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Quick Roundup

Typesort icon Title Author Replies Last Post
goblinxfc srlinuxx 26/04/2007 - 6:30pm
nixsys.com srlinuxx 24/09/2007 - 11:24pm
wolvixondisk srlinuxx 02/10/2007 - 10:49pm
arnybw srlinuxx 18/10/2007 - 3:39pm
webpathinlovelinux srlinuxx 07/02/2008 - 3:44pm
bluewhite srlinuxx 25/03/2008 - 10:44pm
pclos srlinuxx 15/06/2008 - 11:18pm
nixsys2 srlinuxx 18/08/2008 - 7:12am
nixsys3 srlinuxx 18/08/2008 - 7:22am
gg 480x60 srlinuxx 03/09/2008 - 11:55am

Kernel: UNIX Time, Bluetooth Bug, Char/Misc and Intel

Filed under
Linux

      

  • Linux 5.10 Solves the Year 2038 Problem Till Year 2486

    The Year 2000 problem was one of the most severe issues in programs of computerized systems that created havoc in computers and affecting systems worldwide. A little background on why this problem emerged — Ever noticed when a computer or a website asks you to enter the last two digits of the year?

    Computers are programmed to store only the last two digits of years because it saves storage space (Four digits Vs. Two digits). Say there’s only one day left in the year 1999 (99); a day later, the systems would fail to understand if it’s the Year 2000 (00) or 1900 (00).

  • Linux 5.9.1 And Older Stable Kernel Updates Fixing "Bleeding Tooth" Bluetooth Vulnerability Are Available - LinuxReviews

    BleedingTooth is a really bad and in theory very serious Linux kernel vulnerability. It allows someone within Bluetooth range to potentially execute code on your Linux machine thanks to a combination of improper input validation, improper buffer restrictions and improper access control in the BlueZ libraries and heap-based type confusion in the Linux kernel's L2CAP code. The practical threat isn't all that.

    Linux 5.9.1 as well as updates to the older "stable" kernel series (5.8.16, 5.4.72, 4.19.152, 4.14.202, 4.9.240, and 4.4.240) have been released with a patch by Intel's Luiz Augusto von Dentz addressing the Linux kernel side of the BleedingTooth vulnerability. You should upgrade to one of those if your machine has a Bluetooth adapter (most laptops do). 

  •   

  • Char/Misc With Linux 5.10 Brings Nitro Enclaves, Alder Lake, More Code For Gaudi - Phoronix

    The "char/misc" area within the Linux kernel continues to have a bit of everything as the "catch all" pull request of the kernel not fitting into other existing subsystems. 

    [...]

    - Qualcomm's MHI bus added in Linux 5.7 supports more features with Linux 5.10 albeit mostly lower-level changes. 

    - The Intel-owned Habana Labs continues working extensively on their upstream kernel driver supporting their AI inference and training accelerators. With Linux 5.10 is a wide range of improvements to the Habana Labs kernel code largely on the Gaudi side. 

    - The SoundWire code has gained support for run-time power management, including within the Intel SoundWire support paths. The Intel code also adds multi-link support and other improvements. 

  •   

  • Linux 5.10 Continues Bringing Up Support For Intel's Rocket Lake - Phoronix

    Building off Linux 5.9 that featured initial support for Gen12 graphics on next year's Rocket Lake desktop platform along with other early enablement for Rocket Lake like RAPL support and other PCI ID additions, that work has continued for the Linux 5.10 cycle. 

    The libata pull adds Rocket Lake PCH-H RAID PCI IDs as one of the additions. 

    There is also the platform-drivers-x86 work for Linux 5.10 where Rocket Lake support is added to the intel_pmc_core driver. 

    While the DRM code in Linux 5.9 brought initial support for Rocket Lake building off the existing Gen12 code, the DRM code for Linux 5.10 also has necessary code changes for properly driving displays with the hardware. 

