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PC-MOS/386 is the latest obsolete operating system to open source on Github

Filed under
OS
OSS

PC-MOS/386 was first announced by The Software Link in 1986 and was released in early 1987. It was capable of working on any x86 computer (though the Intel 80386 was its target market). However, some later chips became incompatible because they didn't have the necessary memory management unit.

It had a dedicated following but also contained a couple of design flaws that made it slow and/or expensive to run. Add to that the fact it had a Y2K bug that manifested on 31 July 2012, after which any files created wouldn't work, and it's not surprising that it didn't become the gold standard. The last copyright date listed is 1992, although some users have claimed to be using it far longer.

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GIMP, More Awesome Than I Remember

Filed under
GNU

For what seems like decades, GIMP (Graphic Image Manipulation Program) has been the de facto standard image editor for Linux. It works well, has many features, and it even supports scripting. I always have found it a bit clumsy, however, and I preferred using something else for day-to-day work. I recently had the pleasure of sitting at a computer without an image editor though, so I figured I'd give GIMP another try on a non-Linux operating system. See, the last time I tried to use GIMP on OS X, it required non-standard libraries and home-brew adding. Now, if you head over to the GIMP site, you can download a fully native version of GIMP for Windows, OS X and Linux.

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Linux 4.13.9

Filed under
Linux

I'm announcing the release of the 4.13.9 kernel.

All users of the 4.13 kernel series must upgrade.

The updated 4.13.y git tree can be found at:
git://git.kernel.org/pub/scm/linux/kernel/git/stable/linux-stable.git linux-4.13.y
and can be browsed at the normal kernel.org git web browser:
http://git.kernel.org/?p=linux/kernel/git/stable/linux-st...

Read more

Also: Linux 4.9.58

Linux 4.4.94

Linux 3.18.77

Linux 4.14-rc6

Filed under
Linux

So rc6 is delayed, not because of any development problems, but simply
because the internet was horribly bad my usual Sunday afternoon time,
and I decided not to even try to fight it.

And by delaying things, I got a couple more ull requests in from Greg.
Yay, I guess?

rc6 is a bit larger than I was hoping for, and I'm not sure whether
that is a sign that we _will_ need an rc8 after all this release
(which wouldn't be horribly surprising), or whether it's simply due to
timing. I'm going to leave that open for now, so just know that rc8
_may_ happen.

Read more

Also: Linux 4.14-rc6 Released: Linux 4.14 Kernel Final In 2~3 Weeks

What Will the Ubuntu 18.04 Name ‘B’?

Filed under
Ubuntu

Linux Foundation Certified System Administrator: Gabriel Rojo Argote

Filed under
Linux
Interviews

I started to get interested while studying at the Instituto Tecnológico de León in Guanajuato México. One of my professors taught a subject called "Introduction to Computing" and began to talk about the variety of operating systems that existed in the market. The professor put a lot of emphasis on the Unix and GNU/Linux operating systems, talking about the versatility and robustness they had. This sparked my interest in knowing GNU/Linux and, because it was distributed in disks in some city magazines, it was easy for me to be able to acquire a distribution—an easy route to use the operating system and get to know different free applications. I got involved little by little in the management of the same GNU/Linux.

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Linux Foundation wants to do to data what it's done for software

Filed under
Linux

Today at the Open Source Summit in Prague, executive director Jim Zemlin announced the Community Data License Agreement, which is designed for non-proprietary data.

The org says data producers can now share the goods "with greater clarity about what recipients may do with it".

One branch "puts terms in place to ensure that downstream recipients can use and modify that data, and are also required to share their changes", while the other does not oblige users to share those changes.

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Best Alternatives To Photoshop On Linux

Filed under
Linux

​You need an image editing software and you do not yet feel ready to buy a Photoshop license. Besides the online retouching sites, there are also free alternatives adapted for each use of the famous Adobe software that will allow you to tinker with the pixel at a lower cost.

Read<br />
more

5 Most Beautiful Linux Desktop Environments

Filed under
Linux

When it comes to choosing a Linux distro, one thing that influences the choices of many is the desktop environment that comes with the distros. As such, many distros provide variants with different desktop environments to cater for the specific needs of users. Some desktop environments are preferred because of their stability, or their familiarity and many others are popular because of their aesthetics. So today I present some 5 very beautiful desktop environments that you can choose from. So let’s take a look.

