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Wednesday, 22 Feb 17 - Tux Machines is a community-driven public service/news site which has been around for over a decade and primarily focuses on GNU/LinuxSubscribe now Syndicate content

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Quick Roundup

Typesort icon Title Author Replies Last Post
Story 7 Best Android Tablets Under $200 Rianne Schestowitz 21/11/2015 - 8:47am
Story Red Hat News Roy Schestowitz 21/11/2015 - 1:29am
Story today's howtos Roy Schestowitz 21/11/2015 - 1:28am
Story Android Leftovers Roy Schestowitz 21/11/2015 - 1:27am
Story KDE Ships Beta of KDE Applications 15.12 Rianne Schestowitz 21/11/2015 - 1:15am
Story A World Without Linux Would Mean a World Without Our Favorite Movies Rianne Schestowitz 21/11/2015 - 1:12am
Story Libpng Vulnerabilities Fixed in All Supported Ubuntu OSes Rianne Schestowitz 20/11/2015 - 10:30pm
Story NVIDIA 358.16 Linux Driver Brings Fixes Rianne Schestowitz 20/11/2015 - 10:28pm
Story The Best Android Smartwatch You Can Buy Today Rianne Schestowitz 20/11/2015 - 10:24pm
Story Smart light switch includes HD camera, IFTT support Rianne Schestowitz 20/11/2015 - 8:03pm

Freedom Walk: A walk to claim, ensure and preserve freedom

Filed under
OSS

fsf.org: A team of four people decided to take the fundamental principle of the freedom behind free software and take this message of freedom to the masses in Kerala. For doing this they decided to follow the Gandhian concept of walking, and walk they did.

How to Create a Profitable Desktop Business for Linux

Filed under
Linux

seekingalpha.com: I've been involved in Linux since the early 1990's, worked at one of the mainline Linux distros some years ago and have been an Open Source author of two projects. Over the years, the Linux environment has made great functional progress, yet mainline Linux vendors have struggled continuously to create a profitable desktop business around it.

Freeciv

Filed under
Gaming

meandubuntu.wordpress: The other day I was looking for a game and Freeciv caught my eye. Freeciv is easy to install, quick to get started, and has deep gameplay. As I played the game, I was having fun and seeing where strategy could start be developed.

7 reasons why Windows 7 will not wreck Ubuntu

Filed under
Microsoft
Ubuntu

blogs.zdnet.com: One of our competitors has a review of the Windows 7 beta which claims that desktop Linux is doomed — doomed! Not exactly. Not even approximately.

The beauty of AUR

Filed under
Linux

kmandla.wordpress: One of the shining stars of Linux is Arch Linux, and one of the crowning points of Arch Linux is the AUR. After you use it you can’t help but marvel at the obvious common-sense of it.

New Volume Control Interface For GNOME

Filed under
Software

phoronix.com: One of the items being worked on by Red Hat for Fedora 11 is making the GNOME volume control and sound preferences area more intuitive and easier to use.

Windows 7 is enough to kill Linux on the desktop

Filed under
Linux
Microsoft

theinquirer.net: FOR THE PAST three years I have been a Linux fan-boy using Ubuntu most of the time. I decided to play with the new Windows 7 beta. It was pretty good and, if I am right, could result in the move away from Voleware to Linux and OSX being stopped in in its tracks.

The "just works" crowd

Filed under
Linux

raiden.net: One of the things I've been seeing more and more as of late is an attitude of "I just want it to work". Oddly, it's not a new attitude, but as we expand out into new markets, and go after new groups of users, we're starting to encounter people like this more and more.

How To Migrate Your Desktop From Windows To Linux

Filed under
Linux

bmighty.com: Moving from Windows to Linux is a big decision, but actually making the leap can be challenging and intimidating. Deciding in principle that you'll move to desktop Linux is one thing; actually executing such an important -- and potentially controversial -- decision is quite another.

Also: Step-By-Step: Migrating Your Desktop From Windows To Linux

The Gremlins of Open Source Software

Filed under
Linux

getshotwithlinux.zenerves: It seems that every time stuff kinda works, and in any possible, logical way I want to built upon it to improve/update/refine, the rest has to fail.

Ironically, it's free: a review of GIMP 2.6.4

Filed under
GIMP

arstechnica.com: As the open-source image editor of choice, the feature list of GIMP 2.6 is very long, and despite its status as a free application, it's as feature-packed as any commercial application.

Free Ways to approach Ubuntu from Windows

Filed under
Ubuntu

kabatology.com: For Windows Users: Apart the rhetoric that Linux is not Windows, how can one gradually get used to this different way of conceiving an operating system?

The New Ubuntu Brainstorm

Filed under
Ubuntu

linuxloop.com: The new and much improved version of Ubuntu Brainstorm, Ubuntu’s site for receiving ideas from users and allowing other users to vote on those ideas, was launched today.