Graphics: Vulkan, Intel and NVIDIA

Filed under
Graphics/Benchmarks
Linux
  • Vulkan 1.2.158 Released With Fragment Shading Rate Extension - Phoronix

    Vulkan 1.2.158 was released this morning with two notable extensions introduced.

    First up is VK_KHR_fragment_shading_rate that allows changing the rate at which fragments are shaded. Multiple pixels can be shaded now by a single fragment shader invocation. The new extension allows controlling the fragment shading rate on a per-draw, per-primitive, or per-region basis. Most notably this can be used by Vulkan-powered games for shading higher levels of detail in a scene compared to others. Or rather lower quality shading in some areas of the scene.

  • Linux 5.10 Continues Bringing Up Support For Intel's Rocket Lake - Phoronix

    Building off Linux 5.9 that featured initial support for Gen12 graphics on next year's Rocket Lake desktop platform along with other early enablement for Rocket Lake like RAPL support and other PCI ID additions, that work has continued for the Linux 5.10 cycle.

    The libata pull adds Rocket Lake PCH-H RAID PCI IDs as one of the additions.

    There is also the platform-drivers-x86 work for Linux 5.10 where Rocket Lake support is added to the intel_pmc_core driver.

  • GCC's Ada Frontend Seeing More Work On NVIDIA CUDA Support - Phoronix

    Should you want to use the Ada programming language for GPU programming, the GCC compiler has been working on CUDA support within its front-end for this safety and security minded language.

    In the past born out of academia there's been CUDA Ada bindings. There has also been Ada/SPARK GPU programming initiatives in the past with various APIs. This latest still ongoing effort is wiring up the GCC Ada front-end with CUDA support.

  • You may want to avoid Linux Kernel 5.9 if you want fully supported NVIDIA drivers | GamingOnLinux

    On the official NVIDIA forum, an employee put out an announcement warning NVIDIA GPU owners that the Linux Kernel 5.9 and later is currently unsupported. It's worth noting they posted that in the CUDA forum, so other workloads like gaming may work as normal.

    In the post they mention Kernel 5.9+ is currently "incompatible" with any of their drivers, and they're suggesting to wait until "mid-November" for a fresh NVIDIA driver update which is expected to bring support for it. They're "working diligently" to get ready to support it.

Con Kolivas Releases Linux 5.9-ck1 (MuQSS)

Filed under
Linux

      

  • -ck hacking: linux-5.9-ck1, MuQSS version 0.204 for linux-5.9

    Unfortunately these past few months have been marred by lockdown and family issues, culminating in the ultimate death of my father just over a month ago (unrelated to covid19 but made that much worse because of its effects on everything in our city) so linux kernel was the furthest thing from my mind and a 5.8 resync never happened. He'll be sorely missed, and if this were something more substantial I'd dedicate it towards him but it doesn't do him justice.

    Announcing a new -ck release, 5.9-ck1  with the latest version of the Multiple Queue Skiplist Scheduler, version 0.204 These are patches designed to improve system responsiveness and interactivity with specific emphasis on the desktop, but configurable for any workload. 

  • Linux 5.9-ck1 Released With Updated MuQSS - Phoronix

    Independent Linux kernel developer Con Kolivas (and retired anaesthetist) is back on track with a new update to his "CK" patch-set and the MuQSS scheduler. 

    The retired doctor had taken some time off from his kernel development hobby earlier this year to help design equipment for the COVID-19 battle. He did manage to release his updated patches for Linux 5.7 but has been becoming increasingly concerned over the size of the Linux kernel and his ability in the future to continue maintaining these independent patches as a result. Making the matters worse, his father passed away (non-COVID) and that further complicated his development work. 

Change CPU Governor And Frequencies On Linux With cpupower-gui (New Release)

Filed under
Software

cpupower-gui is a tool that makes it easy to change the CPU governor as well as the CPU frequency limits on Linux.

[...]