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more

Debian and Ubuntu Leftovers

Filed under
Debian
Ubuntu
  • APT 1.6 alpha 1 – seccomp and more

    I just uploaded APT 1.6 alpha 1, introducing a very scary thing: Seccomp sandboxing for methods, the programs downloading files from the internet and decompressing or compressing stuff. With seccomp I reduced the number of system calls these methods can use to 149 from 430. Specifically we excluded most ways of IPC, xattrs, and most importantly, the ability for methods to clone(2), fork(2), or execve(2) (or execveat(2)). Yes, that’s right – methods can no longer execute programs.

  • Debian Policy call for participation -- October 2017

    Here’s are some of the bugs against the Debian Policy Manual. In particular, there really are quite a few patches needing seconds from DDs.

  • Free Software Efforts (2017W42)

    Here’s my weekly report for week 42 of 2017. In this week I have replaced my spacebar, failed to replace a HDD and begun the process to replace my YubiKey.

  • Winners of the Ubuntu 17.10 Free Culture Showcase

    Every new Ubuntu cycle brings many changes, and the arrival of Ubuntu 17.10, the “Artful Aardvark” release, brings more changes than usual. The default desktop has changed to GNOME Shell, with some very thoughtful changes by the desktop team to make it more familiar. And of course, the community wallpapers included with this exciting new release have changed as well!

    Every cycle, talented artists around the world create media and release it under licenses that encourage sharing and adaptation. For Ubuntu 17.10, 50 images were submitted to the Ubuntu 17.10 Free Culture Showcase photo pool on Flickr, where all eligible submissions can be found.

today's leftovers

Filed under
Misc
  • Linux Users Discuss DRM 1 on 1 – Unleaded Hangout

    Linux Users Discuss DRM. Today my Brandon and I discuss encrypted media extensions, digital rights management and our freedom on the Linux desktop. So join Brandon and I as we as Linux Users Discuss DRM.

  • i965 Shader Cache Revised As It Still Might Squeeze Into Mesa 17.3

    Intel's Jordan Justen has sent out his third revision to the recently renewed patches for allowing an OpenGL on-disk shader cache for the "i965" Mesa driver.

    Just a few days back Jordan sent out a revised Intel shader cache implementation for this code that's long been baking on the Intel side but yet to be merged for mainline Mesa while the RadeonSI shader cache and co has been present now for many months.

  • Sunday Linux Gaming Wrap-up
  • retro-gtk: The Future, Marty!

    Let's come back to retro-gtk. In the previous articles I explained how bad retro-gtk was, what I did to start improving it and more importantly what I did to prepare the terrain for further development. This article will detail the aforementioned planed improvements!

  • Ikea’s Open-Source Showrooms

    Ikea Group will also roll out a new digital platform called 'Co-Create Ikea' which mimics its IT division's open-source software development, where customers have the chance help develop and test new products.

  • Glibc Picks Up Some More FMA Performance Optimizations

    The GNU C Library, glibc, has picked up support for some additional functions as FMA-optimized versions.

    The newest functions now getting the fused multiply-add (FMA) support are powf(), logf(), exp2f(), and log2f(). The FMA instruction set is present since Intel Haswell and AMD Piledriver generations and like past FMA optimizations, the benefits can be quite noticeable.

  • Landmark release of Termination of Transfer tool from Creative Commons and Authors Alliance

    For more than a decade, Creative Commons has developed and stewarded legal tools that give creators the opportunity to share their work on open terms. We have focused on tools that empower sharing at the moment of publication, leaving out an important group of creators: what about those who previously signed away their rights to their works long ago, but who now want to share on open terms under a CC license or renegotiate unfavorable publishing terms?

  • The recent catastrophic Wi-Fi vulnerability was in plain sight for 13 years behind a corporate paywall

    The recent Wi-Fi “KRACK” vulnerability, which allowed anyone to get onto a secure network (and which was quickly patched by reputable vendors), had been in plain sight behind a corporate-level paywall for 13 years. This raises a number of relevant, interesting, and uncomfortable questions.

Events: openSUSE.Asia Summit 2017, GStreamer Conference 2017, FSFE Assembly During 34C3

Filed under
OSS
  • openSUSE.Asia Summit 2017 in Tokyo
  • GStreamer Conference 2017 Videos

    Taking place this weekend in Prague has been the 8th annual GStreamer Conference, which is preceding next week's Linux Foundation Embedded Linux Conference Europe.