Nokia Qt LGPL switch huge win for cross-platform development

Filed under
Software

arstechnica.com: Nokia has announced plans to make the open source Qt toolkit available under GNU's Lesser General Public License (LGPL), alongside the existing GPL and commercial licensing options.

today's leftovers

Filed under
News
  • Linus: Odd Hardware

  • 3D graphics are 100% free software
  • What’s next for OLPC?
  • Why Pre is the right move for Palm
  • Fun With Linux
  • about:mozilla 01/13
  • Gentopia has left the building
  • X Input 2.0 Protocol Draft Specification
  • Humanitarian FOSS Project
  • The Outer Limits
  • Can Microsoft Make Windows For a Small World?
  • Is Linux really better than Windows 7?
  • Windows 7 Anti-Competitive in Nature?
  • The New York Times On Ubuntu: Half-Right
  • The real (sort of) $100 laptop
  • Interview: Dann Washko, The Linux Link Tech Show
  • Conky now supports MOC player
  • New Friends of GNOME
  • Linux is the Engine Under the Hood of Instant On
  • Portable Linux is now available
  • Ubuntu Launchpad to go open source
  • Where is all the open-source EDA software?
  • Where’s Open Source At National Retail Federation Convention?
  • Bridging the Server Divide
  • Liferea: Rewrite/Redesign From Scratch

some howtos:

Filed under
HowTos
  • An rsync primer

  • Make Sudo Applications Beautiful
  • How to reduce the icon size in Ubuntu 8.10
  • Adding Grub After Ubuntu Installation
  • Turn Thunderbird into a Full-Blown PIM with Lightning
  • Diff Two Directories
  • Regular Expressions in Python 3
  • Linux tip: How to run multiple X sessions
  • Discwrapper - Design CD/DVD covers and labels for your personal discs
  • BleachBit - Cleans unnecessary files to free disk space and maintain privacy
  • openSUSE 11.1 - The Workarounds
  • Gentoo Cache Mirror using apache and php
  • Understanding automatic blank Pages in Open Office
  • Mail Merge in Openoffice.org: Everything You Need to Know

Linux Succumbs to Creeping Windows-Itis

Filed under
Linux

blog.linuxtoday: I've been using Linux since 1995, and while that doesn't quite elevate me to grizzled geekbeard status, it's long enough to have observed a whole lot of growth and changes. Most of them are good; but some of them are rather alarming.

KDE 4.1.4 and 4.2 Release Candidate Available Now

Filed under
KDE

dot.kde.org: The KDE community has made available two new releases of the KDE desktop and applications today. KDE 4.1.4 is the latest update for the KDE 4.1 series. KDE 4.2 RC is the release candidate of KDE 4.2.

Where have all the community managers gone?

Filed under
Linux
OSS

blogs.the451group: As we have seen open source vendors trimming headcount just like many other companies in search of controlling costs and weathering the storm during recent months, community managers seem to be on the line among the layoffs.

Also: building a community around your F/OSS project

The Secret Lives of Ubuntu and Debian Users

Filed under
Linux
Ubuntu

earthweb.com: Using free and open source software (FOSS), advocates like to say, is not a popularity contest. It's about doing what's right. However, the Debian and Ubuntu Popularity Contest projects might disagree.

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More in Tux Machines

Digital audio and video editing in GNU/Linux

  • Linux Digital Audio Workstation Roundup
    In the world of home studio recording, the digital audio workstation is one of the most important tools of the trade. Digital audio workstations are used to record audio and MIDI data into patterns or tracks. This information is then typically mixed down into songs or albums. In the Linux ecosystem, there is no shortage of Digital audio workstations to chose from. Whether you wish to create minimalist techno or full orchestral pieces, chances are there is an application that has you covered. In this article, we will take a brief look into several of these applications and discuss their strengths and weaknesses. I will try to provide a fair evaluation of the DAWs presented here but at the end of the day, I urge you to try a few of these applications and to form an opinion of your own.
  • Shotcut Video Editor Available As A Snap Package [Quick Update]
    Shotcut is a free, open source Qt5 video editor developed on the MLT Multimedia Framework (it's developed by the same author as MLT), available for Linux, Windows and Mac. Under the hood, Shotcut uses FFmpeg, so it supports many audio, video and image formats, along with screen, webcam and audio capture. The application doesn't require importing files, thanks to its native timeline editing. Other features worth mentioning are multitrack timeline with thumbnails and waveforms, 4k resolution support, video effects, as well as a flexible UI with dockable panels.
  • Simple Screen Recorder Is Now Available as a Snap App
    Simple Screen Recorder, a popular screen recording app for Linux desktops, is now available to install as a Snap app from the Ubuntu Store.