This Python3 + Gtk3 application was updated to version 0.9.0 (followed by 0.9.1 to fix a few bugs) recently with new features, like the ability to use custom CPU profiles for quickly switching the settings. You can switch between the 2 pre-built profiles, Balanced and Performance, from the cpupower-gui user interface, but you can't change them or create a new profile from there.

Read more

Ubuntu Vs Pop!_OS: Which One’s Better?

Filed under
GNU
Linux
Ubuntu

Both Ubuntu and Pop!OS is great for beginners as well as professionals. Like how the budget Android devices ship with a lot of bloatware, Ubuntu also ships with bloatware, resulting in a relatively poor user experience and performance compared to Pop!_OS.

Ubuntu also comes with “Ubuntu Minimal options” that don’t include many applications letting you install what you actually need. Apart from that, Ubuntu’s software center has a built-in section for snap applications, whereas you won’t find snap packages in the Pop!_OS shop rather you’ll find the Flatpak package option.

However, Snap packages take too much space on the disk; hence, we suggest you consider using the APT version of any application. Pop!_OS also has its own official PPA, where you can find applications like TensorFlow and Android Studio one “apt-get install” away from installing.

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Audiocasts/Shows: bpytop, Linux in the Ham Shack and Full Circle Weekly News

Filed under
GNU
Linux
  • Awesome Linux Tools: bpytop - YouTube

    I found another awesome Linux tool! This time, it's bpytop, a really neat utility that's similar to htop and allows you to monitor the system resources on your Linux workstation or server. In this video, I'll show you how to install it, and you'll see it in action!

  • LHS Episode #373: GridTracker Deep Dive Part 3 | Linux in the Ham Shack

    Welcome to Episode 373 of Linux in the Ham Shack. In this episode, we have a roundtable discussion with several of the contributors to the GridTracker.org project. We explore all the changes in GT from Part 2 through the recording date and also look at the new direction of GridTracker as an organization. GT is expanding in mentoring, STEM education, community and much more. Thank you for listening and have a great week.

  • Full Circle Weekly News #186 | Full Circle Magazine

    Linux GUI Apps Coming to Windows
    https://www.zdnet.com/article/linux-graphical-apps-coming-to-windows-subsystem-for-linux/
    Linux Mint 20.1 Will Arrive Mid-December
    https://blog.linuxmint.com/?p=3969
    Ubuntu 20.10, Groovy Gorilla [beta], Out
    https://9to5linux.com/ubuntu-20-10-beta-is-now-available-for-download
    Fedora 33 Beta Out
    https://fedoramagazine.org/announcing-the-release-of-fedora-33-beta/

    KaOS 2020.09 Out
    https://kaosx.us/news/2020/kaos09/

    Tails 4.11 Out
    https://tails.boum.org/news/version_4.11/index.en.html

    Nitrux 1.3.3 Out
    https://nxos.org/changelog/changelog-nitrux-1-3-3/

    Firefox 81.0.1 Out
    https://www.mozilla.org/en-US/firefox/81.0.1/releasenotes/

    Calibre 5.0 Out
    https://calibre-ebook.com/new-in/fourteen

today's howtos

Filed under
HowTos
  • Manage your Linux backups with Rdiffweb | Opensource.com

    The Rdiffweb app offers a simplified web interface for easy management of rdiff-backup, software that offers robust automatic backups from one Linux computer (client) to another Linux computer (server) using secure shell (SSH), thus maximizing your disk space. The free, open source online tool helps save time when accessing rdiff-backup archives, recovering data, and managing administrators. Recently, rdiff-backup received a major update with a host of new features when it was migrated to Python 3.

    In this article, I'll show you a basic way to set up rdiff-backup with Rdiffweb. Before getting started, you should know enough network basics to identify a Linux computer's IP address and set up an SSH connection.

  • How To Install Grafana on Ubuntu 20.04 – devconnected

    Recently, Grafana Labs released a brand new version of Grafana : v7.0

    This new version featured a whole set of different features : namely a new panel editor, a new explore function as well as new plugins and tutorials for beginners.

