The automobile industry thinks they have a solution: lease rather than sell autonomous cars, lock the hood shut, and maintain them exclusively through their dealers.

That works great for the 1%. But what about the rest of us? The folks who drive a dented, 10-year-old car? We should have the option to drive autonomous cars, and to participate in the same world as the more wealthy folks.

Read more

Lubuntu 18.04 Review: Stable and Dependable As Always

Filed under
Reviews
Ubuntu

I stated earlier that 18.04 looks pretty much the same compared to when I first installed it. This is not a bad thing. Lubuntu is not designed to be flashy or to have the latest cutting-edge features. It is designed to use few resources and run well on a wide variety of computers. It does that very well. You could set anyone who ever used Windows in front of a Lubuntu box and they would be good to go. I would certainly recommend it for beginners and older computers

One thing that was confusing when I was researching this article was the existence of more than one site for Lubuntu. When I searched for Lubuntu, one of the first search result entries was for lubuntu.net. I thought it was the project’s official website. Then, I was surfing through Lubuntu’s Wikipedia entry. It listed lubuntu.me as the official site. Both look very official. It’s only after you dig that you discover that lubuntu.net was created by “Free and Open Source contributors from Asia, Linux Fans and the Lubuntu Meilix community”. It’s essentially a fan site. They had better let people know that they are not the official site before they get in trouble with someone.

Have you ever used Lubuntu? What is your favorite Ubuntu flavor? Please let us know in the comments below.

If you found this article interesting, please take a minute to share it on social media.

Read more

Lubuntu 18.04 Review: Stable and Dependable As Always

Filed under
Reviews

Ubuntu’s lightweight edition Lubuntu 18.04 still revives older computers through LXDE but it has different plans for future. Read the Lubuntu 18.04 review to find out more about it.
Read more

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More in Tux Machines

Today in Techrights

today's leftovers

Linux Kernel/Foundation

  • Linux Foundation Brings Power of Open Source to Energy Sector
    The Linux Foundation launched on July 12 its latest effort—LF Energy, an open-source coalition for the energy and power management sector. The LF Energy coalition is being backed by French transmission system operation RTE, Vanderbilt University and the European Network of Transmission System Operators (ENTSO-E). With LF Energy, the Linux Foundation is aiming to replicate the success it has seen in other sectors, including networking, automotive, financial services and cloud computing.
  • Marek Squeezes More Performance Out Of RadeonSI In CPU-Bound Scenarios
    AMD's leading open-source RadeonSI Gallium3D developer, Marek Olšák, sent out a new patch series this week aiming to benefit this Radeon OpenGL driver's performance in CPU-bound scenarios. The patch series is a set of command submission optimizations aimed to help trivial CPU-bound benchmarks to varying extents. In the very trivial glxgears, the patch series is able to improve the maximum frame-rates by around 10%.
  • Intel Sends In A Final Batch Of DRM Feature Updates Targeting Linux 4.19
    After several big feature pull requests of new "i915" Intel DRM driver features landing in DRM-Next for Linux 4.19, the Intel open-source developers have sent in what they believe to be their last batch of feature changes for queuing this next kernel cycle.

OSS Leftovers

  • Open source governance accelerates innovation [Ed: Evolution of the tactics by which anti-FOSS proprietary software firms, Sonatype in this case, try to sell their 'wares']
  • GitHub Enterprise 2.14 brings unified search of cloud and local
  • GitHub Enterprise 2.14 is ‘open goodness’ behind an enterprise firewall
  • DragonFly BSD Lead Developer Preaches The Blessing Of SSDs
    DragonFlyBSD lead developer Matthew Dillon has provided an update on the open-source operating system project's infrastructure and acknowledging the SSD upgrades that are noticeably beneficial over HDDs. DragonFlyBSD has recently been replacing various HDDs with SSDs in their build machines and other systems having an important presence in their infrastructure. Following these storage upgrades, things have been running great and ultimately should deliver a snappier experience for users and developers.
  • Binutils 2.31 Offers Faster DLL Linking For Cygwin/Mingw, Freescale S12Z Support
    A new release of the Binutils collection of important tools is now available with a number of new features and improvements. Binutils 2.31 contains work like direct linking with DLLs for Cygwin/Mingw targets now being faster, AArch64 disassembler improvements, MIPS GINV and CRC extension support, Freescale S12Z architecture support, the x86 assembler now supports new command line options to enable alternative shorter instruction encodings, and the Gold linker now supports Intel Indirect Branch Tracking and Shadow Stack instructions.
  • GCC 8/9 Land Fix For "-march=native" Tuning On Modern Intel CPUs
    The other day we reported on a GCC 8 regression where Skylake and newer CPUs with "-march=native" haven't been performance as optimally as they should be. Fortunately, that patch was quickly landed into the GCC SVN/Git code for GCC 9 as well as back-ported to GCC 8. In the GCC 8.1 release and mainline code since April, as the previous article outlined, when using "-march=native" as part of the compiler flags with GCC the full capabilities of the CPU haven't been leveraged. This affects Intel Skylake CPUs and newer generations, including yet to be released hardware like Cannonlake and Icelake.
  • ARM Kills Its RISC-V FUD Website After Staff Revolt
    ARM is under fire for the way it attempted to kneecap a fledgling open-source hardware project, and has retreated from its own line of attack after several days. ARM had launched a website, riscv-basics.com, which purported to offer “real” information on the rival ISA. As one might expect, the “information” on display was a bit less neutral than a visitor might hope for. Taking this kind of shot against an open-source hardware project also struck many in the OSS community as being in exceptionally poor taste, given how critical open source software has been to ARM’s overall success and visibility. First, a bit of background: RISC-V is an open-source ISA based on RISC principles and is intended to eventually provide flexible CPU cores for a wide variety of use-cases. By using the BSD license, the RISC-V teams hope to allow for a greater range of projects that support both open and proprietary CPU designs. RISC-V CPUs are already available today in a range of roles and capabilities. Despite some modest initial success, RISC-V, today, isn’t even a rounding error in CPU marketshare measurements. It’s certainly no threat to ARM, which enjoys the mother of all vendor lock-ins measured in per-device terms.
  • Python boss Guido van Rossum steps down after 30 years
     

    He lays out a list of things that the users will need to consider going forwards like who has banning rights and who inducts noobs to the core developer team, but its laid out in a context of ‘do what you want but keep me out of it'.  

    "I'll still be here, but I'm trying to let you all figure something out for yourselves. I'm tired, and need a very long break."