  • Call for sessions at the FSFE assembly during 34C3

    With the CCC moving from Hamburg to Leipzig, there are not only logistic changes to be done but also some organisational changes. We are still figuring out the details, but in the context of this call, one of the major changes will be the loss of free available rooms to book for self-organised sessions. Instead, assemblies that match with each other are asked to cluster around 1 of several stages and use that as a common stage for self-organized sessions together. To make the most of this situation, the FSFE will for the first time not join the Noisy Square this year but form a new neighbourhood with other freedom fighting NGOs – in particular with our friends from European Digital Rights. However, at this point of time, we do not yet have more information about the concrete or final arrangements.

GNOME 3.28 Linux Desktop Environment Development Kicks Off with First Snapshot

Filed under
GNOME

GNOME developer Javier Jardón is kicking off the development of the GNOME 3.28 desktop environment with the first snapshot, GNOME 3.27.1, which is now available for public testing.

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How to manage casual contributors to open source projects

Filed under
OSS

Increasingly, people want to contribute to projects casually—when they want to, rather than adhering to a schedule. This is part of a broader trend of "episodic volunteering" noted by a wide range of volunteer organizations and governments. This has been attributed not only to changes in the workforce, which leave fewer people able to volunteer with less spare time to share, but also to changes in how people perceive the act of volunteering. It is no longer seen as a communal obligation, rather as a conditional activity in which the volunteer also receives benefits. Moreover, distributed revision-control systems and the network effects of GitHub, which standardize the process of making a contribution, make it easier for people to contribute casually to free/libre/open source software (FLOSS) projects.

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5 ways to invigorate education with Raspberry Pi

Filed under
Linux

A couple of years ago, I was talking to PayPal senior director of software development Harper Reed at All Things Open in Raleigh, N.C., when he suggested that the best way to invigorate education would be to purchase Raspberry Pis en masse and put them in public libraries.

Although many schools have made sizeable investments in classroom technology, those investments have done little to advance students' understanding of how the technology works. That's where the Raspberry Pi comes in, as it's the ideal vehicle to demonstrate the educational efficacy of open source software and open hardware in the classroom.

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System76 Unveils First Release of Pop!_OS Linux Distro, Based on Ubuntu 17.10

Filed under
OS
Linux
Ubuntu

System76, the maker of Linux-based computers, is proud to announce the first-ever release of Pop!_OS Linux, its own GNU/Linux distribution based on Canonical's Ubuntu OS.

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Lubuntu Next 17.10 Rolls Out to Early Adopters with LXQt 0.11.1 Desktop

Filed under
Ubuntu

Lubuntu team announced the release and immediate availability for download of Lubuntu 17.10 and Lubuntu Next 17.10 distributions as part of the Ubuntu 17.10 (Artful Aardvark) operating system.

Read more

Also: Ubuntu Kylin 17.10 Releases for Chinese Linux Users with Own Video Player, More

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More in Tux Machines

GIMP, More Awesome Than I Remember

For what seems like decades, GIMP (Graphic Image Manipulation Program) has been the de facto standard image editor for Linux. It works well, has many features, and it even supports scripting. I always have found it a bit clumsy, however, and I preferred using something else for day-to-day work. I recently had the pleasure of sitting at a computer without an image editor though, so I figured I'd give GIMP another try on a non-Linux operating system. See, the last time I tried to use GIMP on OS X, it required non-standard libraries and home-brew adding. Now, if you head over to the GIMP site, you can download a fully native version of GIMP for Windows, OS X and Linux. Read more

Linux 4.13.9

I'm announcing the release of the 4.13.9 kernel. All users of the 4.13 kernel series must upgrade. The updated 4.13.y git tree can be found at: git://git.kernel.org/pub/scm/linux/kernel/git/stable/linux-stable.git linux-4.13.y and can be browsed at the normal kernel.org git web browser: http://git.kernel.org/?p=linux/kernel/git/stable/linux-st... Read more Also: Linux 4.9.58 Linux 4.4.94 Linux 3.18.77

Linux 4.14-rc6

So rc6 is delayed, not because of any development problems, but simply because the internet was horribly bad my usual Sunday afternoon time, and I decided not to even try to fight it. And by delaying things, I got a couple more ull requests in from Greg. Yay, I guess? rc6 is a bit larger than I was hoping for, and I'm not sure whether that is a sign that we _will_ need an rc8 after all this release (which wouldn't be horribly surprising), or whether it's simply due to timing. I'm going to leave that open for now, so just know that rc8 _may_ happen. Read more Also: Linux 4.14-rc6 Released: Linux 4.14 Kernel Final In 2~3 Weeks

What Will the Ubuntu 18.04 Name ‘B’?