    As Grafana evolves a lot since our last tutorial, it is time for us to update the Grafana installation guide for Ubuntu 20.04.

  • Linux security: Manipulating SELinux policies with Booleans | Enable Sysadmin

    A quick look at the flexibility that Booleans offer SELinux and how to make use of them.

  • Update hell due to not updating for a long time

    SecureDrop right now runs on Ubuntu Xenial. We are working on moving to Ubuntu Focal. Here is the EPIC on the issue tracker.

mpz – open source music player

Filed under
Software

My favorite pastime is to see an eclectic range of bands, solo artists, and orchestras live. It’s such a life-changing and exhilarating experience to be present. It’s one thing to be sitting at home listening to a CD or watching music videos on TV or on YouTube, but being with an audience, packed out in a stadium or music hall, takes it to another level. But it’s an expensive pastime, and still on hold given the current coronavirus pandemic. I’m therefore listening to music from my CD collection which I’ve encoded to FLAC, a lossless audio format, and stored locally.

Linux offers a huge array of open source music players. And many of them are high quality. I’ve reviewed the vast majority for LinuxLinks, but I’m always keeping abreast of new projects.

This brings me on to mpz, a program that only saw its first public release 11 days ago. Why did it catch my eye? Mainly because mpz is a music player that’s designed for large, locally stored, music collections.

Read more

Games: Stardew Valley, Book of Travels and More

Filed under
Gaming
  • Stardew Valley to get splitscreen co-op in the big 1.5 update and what else to expect | GamingOnLinux

    Stardew Valley, one of the most popular casual farming life sims available on PC is getting another major upgrade and some features have been teased out by the creator.

    Eric Barone, known as ConcernedApe, posted on Twitter that the 1.5 update will bring (amongst other things) splitscreen co-op which is quite exciting. Barone confirmed in follow-up posts that on PC this would be with up to 4 people.

  • Might and Delight tease early Book of Travels footage, will experiment will player numbers | GamingOnLinux

    Book of Travels is the upcoming RPG from Might and Delight, a developer known for the Shelter series and Meadow and I'm seriously curious to learn more about it.

    After a very successful crowdfunding campaign back in November 2019, they've continued giving regular progress updates on their unique take on an online RPG. They're using the term "TMORPG", which means tiny multiplayer online role-playing game. So unlike big MMOs, they're going with smaller more intimate numbers. Something they did with the likes of Meadow with it having around 50 people together. In a post on Kickstarter, they mentioned how with Book of Travels in Early Access next year, they will be experimenting with the number to see what works for it so they're not yet set on an exact amount.

  • Work for a bumbling supervillain in Henchman Story - try the demo | GamingOnLinux

    Love a good superhero story? Well, this isn't it. Instead, you're a henchman following around a pretty clumsy supervillain in Henchman Story. A new and somewhat amusing visual novel currently in development by Silken Sail Entertainment, and they're currently funding it on Kickstarter.

    "It’s thankless work. Week in and week out, you put on your purple spandex and get the crap beaten out of you by much stronger, much cooler people wearing much fancier spandex. But the checks clear, and Lord Bedlam offers healthcare, so a job’s a job, right?"

  • Free and open source PlayStation 4 Remote Play client Chiaki adds PS4 8.0 firmware support | GamingOnLinux

    Own a PlayStation 4 and want to stream games from it to your Linux desktop? Chiaki is great for that and a fresh upgrade is out to keep it working.

    As a reminder: it's a free and open source project, not backed by Sony and totally unofficial. Impressive though, and it actually works quite well. Sony recently upgraded the PS4 firmware, and each time that happens it tends to break Chiaki, thankfully though it doesn't happen too often.