Kernel News: Linux 4.10 in SparkyLinux, Wayland 1.13.0, and Weston 2.0 RC2

  • Linux Kernel 4.10 Lands in SparkyLinux's Unstable Repo, Here's How to Install It
    The trend of offering users the most recent Linux kernel release continues today with SparkyLinux, an open-source, Debian-based distribution that always ships with the latest GNU/Linux technologies and software versions. SparkyLinux appears to be the third distro to offer its users the ability to install the recently released Linux 4.10 kernel, after Linux Lite and Ubuntu, as the developers announced earlier that the Linux kernel 4.10 packages are now available from the unstable repository.
  • Wayland 1.13.0 Display Server Officially Released, Wayland 1.14 Lands in June
    Bryce Harrington, a Senior Open Source Developer at Samsung, announced today the release and general availability of the Wayland 1.13.0 for GNU/Linux distributions that already adopted the next-generation display server.next-generation display server. Wayland 1.13.0 has entered development in the first days of the year, but the first Alpha build arrived at the end of January, along with the Alpha version of the Weston 2.0 compositor, including most of the new features that are present in this final release that you'll be able to install on your Linux-based operating systems in the coming days.
  • Weston 2.0 RC2 Wayland Compositor Arrives With Last Minute Fixes
    While Wayland 1.13 was released today, Bryce Harrington today opted against releasing the Weston 2.0 reference compositor and instead issue a second release candidate. Weston 2.0 is the next version of this "playground" for Wayland compositor technologies since the new output configuration API had broke the ABI, necessitating a break from the same versioning as Wayland.
  • [ANNOUNCE] weston 1.99.94

KDE Leftovers

  • Fedora 25 KDE: disappointing experience
    Fedora is not a frequent guest on the review deck of Linux notes from DarkDuck blog. The most recent review was of Fedora 22 back in July 2015. That was a review of the GNOME version, the most native for Fedora. You are probably aware of the tight link between the GNOME project and RedHat, the Fedora Project main sponsor.
  • [Video] Ubuntu 17.04 Unity 8 - KDE apps native on Mir
  • Plasma in a Snap?
    Shortly before FOSDEM, Aleix Pol asked if I had ever put Plasma in a Snap. While I was a bit perplexed by the notion itself, I also found this a rather interesting idea. So, the past couple of weeks I spent a bit of time here and there on trying to see if it is possible.
  • QStringView Diaries: Advances in QStringLiteral
    This is the first in a series of blog posts on QStringView, the std::u16string_view equivalent for Qt. You can read about QStringView in my original post to the Qt development mailing-list, follow its status by tracking the “qstringview” topic on Gerrit and learn about string views in general in Marshall Clow’s CppCon 2015 talk, aptly named “string_view”.
  • Making Movies with QML
    One of the interesting things about working with Qt is seeing all the unexpected ways our users use the APIs we create. Last year I got a bug report requesting an API to set a custom frame rate for QML animations when using QQuickRenderControl. The reason was that the user was using QQuickRenderControl as an engine to render video output from Qt Quick, and if your target was say 24 frames per second, the animations were not smooth because of how the default animation driver behaves. So inspired by this use case I decided to take a stab at creating such an example myself.
  • How to Create a Look and Feel Theme
  • United Desktop Theme for KDE Plasma 5.9
  • KDE Talks at FOSDEM
    The continuation of the original talk from Dirk Hohndel and Linus Torvalds about the port of Subsurface from Gtk to Qt, now with mobile in mind.

SteamVR for Linux, Benchmarks of HITMAN on NVIDIA

  • SteamVR for Linux is now officially in Beta
    Valve have put up SteamVR for Linux officially in Beta form and they are keen to stress that this is a development release. You will need to run the latest Steam Beta Client for it to work at all, so be sure to opt-in if you want to play around with it.
  • Valve Publishes A SteamVR Developer Build For Linux
    Valve has begun rolling out their SteamVR Linux support by announcing today a beta/developer build of their VR support for Linux. Valve's SteamVR for Linux page was updated today to reflect the build becoming public via the Steam beta channel, "This is a development release. It is intended to allow developers to start creating SteamVR content for Linux platforms. Limited hardware support is provided, and pre-release drivers are required. Linux support is currently only available in the "beta" branch, make sure you are using SteamVR[beta] before reporting issues."
  • HITMAN Linux Benchmarks On 12 NVIDIA GPUs
    Last week Feral Interactive released the much anticipated port of HITMAN for Linux. While at first it didn't look like this Linux game port would work out for our benchmarking requirements, thanks to Feral it does indeed work for another interesting Linux gaming test perspective. For our initial HITMAN Linux benchmarks are tests from 12 NVIDIA GeForce GPUs while our Radeon tests will come tomorrow.