  • Stadia to get a bunch more Ubisoft games including Assassin's Creed and Far Cry | GamingOnLinux

    Not long after confirmation that Cyberpunk 2077 will be on Stadia at release on November 19, Google has confirmed lots more games are on the way from Ubisoft.

    We already knew of a few newer titles coming to Stadia from Ubisoft, however, it appears they're really going all-in with what they have.

Got Kids? Limit Computer Usage Per Account in Linux With Timekpr-nExt

Filed under
Software

Use Timekpr-nExt to limit computer usage on Linux

If you have young children at home who spend too much time on computer, you may want to put some sort of restriction on the usage.

Timekpr-nExt enables you to limit computer usage for certain accounts based on the time of day, number of hours a day, week or month. You may also set time interval to force the account user to take break.https://itsfoss.com/timekpr-next/

Read more

Top 10 Features of Ubuntu 20.10 Groovy Gorilla

Filed under
Ubuntu

It's finally the time for the release of Ubuntu 20.10 Groovy Gorilla this week. And here I put together a list of the top 10 features of Ubuntu 20.10 which you could read before you try your hands on the actual iso.
Read more

today's leftovers

Filed under
Misc

  • Linux 5.10 Staging Area Has The Usual Smorgasbord Of Changes - Phoronix

    The Linux 5.10 kernel "staging" changes have the usual assortment of changes throughout this area where premature kernel code goes prior to proving itself and meeting kernel coding quality standards.

    For Linux 5.10 there is the seemingly never-ending work on cleaning up Realtek network drivers, this cycle with more work on the rtl8188eu and rtl8723bs drivers. Other network candidates like WFX, which hit staging a year ago, continue to be cleaned up.

    The staging area also saw more work on the HiKey / Kirin 900 series support with a new SPMI controller driver and PHY driver for the Kirin 970 SoC. Also on the staging front is a new character device interface driver for the five-year-old MOST subsystem.

  • Linux Action News 159

    The new Plasma release makes a compelling argument for the workstation, why LibreOffice and OpenOffice can't seem to get along and a recently found bug in Linux that goes back to Kernel 2.6.

    Plus, our thoughts on Apple's seeming abandoning of CUPS, the latest and greatest open source podcast player, and an important show update.

  • How my Chromebook is getting me through Computer Science college classes - About Chromebooks

    I’ve noted before that in many cases you can actually use a Chromebook to get through a Computer Science degree. That’s mainly due to having full access to Linux where it’s easy to install and use your programming tools of choice.

  • Linux Weekly Roundup #100

    Hello and welcome to a very special edition of our Linux Weekly Roundup!

    We reached our 100th edition! That means nearly 2 years of Linux Roundups. I can't believe it!

    In this week Amarok Linux 2.1 and KDE Plasma 5.20 have been released.

  • Arduino Blog » Keeping e-scooter riders off sidewalks with Arduino

    Shared electric scooters can be found zooming many city streets, and while convenient, they can also be a nuisance when used on sidewalks instead of roadways. After receiving complaints about sidewalk riding, the city of Santa Monica, California approached the California Polytechnic State University’s Digital Transformation Hub (DxHub) about finding a solution beyond signage and outreach campaigns.

    What they developed, with help from student employee Casey Johnson, is a system to throttle scooters when they are traveling on sidewalks via a solenoid. Initial detection experiments involved a dual-band GPS receiver chipset, but after that proved insufficient, accelerometer readings were then used to sense successive periodic bumps observed in sidewalk riding. A scooter prototype was implemented with an Arduino Nano and cheap IMU module, which provided a high degree of accuracy that could be further refined in the future.

  • Kiwi TCMS - SEDC Academy For Software Testing is running Kiwi TCMS

    to equip future testers with practical tools and skills from the get go

  • The popularity of EspoCRM is increasing due to the rise of digital transformation trends

    As open source software, it is available under GPLv3 (GNU General Public License version 3). EspoCRM was written in PHP and JavaScript; it is designed to be used on multiple operating systems, as it is a cross-platform software.

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  • Criminals leak Software AG data after Windows ransomware attack

           

             

    Cyber criminals who attacked the Germany-based global enterprise software company Software AG using the Windows Clop ransomware on 3 October have leaked a large amount of data, that was stolen during the attack, on the dark web.

  • Free P2P VPN | Hackaday

    People use a VPN — virtual private network — for a lot of reasons. However, for many people it is synonymous with hiding your network traffic, one thing that VPN can do. FreePN is a relatively new open source project that aims to build a free peer-to-peer VPN network. Like TOR, it is decentralized.

    Right now, you can download for Ubuntu and Gentoo. There is a way to ask for early access for Debian, Fedora, and Arch. Windows, iOS, MacOS, and Android versions are promised for the future.

today's howtos

Filed under
HowTos
  • Manjaro Linux kernel headers installation - LinuxConfig.org

    In this tutorial, we guide you through the process for how to install kernel headers, check the version of installed kernel headers, and switch between kernel header versions on Manjaro Linux.

  • How to Check Disk Space in Linux from the Command Line – Linux Hint

    Disk space monitoring is considered a very important task when working with any device, whether it is a mobile phone, laptop, desktop, or even a tablet. It is important to ensure the proper functioning of any device by keeping an eye on the disk space. This helps you in identifying the programs or the applications that are using a large amount of space and informs you if you are about to run out of disk space.

    Like every other operating system, Linux also provides multiple ways to keep track of the disk space on your device, including both CLI-based and GUI-based methods. In Linux, however, most operations are performed via the command line. Therefore, Linux users are more likely to be interested in methods of checking disk space via the command line. This is why our discussion today will revolve solely around methods for checking disk space in Linux from the command line.

  • How to Find Linux File Creation Time using Debugfs

    This tutorial shows how to find file creation time in Linux using debugfs. Inode number and partition where directory created is required.

  • How to Install OpenLiteSpeed Web Server on CentOS 8/RHEL 8

    Learn how to install OpenLiteSpeed web server on CentOS 8 and RHEL 8 system.

Programming Leftovers

Filed under
Development

  • Bash “For” Loop to Iterate through an Array – Linux Hint

    “For” loops are very commonly used in all the programming languages. Similarly, Bash also has a dedicated syntax for making use of the “For” loop. The basic purpose of using this loop is to iterate through arrays which can also lead to other complex calculations. Therefore, in this article, we will be talking about the three different scenarios in which you can use the “For” loop for iterating through an array.

  • Bash For each line in a file – Linux Hint

    The “For” loop in Bash can be used with different variations for performing multiple tasks. One such variation is the “For each line in file” which is responsible for reading all the lines in a file. In this article, we will talk about the methods of using “for each line in file” in Bash.

  • Python Random Number Generation – Linux Hint

    Python offers a random number generation module. In the “random” module, we have a set of various functions that are used to create random numbers. Sometimes we need to generate random numbers while performing simulated experiments. In this article, the random number generation in Python using the various function of the “random” module is explained.

  • CDPATH replacements - anarcat

    after reading this post I figured I might as well bite the bullet and improve on my CDPATH-related setup, especially because it does not work with Emacs. so i looked around for autojump-related alternatives that do.

    [...]

    Those are commandline tools that can be used from a shell, generally with built-in shell integration so that a shell alias will find the right directory magically, usually by keeping track of the directories visited with cd.

  • Course Review: Reverse Engineering with Ghidra · System Overlord

    If you’re a prior reader of the blog, you probably know that when I have the opportunity to take a training class, I like to write a review of the course. It’s often hard to find public feedback on trainings, which feels frustrating when you’re spending thousands of dollars on that course.

    Last week, I took the “Reverse Engineering with Ghidra” taught by Jeremy Blackthorne (0xJeremy) of the Boston Cybernetics Institute. It was ostensibly offered as part of the Infiltrate Conference, but 20202 being what it is, there was no conference and it was just an online training. Unfortunately for me, it was being run on East Coast time and I’m on the West Coast, so I got to enjoy some early mornings.

    I won’t bury the lede here – on the whole, the course was a high-quality experience taught by an instructor who is clearly both passionate and experienced with technical instruction. I would highly recommend this course if you have little experience in reverse engineering and want to get bootstrapped on performing reversing with Ghidra. You absolutely do need to have some understanding of how programs work – memory sections, control flow, how data and code is represented in memory, etc., but you don’t need to have any meaningful RE experience. (At least, that’s my takeaway, see the course syllabus for more details.)

    [...]

    One key feature of Jeremy’s teaching approach is the extensive use of Jupyter notebooks for the lab exercises. This encourages students to produce a log of their work, as you can directly embed shell commands and python scripts (along with their output) as well as Markdown that can include images or other resources. A sort of a hidden gem of his approach was also an introduction to the Flameshot screenshot tool. This tool lets you add boxes, arrows, highlights, redactions, etc., to your screenshot directly in an on-screen overlay. I hadn’t seen it before, but I think it’ll be my goto screenshot tool in the future.

  • sphinxcontrib-spelling 6.0.0 - Doug Hellmann

    sphinxcontrib-spelling is a spelling checker for Sphinx-based documentation. It uses PyEnchant to produce a report showing misspelled words.

  • EuroPython Blog — EuroPython 2020: Edited videos are online

    EuroPython 2020: Edited videos are online We’re happy to announce that all edited videos of this year’s conference are now available on our YouTube channel: EuroPython 2020 Playlist We have 131 videos...

  • Perl Weekly Challenge 82: Common Factors | laurent_r [blogs.perl.org]

    On Friday, Oct. 16, 2020 around 5:00 p.m., an awful terrorist attack was perpetrated in my home-town of Conflans Sainte-Honorine in France (35,000 inhabitants), the city where I live and of which I am a city councilor. A secondary school teacher was beheaded by a crazy religious extremist who coudn’t accept that teacher’s defense of the freedom of speech. This is a terrible shock to all my fellow citizens, to the teachers and pupils of that school, and to my fellow members of the city council. Because of that, I did not have time to complete the second task of this challenge (although it was almost complete) and my blog post on the first task will be shorter than what I wanted to make. I actually considered not publishing a blog post this week, but I have written at least one blog post for every single Perl Weekly Challenge since the very beginning, I certainly do not want a madman to prevent me from continuing this uninterrupted series of blogs on PWC. And I also don’t want to leave my friend Mohammad S. Anwar alone in the cold.

  • AMD Sends Out Patches Adding "Znver3" Support To GNU Binutils With New Instructions - Phoronix

    One of AMD's compiler experts this week sent out a patch wiring up Zen 3 support in the important GNU Binutils collection for Linux systems.

    The patch adds Znver3 to Binutils and was sent out at the start of the week. Unfortunately though the GNU Compiler Collection (GCC) patches for Znver3 have yet to be posted by AMD but hopefully will be done with enough time still for reaching the early next year GCC 11 compiler release.

    In any case the public Binutils patch for Znver3 confirms that the forthcoming AMD Zen 3 processors support a number of new instructions.

Review: Tails 4.11

Filed under
Reviews
Debian

The Amnesic Incognito Live System (better known as Tails) is a Debian-based live DVD/USB with the goal of providing complete Internet anonymity for the user. The distribution ships with several Internet applications, including web browser, IRC client, mail client and instant messenger. The distribution transfers Internet traffic through the Tor network to hide its origin.

One of the project's latest releases was version 4.11. (At the time of writing 4.12 is about to be published, though without any significant new features.) Lately the project has mostly focused on bug fixes and minor tweaks, though Tails 4.11 introduces the option of persistent storage for some of the distribution's settings and data. Persistent storage is not enabled by default, but can be set up using tools included on the live media.

Tails is available for 64-bit (x86_64) computers and its live media is approximately 1.2GB in size. The live media can be written to a DVD or USB thumb drive. There are separate files provided depending on whether we want to write the distribution to DVD or USB media, however I tested and confirmed the DVD image can be written to, and run from, a USB thumb drive if need be.

Early impressions

Booting from the Tails media brings up a welcome screen. This graphical interface offers to either start the desktop session or shutdown the operating system. On this welcome screen we can click buttons to bring up settings options that allow us to select our keyboard layout, language, and locale formats. At the bottom of the welcome window is a button which opens additional settings. These extra settings are security related and allow us to assign a password to the administrator account, enable/disable MAC address spoofing, set whether to allow the "Unsafe Browser" to run, and how to connect to the Tor network or to disable networking entirely.

Read more

Videos/Shows: GNU World Order and Amarok Linux 2.1 XFCE

Filed under
GNU
KDE
Linux
  • GNU World Order 376

    Listener email and a look at GNU Nano from the **ap** package set of Slackware Linux.

  • Amarok Linux 2.1 XFCE

    Today we are looking at Amarok Linux 2.1. It is an XFCE distro based on Debian 10, Linux Kernel 5.4, and uses about 600-700 MB of ram when idling. It is beautiful also, just need to smooth out a light theme. Enjoy!

  • Amarok Linux 2.1 Run Through - YouTube

    In this video, we are looking at Amarok Linux 2.1.

today's howtos

Filed under
HowTos
  • How to Install GhostBSD 20.04.8 + VMware Tools on VMware Workstation - SysAdmin

    This video tutorial shows how to install GhostBSD 20.04.8 on VMware Workstation step by step.

  • Z Lua: The Fastest Way To Navigate Linux - YouTube

    Today we're checking out a new and interesting way to navigate through your Linux file system called z lua which learns how you navigate linux and provides you with neat shortcuts to do it quicker.

  • How to Copy Text from Nano Editor to Shell – Linux Hint

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    To move your cursor in the forward direction, you can use Ctrl+f and for backward movement, use Ctrl+b. These keys will move forward or backward your cursor one letter or character at a time. To move your cursor one word forward, then use Ctrl+Space and use Alt+Space to move one word backward.

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    If you have any questions, please contact us via a YouTube comment and we would be happy to assist you!

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Marcus Lundblad: Maps in GNOME 3.38

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GNOME

It's been a while since the last blog post and it's been a while since 3.38.0 was released, and in fact there was already the stable on-schedule 3.38.1 release. On top of that a sneaky asynchronous programming bug showed up that in some circumstances such as high-latency connections, or fast typing can give out-of-sync search results I cut an extra 3.38.1.1 patch release.

But now to the summary of the 3.38 user-facing changes. I think all of this has been covered in previous posts, but I guess it's always nice with a bit of a summary.

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Con Kolivas Releases Linux 5.9-ck1 (MuQSS)

      
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Change CPU Governor And Frequencies On Linux With cpupower-gui (New Release)

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Ubuntu Vs Pop!_OS: Which One’s Better?

Both Ubuntu and Pop!OS is great for beginners as well as professionals. Like how the budget Android devices ship with a lot of bloatware, Ubuntu also ships with bloatware, resulting in a relatively poor user experience and performance compared to Pop!_OS. Ubuntu also comes with “Ubuntu Minimal options” that don’t include many applications letting you install what you actually need. Apart from that, Ubuntu’s software center has a built-in section for snap applications, whereas you won’t find snap packages in the Pop!_OS shop rather you’ll find the Flatpak package option. However, Snap packages take too much space on the disk; hence, we suggest you consider using the APT version of any application. Pop!_OS also has its own official PPA, where you can find applications like TensorFlow and Android Studio one “apt-get install” away from installing. Read more

Audiocasts/Shows: bpytop, Linux in the Ham Shack and Full Circle Weekly News

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